For Lincoln

Democratic Biography of Abe Lincoln.

CHAPTER I.
Abraham Lincoln, the “rail candidate for the Presidency,” was born in Harding county, Kentucky, 1809.

CHAPTER II.
He hadn’t much education for one of his size.

CHAPTER III.
He kept a seven-by-nine grocery in Egypt, Illinois; failed in that; went to work and actually split 1500 chestnut rails in six weeks and eleven days.

CHAPTER IV.
Was twice a member of the Illinois Legislature.

CHAPTER V.
Was a member of Congress two years, and behaved himself so well they let him off.

CHAPTER VI.
Became a great man by running against Douglas for the Senate and getting beautifully beat.

CHAPTER VII.
Was nominated at Chicago by a rail, and like the celebrated rail carries of old, W.R. Snapp, will run himself and rail into the ground.

THE END.

The Appleton Motor (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jul 19, 1860

Image from The Violent History of American Unions on LiveJournal.

Song of the Lynn Strikers.

We strikers once for higher pay
With crowded ranks did cram Lynn;
We come with fuller ranks to-day
For Lincoln and for Hamlin.

The Southerners at us did sneer
And fiercely curse and ban Lynn,
But wilder yet will be their fear
Of Lincoln and of Hamlin.

Bold Robin Hood won Lincoln green,
And his sweet minstrel Gamelyn,
Were they alive they’d go, I ween,
For Lincoln and for Hamlin.

Like Sherwood’s king, we strike down wrong,
And while our town’s no sham Lynn,
We’ll wave our flag and go in strong
For Lincoln and Hamlin.

Lynn, May 18.

The Appleton Motor (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jul 19, 1860

The Bells!
NOT BY EDGAR A. POE.

Hear the Opposition Bells,
Empty bells!
How the turbulence of Babel their dissonance excels;
How they rattle, rattle, rattle,
Like a cow-bell with a cold;
Like the bells they hang on cattle,
Or a sword and buckler’s battle,
In the civil days of old.

Oh! the anger and the clangor
Of the bores!
From New Orleans to Bangor,
How it roars!
Hear their broad and brazen throats
Begging Abolition votes —
With a pledge to act the Hessian
In the war against Secession,
Whilst they shyly try to “ring in” Mr. Bell,
Bell! Bell! Bell!
Oh, the fusion and confusion of these Bells!

Appleton Motor (Appleton, Wisconsin) Oct 25, 1860

From the Boston Transcript.

“Is This a Dagger?”

Roger Pryor turned to Brutus!
‘Tis awful to think on!
He’s going to shoot us!
And poignard Abe Lincoln!
For, should Abe be elected,
And veto Secession,
Bold Roger will give him
No time for confession;
But murder old Abe —
How it makes the blood curdle!
And stick him where Brutus did,
Over the gurdle.
But who is this Roger,
That vapors and swaggers?
This vilonous Roger,
That talks about daggers?
Why, it’s Roger A. Pryor,
Whose clay has grown hotter,
Since the roasting it got
At the hands of the Potter.

Appleton Motor (Appleton, Wisconsin) Oct 25, 1860

About Roger A. Pryor — from Wikipedia:

In 1859, he was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives to fill the vacancy in Virginia’s 4th District caused by the death of William O. Goode. He served from December 7, 1859 to March 3, 1861. In the House, Pryor became a particular enemy of Representative Thaddeus Stevens, a Republican abolitionist.

During his term, he got into a verbal altercation with John F. Potter, a representative from Wisconsin, and challenged Potter to a duel. Potter, having the choice of weapons, chose bowie knives. Pryor backed out saying that bowie knives were not a civilized weapon. The incident found widespread publication in the Northern press which saw the refusal as a coup for the North — the humiliation of a Southern “fire eater”.

Image from the Vintage Glory Cards website

Liberty and Union.

Dissolve the Union! We curse the thought,
The lips that breathe, the hand that plans it,
Our country never shall be bought,
Nor conquered, whilst we can defend it.

As braves the storm the mountain rock,
As cleaves the cloud the eagle’s pinion,
We’ll meet oppression’s battle shock,
And triumph o’er corruption’s minion!

Appleton Motor (Appleton, Wisconsin) Oct 25, 1860

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: