Social Reforms – Equality in Slavery

Shall the Names of “Wife” and “Mother” become Obsolete?

THE eloquent Father Hyacinthe offers the following hints to our social reformers of the present day: In the poorer classes there was a time when woman was called wife — mother; they have baptized her now-a-days by a name that does not belong in our language — the work-woman!

The workman I know and honor, but I do not know the workwoman. I am astounded. I am alarmed, whenever I hear this word.

What? This young woman — is toil, unpitying, unintelligent toil, to come bursting in her door early in the morning, to seize her in its two iron fists, and drag her from what ought to be her home and sanctuary to the factory that is withering and consuming her day by day?

What! Is toil — brutal, murderous toil — to kill her children, or at least to snatch them screaming from their cradles and give them over into stranger hands?

And all the time a false philosophy will be lifting its head and shouting, “Equality! equality for man and woman! Equality for the workwoman by the side of the workman!”

Ah! yes, equality in slavery! Or, rather, a profound inequality in slavery and martyrdom.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Jul 2, 1870

Image from the New York Architecture – Gone but not forgotten website

STEWART’S NEW HOME FOR FEMALES.

This immense structure, now in course of erection on Fourth avenue, near Thirty-second street, New York, is fast approaching completion. The building is to be seven stories high, 192 1/2 feet on Fourth avenue, and 205 feet on Thirty-second street and Thirty-third streets respectively. It will cover an area of 41,000 square feet.

The rent to each tenant, it is expected, will be fixed at $1 a week, and food will be furnished on the European plan. A resident can live here for about $2.50 or $3 per week. The establishment is calculated to hold 1,500 persons. The ground floor will be occupied as stores.

The total cost of the structure will be about $3,000,000. This building is intended for the benefit of single women in poor circumstances, such as shop girls, sewing girls, &c.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Oct 15, 1870


A GOOD little girl of the period:

I want to be a voter,
And with the voters stand;
The “man I go for” in my head,
The ballot in my hand.

*******

WOMEN who claim to have been pioneers in the woman’s rights agitation are scarce. The movement was started twenty-two years ago, and they don’t like to admit the necessary age.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Nov 5, 1870

WOMEN’S right and women’s tights, now occupy a deal of public attention.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Jan 21, 1871

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