Archive for August, 2011

Our Federal Constitution is Good; but…

August 31, 2011

TO LIBERTY PARTY VOTERS.

As Liberty men we love to contemplate the principles which we have embraced, the grounds which constituted the necessity for a distinct political organization, and the reasons why we should remain firm and uncompromising in maintaining the position which we have assumed. In this field of intellectual action we feel at home; strong in the consciousness of pure motives and upright aims; and rejoicingly assured that truth and reason and justice and patriotism and philanthropy are, fully and forever, the patrons and duties of our great enterprise.

But in view of the nearness of an election, (especially and particularly important, of course, as every election was and is and will ever be,) we feel an interest in our cause, in some respects, beyond what we are wont to feel. We know that every election is, more or less, a crisis in the political history and course of a numerous class of voters. A time when their political character and principles are severely tried by every thing in the shape of argument and motive which political opponents and selfish partisan demagogues can employ to influence them.

As freemen, feeling a solemn responsibility for a wise and upright and conscientious use of the elective franchise, and being virtually sworn to such a course, it would sadly belie our principles and our professions if we were to suffer any individual preference, or former party attachment, or any little interest of a local or temporary nature, in any instance, to determine our course at the ballot box.

Ours is the party which recognises, and avows, and strives to maintain in political action, the good old principles of the fathers if this Republic, vis: to act and to vote in reference to those interests which are of a far-reaching and an enduring character; to act and to vote with a view to the good of the whole community; the good of the distant future; the good of posterity; the good of the great human family; and not in reference to the little interests of a narrow locality or an evanescent occasion.

Ours are not principles recently avowed for the first time, nor of a mushroom growth, nor of a character which betokens for them a sickly and short-lived existence. They are principles as old as the nature of man. They are principles constitutionally inherent in human nature; and can never cease to be so, unless the social and moral nature of man is brought to undergo a radical change. They are the grand centre principles of our Declaration of Independence. They are the foundation principles of the American Constitution. Principles, s????y identical with the universal equality, and the inherent nature of the rights of all human beings.

Image from Undoctrination.org

Our Declaration of Independence is good; but for a long course of years, and in a rapidly increasing degree, we have seen its principles disregarded, and virtually annulled, by those at the helm of our political affairs. Our Federal Constitution is good; but long, and shamefully, and sacrilegiously have we seen it perverted, and rendered subservient to purposes which its whole spirit and character do most obviously and heartily abhor. Our representative form of government is good; but, by the provision for slave representation, it has been made permanently, and in an ever increasing degree, an engine for bringing the rights and interests of the many into subjection to the will of the few.  Our Federal Union is good; but, by the constant ascendency and domination of the slave power, the free states have long been becoming, more and more, the abettors and coadjutors in the work of fostering and extending the institution of slavery.

Let us now glance at the past course and present condition of the two great political parties; and notice their bearings and tendency in reference to the prospective or probable success of our favorite enterprise and principles.

We invite your attention, then, to the present position of the (so called) Democratic party. Its history is familiar to those who have been candid enough to read it impartially. All know that it has grown old in a course of subserviency to the slave power. The dictum of that power has been the law of that party; and the extension of that power the great end to which the action of that party has been directed. It was with that party in the ascendency that Louisiana was purchased, with northern money, for the purpose of doubling the slave territory of the Union. It was under the auspices of that party that the infamous Missouri compromise, in favor of slavery, was effected. It was under Democratic rule that the plighted faith of our nation, in more than forty Indian treaties, was wantonly violated for the gratification of slaveholders. The grand national negro hunt in Florida, with the Cuban bloodhounds for our allies, and the crusade against Mexico, will remain through all coming time, way-marks in the history of the past course of that party….

American Freeman (Prairieville, Wisconsin) Sep 18, 1844


DEMOCRACY.

BY JOHN G. WHITTIER.

“All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you do ye even so to them.”
[Mat. vil. 12.

Oh! fairest born of  Love, and Light,
Yet bending brow and eye severe
On all which pains the holy sight,
Or wounds the generous ear:

Beautiful yet thy temples rise,
Though there profaning gifts are thrown;
And fires unkindled of the skies
Are glaring on thy altar-stone.

Still sacred — tho’ thy name be breathed
By those whose hearts thy truth deride,
And garlands, pluck’d from thee, are wreathed
Around the haughty brows of Pride.

Oh! ideal of my boyhood’s time!
The faith in which my father stood,
Even when the sons of Lust and Crime
Had stained thy peaceful courts with blood!

Still to those courts my foot-steps turn,
For through the mists which darken there
I see the flame or Freedom burn —
The Kebla of the patriot’s prayer!

The generous feeling, pure and warm,
Which owns the rights of ALL divine —
The pitying heart — the helping arm —
The prompt, self-sacrifice — are thine.

Beneath thy broad, impartial eye,
How fade the lines of caste and birth!
How equal in their suffering lie
The groaning multitudes of earth.

Still to a stricken brother true,
Whatever clime hath nurtured him;
As stooped to heal the wounded Jew
The worshipper on Gerizim.

By misery unrepelled, unawed
By pomp, or power, thou seest a MAN
In prince or peasant — slave or lord —
Pale priest, or swarthy artisan.

Through all disguise, form, place, or name,
Beneath the flaunting robes of sin,
Through poverty and squalid shame,
Thou lookest on the man within;

On man as man, retaining yet,
Howe’er debased, and soiled, and dim,
The crown upon his forehead set —
The immortal gift of God to him.

And there is reverence in thy look;
For that frail form which mortals wear
The Spirit of the Holiest took,
And veiled His perfect brightness there.

Not from the cold and shallow fount
Of vain philosophy thou art;
He who of old on Syria’s mount
Thrilled, warmed by turns the listener’s heart.

In holy words which cannot die,
In thoughts which angels leaned to know,
Proclaimed thy message from on high —
Thy mission to a world of wo.

That voice’s echo hath not died!
From the blue lake of Gallilee,
And Tabor’s lonely mountain side,
It calls a struggling world to thee.

Thy name and watchward o’er this land
I hear in every breeze that stirs,
And round a thousand altars stand
Thy banded party worshippers.

Not to these altars of a day,
At party’s call, my gift I bring;
But on thy olden shrine I lay
A freeman’s dearest offering!

The voiceless utterance of his will —
His pledge to Freedom and to Truth,
That Manhood’s heart remembers still
The homage of his generous youth.

American Freeman (Prairieville, Wisconsin) Sep 18, 1844

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What a Woman Can Do

August 31, 2011

Image from the Utah State History Digital CollectionLife in the West

What a Woman Can Do.

There are lots of things a woman can do that a man cannot.

A woman can hold more clothespins in her mouth and talk through a knot-hole in the fence at the same time than a man can.

A woman can arrive at a conclusion without the slightest trouble of reasoning on it, and no sane man can do that.

Six of them can talk all at once and get along first rate, and no two men can do that.

She can safely stick pins in her dress while he is getting one under his thumbnail.

She can button her shoes standing up with both feet on the floor, but he can’t.

She is as cool as a cucumber in half a dozen tight dresses and shirts, while a man will sweat and fume and growl in one loose shirt.

She can talk as sweet as peaches and cream to a woman she hates worst, while two men would be punching each other’s heads before they had exchanged a dozen words.

She can throw a stone with a curve that would be a fortune to a baseball pitcher, and finally she can drive a man crazy for twenty-four hours, and bring him back to paradise in two seconds, by tickling him under the chin, and there does not live that mortal son of Adam’s misery who can do it.

— Figaro.

Weekly Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Oct 4, 1884

Extraordinary Case of Shipwreck

August 30, 2011

Image of the Rob Roy Schooner (1832) from the Old News from Southern Maine website (Couldn’t find an picture of the Thornton)

HORRIBLE SUFFERING — STARVATION — MAN EATING HIS HAND — SHIPWRECK ON LAKE MICHIGAN.

We are indebted to Capt. William H. Hopper, of the central road, for the following particulars, which we relate.

Captain Hopkins, of the steamer J.D. Morton, while on her passage from Chicago to New Buffalo, on Friday last, discovered what he supposed to be a raft with some one upon it, some five miles in the lake. He immediately turned his boat and went for the object. He found the raft made of spars, with Capt. Davidson, of the schooner Thornton, upon it. It appears he was wrecked on the 31st ult., having been seven days and nights without food. Two of the crew, whose names he did not learn, with the captain, made the raft of the mainmast, main boom and main gaft. The two men dropped off on the third night after, having become exhausted for want of food. Captain Hopkins describes the scene as most pitiful. Captain Davison had commenced eating his left hand the last night! Several steamers and vessels have been in sight, and one vessel hailed him, but made no attempt to get him off. Of course the captain is exceedingly weak, but in a fair way for recovery.

Capt. Hopkins, of the J.D. Morton, has shown himself a humane man and the public should recollect it.

A collection was taken up for the unfortunate man, on the Morton, and some $10 was raised, mostly by the crew, headed by the captain.

Detroit Tribune.

The Daily Sanduskian (Sandusky, Ohio) Sep 10, 1850

EXTRAORDINARY CASE OF SHIPWRECK.

The Chicago Tribune of the 16th, announces the arrival there of George Davis, Captain of the schooner Thornton, taken up by the steamer Julius Morton, four miles out from Michigan City, floating upon a spar. His vessel was capsized six miles east of Chicago, and two of the hands were lost. The Tribune says:

At the time of the disaster, the schooner Thornton, in charge of Capt. Davis, assisted by two hands, was on her passage from Muskegon, freighted with lumber, belonging to Mr. Parks, of the former place. The vessel was driven out of her course by the violence of the storm, and on Friday afternoon, when about six miles northeast of this port, she became unmanageable and capsized, precipitating the captain and crew into the angry flood. Fortunately, a spar, which had been lying loose upon the deck, floated near them, and all three grasped it, supposing the vessel had sunk, though she afterwards floated ashore.

For the next twenty-four hours, the three shipwrecked men were driven about at the mercy of the wind and waves, they knew not whither; at the end of which time, (Saturday afternoon), the two companions of Capt. Davis, exhausted by cold, hunger and fatigue, relinquished their hold upon the spar, nearly at the same time, and sunk to rise no more. Capt. D. supposes that at this time, they were some where near the middle of the Lake.

After the loss of his companions, Capt. Davis was driven about, he knew not whither; the only incidents occurring to break the dreary monotony being the sight of two or three vessels. Only one of them came within hailing distance; and this he thinks was on Monday or Tuesday, he is not certain which. The vessel was near enough for him to read her name (which we think not best to give at present,) and a man whom he supposes was the captain, seemed to see him in the distance, and afterwards several of the crew joined him and looked in the same direction. Capt. D. thinks they must have seen him, but the vessel held on her course, and the hope of rescue, which he had indulged a moment before, gave place to black despair. He cannot tell where he was at the time. From that time till he was picked up by the crew of the steamer Morton, between 9 and 10 o’clock A.M. on Friday, there was nothing to relieve the horrible monotony of this lone, aimless, voyage, except that at one time he drifted within about a mile of the eastern shore of the Lake; but he was then too much exhausted — too weakened and benumbed in body, and paralyzed in mind, to make the attempt to swim ashore.

The pangs of hunger became so pressing, towards the last, that the poor sufferer attempted to reach a dead body that floated near him, with the dreadful thought of satisfying it by eating a portion of a fellow-creature, but it eluded his grasp. After this, he does not know when, he gnawed one of his hands to relieve the pain of famine, and afterwards he gnawed the other in the same manner.

It is impossible for the imagination to conceive of the horrible realities of such a voyage — during which, for seven days, the poor wayfarer upon the deep, without a morsel of food, benumbed with cold, and with the prospect of death every moment — where day brought no relief and hardly hope, and the long dreary night added to the horror of his situation — was drifted at the mercy of the elements. Happily, however, by the operations of a beautiful law, by which the intensity of human suffering after a time deadens the capacity to feel it, Capt. Davis has but an indistinct remembrance of the trial through which he has passed. For most of the time he was in a state of semi-consciousness, and at times he must have slept, though the strong instinct of self-preservation enabled him, through all, to maintain a firm grip upon the spar.

On being picked up by the Morton, every attention was paid to his wants which humanity could suggest, and a physician (whose name we were not able to learn) was taken on board at Michigan city, who bound up his wounded hands and otherwise ministered to his relief. — This morning he was quite cheerful, though much emaciated from his long famine, and the prospect is that he will shortly recover. It will be some time, however, before he will have the use of his hands, as they are very much cramped and benumbed by his long continued grasp upon the spar, and the gnawing to which they were subjected. His whole body, with the exception of his head and hands, being immersed in the water, he did not suffer much with cold until the last night of the exposure. He is of the opinion that he could not have survived another night.

Capt. Davis is naturally a strong athletic man, as might be expected from the sufferings which he lived through, and we should judge, between 36 and 40 years of age. He is a Scotchman by birth, but has resided here for several years, where he has a wife and two young children, to whom he is happily restored. He has always borne the character of an industrious, honest man.

Alton Telegraph and Democratic Review (Alton, Illinois) Sep 27, 1850

Information on the schooner, Thornton from the Great Lakes and Seaway Shipping website:

GEN. THORNTON
Other names : also seen as just THORNTON
Official no. : none
Type at loss : schooner, wood,*2-mast
Build info : 1837, St Joseph’s Mich
Specs : 56x15x7, 49 t.
Date of loss : 1850, Aug 31
Place of loss : at Calumet, Ill.
Lake : Michigan
Type of loss : storm
Loss of life : 4
Carrying : ?
Detail : She went ashore bottom up and was wrecked, a total loss. Steamer J. D. MORTON found her skipper floating on a makeshift raft five miles offshore on her route Chicago-New Buffalo. The raft was found Sep 7, and the occupant had reportedly begun to eat his own hand to avoid starvation. Final enrollment document annotated “lost.”
Sources: rp,hgl,wl,bc

Sea Song of the Landlubber

August 29, 2011

SEA SONG OF THE LANDLUBBER.

If you really want a song of the sea,
Let no sailor that song sing,
But some lubbery clown from an inland town,
His song will have the ring.

There never was a man who went to sea,
Abaft the mast or before,
Who could sing you a rollicking song of the sea
With a man who stays on shore.

Then pass the steaming punch around
When the nights grow merry and long;
When the black tides swirl at the harbor’s mouth
We’ll raise the lubbersong.

Oh, the starboard watch was well wound up,
Likewise the port watch too,
When the binnacle fell from the mizzentop
And the chaplain piped to the crow.

‘Twas a close hauled reach to nearest beach,
And the spanker floated free,
As we stood by our guns of some thousand tons
With a gale upon our lee.

Then blow, ye breezes, blow,
And the guns they go bang! bang!
A sailor’s joy is the harbor buoy;
Hurrah for Li Hung Chang!

Our capstan sail was hoisted up,
The garboard strake gave room,
And we sailed away from New York bay
By the light of the spinnaker boom.

The captain found the anchor a-trip
In the salt of the sparkling brine,
And the ho’sun said that the anchor tripped
When the good ship crossed the line.

Then brail away on the topsail sheet,
Belay on keep downhaul;
It’s our cowsprit yard that is safe and hard,
And we’ll reef in the sounding pawl.

— New York Press.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Nov 12, 1896

The Whistling Buoy.

The accompanying little illustration shows a device which, had it been in position on the Manacles, would have saved the Paris and the Mohegan from running ashore on that dangerous bit of English coast. This machine is what is known as the whistling buoy. It is capable of giving out a much more effective signal than the old-fashioned bell buoy, which is has just replaced off the Manacles. This new buoy works automatically, and every short while emits a most doleful but far-reaching whistling scream.

Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa) Sep 22, 1899

BOXING THE COMPASS.

The Test Between a Sailor and a Landlubber.

Boys who live in seaport towns are sometimes asked to “box the compass.” If they can do it quickly and accurately, they are fine sailors and may grow up to be the captain of a four master. If they miss a point or can only do it slowly, they are landlubbers and will never see blue water.

To box the compass means to name all the points in order just as fast as you can speak. This is the way an old down east skipper will rattle it off:

North, nor’ by east, nor’-nor’east, nor’ east by north, northeast, nor’east by east, east-nor’east, east by north, east, east by south, east-sou’east, sou’east by east, sou’east, sou’east by south, sou’-sou’east, sou’ by east, south, sou’ by west, sou’-sou’west, sou’west by south, sou’west, sou’west by west, west-sou’west, west by south, west, west by north, west-nor’west,, nor’west by west, nor’west, nor’west by north, nor’-nor’west, nor’ by west, north.

Can you do it?

If a needle is drawn a few times over the ends of a horseshoe magnet, it becomes magnetized. Push such a magnetized needle throng a small cork. Place the cork in a bowl of water, taking pains to see that the cork when it floats on the water will carry the needle in a horizontal position or “on an even keel.”

Another way is to cut about three inches from a hollow straw (such as is used to suck lemonade) and to push the needle inside the straw. The straw will float and carry the needle.

Now observe what happens. The floating needle will slowly swing round till it points north and south. The straw will behave in the same way. Push it in any other direction, and the moment it is free it swings back again.

We do not know who first observed the fact that a floating magnetized needle will point to the north. Nor do we know precisely when or where some unknown inventor used this idea to make a compass. All we know is that the Chinese made and used compasses more than 2,000 years ago.

When men began, perhaps 10,000 years ago, to sail upon the water, they used marks upon the shore to guide them on their way. Long years after they observed that a certain star kept at all times the same place in the sky, and they used this pole star as a guide in steering their ships. Today a steamship starting down the Hudson river for Europe is guided by the pilot, and he uses the buoys, beacons and other guide marks to steer the ship down the bay. Off Sandy Hook he gives up the ship to the captain, who instructs the helmsman to steer northeast by east, east by north or whatever course he selects, and the helmsman, watching the compass, keeps the ship headed in that direction.

— Dallas News.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Dec 10, 1902

Another Tradition of Seas Gone.

One of the latest inventions to improve the efficiency of travel at sea is the invention of an automatic ship-steering device which is said to be more accurate in holding a vessel to its course than the best helmsman who ever manned the wheel. The contrivance, known already in the parlance of the briny as “Metal Mike,” not only releases the helmsman for other services, but checks the weaving of a ship to either side of a predetermined course and thus permits a saving of time and fuel. Tests have been made on several ships and the apparatus has proved highly satisfactory.

“Metal Mike” is said to resemble a street care motorman’s box rigged alongside the ship’s steering wheel and attached to its hub by a chain operated by an electric motor. The motor in turn is connected with a gyroscopic compass in such a way that any variation registered by the compass is immediately transmitted to the steering device which automatically turns the wheel so as to keep the ship on its course. The advantage lies in the fact that the time required for a variation in the course to be transmitted electrically to the rudder is almost infinitesimal compared to that needed by a human helmsman to perform the same operation.

Science has thus robbed the sea of one of its cherished traditions. The landlubber’s conception of the helmsman at the wheel is that of a bearded, wrinkled, weather-beaten veteran of many storms, defying the pelting rain and wind as he peers through the inky blackness. That day, of course, has long passed on the larger sea-going vessel and the modern helmsman is comfortably ensconced in the glass-inclosed room. Now “Metal Mike” comes along to supplant the human touch altogether after the vessel has reached the high seas and is speeding along under favorable weather conditions. Once the ship’s course has been determined, “Metal Mike” takes charge, and until relieved of the task will hold the vessel straight across the pathless deep. Rather a far cry from the days of the “Flying Dutchman” or the hardy adventurers who were guided by the North Star.

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) Nov 10, 1922

Learn the Lingo:

Title: The Sailor’s Word-Book
(An alphabetical digest of nautical terms, including some more especially military and scientific, but useful to seamen; as well as archaisms of early voyagers, etc.)
Author: Admiral William Henry Smyth
Editor: Vice-Admiral Sir Edward Belcher
Publisher: Blackie and Son, 1867 (google book link)

Or:

Title: The Sailor’s Sea-Book
(Volume 55 of Weale’s rudimentary series)
Author: James Greenwood
Editor:William Henry Rosser
Published    1879
Dictionary of Sea TermsPage 163

Hobo Cooking

August 28, 2011

Image from the Hobo Soul blog

“HOBO” COOKING.

The Valuable Culinary Lesson Which a Professional Tramp Gave to Runaway Boys.

“The first time I ran away from home I learned a trick or two that was worth while,” said a well-known business man. “I started out on several unauthorized tours of adventure before I reached years of discretion, but the first is most vividly impressed upon my memory. Three of us kids caught a freight train and got some 60 or 70 miles away from home before the first nightfall. Then we didn’t know where to spend the night. Several attempts to quarter ourselves in empty box cars on the side track of a little village only resulted in our being chased away and threatened with arrest, so we went to the outskirts of the place, and built a fire on the bank of a little creek. Here we made ourselves as comfortable as possible, and one or two of us had actually dozed off for short naps when a regular hobo, a good specimen of the real article, happened along and wanted to know if we had anything to eat. Of course we hadn’t.

“‘Well,’ he said, ‘if you fellers’ll ketch a chicken, I’ll show you a trick that’ll be useful to you.’

“It didn’t take us long to catch the chicken and bring it back. The veteran member of the nomadic fraternity wrung its neck, jerked off its head, cleaned it and going down to the creek added it up, feathers, feet and all in a big ball of yellow clay. This he rolled into the fire and scraped the burning embers up around it. The clay soon hardened, and we could see it among the wood coals gradually becoming a bright cherry red. When it did so the cook rolled it out again, let it cool a little and then broke it open with a stone. The feathers had stuck to the baked clay and a clean, inviting chicken was ready to be served. All the moisture that in ordinary baking is lost had been kept in by the brick-like inclosure and the morsel that fell to my lot was the juiciest and sweetest I have ever eaten.”

— Cincinnati Enquirer

Daily Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Apr 6, 1899

What Constitutes a State

August 27, 2011

Image from the University of Duisburg Essen website

TRUE POLITICS.

In one of his lyrics, Sir William Jones, the great oriental scholar and judge, breaks forth into the annexed statistic strain:

What constitutes a state?
Not high raised monuments or labored mound,
Thick wall or moated gate;
Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned;
Not bays and broad armed ports,
Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride.
Not starred and spangled courts,
Where low browed baseness wafts perfume to pride.
No! men, high minded men!
With powers as far above dull brutes endured
In forest, brake, or den,
As beasts excel cold rocks and and brambles rude;
Men who their duties know,
But know their rights, and knowing, dare maintain,
Prevent the long aimed blow,
And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain!
These constitute a state.

Alton Observer (Alton, Illinois) Jan 19, 1837

And what would TRUE POLITICS be without a little plagiarism? James Sidney Rollins appears to have used this verse, minus a few lines in a letter sometime around 1870. I can’t find any citation/credit in the book:

Title: James Sidney Rollins, memoir
Author: William Benjamin Smith
Publisher: Printed at the De Vinne Press, 1891
Page 253

Loper’s Gay Marines

August 27, 2011

Image from the Genealogy Trails History Group page for The Fifty First Regiment of Iowa Volunteers

FROM MANILA.

The following piece of poetry was written by W.B. Emerson, Company C, 51st Iowa at Iloilo Harbor, January 29th, and dedicated to Col. John C. Loper, commander of the 51st Iowa volunteers. It appeared in a Manila paper of that date which was sent to J.S. Mahana by his nephew Bert.

Image of Col. John C. Loper from IowaGenWeb’s  page, Iowa in the Great War

Loper’s Gay Marines.

Some long for their homes in the city
‘Mid the worry and bustle and strife,
While others pine for the country
And a peaceful quiet life,
But give to me the pleasure
Of a life of shifting scenes
On board the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

I know there is joy in the city
With its mansions great and grand,
And I’ve tasted the sweets of the country;
That “glimpse of the Promised Land;”
Yet with all respect to their granduer,
My heart with rapture leans
To life on the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

We live in the height of glory;
Our lot is hard to beat,
For the extent of our exertions
Is the effort to sleep and eat;
We have no cause to worry
For we live like kings and queens
On board the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

For breakfast we have tit-ham and coffee
With potatoes still wearing their skin,
Two hardtacks and a mouthful of oatmeal
That always produces a grin;
For dinner there’s soup or slumgullion
While at supper we sometimes get beans
Such is life on the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

True the coffee is often quite tasteless
And the hardtack is fast turning green,
While the potatoes are black in the center
And the tit-ham is never too lean,
The rice and oatmeal is wormy,
The slumgullion is rotten it seems,
Yet we cling to the old Pennsylvania
And Loper’s Gay Marines.

The water’s a little rusty
Being condensed from the native salt,
Nor would its smell mislead you
Into thinking it was malt,
And though warm as if just taken
From the home of incarnate fiends
It goes on the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

Nor are we allowed to get lonesome
We are all provided for that,
Each man has a pet monkey
Or at least a well trained rat,
While the graybacks are always plenty
In each man’s trouser seams
On board the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

Nor are these our only comforts
For we are safe from gore
Lying secure at anchor
About a mile from shore.
And though we can see the enemy
As his gun in the sunlight gleams,
There’s no danger on the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

Our fighting is done by diplomacy
Of the latest modern style,
We win numerous bloodless battles
By a look, a word or a smile;
The ignorant landlubber forces
Still use a gun it seems,
But they’re out of date on the old Pns’lvna
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

We’ve sailed from San Francisco
To Honolulu bay,
Across the broad Pacific
To old Manila Bay,
Then down to Iloilo
Where smiling nature beams
Upon the Pennsylvania
And Loper’s Gay Marines.

For ninety days we’ve rode the waves
As ’round the world we sail,
A wonder to all nations
Like Jonah and the whale,
For even Noah with his ark
A common creature seems
When compared with the old P’nsylvania
And Loper’s Gay Marines.

So if you are seeking pleasure
Or longing after fame,
Upon our roll of honor
Allow us to write your name,
For you’ll reach no height of glory
Even in your dreams,
Like life on the old Pennsylvania
With Loper’s Gay Marines.

Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa) May 13, 1899

*****

For more about the 51st: Spanish-American War Fifty-First Infantry Historical Sketch

Bloody Battle at the Big Springs Union Church

August 26, 2011

Image from the Chaparral Arms website

Another Kentucky Affray.

Middleboro, Ky., Dec. 27. — Frank Davis, Buck Chadwell, Estepp Morgan and Richard Davis fell out at a dance at Walnut Hill, 15 miles from here, and a pitched battle ensued. Fifty shots were fired. Frank Davis was killed, Morgan and Dick Davis mortally wounded, and Chadwell slightly wounded.

Davenport Daily Leader (Davenport, Iowa) Dec 27, 1900

MIDDLEBORO, Ky., Oct. 7 — One of the bloodiest battles that ever occurred among the feudists of the mountains was fought at the Big Springs Union meeting house, twenty miles from here, at noon Sunday. The Morgans, of Vogie, and the Chadwells of Tennessee, were the participants. Two were killed and two wounded on each side. Those killed are: Tip and James Chadwell and Rush and Henry Morgan. Mortally wounded: Henry Overstreet and James Jones. Tom Morgan had a leg broken and Joe Moberly received a flesh wound. The feud between the Morgans and the Chadwells has existed since the civil war, and more than thirty of each family have been killed during that time.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Oct 7, 1901

Image from the Cumberland Gap Baptist Association website

Kentucky Feudists Again At War.

—–

ENCOUNTER IN A CHURCH

——-

Four Men Killed, Two Fatally Wounded and Three Others Injured — Chadwell-Morgan Clans.

——-

Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 8. — In a bloody fight at the Union Baptist church at Big Springs, ten miles from Tazewell, Tenn., on Sunday, four men were killed, two mortally wounded and three wounded less seriously.

The killed are:

Tip Chadwell.
John F. Chadwell.
Rush Morgan.
Henry Morgan.

Mortally wounded: John Morgan and Asa Chadwell.

Wounded: —  Jones, leg broken; — Neabley, flesh wound; Sheriff Brook, slight.

There was preaching at the church and about 600 people gathered. Just before 11 o’clock service, Tip Chadwell went to the spring, 50 years from the church. Rush Morgan was at the spring and began firing at Chadwell. Both factions immediately gathered and the fight lasted half an hour.

Sheriff James Brook attempted to arrest Asa Chadwell, who resisted. Both Brook and Asa Chadwell were wounded.

The feud between the Morgans and the Chadwells has existed a long time. They met at Walnut Hills, Va., last Christmas, when a pitched battle ensued, in which several were killed.

Eighteen months ago they met near the Hancock county line. Fighting followed and one was killed. Both the Chadwells and Morgans are prosperous and influential and have large families. All their members are fearless.

Middlesboro, Ky., Oct. 8. — The situation at Big Springs, Tenn., where four members of the Chadwell and the Morgan factions were killed and five wounded, is gloomy and it is the general opinion that more bloodshed is certain to follow.

A report reached here last night by way of Tazewell, Tenn., that a second clash between the factions had occurred late Monday afternoon, but the story is as yet unconfirmed. At noon, when a horseman arrived here from Ewing, Va., five miles from Big Springs, no more trouble had occurred, although the feeling was at high tension. Both factions were barricaded in their homes and were armed to the teeth. Two members of each faction came to Cumberland Gap yesterday and secured large supplies of ammunition.

The Daily Chronicle (Elyria, Ohio) Oct 8, 1901

Knoxville, Tenn., October 7. — (Special.) — A fatal shooting occurred near Tazewell Sunday night, in which four men were killed and five wounded. It was at Big Spring Union Church.

The dead are:

WILLIAM MORGAN,
JAMES MORGAN,
TIPTON CHADWELL and
ALWAIN CHADWELL.

The wounded are: Ross Chadwell, shot twice and not expected to live; Constable Brooks, wounded in the hands; Henry Overstreet, mortally hurt; Toe Moberly, a flesh wound; Tom Jones, dangerously injured, and Frank Morgan, leg broken.

The shooting was the sequence of an old feud — a quarrel between the Virginia Morgans and the Tennessee Chadwells, which began in 1864 — during the civil war. Since the war between the families began thirty Morgans and forty Chadwells have been killed. Between the two factions many encounters, a number of them being equal to pitched battles between organized armies, have taken place. No arrests so far have been made.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Oct 8, 1901

Settling the Morgan-Chadwell Feud.

Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 9. — A delegation of prominent citizens of Lee county, Va., and Claiborne county, Tenn., have gone to the scene of the Morgan-Chadwell encounter, Sunday, in the hope of securing peace. It is stated that members of both families has expressed a willingness to leave the settlement of their troubles in the hands of the law.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Oct 9, 1901

TWO MORE FEUD VICTIMS DIE.

Morgans and Chadwells Preparing for Another Season of Shooting.

Middlesboro, Ky., Oct. 9. — Two of the feud fighters wounded in the battle Sunday at Union Church, Big Springs, Tenn., have died, making a total of six dead as a result of the fight. These two are Ross Chadwell, who died yesterday morning, and William Morgan, who died late last night.

Reports from the feud districts say that both sides are gathering and further trouble is expected. Sunday’s battle revived a feud which has existed since the Civil war, but of late peace had reigned among both factions. Each side seems now to be thinking only of vengeance, and blood will be the price.

Relatives of the feudists are hastening to their aid and all are heavily armed. Len Chadwell, Bud Chadwell, Joe Dooley, Henry Lynch and seven others have left Middlesboro, armed with rifles, to join the Chadwell forces.

Naugatuck Daily News (Naugatuck, Connecticut) Oct 9, 1901

Feudists Released.

Tazewell, Tenn., Oct. 16. — John Morgan, James Estep and Robert Brooks were arrested and arraigned for trial on the charge of killing Alwaine and Tipton Chadwell in the Chadwell-Morgan feud Sunday of last week. The trial, however, failed to materialize, as Isaac Chadwell, brother of the dead men, who was prosecutor in the case, appeared and withdrew the warrants. This ended the proceeding.

Mansfield News (Mansfield, Ohio) Oct 16, 1901

Kentucky Feuds – State of War Continues

August 25, 2011

One more article about the Baker-Howard-White feuds:

BEV. WHITE’S TOUGH DEPUTIES FALL OUT AT MANCHESTER, KY.
———
State of War Still Continues — Town in a State of Intense Excitement — Howard Faction Keeps the Baker’s and Their Friends Out of the Place — Sheriff White Purchasing Ammunition.

London, Ky., June 19. — News of a fight at Manchester between Sheriff Beverly P. White’s numerous deputy sheriffs has just reached this place. Prior to the convening of court at Manchester, Sheriff White swore in 25 desperate characters as deputy sheriffs. Saturday night after they had received their pay several of them got drunk. They met at the upper side of the town and fired off their pistols almost continually until a late hour.

This morning “Bill” Holland, the negro deputy, was missing and it developed that he had been so badly beaten during a fight in which several shots were fired that he is confined to his bed. Holland says Dave Chadwell undertook to get a bottle of whiskey away from him and he struck Chadwell, knocking him down. This angered Chadwell’s friends and he was beaten over the head with the butts of pistols until he was almost dead.

The town is still in a state of intense excitement and the Howards and Whites a hundred and fifty strong keep the Bakers and their friends out of the place. A courier arriving here says he heard after leaving Manchester that Andy Baker and Jason Bowling with a number of friends had come into Clay county and were at Bowling’s house at Begtown. This is where Chris Johnson was attacked by members of the Howard-White faction Friday night and it is feared that Bowling’s house will be the next scene of a battle between the warring factions.

Sheriff White has just returned to Manchester and it is reported that he has secured a large amount of ammunition and a number of guns with which to equip more men in case Governor Bradley attempts to send court there to try him and others on the charge of murdering Tom Baker. John Whitmore, whose horse’s throat was cut at Manchester has arrived here. He says the Whites deny most emphatically that Tom Baker was killed by any of them. Sid Baker and Hiram Bolin, the body guard of John G. White, accompanied him home to Winchester to-day and returned here this afternoon, leaving for Manchester later. It develops that Judge Eversole is related to James Bowling, who is now in the feud and this further complicates matters, allying the judge with the Baker faction. Judge Eversole has gone to Lesile county to hold court. Instead of going via Manchester, which is the usual route, he went via Richmond several miles out of the way. Court is to begin to-day but he cannot reach there before Tuesday. Cale, Robert and Dee Baker are still at the home of Chris Jackson, who will recover from the wound received Friday afternoon at Begtown.

Naugatuck Daily News (Naugatuck, Connecticut) Jun 19, 1899

UPDATE: The Feudin’ Never Seems to Stop:

KENTUCKY OUTLAWRY.

Five Men Killed in the Philpot-Griffin Feud.

Louisville. July 18. — A special from London, Ky., tells of a report reaching there of the outbreak of another feud in Clay county, by which five men lost their lives yesterday. The dead are said to be: Robert Philpot, Ed Fisher, Aaron Morris, Jim Griffin and Hugh Griffin. These fatalities resulted from a pitched battle fought near Little Goose creek, three miles from Manchester.

The feud dates back nearly two years. On Christmas, 1897, James Philpot was killed by Aaron Morris, but before he died he shot and killed William Bundy, a friend of Morris. The Morrises and Griffins were closely affiliated. Since then the feeling between the two factions has been very bitter, and it has been aroused recently by the White-Baker hostilities. The Philpots, which are the strongest faction in the mountains, numbering about 750 voters, openly espoused the cause of the Bakers, while the Griffins took sides with the Whites.

The story that reaches here from Manchester is to the effect that Rob Philpot was arrested yesterday by Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker. It is said that while Thacker was taking Philpot’s bond the latter was shot from behind by a member of a crowd that had gathered. This precipitated a general fight with Winchesters and revolvers, which was participated in by George, Granville, Robert and Peter Philpot and Ed Fisher on one side, and Aaron Morris, Hugh, Jim and Green Griffin on the other. The battle raged fiercely for ten or fifteen minutes. When it was over it was found that the five men mentioned above had been killed outright, three of the belligerents were seriously wounded, while Pete Philpot was the only one on either side to escape injury. Granville Philpot is said to be one of the most seriously wounded. He is a Union veteran, having lost a leg at Stone River; is an ex-member of the Kentucky legislature, and is said to have killed three or four men. Ed. Fisher was about 23 years old, but was said to have killed three men.

The situation in Manchester is deplorable. The place is in a state of terror, scarcely any one daring to venture out of doors. Business is suspended and the residents are momentarily expecting a renewal of hostilities.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Jul 18, 1899

Five Men Are Slain in a Pitched Battle
——-
FEUDISTS AGAIN AROUSED
——-
Philpot Griffin Broil is Revived by the White Baker Hostilities
Their Respective Followers Engaging in a Mortal Combat.
——

[Excerpt]

The story of this battle caused consternation here, notwithstanding the fact that serious trouble has been expected to break out among the mountaineers of Clay county ever since the assassination of Tom Baker several weeks ago. An effort was at once begun to secure deputies to go to the seat of the trouble and attempt to restore quiet, but there had not been enough responses to make up a force that would command respect.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Jul 18, 1899

FEUD SPREADING

Kentucky Factionists Gathering and Another Outbreak Feared.

London, Ky., July 19. — The Clay county feud is growing to gigantic proportions. Monday’s battle in which three persons were killed outright and several were mortally wounded is believed to be the beginning of a series of battles.

Armed Philpots have gathered from all sections, 100 strong. The opposing clans, the Morris, Griffin and Chadwell families, are said to be only two miles away fifty strong.

Ed Fisher, who was mortally wounded Monday, died yesterday. Robert Philpot was reported dying last night, but this morning he was not yet dead.

——-

Frankfort, Ky., July 19. — Governor Bradley has taken no action in the Clay County matter. He favors calling an extra session of the legislature as well as sending troops.

——-

London, Ky., July 19. — Details of the ferocious fight between the Philpot and Griffin factions show that Aaron Morris, William and Green Griffin were instantly killed, and Hugh Griffin, Ed Fisher and Robert Philpot were mortally wounded. The dead men were buried at Island Branch graveyard and the wounded conveyed to the homes of their friends.

Messengers from Manchester report the situation more threatening than ever, because of the spread of the feud to families not heretofore directly concerned. The Chadwells and Barnetts are said to be joining the Griffins and Morrises, while the Philpots, in themselves the strongest faction, are gathering their followers from neighboring districts in expectation that their antagonists who were worsted in Monday’s battle, will seek an early opportunity for revenge.

——-

Clay County Officers Criticized.

Frankfort, Ky., July 19. — Governor Bradley received full official particulars concerning the Clay county battle. The governor is more than every worried over Clay county affairs, but has not decided on any plans with reference to the latest outbreak. There is very severe criticism of the Clay county civil authorities in state official circles, and it is hinted that some of the judicial authorities in that district will be made the subject of rigid investigation by the legislature.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) July 19, 1899

Both Factions Have Quit Work to Prepare for the Tremendous Struggle About to Take Place

———

Arms Said to Have Been Received From Louden — Victims of the Fight the Other Day Escorted to Their Graves by a Heavily Armed Guard.

—–

LONDON, Ky., July 21. — Clay county appears to be alive with armed men; both sides to the feud have suspended all labor and are assembled in their respective neighborhoods. Preparations for war go on. Arms are said to have been received from this point and taken to Clay county. It is believed they were for both sides.

Judge W.L. Brown, London, who has tried many mountain feud fighters, says that he regards this as the most serious trouble Clay county has ever had, and he expects to hear of a desperate fight.

Hugh Griffin and Aaron Morris were laid in the same grave. Harvey Griffin was placed beside them. The funeral procession escorted the corpses to the burial grounds under a heavy guard, armed with Winchesters.

The Philpot-Morris feud can be traced back over eight years. It began in the Pigeon Roost fight, in which the Philpots and Fishers were engaged with a number of alleged followers of Morris. On election day I.B. Philpot was killed, and a young man named Nicholson, a clerk in the pension department at Washington, who had come home to vote, had a leg shot off. George Cole, who last year killed Marshal Roach at Barboursville, and is now a fugitive from justice, was riddled with bullets. Several others were wounded. Sam Philpot, who figured prominently in that fight, was wounded at the battle of San Juan hill.

The next fight was about six years ago. One of the Stuarts and Maj. Jack Downey, of the Chadwell-Stuart forces, were killed. The Stuarts are alleged allies of the Chadwells and Griffins in the present feud. Joe Nance and John Bowling were sent to the penitentiary on account of their participation in this battle, but were afterward pardoned.

The next engagement was four or fives years ago, when Tim Philpot, Ed Fisher and others on one side were engaged by the Chadwells and George Thompson on the other. Thompson was killed, and both Tim Philpot and Ed Fisher were indicted and tried, but they were acquitted.

One other fierce but short battle occurred at Dripping Springs, Clay county, in which Dave, Hugh and Joe Bowling lost their lives at the hands of the Hamptons, who are now in the Morris-Griffin ranks. Others were wounded.

The next battle was fought on Horse Creek, at a saloon, a year ago. In this fight James Crow Philpot shot and killed William Bundy, and was in turn killed by Aaron Morris, Bundy’s son-in-law. Morris was sentenced for 21 years, but on a new trial he was acquitted.

It is charged that the Whites, of the Howard-White-Baker feud, assisted him.

As a result of last Monday’s battle four men, Hugh Griffin, Aaron Morris, Harvey Griffin, of the Morris side, and Ed Fisher of the Philpot faction, have been buried. Two others will probably die.

Lima Daily News (Lima, Ohio) Jul 21, 1899

LONDON, Ky., Sept. 5.

Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker was found dead on the roadside on the road to Manchester where it is supposed he was shot from ambush. He had recently testified against the Griffins.

Butler County Democrat (Hamilton, Ohio) Sep 7, 1899

KILLING DUE TO KENTUCKY FEUD.

Deputy Sheriff, of Clay County, is Slain From Ambush.

BARBOURSVILLE, Ky., Sept. 6. — [Excerpt]

…Later details of the killing of Deputy Sheriff Thacker, of Clay county, give the surmised reason for his assassination. Thacker had served as deputy sheriff of Clay county for fifteen years, and it was believed he was a favorite. No threats against his life had come to his ears and he felt perfectly secure in the discharge of his official duty. Since his murder it is recalled that he was a witness of the Morris Philpot fight and that his testimony in court was favorable to the Philpots. Sheriff Beverly White’s zeal in pursuit of the murderers with an armed posse of fifty men would seem to indicate that the White faction has no sympathy with the criminal.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Sep 6, 1899

FEUD ON IN EARNEST AGAIN.

One Faction in Kentucky Making War on Women.

LONDON, Ky., Sept. 11. — The opening of war between the Griffin and Philpot factions in Clay county began last night. The house of Widow Chadwell, wife of Evan Chadwell, brother of Deputy Sheriff Dave Chadwell, the leader of the Griffin faction, was fired into from all sides. She escaped by throwing herself on the floor. All the cattle, hogs and dogs were killed and a notice was posted on her door giving her twenty-four hours to leave or be killed. It was done by a body of horse-men whom the Griffins say were Philpots. The jail here, which has two Griffins in it, is heavily guarded by men with Winchesters.

A rumor is also current here that a battle was fought yesterday in Clay county resulting in killing four men and wounding seven. The rumor locates the battle on Red Bird creek, eighteen miles from Manchester. There have been several killings there of late and the battle may have been either between the Markums and Roberts or the Sizemores and Ashers, which four factions are at war with each other.

The Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Sep 12, 1899


Slain from Ambush in Kentucky.

Wash Thacker, a deputy sheriff of Clay County, Ky., has been shot from ambush and killed. A mule on which Bob Smith, who accompanied Thacker, was riding, was slain, but Smith lay motionless on the ground for a couple of hours, feigning death, and thus escaped assassination.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Sep 16, 1899

Fear Serious Trouble.

Pittsburg, Ky., Sept. 27. — The situation in Clay county is very serious. The trial of the Griffins, Chadwells and Barnetts for the killing of Wash Thacker was again postponed. Two bands of 40 men each of the Philpots went to Manchester, all heavily armed. An unexpectedly large force of Griffins are near that town well equipped with Winchester rifles. The jail is being guarded by a large force, as the Griffins claim that the jail will be attacked and an effort made to lynch the eight inmates, members of their faction. Law-abiding citizens of Clay county are clamoring for troops.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Sep 27, 1899

Kentucky Feudists Tried.

Manchester, Ky., Oct. 2. — The trial of seven Griffin feudists for ambushing Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker and Jim Smith of the Philpot faction has been held. Eddy and Floy Chadwell, Sol, Jim and Tom Griffin were held without bail, and Charles Burnett, Dan Hampton and Anderson Griffin were discharged.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Oct 4, 1899

KENTUCKY FEUD TRIAL TO-DAY.

LONDON, Ky., Oct. 22. — The Clay County Circuit Court opens to-morrow at Manchester. Five feudists, Eddie and Floyd Chadwell, and Sol. Jim, and Tom Griffin, will be tried for the killing of Deputy Wash Thacker of the Philpot faction.

Gov. Bradley has troops in readiness to go to the protection of the court immediately upon the request of the Judge.

Since the last term of court twenty men and one woman have been shot and there are only five indictments.

The New York Times (New York, New York) Oct 23, 1899

The Clay County Trouble.

Manchester, Ky., Oct. 26. The grand jury impaneled here at the term of court with began Monday has a big task before it. There are 12 murders besides the assassination of Tom Baker to be investigated. The jury has returned true bills against Sol, Jim and Tom Griffin, charging them with the murder of Sheriff Wash Thacker, and Eddy and Floyd Chadwell, charging them with complicity in the crime. Eddy Chadwell confessed that the plot was made and executed by the Griffins to revenge the advantage Thacker had given the Philpots by his testimony against the Griffins after the battle of July 17, in which four Griffins and one Philpot were killed. The town is full of witnesses and feudists. Judge Eversole did not arrive, and C.B. Little is holding the court.

The Trenton Times (Trenton, New Jersey) Oct 26, 1899

INDICT KENTUCKY MURDERERS.

——-

The Regular Judge, However, Fails to Appear in Court — Armed Feudists Await Further Developments.

Special to The New York Times.
MANCHESTER, Ky., Oct. 25. — True bills of indictment, charging Solomon and Jim and Tom Griffin with the murder of Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker in Clay County on Sept. 4, and against Eddy and Floyd Chadwell with complicity in the crime, were returned by the Grand Jury here to-day. The regular Judge, H.C. Eversole, for some reason has not arrived as yet, but he sent word to two members of the bar to elect a special Judge and go ahead with the court. Judge C.B. Little was chosen, and a Grand Jury empaneled.

The Grand Jury has its hands full, there being about 10 killings and assassinations to investigate, all of which have taken place since the last term of court, in June, and this in addition to the killing of Tom Baker, which Judge Eversole has promised Gov. Bradley to investigate. Troops are being held in readiness at Lexington, and it is believed by members of the bar that Judge Eversole will not come until the Governor agrees to furnish him with military protection. In view of this fact, Judge Eversole’s instructions to try unimportant matters until he arrives is being disregarded, and Judge Little will take up the cases as they are reported by the Grand Jury.

It is now believed that the assassin who killed Tom Baker while he was a prisoner will never be found. Sheriff White, from whose house the fatal shot was fired, is seriously ill and has left the business of his office with his deputies. Commonwealth’s Attorney Isaacs has also failed to appear. He sent word that he would be compelled to be absent during the term because of sickness in his family. In Perry County, County Attorney Turner and B.B. Golden of Barbourville will represent the Commonwealth.

The Griffins and the Philpots are on hand in force, all heavily armed. Every one appears in the best of humor, and they mingle together telling jokes. Valentine G. Philpot came near causing a riot yesterday by stating that he told the farmer who came up with his two-horse wagon and offered to haul off the dead after the Philpot-Griffin fight on July 17, that he only wished they could finish out a load for him.

The Griffins heard of this remark and there was a rush to arms, but through some agreement the matter was settled and no blood spilled. The report that Pete Philpot, the boy who shot three Griffins in the big fight, had been shot yesterday, is untrue. “Tom” Whittamore, a Philpot sympathizer, is dead, the reports to this effect having been confirmed.

Gov. Bradley will be requested to place the whole county under martial law by the citizens who hope to have an end put to the feud at once, but this plan is not considered practicable by the Chief Executive.

The following is a list of the people killed in the Philpot-Griffin feud since the last term of the Circuit Court:

July 6 — James Stubblefield, Deputy Sheriff, killed while attempting to arrest Mart Smith. Smith escaped.

July 17 — Aaron Morris, Harvey Griffin, Green Griffin of the Griffin faction, and Ed Fisher of the Philpot faction, killed in pitched battle. Several other men wounded. Philpot tried and cleared.

Sept. 2 — Bill Lewis, Deputy Sheriff, killed while trying to arrest Mart Smith. Smith again escaped.

Sept. 4 — Wash Thacker, Deputy Sheriff, killed while riding along the road with Jim Smith, a friend. Jim, Tom, and Sol Griffin and Eddy and Floyd Chadwell arrested, and are to be tried for the crime.

Sept. 5 — James Robertson, Philpot sympathizer, assassinated. No arrests.

Sept. 28 — Eli Taylor, a juryman in Philpot cases, assassinated. No arrests.

Sept. 6 — [maybe meant to be Oct 6?] Henry Marcum, a Griffin feudist, assassinated. No arrests.

Oct. 23 — Tom Whittamore, friend of Philpot’s, assassinated. No arrests. Simon Philpot assassinated at Pigeon Roost. No arrests.

One woman was shot and seriously wounded, having been mistaken for a Philpot, and the homes of a number of the factionists riddled with bullets at night.

The New York Times (New York, New York) Oct 26, 1899

Banished From Clay County.

London, Ky., Nov. 7 — Dave Chadwell, father of Eddie and Floyd Chadwell, who are accused of complicity in the murder of Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker, has been run out of Clay county. He was shot from ambush and almost killed two weeks ago and afterward notified to leave the county. He did this, going to Corbin, but on Sunday he was warned that he was still too close to Clay county to please the Philpots and advised to go farther. Consequently he has removed with his family to Winchester.

The Trenton Times (Trenton, New Jersey) Nov 7, 1899

TROOPS ORDERED OUT

Corbin, Ky., Dec 11. — Governor Bradley ordered the company of state guards just organized here, into service to protect Floyd and Eddie Chadwell, who killed Town Marshal Hartford Saturday night. The town is crowded and an attempt to lynch them may be made.

The two Chadwells are feudists from Clay county, sons of Dave Chadwell, one of the leaders of the Griffin faction in the Philpot-Griffin feud. They said, “We just wanted to show how we have fun back in Clay.”

An attempt at rescue may be made by Clay countians.

The Daily Review (Decatur, Illinois) Dec 11, 1899

 

Women of Days of Yore

August 25, 2011

Image from the Digital History website.

THE WOMEN OF DAYS OF YORE.

The women of the days of yore!
They never talked of “mind,”
Yet bore beneath their thoughtful breasts
The great of human kind.

They never talked of their own rights,
Yet knew their rights, and then
In their sweet perfectness of heart
They chose to give us men.

O women of the days of yore!
From your high heaven bow,
And breathe your true, sweet woman’s soul
On every daughter’s brow.

So, women of the days of yore!
They’ll know their rights, and then,
Like you, in their sweet perfectness
They’ll give us mighty men.

— New York Ledger.

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Jan 30, 1897