Election 1894: Get the Vote Out!

THE Republican victory should be made so complete this year that its significance will be understood by the whole world.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 5, 1894

Get the Vote Out!
There is just one thing left for republicans to do — get out a full vote. There is where the danger lies. The voters are all right. They don’t want any more democratic policy. They was a change. Their experience has been bitter enough. Thousands who voted the democratic ticket in 1892, and who have in recent years been getting into the way of voting the democratic ticket at least occasionally, see their mistake. They regret it. They would not do it if they had it to do over again. This is their genuine feeling. The drift is apparent.

— Sioux City Journal.

After this election the democrats will have to re-organize again, and work like nailers to get the populist pitch off their garments.

Republican success will induce capital to enter upon enterprises that will keep men at work and render a profit. That’s what it will do for capital.

There can be no mistaking the signs over the country. They mark a veritable revolution.
— Sioux City Journal.

The best way in all the world to distribute wealth is to give big wages for good work, and provide good work for all.

Vote for business. There is always a dead-beat faction in every city, but its tickets should never win.

Keep everybody busy. That is the way to keep everybody out of mischief, and out of despondency.

No good man in this section can afford to take any risks on losing a sound republican United States senator. Vote for the republican legislative ticket.

Let every republican come out, rain or shine. No ballot will be lost, although it may be only one in a vast majority. There is more in the election than the mere choice of candidates.
— Sioux City Journal.

Republican success will put labor to work. That’s what it will do for labor.

Daily Huronite (Huron, South Dakota) Nov 5, 1894

Voting Time in Tyrone.

It seems beyond belief that from the placid precints of Hollidayburg may proceed the ?ome frollicking poetical exhuberance. Yet so harmoniously combined are a retrospective remembrance of Tyrone hustle and an intelligent appreciation of the sweep to be made tomorrow by the Republican broom, in at least one active mind there, that the anomaly really appears, to set aside conventialities and demonstrate what queer things may happen.

To one given to writing for the press, it is a certainty that the time comes at least once in his career that he will essay poetry. So it is that our Hollidaysburg friend has unburdened himself of an effusion which has doubtless been formulating in his mind for many years. It is a rare poetic achievement, for the article breaks over all precedents f license in versification, and the stupendous thought conveyed in the lines moves with a vigor and frolic that seems almost to reveal a tumbling over each other of the alphabetical elements which compose it, in the endeavor of each individual letter to reach the end of the poem first and execute the most violent impact against the concluding exclamation point. But here are the verses, to which our old friend and fellow-editor, Samuel Beswick, signs his name:

Voting time in Tyrone
Comes once in four years.
Ketch the coon by his long curl’d tail,
Or ketch him by the ears.
But ketch him! O ketch him!
On the post of honor place him.
Be sure and ketch him
Once in four long years.

Voting time in Tyrone,
Speakers on the stump.
Ketch the coon on the high fence rail,
Or ketch him on the jump.
But ketch him! O ketch him!
In the ballot box secure him.
Make sure and ketch him
Once if four long years.

Voting time in Tyrone,
Here the roosters call!
In the Democratic barn yards!
Just ketch ’em — tails and all.
But ketch ’em! O ketch ’em,
And on the high fence pluck ’em.
Make sure and ketch ’em
Once in four long years!

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Nov 5, 1894

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