Whang-Doodle’s Good Square English

schoolmarm

RADICAL DESPOTISM.

Of all the outrages yet perpetrated upon the Southern people, by the Northern “carpet-baggers,” none will strike the intelligent reader as giving evidence of greater malignity, than that perpetrated by the School Superintendent of Hinds county, Mississippi, in recommending the people of that region to drop their provincial pronunciation of common words and use good square English in conversation. He advises teacher to say going, instead of “gwine”; where, instead of  “whar”; clear, instead of “clar”; but this does not suit the editor of a newspaper in that benighted region, who vents his indignation in the following language:

If this is not placing “the last feather on the camel’s back,” then we are at a loss to say what it is. We have been plundered and robbed by the Yankees; we have been ruled for five years with a rod of iron in the hands of the Yankees; the Yankees have formed a State Constitution for us, and our laws at Jackson are enacted by Yankees; they have given us a Yankee school system, directed and managed by Yankees and Yankee school-books (and Yankee carpet-bag teachers, whenever it was possible for them to be introduced) and now our masters have the presumption and impudence to require Southern teachers to ram down the throats of Southern children the popular pronunciation and whang-doodle* of New England!

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Aug 19, 1871

*From: A DICTIONARY  OF SLANG, JARGON & CANT
Compiled and Edited by Albert Barrere and Charles G. Leland, M.A., Hon. F.RS.L.
The Ballantyne Press 1890

Whang-doodle (American). This eccentric word first appeared in on of the many “Hard-Shell Baptist” sermons which were so common in 1856. “Where the whang-doodle mourneth for her first-born.” It refers to some mystical or mythical creature. It was subsequently applied to political subjects, such as the Free Trade, Lecompton Democracy, &c.

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