Pearl Harbor Pays Homeage To Victims Of 1941 Attack

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TEN YEARS AFTER the treacherous Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the scars are gone — but not the memory of “the day that will live in infamy.” In the photo at top, made on Dec. 7, 1941, the battleship California hit by two torpedoes and several aerial bombs, is wrapped in flames as it sinks. In the background other vessels are fire-swept. At bottom is the same locale as it looks today after extensive salvage and reconstruction operations. We now have a peace treaty with Japan and our one-time enemy is our ally. (International)

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Sunken Ship Is Tomb For 1,000

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii — Pearl Harbor pays homage today to the men who died in the sneak attack that plunged America into World War II.

At 7:55 a.m. — 10 years to the minute after the first Japanese raiders struck — three chaplains will pray for the dead.

These include 13,000 buried in the National Cemetery and another 1,000 still trapped in the steel tomb of the sunken battleship Arizona.

Barkley, Chapman There

Vice President Alben W. Barkley and Interior Secretary Oscar Chapman will preside at a ceremony. In the wooden office buildings of the Naval Base a few men who remember when the Japanese attacked will go on working.

A few miles away a launch will chug across the harbor to a flagpole rising from the Arizona’s hulk.

Today Pearl Harbor echoes to the sound of war practice, 10 years after 360 Japanese planes streaked out of the northwest and pounced on the helpless outpost.

Not far from the spot where the Japs turned “Battleship Row” into an inferno, the battleship Iowa fires shells onto a target island to sharpen its gunners for combat.

Submarines Busy

Eighteen hours a day gray submarines slip through the breakers and try to elude practicing pilots overhead.

At Hickman Field, where sitting American planes were strafed and blasted, big military transports rumble in and out. They carry 110 pounds of war supplies a minute to Korea.

The big workshops of the sprawling Naval Base hum with the chatter of riveting machines and the clang of hammers — activity brought about by the need to speed men, ships and ammunition to the Korean war front.

On the hill above the harbor unbelieving islanders scrambled to see the columns of black smoke Dec. 7, 1941, trade winds ripple the green grass on the cemetery graves. To the Hawaiians, it is the “Hill of Sacrifice.”

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Dec 7, 1951

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