Archive for January 12th, 2009

Apples, Not Bullets

January 12, 2009

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TRAGEDY AT SCHOOL.
Lady Teacher Shot Five Times by Her Jealous Husband.

SYRACUSE, N.Y., Jan 20. — Mrs. W.F. Barker, teacher at the Bissett street public school, was shot five times yesterday morning by her husband in the class room. He drove to the school in a sleigh with their sixteen months-old child in his arms, walked into his wife’s class room and said: “Is this the way you take care of your child?” Mrs. Barker went into the hallway. Her husband followed and fired two shots at her. She reached another class room and then fell on the floor. Barker put the baby on the floor and, leaning over his wife, fired at her several times, five shots taking effect. Barker then drove rapidly away.

The couple have been married about two years and jealousy on Barker’s part is the supposed cause of the tragedy. The only lived together a short time after the marriage. Mrs. Barker was taken to the House of the Good Shepherd. It could not be told whether her injuries are fatal. She was shot three times in the head and face, once through the left hand and once through the left thigh. Barker left the baby in the school room.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Jan 21,  1891

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Unable to Work the Insanity Dodge.
Syracuse, N.Y., Jan. 23. — Wilbur F. Barker, who shot his wife five times at the Bassett street public school, where she was teaching, was unable to work his insanity dodge on the examining physicians, and he was declared sane. He was arraigned for assault in the first degree, pleaded not guilty, and was committed to jail. Mrs. Barker lingers between life and death.

Middletown Daily Press (Middletown, New York) Jan 23, 1891

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Wilbur F. Barker Buried.
Wilbur F. Barker, at one time a well-known real estate agent of this city, died at his home, No. 507 East Fayette street, on Friday of locomotor ataxia. He was 70 years old. In January, 1891, Mr. Barker shot his wife, Mrs. Nellie Sloan Barker, while she was discharging her duties as principal of the Bassett Street (now Sumner) school. He was arrested and tried for assault in the first degree, the plea of insanity being advanced by his counsel. For several years he and his wife have been reconciled. One daughter and a widow are the only survivors. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jan 11,  1909

Interesting NOTE: I looked up locomotor ataxia, which is another name for Tabes dorsalis. Besides several physical symptoms, these two were also listed:  Personality Changes and Dementia. So maybe Mr. Barker was actually crazy, due to this disease.

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MRS. NELLIE S. BARKER
422 Marcelius St.
Mrs. Nellie Sloan Barker of 422 Marcellus St. died at her home this morning after a long illness. She was 96, and a lifelong resident of Syracuse. A retired school teacher, Mrs. Barker was a member of the Sons and Daughters of Liberty, Harmony Circle. Services will be held Thursday at 11:00 a.m. at the Schumacher-Whelan Brothers Funeral Home, with Rev. Amos Phipps officiating. Friends may call at the funeral home from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight and from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. tomorrow. Surviving is a grandnephew Thomas McCormack.

Syracuse Herald Journal (Syracuse, New York) Mar 6,  1956

The Wanton Murder of Chief Few Tails

January 12, 2009

Pine Ridge Sioux Camp 1890

Pine Ridge Sioux Camp 1890

BAD AS THE INDIANS.
An Atrocious Outrage Commited by Cowboys.

WANTON MURDER OF AN OLD CHIEF.
Cowboys Kill a Friendly and Aged Chief and Wound His Wife — The News

Terribly Excites the Reds at Pine Ridge and Makes It Necessary to Postpone a Grand Review and Prepare for Emergencies

Young Man Afraid of His Horses 1891

Young Man Afraid of His Horses 1891

PINE RIDGE AGENCY, S.D., Jan 20 —
When the treacherous whites in Bear Butte county wontonly murdered old Few Tails last week and wounded his squaw they committed an outrage that came near ruining Gen. Miles’ plans and stampeding the 5,000 hostiles who are in camp here. Few Tails was a relative of Young Man Afraid-of-His-Horses, the only hereditary chief in the Sioux nation, and the most powerful leader among his people. Few Tails’ wounded squaw arrived here Sunday, and almost immediately there was a commotion in the hostile camp.

Complicates the Situation

The scouts reported the situation to Gen. Miles, who immediately sent runners after Young Man. When that chief appeared at headquarters and learned of the ingratitude of the whites for the heroic work he had been doing in their behalf he refused to be pacified, and it took all the diplomacy at the command of Gen. Miles to win back finally the good will of the outraged chief. The situation has become so complicated that the quartermaster has ordered twenty days additional rations and the troops that were expected to come to the agency for a grand review have been ordered to remain in camp.

An Indefensible Outrage

Young Man Afraid of Horses 1891

Young Man Afraid of Horses 1891

This order for nations is as heavy as any that has been issued since the war begain. Few Tails was not only a relative of Young Man Afraid of His Horses, but a brother of Big Road, one of the most powerful sub chiefs at Pine Ridge. Big Road said yesterday that eighty cowboys had slaughtered the little band as they were returning, unarmed, from an eagle hunt, bearing with them Gen. Miles pass permitting them to be off the reservation, and that the squaw of Few Tails was the only survivor.

Fired Upon from Ambush

The little party was journeying south ward and had just started onthe morning of the 11th. They had gone but a short distance when they were fired upon from ambush by a party of whites. Few Tails fell dead. One bullet pierced his brain, and another missile struck him in the breast. His squaw was shot in the leg and breast and probably fatally hurt. The horses of one wagon were also killed by the volley. Few Tails’ corpse lay in the vehicle, while his squaw managed to crawl to the bushes, where she hid for a day before setting out on her painful tramp to Pine Ridge, 100 miles away. The rest of the Indians abandoned the other wagon and fled, and it is supposed that they, too, were slain.

Review (Decatur, Illinois) Jan 21, 1891

* I couldn’t find any pictures of Few Tails.