Archive for December, 2009

Pusillanimous Poltroons

December 17, 2009

This nation was not founded by weaklings. It never could have been. It has been maintained and defended, not by cowards, not by peace-at-any-price advocates, but by men of valor, and by women who, though they did not raise their boys to be soldiers, would rather bury them than to be the mothers of molly-coddles and pusillanimous poltroons.

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Apr 2, 1917

*****

In case the definition link for pusillanimous goes bad, here is the definition from Wordsmith.org:

pusillanimous (pyoo-suh-LAN-uh-muhs) adjective

Lacking courage; timid.

Freedom’s Teacup

December 16, 2009

TAKING TEA.

— The 16th of December, being the Centennial anniversary of the great Boston Tea Party, when the Pioneers of American Liberty steeped British tea in the briny waters of the Atlantic, the ladies of the Presbyterian Church of this city purpose giving on that evening a Memorial Tea Drinking.

All in whom the patriotic pulse still beats time to liberty’s song of one hundred years ago, are most heartily invited to participate with them on this occasion. There will be addresses and songs, and an abundant supply of the refreshing beverage, so dearly prized, and yet so willingly sacrificed by our noble forefathers, that we might drink of the cup and eat of the fruit of Liberty.
D.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Nov 29, 1873

A Center of Patriotism.

The convention which voted not to drink a drop of tea that was brought to Maryland in English ships and taxed to support the British crown, was held in Frederick, where an intense spirit of patriotism prevailed throughout the entire period of the colonial struggle.

The indignation of the people of the colony against oppressive taxation reached its climax at Annapolis, where the brig “Peggy Stewart,” loaded with tea, was burned by her owner in compliance with the threats of the people. This occurred 119 years ago, and the descendants of American revolutionary fathers in Baltimore yesterday celebrated the anniversary of an event that was of equal import with the Boston tea party.

There is no doubt the liberty-impregnated atmosphere of Frederick and the hatred of oppression which prevailed among her people had great influence upon the convention that assembled here to discuss the problem of taxation without representation. That spirit of patriotism to the nation has never flagged. It has made Frederick a center out of which the spirit of loyalty has constantly emanated.

The Boston tea party attracted the attention of poets, romancers and historians, but the burning of the Peggy Stewart and the previous convention that incited the deed were far more striking and original examples of the righteous indignation of an oppressed people seeking to throw off the yoke.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Oct 15, 1893

A Ballad of the Boston Tea-Party
By Oliver Wendell Holmes
1874

No! never such a draught was poured
Since Hebe served with nectar
The bright Olympians and their Lord,
Her over-kind protector,–
Since Father Noah squeezed the grape
And took to such behaving
As would have shamed our grandsire ape
Before the days of shaving,–
No! ne’er was mingled such a draught
In palace, hall, or arbor,
As freemen brewed and tyrants quaffed
That night in Boston Harbor!
It kept King George so long awake
His brain at last got addled,
It made the nerves of Britain shake,
With sevenscore millions saddled;
Before that bitter cup was drained,
Amid the roar of cannon,
The Western war-cloud’s crimson stained
The Thames, the Clyde, the Shannon;
Full many a six-foot grenadier
The flattened grass had measured,
And many a mother many a year
Her tearful memories treasured;
Fast spread the tempest’s darkening pall,
The mighty realms were troubled,
The storm broke loose, bnt first of all
The Boston teapot bubbled!

An evening party,– only that,
No formal invitation,
No gold-laced coat, no stiff cravat,
No feast in contemplation,
No silk-robed dames, no fiddling band,
No flowers, no songs, no dancing,–
A tribe of red men, axe in hand,–
Behold the guests advancing!
How fast the stragglers join the throng,
From stall and workshop gathered!
The lively barber skips along
And leaves a chin half-lathered;
The smith has flung his hammer down,–
The horseshoe still is glowing;
The truant tapster at the Crown
Has left a beer-cask flowing;
The cooper’s boys have dropped the adze,
And trot behind their master;
Up run the tarry ship-yard lads,–
The crowd is hurrying faster,–
Out from the Millpond’s purlieus gush
The streams of white-faced millers,
And down their slippery alleys rush
The lusty young Fort-Hillers;
The rope walk lends its ‘prentice crew,–
The tories seize the omen:
“Ay, boys, you’ll soon have work to do
For England’s rebel foemen,
‘King Hancock,’ Adams, and their gang,
That fire the mob with treason,–
When these we shoot and those we hang
The town will come to reason.”

On– on to where the tea-ships ride!
And now their ranks are forming,–
A rush, and up the Dartmouth’s side
The Mohawk band is swarming!
See the fierce natives! What a glimpse
Of paint and fur and feather,
As all at once the full-grown imps
Light on the deck together!
A scarf the pigtail’s secret keeps,
A blanket hides the breeches,–
And out the cursèd cargo leaps,
And overboard it pitches!
O woman, at the evening board
So gracious, sweet, and purring,
So happy while the tea is poured,
So blest while spoons are stirring,
What martyr can compare with thee,
The mother, wife, or daughter,
That night, instead of best Bohea,
Condemned to milk and water!

Ah, little dreams the quiet dame
Who plies with rock and spindle
The patient flax, how great a flame
Yon little spark shall kindle!
The lurid morning shall reveal
A fire no king can smother
Where British flint and Boston steel
Have clashed against each other!
Old charters shrivel in its track,
His Worship’s bench has crumbled,
It climbs and clasps the union-jack,
Its blazoned pomp is humbled,
The flags go down on land and sea
Like corn before the reapers;
So burned the fire that brewed the tea
That Boston served her keepers!

The waves that wrought a century’s wreck
Have rolled o’er whig and tory;
The Mohawks on the Dartmouth’s deck
Still live in song and story;
The waters in the rebel bay
Have kept the tea-leaf savor;
Our old North-Enders in their spray
Still taste a Hyson flavor;
And Freedom’s teacup still o’erflows
With ever fresh libations,
To cheat of slumber all her foes
And cheer the wakening nations!

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Feb 5, 1874

Democratic Principles: As Laid Out by Thomas Jefferson

December 14, 2009

Where is Mr. Jefferson when we need him? If only these principles held true today:

DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES.

Jefferson lays down the following principles:

The people, the only source of legitimate power.

The absolute and lasting severance of church and state.

The freedom, sovereignty and independence of the respective States.

The Union, a confederacy, a compact neither a consolidation nor a centralization.

The constitution of the Union, a special written grant of powers, limited and definite.

The civil paramount to the military power.

The representative to obey the instructions of his constituents.

Elections free, and suffrage universal.

No hereditary office, nor order, nor title.

No taxation beyond the public wants.

No national debt, if possible.

No costly splendor of administration.

No proscription of opinion, nor of public discussion.

No unnecessary interference with individual conduct, property, or speech.

No favored classes, and no monopolies.

No public moneys expended except by warrant of specific appropriation.

No mysteries in government inaccessible to the public eye.

Public compensation for public services, moderate salaries, and pervading economy and accountability.

The Experiment (Norwalk, Ohio) Oct 11, 1843

This Child For A Horse

December 13, 2009

WHITE CHILDREN AMONG THE INDIANS.

The St. Louis Republican states on the authority of a gentleman personally cognizant of the fact, that the Osage Indians have among them about twenty white children, whome they purchased from the Comanches, by whom they were stolen from their parents in Texas and New Mexico.

The same paper says in addition:

Our informant states that such of them as have been seen by the whites are said to be sprightly and intelligent children, of both sexes, but generally have been taken so young as to have lost all recollection of their parents, homes, or of the place from whence they were taken.

The Osages will only sell them for horses or goods. Occasionally they bring one into the settlement to barter off. A few days since a gentleman of Newton county purchased, for a hrose, a pretty girl, about eleven years old. — A few days before our informant left, another Osage brought in a boy, about eight or nine years old, which he, however, did not succeed in selling.

The Sandusky Clarion (Sandusky, Ohio) Jul 11, 1845

Forty-Niner Profile: Stewart E. Bell

December 12, 2009

Previous California Gold Rush posts mentioning Stewart E. Bell:

“A Pocket Full of Rocks Bring Home”

The Ohio 49′ers: Some Stay, Some Return

*****

Stewart E. Bell came from good pioneer stock:

Stewart E. Bell died March 11, 1896, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Arthur Phinney, in Sandusky, Ohio. He was born in Middleberry township, Hartford county, Connecticut, November 25th, 1809. He was the son of Elizur Stewart Bell and wife Polly.

His father, with a party of eighteen families, left Connecticut for Ohio in September, 1815, making the journey with oxen, cows and wagons — Mr. Bell’s father being the only one of the party having a horse ; one other of the party, Mr. Beatty, father of General Beatty, having a very long eared donkey, which gave much amusement to the children during the journey. After spending about six weeks on the way, they arrived in Sandusky the latter part of October. Mr. Beatty owned a large tract of land in the vicinity of Sandusky, and sold parcels of it to the members of the party.

Schooner (Image from http://www.schoonerman.com)

Mr. Bell‘s father purchased 140 acres at $4 per acre. Mr. Bell’s father was a ship carpenter and soon after his arrival he built a schooner, which he named ” Polly of Huron,” after his wife. The boat was built about a mile and a half from the lake shore and it took forty yoke of oxen — all there were in the counties — to haul it to the lake. The hauling was done in one day. He died in October, 1816, and his widow subsequently married a man by the name of Munger but lived with him but a short time.

Mr. Stewart E. Bell, on May 8, 1834, married Elvira Dibble, who was born in Connecticut but emigrated from the city of New York with a brother to Sandusky in 1832. They first located on Hancock street, but later bought a house on Adams street, where they resided till 1870, when they moved to their country home about two miles from Sandusky on Columbus avenue.

Mr. Bell was a ship carpenter, following the trade of his father. In 1849 he caught the gold fever and went to California, where he remained about sixteen months. During the fore part of his stay there he worked at his trade, making the first boat ever built at Sacramento Harbor ; for which he received sixteen dollars per day and board. He afterwards went to the mines, but before securing much gold he was called home by sickness.

After the death of his wife in 1887, Mr. Bell lived with his daughter, Mrs. Arthur Phinney, at whose home he died as above stated, aged 87 years.

Underground Railroad (Image from http://strattonhouse.com)

His wife, Elvira Dibble, was an active member of the Underground Railway and assisted many runaway slaves on their way to Canada. Two sons and one daughter survived him. Both sons reside in Columbus, Ohio, and his daughter, Mrs. Phinney, died January 7, 1898.

From:
The Fire Lands pioneer (1882)
Author: Firelands Historical Society
Volume: 12, ns. p.533-534
Ohio — History Periodicals
Publisher: Norwalk, Ohio : Fire Lands Historical Society

*****

This next article isn’t about Stewart E. Bell (although it mentions him,) but about John Beatty and some of the other pioneers mentioned above:

Seventy-Five Years in Perkins.

BY W.D. GURLEY.
FOR THE REGISTER.

At the close of the war of 1812 the Rev. John Beatty and Julius House, then living in Connecticut, formed a colony of twelve families. Late in the fall of ’15 they arrived in Erie county and selected their farms in Perkins township on the sand ridge now leading from Bogarts to Bloomingville, then an Indian trail. Each family built his own campfire and slept in their wagons while building their one story log cabins. The country being new, they were surrounded by wild beasts and savage tribes. These cabins were built without boards, nails or glass. During the winter of ’15 they organized the first M.E. church on the Firelands, John Beatty being a local preacher and Julius House an exhorter. Mr. House was chosen class leader, which office he held for more than fifty years. The number of members was about fifteen. At a meeting in ’36 there was 108 added to their number. This society has prospered for the last seventy five years under such preachers as the Rev. John H. Powers, Wm. Runnells, John Rellam, Adam Poe, Rev. T.B. Gurley, Sawyer, Dunn, McMahon, Mitchell, Barkdull, Breckenridge, Broadwell, Thompson and a host of others.

The Rev. James Gray has been returned for the second year to Perkins for to persuade the people to come out to church and receive the blessings reserved for them. These old pioneers, fathers and mothers, went to work, fenced and cleared their land, plowed the ground, set out several apple orchards which grew and thrived and in a few years furnished apples and cider not only for the neighborhood but also for Sandusky.

In a few years those old log cabins were removed, frame buildings took the place of the old ones, barns and outhouses were erected, rail fences torn down and picket and board fences became the fashion of the day. These old pioneer fathers went to work, toiled hard early and late for more than half a century, then they one by one passed away, leaving their homes to their children and grand children.

There are today six of those children living who came with their parents to Perkins seventy-five years ago: Mr. Stuart Bell, of Sandusky; Mrs. Susan O. Monnett, of Norwalk; Mrs. Riley, of Avery; Mrs. Green, of Perkins; Ellery Taylor and Lindsley House, were all children when they arrived here.

The new generation that has sprung up was not satisfied with those old pioneer orchards because they were old fashioned and somewhat infirm with age, so they have all been cut down and cleaned away.

Mr. T.B. Taylor, grandson of Jessie Taylor, now occupies his grandfather’s old homestead of seventy-five years. A magnificent mansion has just risen on the sight of the old cottage by Mr. Taylor. It is built in the latest French style, its windows filled with French cut glass, while those of the hall are Chinese glass. The building fronts the road and is built with its hip roof, its stack chimneys and surmounted spires; it is roofed with slate and painted in the latest style of the nineteenth century. The driveway leading from the road to the stable curves to the east parlor door, then passes through a beautiful potochere, a French name, and is a very convenient part of he house. The way is covered with slate and pebble stones; the sidewalk leading from the gate to the house is laid with long square flag stones imported from some foreign port. Shrubbery occupies the yard, while in front of the house stands a beautiful row of maples. The old barn has been removed a little back and a magnificent one erected on the site of the old one, with its surmounted cupola and spire; it is painted red and tipped with white. Thrift and fashion have removed the old land marks by Mr. Taylor and introduced a new era into the shady paradise of the past.

Mr. Taylor and family are now comfortably settled in their new home and the well arrainged furniture shows the taste of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor.

There was one of these old pioneers’ apple trees standing in the door yard which had escaped the notice of hte woodman’s axe.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Dec 29, 1890

See previous post The Pioneer Apple Tree HERE

Sudden Death

Mr. Charles L.* Bell, well known in Sandusky, died suddenly of appoplexy at his home on King avenue in Columbus on Saturday morning, July 6. Mr. Bell was in the sixtieth year of his age, eldest son of Mr. Stewart E. Bell and brother of Mrs. Arthur Phinney, of this city.

Sandusky Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Jul 9, 1895

*(probably should be Charles Stuart/Stewart Bell)

John Alcohol and The Poor Man’s Club

December 12, 2009

JOHN ALCOHOL

A TEMPERANCE PARODY.

John Alcohol, my Joe John,
When we were first acquaint,
I’d money in my pockets, John,
Which now I know there ain’t.
I spent it all in treating, John,
Because I loved you so,
But mark me, how you’ve treated me,
John Alcohol, my Joe.

Now John Alcohol, my Joe John,
We’ve been too long together;
So you must take one road, John,
And I will take the other!
For we must tumble down, John,
If hand in hand we go,
And I will have the bill to pa,
John Alcohol, my Joe.

The Daily Sanduskian (Sandusky, Ohio) Aug 6, 1849

Family Jars

December 11, 2009

Family Jars Engraved by S Angell after a picture by Francois Edouard Picot. (Image from http://www.intaglio-fine-art.com)

FAMILY JARS.

Jars of jelly, jars of jam,
Jars of potted beef and ham.
Jars of early goosberries nice,
Jars of mincemeat, jars of spice,
Jars of orange marmalade,
Jars of pickles, all home-made,
Jars of cordial elder wine,
Jars of honey superfine.
Would the only jars were these,
Which occur in families.

The Daily Sanduskian (Sandusky, Ohio) Aug 3, 1849

Forty-Niner Profile: Josiah Roop

December 11, 2009

Josiah Roop was the son of Joseph Roop, Jr. and Susan Engle. At the link below is some background on the family. I have excerpted the part about Josiah and his brother Isaac.

From:

The Library chronicle (1947)
Author: University of Pennsylvania. Library. Friends
Volume: 24
Subject: University of Pennsylvania. Library; Bibliography; CHR 1947-1981
Publisher: Philadelphia : Friends of the Library, University of Pennsylvania
Year: 1947

Pages 72-78

The arch-wanderer was Josiah,  and he set the pattern for three of his brothers. His initial step from Ashland took him only to Republic, nine miles east of Tiffin, Ohio, but he left his family there when he joined the Gold Rush and by the Spring of 1852 he owned the Old Dominion House at Shasta. On 8 May 1852 he made his brother Isaac his agent and left for home via Nicaragua to bring out his family. Dysentery overtook him in the Caribbean and he was buried at sea from SS Prometheus 14 June. 8.

Isaac became his executor and successor.  He had arrived by the steamer Oregon in San Francisco 18 March 1850 from Panama. Already he had an interesting past. As a farmer’s son in Carroll County, he had found schooling not easy to come by.

When he moved to Ashland at 1 5 he was not too young to notice Nancy Gardner of Westmoreland County, 10 who studied at Transylvania University. They married at 18 and under her ministrations his mind unfolded, advancing from contentment with frugal devotion to the soil toward a broader knowledge of the world and facility in language. Three children came along, but in 1850 she died of typhoid. Ohio could no longer hold him.

Susan and the two boys were left with grandparents and Isaac was off to join Josiah. Ephraim, next older than Isaac, had a part in the adventure, and Jonas E., prepared by apprenticeship for practice, visited Shasta briefly in 1853, but soon returned for medical schooling, and then teaching, at Cincinnati.

Isaac remained the central figure. 11 He was a miner and merchant at “Oak Bottom” (near Shasta) for a year, kept public house for four months, “lived on Bear River” till March 1852.

He entered the Masonic Fraternity at Sacramento 16 June 1851 and was a charter member and Junior Warden of Western Star Lodge No. 2 at Shasta, whose founder and first Master, Saschel Wood, had brought the charter from Missouri. 12 In a report of 15 June 1852 a phrenologist praised his personality. He was chairman of the Whig party meeting of 1 October 1852 and was their candidate for Shasta County assessor, but was defeated 836-674. He raised a fund for the Washington Monument which added up to $348.65, four times as much per voter as could be done at Placerville. He was one of 15 managers of a “cotillion party.”

In the midst of this flowering activity, 7 August 1852, came word of Josiah‘s death; in December fire swept the town, though the Old Dominion was spared; in March 1853 the store was sold but not the hotel; on 14 June 1853 fire most thoroughly destroyed the city. However Isaac had already published notice of his intent to depart “for four years, leaving 1 July for Salt River on steamer Bigler No. 2.” The fire and loss of the Old Dominion confirmed his plan to begin again elsewhere.

*****

Josiah and his father Joseph, evidently were involved in the running of  this school:

From the Huron Reflector – 1845

Mr. Roop was  politically active:

Another Free Soil Taylor Whig.

JOSIAH ROOP, Esq., a distinguished Whig of Republic Seneca County, was nominated by the Free Soil Van Buren party in his district on the 16th ult. as their candidate for Elector. After reflecting on the matter, he resolved to decline the nomination and states his reasons in a communication to the State Journal, as follows:

I am now no less than ever, an humble advocate for the doctrine of FREEDOM — as well of Soil and [Labor, as of Speech and Thought. In espousing this doctrine, I abated nothing of my devotion to the doctrines of the Whig party, of which I have ever been a member. I am a Whig, as well as a Free Soil man. In looking at the political prospects in a practical point of view, I am persuaded that the most effectual means of preventing the extension of slavery and the increase of the slave power, is by co-operating with that party which presents the most formidable obstacles to such extension and increase. I was in Delaware on Thursday, and listened attentively to the address of Hon. THOMAS CORWIN, and I am constrained to admit that my judgment cannot resist the force of his reasoning. I am persuaded that there is no earthly prospect of the vote of Ohio being given to Messrs. Van Buren and Adams; and there is still less prospect of their being elected, even should they, against all human probability, receive the vote of Ohio. To vote for them, therefore, is equivalent to not voting at all. And this I do not conceive to be the part of patriotism, at a juncture like the present, when the great and important crisis is to be met. I cannot avoid responsibility, by throwing away my vote; and I cannot afford to purchase immunity at that rate, even were I disposed so to do.

The States of this Union being now equally divided as between slaveholding and non-slaveholding, I deem it a matter of vital importance to the latter to secure the Vice Presidency, on whom may devolve the casting vote decisive of the most important questions. There is to my mind no prospect of electing Mr. C.F. Adams to the Vice Presidency by the Electoral Colleges. In default of such election the choice will devolve upon the Senate; and that body, as already constituted, could hardly fail to make choice of Gen. William O. Butler, who is not only himself a slaveholder, but who would be constrained by the force of circumstances, as well as long-cherished sentiments, to vote with the slaveholding interest on all questions in which that interest is involved.

Under these circumstances, I feel it my duty to decline the compliment intended me by placing my name on the Free Soil Ticket; and shall at the proper time, if living and able to get to the polls, bestow my suffrage for ZACHARY TAYLOR and MILLARD FILLMORE; confidently believing that the honor and the welfare of the Republic may be safely entrusted to their hands.

JOSIAH ROOP

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) Oct 3, 1848

California Items.

A correspondent of the Tiffin Standard on his way to California, (probably Mr. Josiah Roop from Republic, who signs himself “J.R.,” writes from St. Louis under date of April 17th as follows:

“We left Cincinnati on Friday about 1 o’clock P.M. the 13th inst. on board the fine steamer “Belle of the West,” in company with about 120 passengers bound to the El Dorado of Sacramento’s golden sands, among whom were the “Buffalo Mining Company” from Buffalo N.Y. They are a noble set of fellows, 12 in number, and are commanded by Col. Fay, formerly Governor of Camargo, and Dr. McBeth, who is one of the right stripe; also a company from Xenia and Springfield making some 20; and our own dear selves, vis: Mr. Patrick’s two sons of Norwalk, John H. McArdle, Samuel Myers and your humble correspondent. It is computed that there are now at Independence and the different parts in that region, about 5,000 emigrants. It will be the 10th of May before any will dare to start over the plains.”

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) May 8, 1849

Shasta California Mainstreet

Josiah became the postmaster of Shasta City, California:

From the book:

When the Great Spirit Died: The Destruction of the California Indians, 1850-1860
By William B. Secrest
Pg. 122 (Google Book LINK)

DEATH OF JOSIAH ROOP.

Mr. Josiah Roop, formerly of Republic, Seneca Co., died on board the Monumental City, between Chagres and New York. He was on his way home from California, where he had been highly successful. Mr. Roop was post-master at Shasta City. —San. Mir.

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) Jul 13, 1852

*****

josiah roop death 1josiah roop death 2

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 3, Number 432, 10 August 1852

*****

Previous posts mentioning Josiah Roop and his California Gold Rush Adventure:

Buckeyes Catch the Gold Fever

Buckeyes Prevail, Brook the Trail, Send Loved Ones Gold Dust in the Mail

News From the Gold Country: Josiah Roop Writes Home

** I am not related to Josiah Roop, and have only done cursory research on him. If you have additional information and/or corrections, feel free to leave me a comment.

Results of California Gold Production

December 9, 2009

High Lights of History –    By J. Carroll Mansfield

Rapid Development of the Pacific Coast

The Pony Express

Transcontinental Railway - 1869

The Gold Standard

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Jul 29, 1926

The Vigilantes

December 8, 2009

High Lights of History –    By J. Carroll Mansfield

Lawlessness and Crime Flourished

Frequent Killings

Dishonest Gamblers

Ineffectual Courts

Public Safety Committees

Vigilantes Establish Law and Order

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Jul 28, 1926