Charming Oakland

CHARMING OAKLAND.

If you’re weary of a region
Where the blinding blizzards blow,
And are looking for a refuge
From the chilling frosts and snow,
If you’re tired of deadly cyclones,
Tired of lightning’s lurid glare,
Hurricanes and wild tornadoes,
Dealing death and dire despair,

If you seek a home where songbirds
Sing sweet carols all the day,
Where the climbing roses blossom
In December and in May —
Seek a home where balmy breezes
Gently blow, and skies are clear,
Where the springtime verdure fades not
All throughout the livelong year,

Where the silvery waves of ocean
Gently kiss the golden sands,
And where kindly heaven dispenses
Choicest gifts with lavish hands?
Words must fail, and fancy falters,
Vain are efforts to convey
Thoughts that far transcend description,
Scenes no language can portray.

Come to sunny California,
Come at once — make no delay.
Build your homes in charming Oakland,
Gem of San Francisco bay.
When you’re come you’ll join with Sheba’s
Far-famed royal queen of old
And proclaim in words of rapture
That the half has not been told.

— J.W. DUTTON.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Califorina) May 1, 1907

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 18, 1907

OAKLAND GOOD ENOUGH.

EDITOR TRIBUNE: I have read with interest many of the arguments for and against the changing of the name of Oakland, and many of them carried weight, but the “againsts” more when I listened to this one advanced by W.C. Moody of the State Savings Bank of your city:

“If we had spent,” said he, “twenty million dollars in advertising the name of Oakland we could not then have accomplished what has been accomplished by the free advertising we have received as a result of the fire and earthquake. Fancy spending twenty million to advertise a name and then changing it.

“The people of the world know that it was Oakland that saved the day. Most of them do not know that beautiful Berkeley is on the map.”

Don’t you think this a good one?

Add this to the “againsts” and convince others as I was convinced.

A FORMER RESIDENT.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 25, 1907

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 1, 1907

OBJECTS TO RENAMING THE CITY.

EDITOR TRIBUNE: I read with much interest the view of the “Former Oaklander” in regard to keeping the name of Oakland as it is. I heartily approve of retaining it.

When those busy banqueters in the town to our north emerged from the hall with rosy beaks from the over-indulgence in cork-popping, smoke and torrid atmosphere they firmly believed that annexation of their southern suburb would be accomplished and their stock would soar like some Tonopah stock. Nay, nay, Berkeley! Nip it while in its infancy.

My estimate of the weight of reasons pro and con are as follows:

Alameda — On the fence with a hankering for Alameda for head and front as a name.

Berkeley — Sober citizens for Berkeley and Oakland as second choice; banqueters of Berkeley, blind pig patrons, pinheads, crack brained politicians afraid of missing a political plum, the kind which Francis J. Heney is using to stuff San Quentin, and lastly those Berkeleyans who will be haunted in their padded cell to their last faint breath with “name it Berkeley.”

Emeryville — Any old name so long as we can have our race track and saloons with no keys to their doors.

Fruitvale — Would like to annex, but shy at the thought of politics which would go with it.

Piedmont — Assure the politically ambitious that they can have a plum now and then or a bit of pie and they will say, “Annex by all means.”

Oakland — Retain the name of Oakland because you will find in the records at Washington and Sacramento the name in connection with important matters — past, present and for the future — which are yet to be solved. Other reasons are many and equally weighty.

Yours truly, AN OAKLAND CITIZEN.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 2, 1907

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 19, 1907

A NEW COMBINATION IN NAMES.

EDITOR TRIBUNE” The discussion as to the name of our rejuvenated city is entertaining, and as a matter of pure sentiment may in time lead to something beneficial. May I venture to suggest, in behalf of the self-constituted Committee on a Name, that the possibilities of acceptable nomenclature are not yet exhausted, and to recommend the consideration of such designations as Al-ber-oak, which is made up of the first (and therefore the most worthy) syllables of the names of the three towns which it is sought to combine (or embroil) together? If it becomes a matter of doing honor to the most deserving we can give the muse still freer play. To render immortal the names at once of him whom we revere as the father of his city, and of him to whom our town owes doubtless more than to any one else of its past or present inhabitants, I suggest the name of Motthaven — a designation not new among American towns, but none the less fitting for all all that.

While we are about it and in the mood for poetical invention, why not combine the names of some of our foremost citizens, all of whom are hungry, no doubt, for fame that costs nothing. Let us bestow, without further discussion, the title Rick-mott-ford upon the new triple city. Nothing could be more harmonious, naught more appropriate. This felicitous cognomen is quite the thing, embracing, as it does, the essential part of the names of the mayors (or perhaps the ex-mayors) of the three places, namely, Mr. Rickard of Berkeley, Mr. Mott of Oakland, Mr. Forderer of Alameda. How could we do greater or more deserved honor to three men who we all esteem? Net to their present suite of names I prefer Rickmottford.

Yours, S.A. RALPH.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 3, 1907

Oakland Takes Another Step in Advance

San Francisco Call, November 18.

Oakland has taken one more long step forward, following up the line of progress indicated by the virtually unanimous vote to borrow large sums of money for the improvement of its water front, the erection of public buildings and the installation of modern municipal apparatus.

Things are moving at a rapid pace in Oakland and the impetus inspires admiration as well as confidence. The united spirit of the citizens moves with tremendous force on the goal. The city has now by the vote of Tuesday added an impressive area of valuable territory to its charter limits with a corresponding gain of population and taxable property.

Oakland thus becomes a city of the very first rank in name as well as in fact. Of course, this is only the natural accretion of affiliated territory. The real Oakland was just as big in point of population as it is today by reason of the annexations. The extension of the charter line only includes communities that naturally and geographically have belonged to Oakland from the beginning. The extensive annexations are merely a phase of legitimate municipal evolution.

Again The Call offers congratulations to the people of Greater Oakland for the united spirit of progress of which this week’s elections have given such striking evidence.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 18, 1909

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