Archive for March 17th, 2009

St. Patrick’s Day

March 17, 2009

shamrock1

The Shamrock of Ireland. — One day, St. Patrick was preaching at Tara. He was anxious to explain the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. The people failed to under stand and refused to believe that there could be three persons and yet but one God. The holy man paused a moment absorbed in thought, and seeing a shamrock peeping from the green turf exclaimed, ‘Do you not see in this simple little wild flower how three leaves are united into one stalk?’ His audience understood without difficulty this simple, yet striking illustration, to the inexpresable delight of St. Patrick. From that day the shamrock became the national emblem of Ireland.

Mountain Democrat, The (Placerville, California) Jun 5, 1869

beer-shamrocks

A SERIOUS MISTAKE.

Shamrock Mistaken for Watercress and Devoured by a Beer Drinker.

According to a story that is going the rounds a laughable and yet very annoying mistake was made in one of the saloons of this city on St. Patrick’s day. It is said that the proprietor had received from Ireland some shamrock which he placed on the bar so that any patron desiring to could have a sprig for his lapel. The courtesy was greatly appreciated by those who understood it, but unfortunately, according to the story, one man stepped in for some beer and, mistaking the shamrock for watercresses, cleaned the dish before his error was discovered. It was an expensive free lunch, but the mistake was one which could not be remedied and there was nothing to do but to grin and bear it. It is probably, however, that the man who made it will never again commit so grevious a blunder.

North Adams Transcript (North Adams, Massachusetts) Mar 19, 1897

pitchfork

THE editors of the Benton, Cal, Messenger and the Bodie, Cal., Standard have signed articles to fight a duel under the following rules and conditions: Time, St. Patrick’s Day; weapons, pitchforks; distance, 200 yards; stakes, six bit a side; gate money to go toward defraying the funeral expenses of the loser.

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Mar 15, 1879