Genesis of the Republican Party

Image from the Tarrant County Republican Party website 

Genesis of the Republican Party.
[S.F. Bulletin.]

The States, Maine, Wisconsin and Michigan — each claims to have organized the Republican party. Perhaps Wisconsin is really entitled to the honor. On the last day of February, 1854, a meeting had been held at Ripon in that State, comprised of both Whigs and Democrats, that resolved that in the event of Congress passing the Kansas-Nebraska bill, they would fling their old affiliations to the wind, and join in a determined movement to oppose the further extension of slavery.

The first convention on this platform — which may be called the first Republican platform — convened on the 6th of July of that year, and nominated

Kinsley S. Bingham for Governor, who was elected by an overwhelming majority.

Ohio followed Michigan in the same direction, and at a State Convention nominated a ticket that swept the field.

The next year, in 1855, New Yorkers in convention abandoned their old name of “Whig” and adopted the Wisconsin name “Republican.” In other States the party of “bolters” from both the Whig and the Democratic ranks were designated as “Anti-Nebraskas.” In 1856 they met in a National Convention and nominated John C. Fremont for the Presidency, and the Republican party for the second time under that name came into existence.

Daily Nevada Journal (Reno, Nevada) Jul 16, 1884

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) May 6, 1856

TO THE VOTERS OF RICHLAND COUNTY.

Having appeared before you as a candidate for the office of Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Richland county, I deem it my duty to lay before my friends and the public generally, my position in regard to the present campaign.

For the election of President, I have but one choice, and that is for Fremont; deeming him not only to be the republican candidate, but the only true democratic candidate in the field. For him I shall labor arduously, and hope successfully. For Congress and State, as well as all law-making offices, I shall support the republican ticket throughout.

For county offices I shall endeavor to vote for those men who are the most capable to fill the offices, without regard to party nominations. Holding to the true Republican doctrine of Thomas Jefferson, viz: Are they honest, are they capable?

Respectfully yours,
WM. F. CRAWFORD.
Richland Center, August 9th, 1856.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Aug 19, 1856

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Aug 19, 1856

THEN AND NOW.

“We intend the Constitution to be THE GREAT CHARACTER OF HUMAN LIBERTY to the unborn millions who shall enjoy its protection; and who should never see that such an institution as slavery was ever known in our midst.” — James Madison.

“Slavery exists in Kansas under the Constitution.” — James Buchanan.

The former expresses the view of the Republican party; the latter the views of the so called Democratic party.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Nov 24, 1857

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