Archive for March, 2012

Let Them Come Here and Dig Up My Garden

March 23, 2012

WOMAN DEFIES HEALTH BOARD

Mrs. Selden S. Wright Moves Into Home on Cliff and Issues Proclamation

With her fighting southern blood thoroughly aroused Mrs. Selden S. Wright, widow of the late Superior Judge Wright, president of the Albert Sidney Johnston chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy, and mother of Attorneys George T. and S.S. Wright, is defying the board of health, which attempted to restrain her from moving into her beautiful new residence on Russian Hill by determinedly taking up her home in the dwelling and inviting the shaking health board to dispossess her.

And the board has neglected to pick up the gage of defiance hurled at them from the cliff upon which the house perches. The members are trying to forget all about it.

No Heed for Notice

A notice was boldly served on Mrs. Wright January 30 by the health department at her home 910 Lombard street, telling her that her house had been built on sand or something approaching that sort of soil, and that she could not move into the new dwelling until she had, in accordance with the provisions of an act of the supervisors, cemented over the ground upon which the house stands.

Mrs. Wright answered this notice by promptly moving into the forbidden residence, and then, safely ensconsed there, she turned to the health inspectors, who by its maneuver were placed on the outside looking in, and pointed out that there was a clause in the city ordinance which allows a house to be constructed on a solid rock foundation without the necessity of putting down the cement.

Invites Board to Dig

“And if the board of health does not believe that this house is built on solid rock,” Mrs. Wright said yesterday in a decided way, “then let them come here and dig up my garden for me. I must have that done, anyhow. Why, in placing the foundation for this house the workmen were compelled to use drills and sledge hammers to worry out a trench for the bricks to lie in. and in planting our garden we were compelled to have earth brought up and strewn over the bare rocks. This house is built on rock, and according to the saying in regard to such houses, is going to stand firmly. So am I.”

Willis Polk, who designed the dwelling, may be called into the discussion before it finally is settled, and already he has signified that he stands with Mrs. Wright, whatever occurs.

The San Francisco Call (San Francisco, California) Feb 11, 1909

Homely Philosophy

March 23, 2012

Image from Historical Stock Photos

HOMELY PHILOSOPHY.

(By Alice D.O. Greenwood.)

Don’t set there a-whinin’
‘Taint no use to pout.
‘Spose the Lord ‘ll alter
Work he’s got laid out,
Jis kase you git balky,
An’ don’t wanter draw?
Tighten up yer traces,
Mind yer gee an’ haw.

Lawsy massy neighbor
Ain’t this world chuck full
Of us workin’ critters?
We’ve all got to pull.
If yer crap’s a failure
No use takin’ on,
There’ll be craps a plenty
When we’re dead an’ gone.

Jist git up an’ hustle,
Farily make things bile,
Never mind yer neighbor,
Let him put on style.
Say I kaint affoard it,
An’ I won’t ye bet,
Sling on any tiffics,
Till I’m out o’ debt.

S’pose yer close is seedy,
An’ all out o’ style?
There’s no law agin it,
Better wait awhile.
Don’t go gittin’ funny
Till ye git the cash;
There’s a day o’ recknin’
Fer the chap that’s brash.

There’s wuss folks than pore folks,
Don’t fergit that, pard;
Course it’s onconvenient,
Sometimes powerful hard.
Take it all good natered,
Whistle, an’ be gay,
Sun’ll shine tomorrer,
Never mind today.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 29, 1907

Image from NCSU Libraries’ Digital Collection

Charming Oakland

March 22, 2012

CHARMING OAKLAND.

If you’re weary of a region
Where the blinding blizzards blow,
And are looking for a refuge
From the chilling frosts and snow,
If you’re tired of deadly cyclones,
Tired of lightning’s lurid glare,
Hurricanes and wild tornadoes,
Dealing death and dire despair,

If you seek a home where songbirds
Sing sweet carols all the day,
Where the climbing roses blossom
In December and in May —
Seek a home where balmy breezes
Gently blow, and skies are clear,
Where the springtime verdure fades not
All throughout the livelong year,

Where the silvery waves of ocean
Gently kiss the golden sands,
And where kindly heaven dispenses
Choicest gifts with lavish hands?
Words must fail, and fancy falters,
Vain are efforts to convey
Thoughts that far transcend description,
Scenes no language can portray.

Come to sunny California,
Come at once — make no delay.
Build your homes in charming Oakland,
Gem of San Francisco bay.
When you’re come you’ll join with Sheba’s
Far-famed royal queen of old
And proclaim in words of rapture
That the half has not been told.

— J.W. DUTTON.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Califorina) May 1, 1907

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 18, 1907

OAKLAND GOOD ENOUGH.

EDITOR TRIBUNE: I have read with interest many of the arguments for and against the changing of the name of Oakland, and many of them carried weight, but the “againsts” more when I listened to this one advanced by W.C. Moody of the State Savings Bank of your city:

“If we had spent,” said he, “twenty million dollars in advertising the name of Oakland we could not then have accomplished what has been accomplished by the free advertising we have received as a result of the fire and earthquake. Fancy spending twenty million to advertise a name and then changing it.

“The people of the world know that it was Oakland that saved the day. Most of them do not know that beautiful Berkeley is on the map.”

Don’t you think this a good one?

Add this to the “againsts” and convince others as I was convinced.

A FORMER RESIDENT.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 25, 1907

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 1, 1907

OBJECTS TO RENAMING THE CITY.

EDITOR TRIBUNE: I read with much interest the view of the “Former Oaklander” in regard to keeping the name of Oakland as it is. I heartily approve of retaining it.

When those busy banqueters in the town to our north emerged from the hall with rosy beaks from the over-indulgence in cork-popping, smoke and torrid atmosphere they firmly believed that annexation of their southern suburb would be accomplished and their stock would soar like some Tonopah stock. Nay, nay, Berkeley! Nip it while in its infancy.

My estimate of the weight of reasons pro and con are as follows:

Alameda — On the fence with a hankering for Alameda for head and front as a name.

Berkeley — Sober citizens for Berkeley and Oakland as second choice; banqueters of Berkeley, blind pig patrons, pinheads, crack brained politicians afraid of missing a political plum, the kind which Francis J. Heney is using to stuff San Quentin, and lastly those Berkeleyans who will be haunted in their padded cell to their last faint breath with “name it Berkeley.”

Emeryville — Any old name so long as we can have our race track and saloons with no keys to their doors.

Fruitvale — Would like to annex, but shy at the thought of politics which would go with it.

Piedmont — Assure the politically ambitious that they can have a plum now and then or a bit of pie and they will say, “Annex by all means.”

Oakland — Retain the name of Oakland because you will find in the records at Washington and Sacramento the name in connection with important matters — past, present and for the future — which are yet to be solved. Other reasons are many and equally weighty.

Yours truly, AN OAKLAND CITIZEN.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 2, 1907

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 19, 1907

A NEW COMBINATION IN NAMES.

EDITOR TRIBUNE” The discussion as to the name of our rejuvenated city is entertaining, and as a matter of pure sentiment may in time lead to something beneficial. May I venture to suggest, in behalf of the self-constituted Committee on a Name, that the possibilities of acceptable nomenclature are not yet exhausted, and to recommend the consideration of such designations as Al-ber-oak, which is made up of the first (and therefore the most worthy) syllables of the names of the three towns which it is sought to combine (or embroil) together? If it becomes a matter of doing honor to the most deserving we can give the muse still freer play. To render immortal the names at once of him whom we revere as the father of his city, and of him to whom our town owes doubtless more than to any one else of its past or present inhabitants, I suggest the name of Motthaven — a designation not new among American towns, but none the less fitting for all all that.

While we are about it and in the mood for poetical invention, why not combine the names of some of our foremost citizens, all of whom are hungry, no doubt, for fame that costs nothing. Let us bestow, without further discussion, the title Rick-mott-ford upon the new triple city. Nothing could be more harmonious, naught more appropriate. This felicitous cognomen is quite the thing, embracing, as it does, the essential part of the names of the mayors (or perhaps the ex-mayors) of the three places, namely, Mr. Rickard of Berkeley, Mr. Mott of Oakland, Mr. Forderer of Alameda. How could we do greater or more deserved honor to three men who we all esteem? Net to their present suite of names I prefer Rickmottford.

Yours, S.A. RALPH.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 3, 1907

Oakland Takes Another Step in Advance

San Francisco Call, November 18.

Oakland has taken one more long step forward, following up the line of progress indicated by the virtually unanimous vote to borrow large sums of money for the improvement of its water front, the erection of public buildings and the installation of modern municipal apparatus.

Things are moving at a rapid pace in Oakland and the impetus inspires admiration as well as confidence. The united spirit of the citizens moves with tremendous force on the goal. The city has now by the vote of Tuesday added an impressive area of valuable territory to its charter limits with a corresponding gain of population and taxable property.

Oakland thus becomes a city of the very first rank in name as well as in fact. Of course, this is only the natural accretion of affiliated territory. The real Oakland was just as big in point of population as it is today by reason of the annexations. The extension of the charter line only includes communities that naturally and geographically have belonged to Oakland from the beginning. The extensive annexations are merely a phase of legitimate municipal evolution.

Again The Call offers congratulations to the people of Greater Oakland for the united spirit of progress of which this week’s elections have given such striking evidence.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 18, 1909

Third Rail

March 21, 2012

Image from the Einhorn Press

“You rail at me?”

“Two times.”

“Why not three?”

“Because the third rail is dangerous.”

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 2, 1907

American Aristocracy

March 21, 2012

AMERICAN ARISTOCRACY.
BY J.G. SAXE.

Of all the notable things on earth,
The queerest one is pride of birth
Among our ” fierce democracies!”
A bridge across a hundred years,
Without a prop to save from sneers,
Not even a couple of rotten peers;
A thing for laughter, fleers and jeers,
Is American aristocracy!

English and Irish, French and Spanish,
German, Italian, Dutch and Danish,
Crossing their veins until they vanish
In one conglomeration!
So subtle a tangle of blood, indeed,
No heraldry Harvey will ever succeed
In finding the circulation.

Depend upon it, my snobbish friend,
Your family thread you can’t ascend,
Without good reason to apprehend
You may find it waxed at the other end,
By some plebeian vocation!
Or, worse than that, your boasted line,
May end in a loop of stronger twine,
That choked some worthy relation.

Tioga Eagle (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Jul 4, 1849

American Mind

March 20, 2012

Image from Impressions of Niagra

AMERICAN MIND.

[The following complimentary tribute to the active intellect of our country, is from the pen of Lady EMMELINE STUART WORTLEY, and was written since her recent tour through the Northern States.]

Wand’rers! whose feet, like mine, ne’r press’d before
This proud, magnificiently – various shore —
Wand’rers! who speed from many a distant zone
To gaze on Nature’s transatlantic throne —
Ne’er lightly view the thousand scenes sublime
Of great America’s resplendant clime,
But still, in thoughtful mood’s observant care,
Weigh well the many mingling glories there,
Since all the loftier wonders of the land
Are most admired — when best ye understand!
It’s a gracious study for the soul,
As, part by part, the Heav’n stamp’d leaves unroll; —
Not only all-majestic Nature here
Speaks to each kindling thought, but far and near
A large and mighty meaning seems to lurk,
A glorious mind is every where at work !
A bold, grand spirit rules and reigns around,
And sanctifies the common air and ground ;
And glorifies the lowliest herb and stone
With conscious tints and touches of its own ;
A spirit ever flashing back the sun,
That scorns each prize while aught is to be won ;
More boundless than the prairie’s wondrous sweep,
Or the old Atlantic’s long resounding deep,
And more luxuriant than the forest’s crowd
Of patriarch trees, by weightiest foliage bow’d —
More rich than California’s teeming mould,
Whose hoarded sunbeams laugh to living gold —
More soaring far than the immemorial hills —
More fresh and flowing than their streams and rills —
That mind of quenchless energy and power,
Which springs from strength to strength, hour after hour —
Man’s glorious mind in its most glorious mood,
That seems for aye, on every side to brood,
In this empurpled and exultant land,
So gladly bow’d beneath its bright command —
Man’s glorious mind on its most glorious march —
High spinning earth, like Heav’n’s own rainbow arch.
That soul,  that mind, ’tis every where reveal’d!
It crowns the steep, it gilds the cultured field,
It charms the wild, and paves the rushing stream,
And scarce allows the sun a vagrant beam;
It tames the rugged soil of rocks, and flings
From seas to seas the shadow of its wings,
(And Time and Space in that great shadow rest,
And watch to serve their ruler-sons’ behest.)
And still its growing, gathering influence spreads,
And still abroad its own great life it sheds
O’er mount and lake, o’er cataract, field and flood,
O’er rock, and cave, and isle, o’er plain and wood,
It lives, it lightens, and in might inspires
Each separate scene with fresh creative fires.
Where’er it moves a Wondering World awakes,
And still all nature’s face its likeness takes;
It quickens s—, and kindles and pervades
Her startled deserts and receding shades,
Her mightiest solitudes and paths unknown,
Her hidden shrines and well-springs pure and lone —
Hung — as The Heavens are hung above them all,
And holding their sublimest powers in thrall !

Tioga Eagle (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Dec 5, 1849

*This version is slightly different than the one found online. Maybe it had been reworked after this was first published.

The real traveler is born, not made. The urge to wander is close kin to that which drives the explorer out beyond the end of the trail and like it gives peace and rest only in assailing action. There is something terrifying to the homekeeping about the genuine traveler, and woe unto such as falls under his domination to be dragged everywhere and nowhere, only to be turned about and started elsewhere. The species is usually masculine, regardless of sex, and when the wanderer chances to be a woman there is likely to be a rare excellence about the accomplishments, the spirit in the doing, and especially about the records kept for the timid at home. Such is the case with Lady Emmeline Stuart-Wortley and her narratives of American, Spanish and Syrian journeys.

It was in the spring of the year 1849 that Lady Emmeline and her daughter Victoria set out for America to begin the travels here described. The mother was the second daughter of John Henry, fifth Duke of Rutland, and the widow of Charles Stuart-Wortley, second son of the first Lord Warncliffe. The daughter was soon to become one of Queen Victoria’s maids of honor. The one was already a confirmed traveler, at home in Russia, Holland, Italy and the Near East; the other was a child of twelve years whose goings and comings were shaped by a will not her own. A notable and interesting pair to view America at the end of that Fabulous Forties.

They landed in New York after a passage of eleven days, took one glance at the “ever teeming, tumultuous Broadway,” and then hurried toward Niagra Falls, the mecca of all Europeans in those days. This was the beginning of an itinerary that led along the eastern coast from Boston to Washington, turned westward down the Ohio to St. Louis and southward on the tawny Mississippi to New Orleans; a few days in Mobile, a few more at the capital of Mexico, a turning back to Havana and then into the flood that ran gold-thirsty across the Isthmus toward California. They did not enter the land of gold, but went down to Peru as the farthest point of interest before retracing their steps to Jamaica and back to old world wanderings in Spain and Syria.

The original letters from which Mrs. Cust has constructed the American portion of her narrative have long been in print. They were first published in 1851 under the title “Travels in the United States,” and were gratefully received by a self-conscious people hungry for commendation. A few bits from the younger traveler, however, have been added and the whole woven into a running story heavily sprinkled with quotations from the “diaries, letters and published books.” Strange to say, the original charm has not been lost in the process. Mrs. Cust has selected well to preserve the best comments on the American scene, and in the added narratives on Spain and Syria she has given us a chance to follow these delightful observers still farther.

The main interest of the American reader probably will be in the keen observations made on our means of travel, our thriving cities and our ways of life in those spacious days of national youth. Few salient features escaped them. The floating palaces on the rivers which, under driving competition, carried passengers for less than one-sixth of a penny per mile, the tow-boats almost hidden by the freighted crafts they propeller, the wrecked steamboats, product of collision and explosion, all told buoyant, careless material growth and the attendant growing pains. Yet amid such hurry the railway trains checked speed to allow a lady to cross the tracks and stopped entirely to allow a worried bridegroom to go back to seek the lost bride.

“Eager and go-ahead as they are,” burst out the good lady, “the Americans are the most philosophically patient travelers in the world.”

The cities showed startling evidences of too rapid growth. New York seemed  “a vortex of sound and fury,” Boston a “strange chaos of commerce” where great ships leaned “as if tired” against crowding warehouses; Washington, filled with Negroes and pigs, “would be a beautiful city if it were built”; St. Louis, recently swept by fire and disease, was rising so rapidly that buildings seemed every morning to be about a story higher than when left the preceding night, and New Orleans, smothered with cotton, had a touch of “Spanish grace and Parisian fashion” mingled with an American push and energy manifest at wharf and slave market.

The trip across the Isthmus gave opportunity to see the gulf rush. Dauntless men, fighting river, jungle, disease and passion, yet ever cheerful with their “Ho! for California”; yet something about them seemed to indicate that they went to build a civilization more than to find gold. A royal lady, meanwhile, holding her own with them!

These are [examples?] of American customs — mixed bathing at the beaches, the use of iced drinks, anti-foreign sentiments, etc. — that round out the picture and give the work historical value. And there are, of course, the equally entertaining narratives of journeys in Spain and Syria for those who wish to follow a genuine traveler back to the old world. It is a book worth reading for pleasure or for information.

(“Wanderers,” by Mrs. Henry Cust; New York Coward-McCann)

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Feb 17, 1929

Title: Travels in the United States, etc: during 1849 and 1850
Author: Lady Emmeline Stuart-Wortley
Publisher: Harper & brothers, 1851
(Google ebook LINK)

*I didn’t find the Wanderers  version by Cust online.

PAST AWAY.

In looking over the list of our Contributors for the past year, in order to count our strength in the present, we find that death has taken one the number, whose last contribution to the pages of this work was written from Marsailles, prelusive of those wanderings in the East which have ended so fatally. We allude to the death of Lady Emmeline Stuart-Wortley, whose poems and lively prose sketches so frequently appeared in these pages. Her Ladyship’s death was characteristic of her active energetic nature. In May last, whilst riding in the neighbourhood of Jerusalem, Lady Emmeline had the misfortune to have her leg fractured by the kick of a mule. Notwithstanding the weakened state of her Ladyship’s constitution, she persisted in undertaking the journey from Beyrout to Aleppo, returning by an unfrequented road across the Lebanon. Lady Emmeline reached Beyrout on the 26th of October; but, in spite of the unremitting attention of Dr. Saquet, the French government physician, and two other medical gentlemen, her frame was so weakened and exhausted by the excessive fatigue of the journey, that she gradually sunk and expired on the night of the 29th. Her Ladyship was an authoress of repute, and had probably traveled more than any other lady of her distinguished birth. A daughter of the present Duke of Rutland, her Ladyship married, in 1831, the Hon. Charles Stuart-Wortley (brother of the late Lord Wharncliffe), who died in 1844. Generous, kindly, and genial, she will be long remembered and regretted by those who had the pleasure of knowing her.

Title: THE LADIES’ COMPANION AND MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOL IX
Published: 1856
Page 41

The Rights of Women

March 20, 2012

Image from Assumption College

THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN.
BY MRS. E. LITTLE.

“The rights of women,” what are they?
The right to labor and to pray,
The right to watch while others sleep,
The right o’er others’ woes to weep;
The right to succor in distress,
The right while others curse, to bless;
The right to love whom others scorn,
The right to comfort all that mourn;
The right to shed new joy on earth,
The right to feel the soul’s high worth,
The right to lead the soul to God,
Along the path her Saviour trod —
The path of meekness and of love,
The path of faith that leads above,
The path of patience under wrong,
The path in which the weak gets strong;
Such women’s rights, and God will bless
And crown their champion’s with success.

Tioga Eagle (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 28, 1849

Rena Goff animated image from the Historic Cooking School website

DOMESTIC TRAINING.

Permit us to say, to those mothers who interest themselves in the education of their children, be assiduous early to implant domestic tastes in the minds of your daughters. Let your little girl set by your side with her needle. Do not put her from you when you discharge those employments which are for the comfort of the family. Let her take part in them as fast as her feeble hand is capable. Teach her that this will be her province when she becomes a woman. Inspire her with a desire to make all around her comfortable and happy. Instruct her in the rudiments of that science whose results are so beautiful. Teach her that not selfish gratification, but the good of a household, the improvement of even the humblest dependent, is the business of her sex. When she questions you, repay her curiosity with clear and loving explanations. When you walk out to call on your friends, sometimes take her with you; especially, if you visit the aged, or go on errands of mercy to the sick and poor, let her be your companion. Allow her to sit by the side of the sufferer, and learn those nursing services which afford relief to him.

Associate her with you. Make her your friend. Purify and perfect your own example for her sake. And while you mingle with domestic training, and with the germ of benevolence, a knowledge of the world of books, to which it will be a sweet privilege to introduce her, should not be able not to add a single fashionable accomplishment, still be continually thankful in shielding her from the contagion of evil example.

Image from the Dickinson Journal

ADVICE TO YOUNG LADIES.

Trust not to uncertain riches, but prepare yourself for emergency in life. Learn to work, and not be dependent upon servants to make your bread, sweep your floors, and darn your stockings. Above all things, do not esteem too lightly those honorable young men who sustain themselves and their parents by the work of their own hands, while you care for, and receive into your company those lazy, idle popinjays, who never lift a finger to help themselves so long as they can keep body and soul together, and get sufficient to live in fashion.

Young women, remember this, and instead of sounding the purses of your lovers, and examining the cut of their coats, look into their hearts and habits. Mark if they have trades, and can depend upon themselves; see if they have minds which will lead them to look above a butterfly existence. Talk not of the beautiful white skin and the soft delicate hand — the fine appearance of the young gentlemen. Let not these foolish considerations engross your thoughts.

Tioga Eagle (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 28, 1849

Across the Path of Popular Impatience

March 19, 2012

Image from Mission to Learn

VANDENBERG ON CONSTITUTION
(Lansing State Journal)

If one will take a fairly complete history of the United States and therein trace the history of the United States supreme court, from the beginning to the present time, one will find that the decisions of the court, from first to last, have stirred a good deal of political impatience.

Numerous times there has arisen expression of impatience and vexation because the public might not all at once, on impulse, do what it thought it wanted to do. On these occasions, uniformly, there arose a hue and cry against the high court because it applied the agreed rules.

As one glimpses back over the occasions of impatience one will look in vain to find an instance in our history where the results of impatience would have been better than the results of less hurried and more thoughtful procedure. Wherein would we change our past, if we could?

Watch a documentary about Arthur H. Vandenberg at the GVSU website

The other night in Chicago, Senator Vandenberg of this state, was the chief speaker at the observances held the evening of Constitution Day. His chief thesis was that we should venerate the constitution not because it is old, not because it was made by the founding fathers, not because it has been much lauded, but because it is useful, highly useful to us now.

We think that exceedingly well put. It is little wonder that Senator Vandenberg looms large as a guiding figure in the affairs of the nation, these days. He puts leading contention so clearly, so forcefully. The constitution is not a relic of horse and buggy days, it is the guiding and saving principle among us now, was his way of expressing his thought.

The new dealers are of course saying many a time and often these days that they too are for the constitution. Yes, perhaps in the main, though Professor Tugwell does not appear to be for retention of any of it. But how about the vast impatience that arose a year or two back when the constitution prevented the public from rushing pell mell to a larger extension of federal powers over the nation? In those days the new dealers in congress uniformly always spoke of the supreme court as “those nine old men.” Measures were introduced to nullify their power. Even the president advised that a certain measure be passed even if it were not constitutional.

In those instances, the issue was not the whole constitution. Few wanted to discard it altogether. The issue, the point of impatience, was because the constitution prevented us from rushing all at once to a vast enlargement of federal power. We think the time will come, as it has always come in the past, when pretty much every sound American will be deeply glad that the constitution prevented us from rushing headlong to greater extension of federal power at this time.

The American people can have greater extension of power if they so desire. But if they follow the constitution and respect it the American people will achieve larger application of federal power through calm deliberation and understanding.

The constitution of the United States stands across the path of popular impatience, not of considered popular decision.

This is no long the horse and buggy age but the principle of the wheel on each four corners of a conveyance is still sound.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Sep 23, 1936

A Hundred Years Ago

March 18, 2012

Image from Votaries of Horror

A HUNDRED YEARS AGO.

Where are the birds that sang
A hundred years ago?
The flowers that all in beauty sprang,
A hundred years ago? —
The lips that smiled,
The eyes that wild
In flashes shone
Soft eyes upon —
Where O where are lips and eyes
The maiden’s smile, the lover’s sighs,
That were, so long ago?

Who peopled all the city streets
A hundred years ago?
Who filled the church with faces meek,
A hundred years ago?
The sneering tale,
Of sister frail,
The plot that work’d
Another’s hurt —
Where, O where are plots an sneers,
To a poor man’s hopes the rich man’s fears
That were so long ago?

Where are the graves where dead men slept
A hundred years ago?
Who whilst living, oft times wept
A hundred years ago? —
By other men,
They knew not then
Their lands are tilled,
Their homes are filled,
Ye Nature then was just as gay
And bright the sun shone as to day,
A hundred years ago?

Tioga Eagle (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Jan 31, 1849

St. Patrick’s Day

March 17, 2012

Image from the Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Mar 16, 1892

ST. PATRICK’S DAY.

St. Patrick came, St. Patrick went,
And a — wae us;
We’ve lost a Saint that Heaven sent
To guard o’er us.
And when our isle will see him back,
No one dare say;
But a star o’er an Irish shack
Will shine some day.
So rise again, ye marble halls,
And wake ye ancient voice,
And sound again that Irish harp
That made our hearts rejoice.
And let our hornmen to the hills,
Our heralds o’er the sea;
To spread the news that he has come
To set auld Ireland free!

St. Patrick kind and Mary queen
Let them approach!
With all our fairies drest in green,
Drawing their coach;
And a white winged escort of doves
Fanning the air.
Oh! light is the crown of our loves
That they will wear.
So mount ye lords and ladies fair,
On chargers white as snow,
And ride ye to your Irish halls —
Your rights of long ago —
And if our hornmen ne’er return,
In Heaven then they’ll be,
To spread the news that he has come,
And set auld Ireland free!

MASTER EMERY,
416 Eighth street, Oakland, Cal.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Mar 16, 1906