Archive for December, 2011

Should Auld Acquaintance be Forgot … 1956

December 31, 2011

Famed Sports Celebrities Passed Away During 1956

By OSCAR FRALEY
(United Press Sports Writer)
NEW YORK, Dec. 31 — (UP)

There will be quite a few tears in the cup of happiness tonight.

For when they ring in the new year, too many sporting favorites won’t be on hand. They just didn’t make it all the way with the infant 1956 they helped welcome only a year ago.

But they’ll be in many a mind when the voices rise in the old refrain “should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Babe Didrikson

Like the Babe. They all knew her and the world mourned when its greatest woman athlete, Mrs. Mildred Didrikson Zaharias, died in September at the age of 42. President Eisenhower summed it up when he said:

“I think that every one of us feels sad that finally she had to lose this last one of all her battles.”

Connie Mack

Gone, too, is the tall, spare man who was a baseball legend. Connie Mack, the seemingly indestructible, struck out at 93. But, then, life hadn’t been the same for him since the heart-breaking morning 15 months earlier when his beloved A’s were sold down the river to Kansas City.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Who can forget the “Boston Tar Baby”? He fought the best of them and won the championship of Mexico when he was almost blind. But at 75, Sam Langford finally took the count in a Massachusetts nursing home.

And Bill Cane, the man whose vision “made” the Hambletonian and helped make harness racing a big business. Big Bill, at 81, finally laid down the reins at Miami, Florida, far from the Good Time track at Goshen, N.Y., which he loved so dearly.

Red Strador

It came early for Norman (Red) Strador. The bluff red-head who coached football for St. Mary’s, the San Francisco 49’ers and the erstwhile New York Yankees, was cut down by a heart attack at 53.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Racing fans will remember three who took the checkered flag.

You see again, white-toothed Bob Sweikert sitting happily in victory lane at Indianapolis in 1955 and asking his wife jokingly:

“You were worried about me?” He got it against the wall at Salem, Ind. Age 30.

Then there were bushy-browed Jack McGrath, dead in a Phoenix, Ariz., crash at 35.

And little Walt Faulkner, who flipped five times and out at Vallejo, Calif., a passion for speed burning him out at 37.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot” when you think of the others who bowed out? Like horseman Clifford Mooers, a fabulous personality; Burly Donna Fox, the bobsledder whose passion was golf, and genial, gentle Rud Rennie, a long-time pal from the New York Herald-Tribune.

It can’t be — for the sake of auld lang syne.

The Bridgeport Post (Bridgeport, Connecticut) Dec 31, 1956

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Merry Christmas

December 25, 2011

MERRY CHRISTMAS – No Matter How You Say It!

Hamilton Daily News Journal (Hamilton, Ohio) Dec 24, 1936

CHRISTMAS CULLINGS

The Blessings Which are Ours in This Year of 1940 at Christmas.

The Hammond Times (Hammond, Indiana) Dec 24, 1940

MERRY CHRISTMAS ONE AND ALL!

The Hammond Times (Hammond, Indiana) Dec 24, 1935

Chirstmas Eve

December 24, 2011

On Christmas Eve

Do you by chance tonight recall
Another Christmas Eve?
And does a picture on the wall
Fond memories retrieve?

And can your mind this scene conjure?
An angel by your bed —
A vision lovely, kind and pure,
Who took your hand, and said

“Come son, and see your Christmas tree,
Your books, and games and toys.
I’m sure that then you will agree
Old Santa loves good boys.”

And did you climb upon her knee?
And did she hold you tight?
Oh! don’t you wish that you could see
That saintly fact tonight?

— J. Harold White

Hamilton Daily News Journal (Hamilton, Ohio) Dec 24, 1936

CHRISTMAS EVE SONG
By NEIL MCADONALD

[Copyright, 1901, by Neil Macdonald.]

Grace stood beneath the mistletoe,
A wreath of holly round her head,
And in a voice soft, tender, low,
Led me to hope when hope had fled.
In her brown eyes, so loving, true,
I read the record of my fate.
‘Twas then, entranced, that first I knew
A joy that nothing could abate.

Sylphlike and beautiful as morn,
In sylvan dell by babbling brook,
As fair a maid as e’er was born,
The treasure of her lips I took.
Oh, holly red and mistletoe,
Oh, chimes that speak of love and bliss,
Can aught on earth I e’er shall know
Surpass the rapture of that kiss?

Now in a reminiscent mood
I sadly dream of days gone by;
Of hopes that cheered when Grace I wooed
And saw the lovelight in her eye.
But seasons come and seasons go,
The chimes will ring again tomorrow,
And many hearts with joy will glow,
Though some will hear the bells with sorrow.

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Dec 21, 1901

Hamilton Daily News Journal (Hamilton, Ohio) Dec 24, 1935

Sage Counsel – It’s What’s for Christmas

December 23, 2011

SAGE COUNSEL.

The Christmas season comes apace,
when smiles will hang from every face.
The Christmas spirit for a time,
will make our lives a thing sublime.
Alas, beshrew me, and dodgast!
The Christmas spirit does not last!
A day or two it warms our hearts,
then straightway shrivels and departs;
why does it chase itself so soon,
and leave our lives all out of tune?
It is because we eat too much
of turkey, pudding, pies and such;
the Christmas spirit cannot dwell
where people with dyspepsia yell.
The Christmas morning finds us calm;
the season, like a soothing balm,
has healed the broubles and the cares
that man through weary workdays bears.
We look with kind and loving eyes
upon our smiling fellowguys;
we send some peanuts to the poor,
and think the Spirit will endure.
And then we eat a gorgeous meal,
including turkeys, ducks and veal,
and pies — the kinds that mother made —
and doughnuts, cakes and marmalade.
At night our burdened innards balk,
and through long hours the floor we walk;
and in the morning, cold and gray —
the morning after Christmas day —
we groaning leave the sleepless berth,
and care no hoot, for peace on earth.
And now I spring some good advice,
which followed up, will cut much ice.
Eat humble grub on Christmas Day,
and give the gorgeous things away.

Walt Mason

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 22, 1920

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Dec 23, 1911

Christmas Eves of Childhood

December 23, 2011

Image from The Bluegrass Special

Christmas Eve.

The following verses by a true woman, simple, touching, and teeming with mother-love, come to us from Monroe, Michigan:

‘Tis Christmas-eve! the tireless clock is tolling the hours away,
And my household all are sleeping, dreaming of Christmas-day,
My countless varying duties are finish’d, one by one,
Still, there’s always something left — my work is never done;
So I sit down by the cradle, my little one to rock,
And while I sing a lullaby, I knit for him a sock.

I’ve filled some little stockings with candy and with toys,
And hung them by the chimney-place, to please my darling boys.
There sleeping sweetly in their cribs, I’ve tucked the clothes in tight,
I’ve heard them say their evening prayer, and kiss’d them both good-night.
I know, that ere the daylight shall through the curtain peep,
Their Merry Christmas wishes will wake me from my sleep.

I’ve many, many thoughts to-night, and they are sad to me,
Two stockings only hang, this year, where three were wont to be;
The tears are falling thickly as I think of the day
When I laid that little stocking forevermore away;
For the happy one that hung it there not one short year ago
In yonder grave-yard quietly sleepeth ‘neath the snow.

How many little stockings, that on last Christmas-day
Were fill’d by darling little ones, have since been put away!
How many smiling faces, that to our nursery door
Came wishing “Merry Christmas,” will come again no more!
Their waxen hands are folded upon each quiet breast,
And the Sherpherd God has gather’d those little lambs to rest.

How many pleasant visions, and, oh what sad ones too,
With each succeeding Christmas-eve come vividly to view!
I see again my childhood’s home, and every loved one’s face;
The stockings hanging, as of yore, around the chimney-place,
From the wee red one of baby’s to grandpa’s sock of gray, —
Each in its own accustom’d place, not even one away.

But the pleasant vision passes, and one of darker shade
Reveals how many changes each Christmas-eve has made;
For those whose stockings hung there so closely side by side,
In happy days of childhood, are scatter’d far and wide!
A few still linger here to see this Christmas-eve pass by,
But many, many more to-night within the churchyard lie.

The baby’s sock is finish’d — ’tis sprinkled o’er with tears;
Where will his tiny footsteps wander in future years?
Perhaps this innocent will live to see as I have done,
The Christmas-eves of childhood steal onward one by one;
But whether a life of sorrow, or whether a life of joy,
I feel that I can trust with God my m???-loved baby boy.

The clock has struck the hour of twelve! I’ve put the sock away,
And by the baby’s cradle I now kneel down to pray —
To ask that loving Saviour who on Christmas morn was given
To save our souls from sin and death, and fit us all for Heaven,
That He would guide our footsteps, and fill us with his love,
That we may sing together a Christmas hymn above.

The Burlington Weekly Hawkeye (Burlington, Iowa) Dec 26, 1863

What Christmas Morning Means

December 22, 2011

CHRISTMAS TIME.

Oh, I am glad to know,
Those Christmas days of long ago,
To see the candle-lighted tree
With all the pomp of mystery,
To stand before it open-eyed
As some new tinseled toy I spied.
To wake before the dawn had come
And find beside my bed a drum,
And then to rouse the house with joy
As now does many a little boy.

Those glorious Christmas days, it seems,
Have vanished in the mist of dreams,
Yet other little boys must know
The self-same charms of long ago;
But there’s no table long drawn out
For all the folks to sit about.
No shouts of glee, no welcoming smile
To those who’d driven miles and miles
To be with us and share the day —
Those good old friends were called away.

The mother smiling at the door,
Her eyes with tears just brimming o’er,
Glad tears that seemed so strange to me,
I wondered oft how they could be.
Because, till I’d grown old, I thought
That Christmas day with joy was fraught,
And didn’t understand or know
That it is touched with grief and woe,
And howsoever large the list,
There always is a loved one missed.

The gifts were simple then, but oh,
With love they set all eyes aglow!
For ivory pen or picture framed
“Just what I wanted!” each exclaimed,
“How did you guess, Aunt Jane, that I
This very thing had longed to buy?”
Love’s altar candles were aflame
As we produced our big surprise
Which brought the tears into her eyes.

But we who were the children then
Are now the women and the men;
The girls are mothers and they cry
As mothers did in days gone by,
And I have learned through changing scenes,
Just what the Christmas morning means;
I feel their kisses on my cheek,
And find it difficult to speak —
I’ve come to understand, and know
Just how they felt so long ago.

By Edgar A. Guest

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 22, 1920

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 22, 1921

Hang it All

December 21, 2011

HANG IT ALL

Time: Christmas eve.
Place: Any great American home.
Cast: Pa.
Overture: “Hang up the Holly.”

Pa makes entree with his head hanging.
Bag of presents hangs over his shoulder.
Pa hangs bag on tree.
Pa hangs up kids’ stockings.
Pa hangs Ma’s present on tree.
Pa hangs Grandma’s present on tree.
Pa hangs Grandpa’s present on tree.
Pa hangs Auntie’s present on tree.
Pa hangs Sister Susie’s present on  tree.
Pa hangs the Twins’ presents on tree.
Pa hangs the rest of the kids’ presents on tree.
Pa hangs his own present on tree.
Pa hangs Mother-in-law’s present on tree.
Pa hangs himself on chandelier.
Pa hangs there.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 24, 1924

Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Dec 21, 1911

Packing the Supreme Court

December 21, 2011

Supreme Court Packing Case:

What About Some Future President with Dictatorship Ideas?

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Mar 9, 1937

RUSH! – A Big Order for FDR:

Pack the Supreme Court

CONGRESS – “We didn’t ask for that!”

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas) Mar 16,  1937

Packing the Supreme Court

Patronage and the Vote

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas) Mar 22,  1937

Three Rousing Cheers for Approval!

While labor disputes and war continue.

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas)  Mar 29,  1937

Age of Miracles!

The Supreme Court Lays Golden Eggs!

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas) Apr 2,  1937

The Supreme Court’s Inconspicuous Start

December 20, 2011

Image from Architect of the Capitol

Supreme Court Of The United States Had An Inconspicuous Start

Washington — In a small and undignified chamber on the first floor of the unfinished Capitol of the United States, there assembled in 1801 a body of nine men who probably in the next few years did as much as anyone to mold the still malleable forms of the American Government.

The recent reconvening of the Supreme Court for its 1927-28 term, from October to June here, recalls the inauspicious beginnings of the body in the days of John Marshall. No branch of the Government and no institution under the Constitution, it has been said, has sustained more continuous attack or reached its present position after more vigorous opposition. Today, in black-robed dignity, under the benign smile of Chief Justice William H. Taft, the court sits in assured national respect, in the room in the Capitol which was the Senate Chamber 50 years ago. In 10 or 15 years more the court will sit in its own million-dollar building authorized by the last Congress, to be located on the hill near the Library of Congress.

Quarters Were Inconspicuous

But in 1801, and in the year of the famous Marbury vs. Madison decision, which decided once and for all the court’s power to review, and, if need be, declare unconstitutional acts of Congress, the Supreme Court sat in a chamber only 24 feet wide, 30 feet long, 21 feet high, and rounded at the south end. This was the room casually set aside for it only two weeks before the court came for the first time, in 1800, to the “Federal City,” known now as Washington, D.C.

After 12 years of control by the Federalists, John Adams had been defeated. Jeffersonian Democracy was to have its opportunity. Feeling ran high. Along the unpaved streets of the little capital-town that is now the center of America’s co-ordinated Government, new and old office-holders came almost to blows. Riding into power came the “Anti-Federalists” or Republicans, not to be confused with the present party of that name. Eventually they were to become the Democratic party. Tammany Hall still inscribes its campaign inscription with “Democratic-Republican candidates.”

The Anti-Federalists, with Jefferson, had won the executive and the legislative fields in 1800, but it was the Federal strategy to hold control of the judiciary. A short time before retiring, President Adams almost doubled the number of inferior federal courts and filled them with supporters. Then on Jan. 20, 1801, a little while before leaving office, he sent the name of his Secretary of State to the Senate for confirmation as the _______ Justice. It is recorded that John Marshall, under the stress of the times, nearly failed confirmation at the outset of his 34 years in office.

Image from awesomestoriesMARBURY VS. MADISON

Mingled With the People

John Marshall, the man who upheld the right of judicial review and thereby definitely confirmed that the American Government should ride three-wheeled instead of tandem, with equal powers divided between executive, legislative and judiciary, was regarded as a tower of strength by the Federals. He as a man who felt he could mingle with the people without losing dignity, for he pitched quoits, dressed carelessly, read novels ceaselessly, it is said, and went to market — basket on arm.

He was reared in Fauquier county, Va., served in the Revolution, and was the oldest of a family of 15. From the same state came his arch-opponent in constitutional theory, Thomas Jefferson, the new President. At one end of the unpaved Pennsylvania avenue, in the White House, sat the man who believed in states’ rights; in the stuffy room over the basement, east entrance hall, of the unfinished Capitol sat John Marshall, the very embodiment of the theory of a strong central government.

Decision Delayed Two Years

The incident that made the Supreme Court what it is today came almost at once. Under the act rushed through by the Federalists establishing additional judicial offices a certain William Marbury and three others were named justices of the peace in the District of Columbia. Jefferson coming into office instructed James Madison, as Secretary of State, to refuse to issue their commissions. Marbury and his associates moved by their counsel in December, 1801, in the Supreme Court for a mandamus — a writ requiring a person to do a specified act. A delay of two years ensued. Justice Marshall did not have congested dockets to excuse his delay, but weightier political reasons for withholding judgment.

Then from the small room in the Capitol in 1803 was first enunciated from the Supreme Bench in unmistakable language the doctrine that judicial control over legislation is implied in the provisions of the Federal Constitution. In fact, Chief Justice Marshall was the first man who declared an act of Congress unconstitutional.

Image from Free North Carolina

Comment Still Continues

The Marbury vs. Madison decision declared Marbury was entitled to office and that a mandamus was the rightful remedy. However, the application for the latter from the Supreme Court was denied, on the ground that the authority given the Supreme Court by a recent Judiciary Act of Congress was not warranted by the Constitution. Comment has continued on the decision from that day to this.

The right of judicial review is still challenged. Chief Justice Walter Clark of North Carolina, for example, declared the authority of the court is a “doctrine never held before, nor in any country since,” and attacked it as giving sovereignty in the Nation to a majority of the court — “to five lawyers, holding office for life, and not elected by the people.” On the whole, however, the Nation has supported the Marshall view. The whole course of American democratic development since then has been founded upon it.

Today as the nine Supreme Court justices file into their decorous chamber, led by Chief Justice Taft, smiling broadly, and greeted with old-time pomp of prim, deferential bows from clerk and court attaches, they probably have to thank John Marshall not only for their expanded quarters but for the dignity and power which, under him, the great judicial body has obtained.

— Christian Science Monitor.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Oct 13, 1927

Christmas Shopping on the Farm

December 20, 2011

Image from Zazzle-Farm Christmas

A Verse for Today
By Anne Campbell

CHRISTMAS SHOPPING ON THE FARM

Around the kitchen table, with its checkered oilcloth cover,
A lighted kerosene lamp in the center, shedding cheer,
We sat on winter evenings, and we talked our shopping over;
For it was a December night with Christmas looming near.

The roads were banked with snowdrifts, and the hens had not bee laying.
It was well-nigh impossible to drive the team to town;
So on the printed pages of a catalog went straying
two pairs of twinkling blue eyes and two pairs of happy brown.

The catalog was thick and most profusely illustrated.
There was a section filled with toys and there we loved to look!
But Mother liked to see the furniture, and Father waited
To scan the pictures of the farm machines that spoiled the book.

At least we children thought so, for our minds were filled with scheming,
And nothing useful entered there! We marked the pages where
The toys were pictured, and the games; and then we fell to dreaming
Of Christmas and the happy rush of footsteps on the stair.

The clock struck nine, the book was closed, and sleepy children scattered
To dream of giant catalogs that whisked us far away
To the white home of Santa Claus, where little brown men chattered
Above the toys they fashioned for our happy Christmas Day!

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 20, 1939

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 20, 1939