Archive for June, 2010

Deadly Pickles

June 22, 2010

DISTRESSING DEATHS BY POISON.

A most melancholy circumstance occurred in New York a day or two since. On the last day of December, a member of the family of Eber Wheaton, Esq. placed some mango pickles in a yellow earthen jar, which was glazed on the inside with a preparation of lead; the acid of the vinegar acted on the lead in the glazing, dissolved some of it, and thus produced a powerful poison, (acetate of lead, commonly called sugar of lead,) which was dissolved in the vinegar.

Nearly all the family of Mr. W. partook of the pickles, and especially his eldest daughter, (nineteen years of age,) a niece of his, and his three youngest children. On the 9th January, his youngest child, (a daughter,) was attacked with inflamation of the bowels, and died on the 14th in great agony, but without any one suspecting the cause of her death.

During this interval of five days, his next eldest child, (a boy, seven years of age,) was attacked with similar symptoms, as was also the next eldest daughter; the boy, after suffering dreadfully, died five days after he was first attacked, but the daughter is still living. The direful effects of the deleterious substance of which they had partaken, did not stop here; for on the night that the youngest child died, the eldest daughter was also attacked, together with a young lady, her cousin.

Still the cause of the sickness was not suspected. On the 19th, Judge Wheaton himself ate some of the pickles, and on the following day was attacked the same as the rest of his family had been.

On the 21st, the physician who attended them, stated as his belief that they must have been poisoned by metallic salts; the pickles were tested, and the result confirmed his suspicions. The proper remedies were then resorted to, and the remaining sufferers are now, we are happy to say, considered convalescent.

The Peoples Press (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Feb 6, 1835

The Land of Make Believe

June 22, 2010

Image from Rosen-Ducat Imaging

THE LAND OF “MAKE BELIEVE.”

(By Ida Goldsmith Morris.)

It lies in the distance dim and sweet,
On the borders of Long Ago,
And the road is worn by the little feet
That have journeyed there to and fro;
And though you may seek it by night or day,
The task you will never achieve,
For only the little ones know the way
To the land of “Make Believe.”

Clad in their armor of Hope they ride
On the wings of their fancy fleet,
And we hear as we listen and wait outside,
The echo of laughter sweet.
It lightens the burden of toil we bear,
It brightens the hearts that grieve —
Till we wish we could follow and enter there —
In the land of “Make Believe.”

And O, the wonderful tales that are told
Of the marvelous sights they see!
For the weak grow strong and the young grow old,
And are each what they wish to be.
Oh, the deeds of valor, the mighty things —
Too bold for mind to conceive!
But these are every-day happenings
In the land of “Make Believe.”

Would you follow the print of tiny feet?
You must walk as they, undefiled.
Would you join in their fancies pure and sweet?
You must be as a child.
But in vain should we seek it by night or day,
The task we should never achieve;
For only the little ones know the way
To the land of “Make Believe.”

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Mar 20, 1898

Joseph Damon – A Murderer Swung Twice

June 21, 2010

AN EXECUTION.

A man named JOSEPH DAMON, was executed at Mayville, Chautauque county, New York, on the fifteenth ult. for the murder of his wife.

He walked from the jail to the gallows, ascended the scaffold unassisted and with a firm step, and remained calmly seated there, while a sermon was delivered by a clergyman. He then rose and addressed the assembly in a speech of about thirty minutes, being for the most part a repetition of previous statements, that witnesses had sworn falsely, and that if his wife came to her death by his hands he must have been insane, as he had no recollection of committing any act of violence toward her.

Having shaken hands with the officers and gentlemen on the scaffold, the halter being adjusted and the cap drawn over his face, he was swung off, but the rope slipping from its fastness on the beam above, he dropped upon the ground with but little or no injury to himself. —

He merely observed that he wished they would loosen the rope around his neck as he “wanted to breathe once more.”

The sheriff complied with his wish, and Damon re-ascended the scaffold, and, during the adjustment of the rope the second time, he intreated, “that is be done quick.”

He was then swung off the second time, and thus, with a few struggles, closed the career of Joseph Damon. It is stated that about fifteen thousand persons witnessed the execution!

The Peoples Press (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Jun 5, 1835

Fredonia, NY (Image from http://imagesofwny.com)

OLD TIME HANGINGS.

Executions In Those Days Caused Much Interest — Witnessed By Large Crowds.

The executions of the present are very different from those of 75 or 80 years ago. In those days the affair was public and always attracted large crowds. In the Jamestown Journal of last week, was a description of the hanging of Joseph Damon at Mayville on May 15, 1835, as told by the late Henry S. Aiden, shortly before his last illness, he being an eye-witness to the affair:

Mr. Aiden was then a boy about 14 years old and like hundreds of others was early on the ground to see and hear all that took place. It became a holiday for the people of Chautauque county. From every point of hte compass came wagon loads of men, women and children, all hurrying to reach Mayville. Not one in that crowd by look or tune showed any sign of the solemnity of the occasion.

A wagon, containing a coffin was backed up to the jail door. At the appointed time with a slow step Mr. Damon, attended by officers, came out and was helped to a seat in the wagon. The state guards had been called out for the occasion and were drawn up in two lines, one on either side of he wagon with a band, consisting of fife and muffled drums.

When all was in readiness the musicians played what has since been known as Damon’s March and led the way to the scaffold, erected on the hillside near the present site of the high school building. The guard formed a circle about the scaffold and stood with fixed bayonets. Rev. Sawyer preached the funeral sermon from Prov. 11:19. Mr. Damon listened with marked attention and at its close made some remarks, warning the young to abstain from intoxicating drink.

Assisted by Sheriff Saxton and other officers the prisoner was led up four or five steps and placed on the trap, the rope adjusted and the trap sprung. The falling of the body followed by the cry: “You have hung me once, now let me go,” unnerved the boy of 14 years and when the rope was again adjusted he could bear the sight no longer and turned his face away.

While he was being jostled about in the crowd which he said was the largest he had ever seen, he heard two men discussing the scene. One remarked that he thought it a pretty poor place for women and children. The remark was overheard by a woman who snarled in a not very pleasing tone:

“I have just as good a right here as you have.”

The crowd dispersed, the first execution in the county completed, and the last public execution in the state.

The body was turned over to three men who represented the family and who started in a two-horse wagon for some point in the northern part of the county.

Eight miles from Mayville the three men became thirsty and stopping at the John West tavern refreshed themselves with a liberal supply of whiskey.

LeRoy Gazette (LeRoy, New York) Jun 22, 1908

The first murder trial to be held in the county did not come until 1834, more than thirty years after the first settlement, and was one of the last trials to be held in the old court house. On the 24th day of April, 1834, Doctors Walworth and Crosby, of Fredonia, were called to the residence of Joseph Damon, about three miles from the village. There a terrible tragedy had been enacted. The wife of Joseph Damon was found on a bed with face, hair and pillow on which she lay stiff with her clotted blood. The blood smeared fire poker, which then stood near the fireplace, was unmistakable evidence of the instrument used to commit the horrible deed.

Damon’s trial occured on September 22, 1834. Judge Addison presided, with Hon. Philo Orton, Thomas B. Campbell, Benjamin Walworth and Artemus Herrick, judges of the county court, as associates. Samuel A. Brown, district attorney, and Sheldon Smith, of Buffalo, appeared as counsel for the People, while the prisoner was defended by James Mullett and Jacob Houghton, of Fredonia. Damon was convicted, and sentence of death was pronounced at the oyer and terminer held in March, 1935.

On the 15th of May following, a gallows had been erected in the open field at Mayville, on the west declivity of the hill, not far from the present Union school building. The sheriff, William Saxton, called out the Two Hundred Seventh regiment of the militia, with William D. Bond in command, to serve as a guard on this occasion. A public execution took place; men, women and children from all part of the county came to witness the scene on foot, horseback, and in wagons, the day having been made a general holiday; the number of spectators was estimated at from eight to fifteen thousand. When the drop fell, the fastenings of the rope broke away, and Damon fell to the ground.

He then appealed to the sheriff to postpone the execution, but public sentiment had not reached the deep aversion to legal public executions, and the rope was readjusted and the hanging was completed. This was the last public execution to take place in Chautauqua county.

Title: Legal and Judicial History of New York, Volume 3
Authors: Lyman Horace Weeks, John Hampden Dougherty
Editor: Alden Chester
Publisher: National Americana society, 1911
Pages 305-306 (Google book LINK)

Up To Snuff

June 18, 2010

“UP TO SNUFF.”

A volume of Italian Poems lately received in the British Metropolis, furnishes fine amusement for the learned wits. Leigh Hunt has shown himself up to snuff in giving a merry interpretation to some of these effusions. The following is a free translation of the line on Sneezing: —

What a moment! what a doubt!
All my nose, inside and out,
All my thrilling, tickling, caustic,
Pyramid rhinocerostic
Wants to sneeze and cannot do it!
Now it yearns me, thrills me, stings me,
Now with rapturous torment wrings me,
Now says sneeze, “you fool, get through it.”
Shee — shee — Oh, ’tis most del-ishi,
Ishi — ishi — most del-ishi —
(Hang it! I shall sneeze till spring.)
Snuff’s a most delicious thing.

The Peoples Press (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 4, 1835

Title: A pinch of snuff, anecdotes of snuff taking, with the moral and physical effects of snuff, by dean Snift of Brazen-nose
Author: Benson Earle Hill
Published: 1840 (Google book LINK)

Images from the “pinch of snuff” book. Also from this fascinating book, a bit of sneezing/plague trivia:

Déjà vu: History Repeats Itself

June 18, 2010

Carroll Daily Herald (Carroll, Iowa) May 1, 1937

Government Spending: Déjà vu

*****

Carroll Daily Herald (Carroll, Iowa) Mar 9, 1937

Taxing the working man: Déjà vu

One Burglar with Vested Pumps; One Weltering in Blood

June 17, 2010

Maryland State Penitentiary (Image from http://marylandghosthunterssociety.com)

A desperate burglar killed.

A notorious burglar, named Jesse Sutton, recently released from the penitentiary at Baltimore, met with his death on Friday night last in the following manner: On the night above named, Mr. William Power, of the firm of Power & Son, residing in Franklin street, near Pearl street, returned to his home, in company with a Mr. Zollinger, between ten and eleven o’clock.

Shortly afterwards, Mr. P proceeded to the hydrant in the yard, to get a drink, and, whilst in the act, thought he saw something run into an out-house. He immediately returned to the kitchen, seized a small piece of split wood, and walked towards the out-house, at the same time calling upon his cousin (Mr. Zollinger) to follow him with light. On reaching the place, he attempted to enter; but was resisted from within; finally, he succeeded in his attempt to open the door, when he was dragged in by the coat and the door closed.

At this critical juncture, and before his antagonist could fasten on him, Mr. P raised the stick of wood which he still held in his hand, and struck the villian on the head.

Clinging to one another, they reeled out of the place, the door of which had opened during the scuffle inside. Mr. Power then repeated the blow, when Sutton cried “partners! partners!” and staggered off.

By this time Mr. Zollinger had arrived with a light; and Sutton, on being interrogated to that effect, replied that he had three partners who were close by. Two or three watchmen, drawn thither by the alarm given by Mr. Zollinger, having arrived on the spot, Mr. Power went after a physician, and returned with Dr. Perkins, who dressed the wounded man’s head. He was then taken to the western district watch-house on a litter, where he died on Saturday morning, his skull being severely fractured.

Sutton is 41 years of age, has been in the penitentiary of the State four times, and was only discharged the last time on the 4th of April last.

When first discovered, he was in his stocking feet, and had his pumps beneath his vest.

On his arrival at the watch-house, he was searched; and a bunch of skeleton keys, a screw-driver, a box of friction matches, strips of pine wood, and a silver plated key, supposed to be one of those recently stolen from the house of Miss Rachel Colvin, were found on his person.

Image from Wikimedia

Another burglar killed.

It is a somewhat strange coincidence that a burglar, while plundering the store of Messrs. Sellers & Davis, Third street, Philadelphia, was killed on the same night and about the same hour, that Sutton the burglar was killed in the attempt a house in this city.

He had got into the store; some noise was heard in an adjoining house, when, being frightened, he and his companions, made their escape by way of the trap door.

Being in rather a hurry, it is presumed, he missed his hold, and fell from the house-top to the ground. When found, he was weltering in blood, and in the last struggles of death.

On his arm were the letters P.L., supposed to be the initials of his name.

Thus perished another in the very act of crime.

[Balt. Amer.

The Experiment (Norwalk, Ohio) Jun 22, 1842

Are You Quizzing Me?

June 16, 2010

QUIZ. — Very few words ever took such a run, or were saddled with so many meanings, as this monosyllable; and, however strange the word, it is still strange that not one of our lexicographers, from Bayley to Johnson, ever attempted an explanation, or gave a derivation of it. The reason is very obvious. It is because it has no meaning, nor is it derived from any language in the world, ever known, from the Babylonish confusion to this day.

When Richard Daly was patentee of the Irish theatres, he spent the evening of a Saturday in company with many of the wits and men of fashion of the day.

Gambling was introduced, when the manager staked a large sum that he would have spoken all through the principal streets of Dublin, by a certain hour the next day, Sunday, a word having no meaning, and being derived from no known language; wagers were laid, and stakes deposited. Daly repaired to the theatre, and despatched all the servants and supernumeraries with the word “Quiz,” which they chalked on every door and every shop window in town. Shops being shut all next day, every body going to & comming from their different places of worship, saw the word, and every body repeated it, so that ‘quiz’ was heard all through Dublin.

The circumstances of so strange a word being on every door and window, caused much surprize, and ever since, should a strange story be attempted to pass currant, it draws forth the expression — you are quizzing me.

The Peoples Press (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Jun 5, 1835

Is it true? I don’t know, but if not, the author of the above article sure had a vivid imagination. Notice below in the word history, it is stated that the first recorded reference was in 1782, but then the next wasn’t until 1867. My reference, albeit just a mention in a newspaper, was from 1835.

From Yahoo Education online dictionary entry for QUIZ:

WORD HISTORY:

The origins of the word quiz are as difficult to pin down as the answers to some quizzes. We can say that its first recorded sense has to do with people, not tests. The term, first recorded in 1782, meant “an odd or eccentric person.” From the noun in this sense came a verb meaning “to make sport or fun of” and “to regard mockingly.” In English dialects and probably in American English the verb quiz acquired senses relating to interrogation and questioning. This presumably occurred because quiz was associated with question, inquisitive, or perhaps the English dialect verb quiset, “to question” (probably itself short for obsolete inquisite, “to investigate”). From this new area of meaning came the noun and verb senses all too familiar to students. The second recorded instance of the noun sense occurs in the writings of no less an educator than William James, who in a December 26, 1867, letter proffers the hope that “perhaps giving ‘quizzes’ in anatomy and physiology . . . may help along.”

The Blacksmith at the Battle of Brandywine

June 15, 2010

THE BLACKSMITH AT THE BATTLE OF BRANDYWINE.

The hero of the following story was an humble blacksmith, but his stalwart frame, hardened with toil, throbbed with as generous an impulse of freedom as ever beat in the bosom of a La Fayette, or around the heart of mad Anthony Wayne.

It was in the full tide of a retreat, that follower of the American camp was driving a baggage wagon from the battle field, while some short distance behind a body of Continentals were rushing forward, with a troop of British in close pursuit.

The wagon had arrived at a narrow point of the bye road leading to the South, where two high banks of rocks and crag, arising on either side, afforded just space sufficient for the passage of his wagon, and not an inch more.

His eye was arrested by the sight of a muscular man, some forty years of age, extended at the foot of a tree at the very opening of this pass. He was clad in the coarse attire of a mechanic. His coat which had been flung aside, and with the shirt sleeves rolled up from his muscular arm, he lay extended on the turf, with his rifle in his grasp, while the blood streamed in a torrent from his right leg broken at the knee by a cannon ball.

The wagoner’s sympathies were arrested by the sight — he would have passed in the very instant of his flight and placed the wounded blacksmith in his wagon but the stout hearted mechanic refused.

“I’ll not get into the wagon,” he exclaimed in his rough way; “but I’ll tell you what I will do. Do you see yonder cherry tree on the top of that rock that hangs over the road? Do you think you could lift a man of my build up there? For you see neighbor,” he continued, while the blood flowed from his wound, “I never meddled with the Britishers until they came trampling over this valley and burned my house down. And now I’m all riddled to pieces, and haint got more than fifteen minutes life in me. But I have got three good rifle balls in my cartridge box, and so just prop me against that cherry tree, and I’ll give ’em the whole three shots, and then,” — he exclaimed, “I will die!”

The wagoner started his horses ahead and then with a sudden effort of strength, dragged the blacksmith along the sod to the foot of the cherry tree surmounting the rock by the road side.

In a moment his back was proped against the tree, his face was to the advancing troopers and while his shattered leg hung over the bank, the waggoners rushed on his way; while the blacksmith very coolly proceeded to load his rifle.

It was not long before a body of American soldiers rushed by with the British in pursuit.

The blacksmith greeted them with a shout, and then raising his rifle to his shoulder he picked the foremost from his steed with the exclamation, “that’s for Gen. Washington.”

In a moment the rifle was loaded, again it was fired, and, the pursuing British rode over the body of another fallen officer.

“That’s for myself!” cried the blacksmith.

And then with a hand strong with the feeling of coming death, the sturdy freeman again loaded, again raised his rifle. He fired his last shot, and as another soldier kissed the sod, the tear quivered in the eye of the dying blacksmith. “And that,” he cried with a husky voice which strengthened into a shout, “and that’s for mad Anthony Wayne!”

Long after the battle was pase, the body was discovered, propped against the tree, with the features frozen in death, smiling grimly, whilst the right hand grasped the never failing rifle.

And thus died one of the thousand brave mechanic heroes of the Revolution, brave in the hour of battle, undaunted in the hour of retreat, undismayed in the hour of death.

[Citizen Soldier.

The Experiement (Norwalk, Ohio) Jul 3, 1844

*****

Read more about Brandywine:

Sons of the American Revolution website
“The Battle of Brandywine”

Images from the following book:

Title: On the Trail of Washington
(a narrative history of Washington’s boyhood and manhood, based on his own writings, authentic documents and other authoritative information)
Author: Frederick Trevor Hill
Publisher: Appleton, 1916 (Google book LINK)

Includes The Battle of Brandywine, pages 154-159.

Accused of Murder; Let Off the Hook

June 14, 2010

Distressing Affair.

A short time since we were called upon to notice a serious affair which transpired near the line that divides this state from Pennsylvania, and it now becomes our painful duty to relate another, which has occurred in the same vicinity, of a still more distressing and bloody nature. From all we have heard of the transaction, we believe the following statement to be correct.

On Thursday, the 25th March, Mr. Scott, a deputy sheriff of the county of Warren (Pa.) went to the house of Mr. Jacob Hook, (about four miles from the village of Warren,) for the purpose of arresting him on a charge of perjury; but Hook refusing to go with him, Mr. Scott returned to the village and procured five men to go with him to arrest Hook & bring him away by force. It was evening when they reached the house, the door of which they found fastened, and on demanding admittance, Hook desired to know who was there, and when informed, he told them to keep away, and that if they entered he would be the death of them. Upon this, the officer pushed against the door with such force as to break it suddenly open, and he fell on the floor — two men followed close upon him, when a gun, loaded with four or five leaden slugs was discharged at them, three of which passed through the arm of the second man, (Mr. Perry G. Sherman,) and entered the body of the third, (Mr. ____ Wallace,) who fell and expired without uttering a groan. The accidental falling of Mr. Scott when the door flew open, was undoubtedly the means of saving his own life.

It being dark, the deceased and the wounded man were immediately taken to a neighboring house, and three men stationed to watch the house of Hook during the night. It appeared that he did not know until morning that he had killed any one; as he was observed to come to the door in the night with a candle, and remarked that he believed he had wounded somebody, as there was blood on the steps. He was secured the next morning.

Hook is an old bachelor, and there was no person in the house with him, except a woman whom he kept. He is said to be worth twenty thousand dollars. For justice sake, and the reputation of the county of Warren, we hope he will not be suffered to escape the punishment which his crime justly deserves.

N.Y. Censor.

The Sandusky Clarion (Sandusky, Ohio) Apr 14, 1824

River Rafts Warren PA (Image from http://wiki.cincinnatilibrary.org)

From the Venango Deomcrat.

LAW INTELLIGENCE.

The trial of Jacob Hook, for the murder of Caleb Wallace, came on in the Court of Oyer and Terminer of Warren county, on Wednesday morning the 2d inst. and continued until Sunday evening. It was an interesting trial and produced considerable legal discussion, and the facts, as they turned out in evidence, were much in the defendant’s favor. —

It appeared that Asa Scott, who had collected a party, among whom was the deceased, to arrest the defendant on the 25th of March last, had no legal authority to arrest him. —

That defendant had expressed great anxiety and apprehension of danger that evening, on the arrival of the party who were some of them armed, believing that most of the party were inimical to him — that he had warned and entreated them not to attempt to take him, that he would resist them if they attempted to break open the door; that about 9 o’clock at night the party broke open the door, and immediately a gun was discharged in the house, and Caleb Wallace, who was one of the party, received the principal part of the contents in his breast and died immediately.

The legal discussion turned principally upon the validity of a warrant issued by a justice of the peace without stating an offence upon the face of it, and a general deputation given by the sheriff of the county to Asa Scott, to serve precepts directed to him.

The charge of the Court closed about sundown on Sunday evening, and the jury in about an hour returned a verdict of “not guilty.”

Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Jun 23, 1824

Allegheny River - Warren, PA

From the Cranford Messenger.

TRIAL OF JACOB HOOK.

At the court of oyer and terminer which was held at Warren last week, came on for trial the indictment of Jacob Hook, for the killing of Benjamin Wallis; and after a hearing of several days, the case was submitted to the jury, who after retiring and consulting about twenty minutes, returned a verdict of not guilty.

The circumstances of the case, as we have hear them stated, were thus. A warrant to arrest Hook had been issued by a magistrate, directed to the sheriff; which had not been delivered to the sheriff for execution, but to Asa Scott, the coroner of the county, and who acted, also, sometimes as a kind of deputy to the sheriff. He went on the 25th of March to arrest Hook, who lived about four miles from Warren. Hook would not allow him to arrest him, denying his authority, and alleging the whole proceedings to be an illegal attempt to injure and ill-treat him by a combination of persons hostile to him, of whom he stated Scott to be one; but that he would submit to the arrest of the sheriff, or of the constable. Scott went back to Warren for assistance, and returned to Hook’s after dark with several persons in company and found his house locked.

After informing Hook of the object of their coming, and demanding admittance, and he refusing, they broke open the door; and in the doing of which a gun was fired by Hook, as was understood, and Wallis killed, and another of the company wounded. Upon the trial the court decided that the deputation under which Scott professed to act was illegal, and gave him no authority to execute the warrant against Hook, even if the warrant was good, to which there were several objections raised, but which the court thought unnecessary to decide.

The case then resolved itself into an unauthorised attempt of several armed persons to break open and enter Hook’s house against his will, after dark — and upon the illegality of the attempt, and the legal right of Hook to resist it, (the moral right could not come in question,) we understand the acquittal took place.

The case excited great interest not only in the county, but elsewhere. There were seven counsel for the prosecution, and for the defendant six; among whom were Mr. Baldwin, of Pittsburg, and Mr. Farrelly, of this place.

The Sandusky Clarion (Sandusky, Ohio) Jul 7, 1824

FRANKLIN, Pa. June 15.

Suicide. — On Wednesday morning last, a man named Jared Dunn, a very respectable citizen of Warren county, put an end to his existence by hanging himself in his own barn.

It appears he was subject to a weakness of mind when anything troubled him, from an injury he had once received in the skull; and had the misfortune to be called on the jury in the case of Jacob Hook, for life and death, who was acquitted, but some of his enemies had the imprudence to cast reflections on Mr. Dunn as to the decision of the jury, which is supposed to have been the cause of his committing this horrid act.

He has left a wife and seven children to mourn his untimely end.

Democrat.

Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Jun 30, 1824

Trial of Jacob Hook.

It has already been stated in the papers, that Jacob Hook, a rich man in the western part of Pennsylvania, who committed a most bloody murder a few months since, has been tried and acquitted. His acquittal was received with great amazement by the public, although the anticipations of some were realized.

The New-York Censor, published in Chautauque county, explains the matter by stating that ‘the most abominable corruption was exhibited at his trial, and which reflects nothing but disgrace on the judge and jury who tried him.

As a serious confirmation of this, we have to state, that one of the jurymen, a Mr. Jared Dunn, who has heretofore been considered a respectable man, committed suicide on the morning after the trial. He was heard to say, before his death, that he had been guilty of perjury by means of bribery, and that he might as well die as live. On being asked how much money he received, he replied that he had received no more than the rest of the jury. Mr. Dunn’s wife found a sum of money which she could not tell how or where he received.

It is currently reported that Judge Moore, who presided at the trial, also received a large sum of money from Hook; but this, by some, is not believed.

Hook, since his trial, appears haughty and impudent. We should not be surprised if the effusion of blood did not stop here.”

N.Y. Eve. Post.

Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Jul 7, 1824

Among the earlier settlers and most enterprising lumbermen of the county was Jacob Hook, better known, perhaps, as “Jake Hook.” He emigrated either from Boston or Main somewhere about the year 1798, bring with him, as his stock in trade, a package of the bills of some bank that had failed so recently “down east,” that Jake had time to circulate his bills here before the failure became known. This served to start him; and eventually, by dint of sharp bargains and hard work, rolling saw logs, digging mill-races, and other speculations appurtenant to a lumber country, Jake arrived to the dignity of owning more mills and running more lumber than any other man in the county.

In connection with some of his speculations, the charge of perjury had been fastened upon him, and he had made himself extremely obnoxious to many of the citizens. A party attempted to arrest him for trial, and he killed one of them in the affray, — was tried for his life, but escaped by an informality in the legal proceedings.

The following is from the New York Censor, copied into the Conewango Emigrant of 21st July, 1824.

“It was proved on this trial that seven men, headed by one Asa Scott, went to the house of Hook, about 4 miles above Warren, on the left bank of the Allegheny, between sunset and dark on the 25th March, for the avowed purpose of taking Hook to Warren that night. They all admitted that they intended to use force, if necessary. One stated that they meant to take him at all events. These persons were inimical to Hook with one or two exceptions, and had with them one or two loaded rifles. On arriving at Hook’s they found his door fastened. One of the company endeavored to prevail on him to surrender; but he refused, alleging that he feared to trust himself with such men.

“About 9 o’clock, Scott and his followers went to the house and demanded admittance; but he persisted in stating that he considered himself in danger, and that he looked upon them as a mob. Scott also stated, that on his demanding admittance, Hook informed him, by a token peculiar to a particular society, that he was in danger, and that he (Scot) assured him that he would be safe. Scott immediately burst open the outer door with considerable violence; and almost at the same instant a gun was fired off within the house, by which one of the assailants (Caleb Wallace) was killed, and another wounded. On the trial, the counsel for the prosecution attempted to show that Scott was a deputy sheriff, and had a legal warrant on Hook for perjury. The court, however, on examining the deputation under which he pretended to act, decided that it was void, and gave him no authority.”

Hook was acquitted on that ground.

He had always been at sword’s point with the Warren people, and this affair had no tendency to heal the breach.

He died about 1829 or ’30.

Title: Historical Collections of the State of Pennsylvania
Author: Sherman Day
Publisher: G. W. Gorton, 1843
Pages 648-649
(Google book LINK)

Conewango Creek - North Warren, PA (Image from jenn1872 picasweb.google.com)

ERROR to the Common Pleas of Warren county.

This was an action on the case by Silas Lacy against Lewis Arnett and r.S. Orr, for maintaining a mill-dam in the Conewango creek, a short distance above its confluence with the Allegheny river, whereby the plaintiff’s lands were overflowed.

The mills and dam was of a temporary character, intended for driving a saw-mill. In 1818 or 1819, they were owned by James Arthurs; and Jacob Hook was the owner of the land now vested in the plaintiff, and in respect to which this action was brought.

James Arthurs testified that, at this time, “Hook asked me, one day, what I’d say, if he’d pull down that dam some day, or what I’d give him for the privilege of attaching the dam to his land, and of the water; I told him I would give my horse, saddle, &c.; he said, It’s a bargain, and I gave them to him.”

Title:  Pennsylvania state reports, Volume 33
Author: Pennsylvania. Supreme Court
Publisher: West Pub. Co., 1859
Lacy versus Arnett et al. – Page 169

Jacob Hook owned all the land along the creek, including the entire site of Glade City, before 1816, though he lived at his saw-mill across the river in Mead. This mill, which had five saws, was one of the largest mills on the Allegheny River at that day. In 1819 he built the large barn now standing on the farm of Guy C. Irvine. He died at Pittsburgh in 1827, while there on business. At that time he was one of the most extensive of the lumbermen in the entire State. He owned also a quarter interest in the old Pittsburgh bridge. He was a brother of Orren Hook, who will be mentioned in a later page. The family came from New Hampshire. He was a bachelor, and at the time of his death was in the prime of life. Another brother, Moses, owned his mill after his death, and later still transferred it to Orren Hook, who in turn operated it until it went down. The property is now known as Wardwell’s, and it is the center of quite an oil field.

H I S T O R Y OF WARREN COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
Edited by J.S. Schenck, assisted by W.S. Rann;
Syracuse, N.Y.; D Mason & Co., Publishers; 1887
CHAPTER XLVIII. HISTORY OF GLADE TOWNSHIP.

Borough of Warren PA

A FEW REMINISCENCES
Of Warren’s Early History by an Old Resident.

Some Historical Data Which Will be of Interest to the Present Generation — Personal Reminiscences by the Late James H. Eddy, who Remembered When Warren was a Village of a Half Dozen Buildings.

The first jail was built of hewed logs, was located about where Hon. W.M. Lindsey’s house now stands on Market street, and had a yard adjoining it, surrounded by a palisade of oak logs set on end in the ground, sharpened at the top and about twenty feet high. Capt. Asa Winter and his son Elihu cut the logs for the jail and palisade on Tanner’s hill and hauled them down with oxen. Capt. Winter then owned and occupied the farm this side of North Warren now owned by the Hon. L.D. Wetmore.

Daniel Jackson was said to be the first white settler in Warren county. When he first came here, he camped on Jackson Run where he built his mill about 1794 or 1795. About the only mill irons then used, were the end of the dog with a socket for a wooden bar, a very few light ones for the carriage, and the saw, all other parts of the mill were taken from the forest. Jackson was a great hunter, lumbered a good deal and ran lumber cut at his mill, down the river to Southern markets. As far back as I can recollect, John King, father of Hon. R.P. King, was lumbering and farming, and was a river man canoeing goods and provisions up the river to Warren from Pittsburg the nearest source of supplies.

Joseph Mead, father of Boon Mead, was farming Mead’s island and the farm adjacent below Warren. About 1818 or 1819 James Stuart and Robert Arthur built a mill near where Bartch Bros. Wagon shop now stands, between Liberty and Market streets, and ran the dam across the Conewango creek from that point to the island. I ran across that dam many times, barefooted, when a boy, while they were building it and afterwards. Both Stuart and Arthur afterwards sold out and went to Illinois. Lathrop G. Parmlee came to Warren and started a store in the bar room of a hotel kept in the Daniel Jackson house where the rear part of the Citizen’s National Bank Building stands.

Parmlee must have been very early for leaves from the day book kept by him through the months of January and February, 1815, were lately found in the garret of Chas. Dinsmoore’s house by carpenters making repairs. Parmlee afterwards opened a store below where the Carver House now stands. Lathrop G. Parmlee was the father of Hon. L.T. Parmlee, and G.N. Parmlee. Arichibold Tanner was in business very early and built the store now occupied by Andrew Ruhlman, for a ware house where supplies from Pittsburgh were received and stored for himself, and the public generally until called for.

In early days no attorneys lived in Warren, but came from Meadville to attend Court here, finally two attorneys came to Warren, rented a little building where the Exchage Block now stands, of John Hackney, and prepared to practice law. To occupy their time they wrote for and edited a little paper published here, and at one time in the paper reflected somewhat upon Archibold Tanner. A few nights afterward a little cannon heavily loaded was shot off next to their office, tearing away a good share of that side of the office; the next day the attorneys left the town and the people were without legal counsel for some time.

Jacob Hook purchased a mill at an early day at what is now called Wardwell, enlarged it and put in five saws and carriages, a remarkable enterprise for those days. As early as I can recollect, Jacob Hook was the most extensive lumber manufacturer in this vicinity. I pulled an oar on one of his rafts from his mill to Cincinnati in 1830.

What is now the principal part of Cincinnati was then corn fields. Hook owned about all of the land along the river from Warren to Corydon, including some of the finest of the Kinzua flats. He was an energetic, able man, engrossed entirely in his business, but was continually annoyed by a class of mischief loving practical jokers who exerted themselves much more in attending to other peoples business than in their ow avocations.

In March of 1824 or thereabouts, Mr. Hook had been brought to Warren as defendant in some frivolous litigation every day in the week until Saturday, and a warrant was issued for his arrest on Saturday, on some far-fetched complaint so as to fill out the week. When the officer went to Hook’s mill late on Saturday, Hook not relishing the prospect of lying in jail over Sunday, said he would appear on Monday, but would not go that night. Deputy Sheriff Asa Scott summoned a posse to take him; Hook locked his door and threatened to shoot them if they broke in. The posse broke in the door; Scott being first, fell headlong when the door gave way. Hook fired a slug or bullet which passed above Scott, through Perry Sherman’s arm, and then through the body of Caleb Wallace, instantly killing him.

Hook was arrested, and tried for murder in a house on the corner of 5th and Market streets where the house of William Scott is now located.

Several other boys and myself took seats upon the beams of the house over the heads of the people attending the trial, and were attentive spectators during the whole trial. My father rode horseback to Pittsburg to employ an attorney to defend Hook. He secured the service of Henry Baldwin, afterwards Judge Baldwin, and paid him three hundred dollars in gold for attending the trial. The warrant was irregular, had no seal after the magistrate’s name, and Hook was acquitted. Public opinion was quite strongly in Hook’s favor. Judge Jesse Moore presided at the trial with associates Connely of Brokenstraw, and Hackney of Warren, grandfather of A.T. Hackney, upon the bench.”

PERRY D. CLARK.

The Evening Democrat (Warren, Pennsylvania) Apr 25, 1894

Glade, Pennsylvania (Image from http://explorepahistory.com)

An Old Landmark Gone.

One of the old landmarks of this section is being torn town. The old Hook barn, known as such 60 years ago, on the Andrew Irvine farm is being removed to what was known as the Chapman farm on the Little Glade Run. This barn was built by Jacob Hook in 1819, on the road leading from Glade Run to Warren. It was built some years before the one on the Struthers farm. Andrew Irvine bought the property in 1835 and built the house now occupied by Guy C. Irvine. At the time the house was built it was the only one between the bridge and Glade Run and the land surrounding was nearly all covered with woods.

OLD TIMER.

The Evening Democrat (Warren, Pennsylvania) Jun 4, 1894

Keep It Flying

June 14, 2010

KEEP IT FLYING.

There is something in a flag, and a little burnished eagle,
That is more than emblematic — it is glorious, it’s regal.
You may never live to feel it, you may never be in danger,
You may never visit foreign lands, and play the role of stranger;
You may never in the army check the march of an invader,
You may never on the ocean cheer the swarthy cannonader.

But if these should happen to you, then, when age is on you pressing,
And your great big, booby boy comes to ask your final blessing;
You will tell him: Son of mine, be your station proud or frugal,
When you country calls her children, and you hear the blare of bugle,
Don’t stop to think of Kansas, or the quota of your county,
don’t you go to asking questions, don’t you stop for pay or bounty,
But you volunteer at once; and you go where orders take you,
And obey them to the letter if they make you or they break you.

Hunt that flag and then stay with it, be you wealthy or plebeian;
Let the women sing the dirges, scrape the line and chant the paean.
Though the magazines and journals teem with anti-war persuasion,
And the stay-at-homes and cowards gladly take the little occasion,
Don’t you ever dream of asking, “Is the war a right or wrong one?”
You are in it, and your duty is to make the fight a strong one,
And you stay till it is over, be the war a short or long one.

Make amends when war is over, then the power with you is lying,
Then, if wrong, do ample justice — but that flag, you keep it flying;
If that flag goes down to ruin, time will then, without a warning,
Turn the dial back to midnight and the world must wait till morning.

— Written 30 years ago by Eugene F. Ware (“Ironquill”).

The Carroll Herald (Carroll, Iowa) May 27, 1914