Acrostics for the Dead

An Acrostic.
[To The News.]

An old veteran submits the following double acrostic blending the name of Geo. Ball and the High school, as they will ever be inseparably connected:

Grand was the man whom, while God gave the breatH,
Enthron’d with wisdom and strength to replI;
Opened the doors — a temple of learninG;
Riches to the mind, and joy to the heartH,
God grant his bounteous gift may ever blesS
Each pupil — grades to the scientifiC;
Blending in harmony Art’s highest brancH.
Ages after ages will come and gO
Loving hearts revere the name of one whO
Left this token of affection to alL.

G.W.G.

Galveeston, September 25, 1885

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Sep 27, 1885

GEO. BALL’S BIRTHDAY.
ANNIVERSARY ENTERTAINMENT AT BALL HIGH SCHOOL.
An Excellent Programme to the Memory of George Ball, Galveston’s Philanthropist.
[excerpt]

The recitations given by each were as follows:

GEORGE BALL ACROSTIC.

Gone! Is that man gone
Whose influence is upon his kind?
He lives in glory, and his speaking dust
Has more of life than half its breathing maids.

Each hero’s name
Shall shine untarnished on the roll of fame,
And stand the example of each distant age,
And add new luster to the historic page.

On Fame’s eternal camping ground
His great, good name is read.
and glory guards with solemn round
The last home of the dead.

Rugged strength and radiant beauty —
These were one in nature’s plan;
Humble toil and heavenward duty —
These will form the perfect man.

Great men by their lives remind us
We can make our lives sublime,
And departing leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time.

Earth may not claim them. Nothing here
Could be for them a mear reward;
Theirs is a treasure for more dear —
Eye hath not seen it, nor the ear
Of dying mortal heard
The joys prepared, the promised bliss above —
The holy presence of Eternal Love.

By fairy hands their knell is rung,
By forms unseen their dirge is sung;
There Honor comes, a pilgrim gray,
To bless the turf that wraps their clay;
And Freedom shall awhile repair,
To dwell, a weeping hermit, there.

A city’s gratitude in thee,
Meet tribute to thy honored memory,
A time-enduring monument shall raise
And garland it with glory’s brightest rays.
They noble deed with each returning year
Shall make thee over to us ?? more dear.

Lo, there is no death; the stars go down
To rise upon some fairer shore.
And bright in heaven’s jeweled crown
They shine forevermore.

Let us then be up and doing,
With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Learn to labor and to wait.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) May 10, 1885

Edmund Jackson Davis:

An Elegaic Acrostic.

Erewhile a form of manliness and grace
Did tread our thoroughfares, and we could trace
Much in the man to win our reverence!
Unto all so courteous, without pretense.
None this denied, how else their verdict ran,
Despite all doubt, he is a gentleman.

Justice, perchance, demands no judgment hard;
Defects like his, our Hancock might have marred,
A captive had he been, as once the dead.
Vilest of dooms impending o’er his head —
It may be, here, injustice scarred his brow,
Supreme the wisdom that doth judge him now.

AUSTIN, Feb. 12, 1883. CARITAD.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Feb 16, 1883

Image by Jill.

To Our Child.

The following acrostic, the work of our townsman James Tyson, was handed to us to publish, as aside from the fact of possessing literary merit is has a local application in forming the name of one dear to many of us, now passed to the home beyond the river:

Florence, tis not wrong to cherish fond memory,
Link it with the past in pleasant, happy dreams.
Oh, no! we think of sunny days that
Recollection calls back, of times that were
Ever full with privileged joys agone,
N‘er to return in earth’s abiding place,
Can we contemplate without sorrowing,
Ever recollecting days of childhood?

No, never! never!! ‘Tis not right we should.

Well, then, let it be our greatest pleasure,
Recollecting the pleasant incidents
Ever an anon strewn in Life’s walks —
Ne’er to weary in contemplation —
Ne’er to forget these many happy hours.

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Jul 1, 1893

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