Archive for October 28th, 2010

Foes of the Wheel Have Trotted Out Another Scarecrow

October 28, 2010

BICYCLE VOICE NOW.

Enemies of Wheeling Say It Affects the Vocal Chords.

All the talk of the bicycle face having practically died out, the foes of the wheel have now trotted out another scarecrow claiming that as a result of wheeling women are becoming loud talkers, with an unpleasant quality of voice. They assert that wheeling, especially with the mouth open, has a detrimental effect on the vocal chords, and when to this is added the strain to which the voice is subjected in an effort to keep up a conversation while cycling the danger seems something more than a shadow. Some persons who have made voice culture a life study are inclined to fall in with these views, asserting that exercise on the wheel is responsible for an apparent alteration in the voices of women. One vocal teacher says:

“While bicycle riding people frequently fill their lungs with dust, and this is, of course, injurious. Then the exercise leaves the system exhausted and unable to resist the bad effects of excessive perspiration. A severe cold is detrimental to the speaking voice, and when these colds are frequent, as they are with bicyclists, they will ultimately result in permanent injury. If women would ride but a few miles at a time and would keep their mouths closed there would be no danger, but I find that many of my pupils cannot refrain from overdoing the sport. Professional women realize the harm that bicycling does to their voices, but they say that they cannot bear to give up wheeling. Calling to one another as wheelwomen frequently do cannot help but strain the voice is persisted in.”

Another vocal instructor hold totally opposite views. Said she: “I am strongly in favor of cycling for women. It is a most healthful exercise, and so cannot fail to be beneficial to he singing and speaking voice. I do not believe the old-fashioned theory of things affecting the vocal chords directly. Of course it is possible to strain the voice but I should think this most unlikely when wheeling. The very tendency of the wheel is to keep the rider quiet. If riders should call from one to the other when outdoors their speaking voices might be affected, but the most strident speakers are often the sweetest singers. The soft, well-modulated voice of the English girl does not give us as many brilliant examples of the song bird as the less pleasant and somewhat nasal tones of the American. Nine out of every ten successful singers abroad to-day are Americans. This is because the other girls are never allowed to expand their lungs with the same delightful freedom. A good digestion is the first requisite toward good singing. I should say poor cooks have more to do with spoiling the voice than all the wheels in Christendom. A theory has been advanced that the rapid breathing necessary when riding the wheel is injurious. This is wrong, as the vocal chords are completely protected when not in use.” — Philadelphia Press.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Aug 5, 1897

Election 1894: Get the Vote Out!

October 28, 2010

THE Republican victory should be made so complete this year that its significance will be understood by the whole world.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 5, 1894

Get the Vote Out!
There is just one thing left for republicans to do — get out a full vote. There is where the danger lies. The voters are all right. They don’t want any more democratic policy. They was a change. Their experience has been bitter enough. Thousands who voted the democratic ticket in 1892, and who have in recent years been getting into the way of voting the democratic ticket at least occasionally, see their mistake. They regret it. They would not do it if they had it to do over again. This is their genuine feeling. The drift is apparent.

— Sioux City Journal.

After this election the democrats will have to re-organize again, and work like nailers to get the populist pitch off their garments.

Republican success will induce capital to enter upon enterprises that will keep men at work and render a profit. That’s what it will do for capital.

There can be no mistaking the signs over the country. They mark a veritable revolution.
— Sioux City Journal.

The best way in all the world to distribute wealth is to give big wages for good work, and provide good work for all.

Vote for business. There is always a dead-beat faction in every city, but its tickets should never win.

Keep everybody busy. That is the way to keep everybody out of mischief, and out of despondency.

No good man in this section can afford to take any risks on losing a sound republican United States senator. Vote for the republican legislative ticket.

Let every republican come out, rain or shine. No ballot will be lost, although it may be only one in a vast majority. There is more in the election than the mere choice of candidates.
— Sioux City Journal.

Republican success will put labor to work. That’s what it will do for labor.

Daily Huronite (Huron, South Dakota) Nov 5, 1894

Voting Time in Tyrone.

It seems beyond belief that from the placid precints of Hollidayburg may proceed the ?ome frollicking poetical exhuberance. Yet so harmoniously combined are a retrospective remembrance of Tyrone hustle and an intelligent appreciation of the sweep to be made tomorrow by the Republican broom, in at least one active mind there, that the anomaly really appears, to set aside conventialities and demonstrate what queer things may happen.

To one given to writing for the press, it is a certainty that the time comes at least once in his career that he will essay poetry. So it is that our Hollidaysburg friend has unburdened himself of an effusion which has doubtless been formulating in his mind for many years. It is a rare poetic achievement, for the article breaks over all precedents f license in versification, and the stupendous thought conveyed in the lines moves with a vigor and frolic that seems almost to reveal a tumbling over each other of the alphabetical elements which compose it, in the endeavor of each individual letter to reach the end of the poem first and execute the most violent impact against the concluding exclamation point. But here are the verses, to which our old friend and fellow-editor, Samuel Beswick, signs his name:

Voting time in Tyrone
Comes once in four years.
Ketch the coon by his long curl’d tail,
Or ketch him by the ears.
But ketch him! O ketch him!
On the post of honor place him.
Be sure and ketch him
Once in four long years.

Voting time in Tyrone,
Speakers on the stump.
Ketch the coon on the high fence rail,
Or ketch him on the jump.
But ketch him! O ketch him!
In the ballot box secure him.
Make sure and ketch him
Once if four long years.

Voting time in Tyrone,
Here the roosters call!
In the Democratic barn yards!
Just ketch ’em — tails and all.
But ketch ’em! O ketch ’em,
And on the high fence pluck ’em.
Make sure and ketch ’em
Once in four long years!

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Nov 5, 1894