Archive for June 11th, 2012

Paste This in Your Hat

June 11, 2012

A Silver Song.

It’s silver, silver, silver
On every ringing side;
On every hand throughout the land
Swift sweeps the silver tide.
There’s a jingle in the cities
And a jingle on the plains,
And all the skies of springtime
Pour down their silver rains!

— Atlanta Constitution.

Freeborn County Standard (Albert Lea, Minnesota) Jun 10, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

“Free silver” is a phrase that appeals to the shiftless man who is always out of money. The expression seems to him to imply that under a free-silver regime money would be as readily obtainable as the air we breathe. The word “free” always fascinates men who do not go beneath the surface of great problems. “Free lunch.” “free silver,” “free trade,” “free country,” “free rides,” “free speech” — all these variegated expressions come to mean the same thing to many individuals who are not able to get past the adjective to the noun it qualifies.

— New York World.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Paste This In Your Hat.
As a republican I am proud of many things, but I can sum up as the highest satisfaction I ever had in the party and its career, that the prospect of republican success never did disturb business. — From Harrison’s Speech.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 3, 1896

The Rape of Democracy.

Poor Democracy’s slate
Is — God save her! — completed.
She has now but to wait
Till the same is defeated.

All their rivals o??-vyin’
In the Jacobine duel,
Mr. Congressman Bryan
And ex-Alderman Sewall

Have been put in command
Of the buccaneer crew,
Who have thoughtfully planned
To make one equal two.

Well may Grover decline,
As the fish spins his reels,
To give out any sign
Of the pity he feels.

Well may men who uphold
Honest methods of trade
Join the standard of gold
Where it flies unafraid.

Well may veterans flee
With a bitter disgust
When their banner they see
Labeled: “Silver or Bust!”

Since the party is cursed
With dishonest intention,
Let the fates do their worst
They can’t beat the convention.

FRANK PUTTNAM.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

A fine ounce of gold is worth $20.67.

Sixteen ounces of silver are worth $11.20.

Congress can legislate until it is black in the face without making the ounce of gold worth less or the sixteen ounces of silver worth more.

— New York Press.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Aug 20, 1896

An ounce of gold is worth $20.67 in the open market; an ounce of silver just 70 cents. Only the law of supply and demand can change their relative values.

Congress is powerless to effect it even if it were clothed with the authority to attempt it.

Cambridge Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Aug 27, 1896

I do not know what you think about it but I believe it is a Good deal better to open the mills of the United States to the labor of America than to open the mints of the United States to the silver of the world. — Major McKinley, at Canton, August 12, 1896.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 17, 1896

The Financial Calendar.

The following financial calendar of the past quarter of a century shows what the leading nations of the world have done with silver during that period:

1871. Germany adopted a gold standard.

1873. Belgium suspended standard silver coinage.

1873. Holland suspended silver coinage.

1873. Denmark adopted a gold standard.

1873. Germany demonetized silver coins.

1873. Norway adopted a gold standard.

1873. Sweden adopted a gold standard.

1873. United States suspended free coinage of silver dollars.

1874. The Latin Union limited their silver coinage.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage in Italy.

1875. Switzerland declined to coin her quota of silver under Latin Union.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage on account of Dutch colonies.

1876. France suspended the coinage of silver.

1877. Finland adopted the gold standard.

1878. Spain suspended the free coinage of silver.

1878. Latin Union suspended coinage of silver except subsidiary coins.

1878. United States resumed coinage of the silver dollar, but on government account.

1879. Austria-Hungary suspended the free coinage of silver.

1885. Egypt adopted a gold standard.

1890. Romania adopted the single gold standard.

1890. United States suspended the coinage of silver dollars and began purchase of bullion.

1891. Gold standard adopted in Tunis.

1892. Austria-Hungary adopted the gold standard.

1893. Mints of India closed to the free coinage of silver.

1893. United States suspended purchase of silver bullion.

1895. Russia decided to coin 100,000,000 gold rubles.

1895. Chile adopted the gold standard.

1895. Costa Rica adopted the gold standard.

1878 1881-1892 — Three international conferences held to try to reestablish the use of silver.

Meantime the United States increased her full legal tender silver 50 fold in the face of a 50 per cent fall in its value, until her credit and financial standing could endure the strain no longer, and she was obliged also, reluctantly, to suspend silver coinage.

What would happen if she were to resume, and open wide the doors of her mints to the discarded silver of the world? It does not require much of a financier to answer that.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Related Posts:

Girding Their Loins for William Jennings Bryan

William McKinley – Our Martyred President

Cashing in on Political Gold:

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Shocking Murder — Seven Persons Butchered and Burnt in the Night

June 11, 2012

Shocking Murder — Seven Persons Butchered and Burnt in the Night.

ST. JOSEPH, May 22, 1856.

Last night one of the most diabolical and terrible murders occurred within four miles of this city, that ever shocked a community or outraged humanity.

Mr. Jacob Friend, with his wife and five children, resided in a neat cabin, embowered by ancient forests, upon the border of the beautiful lake which lies just below our town, and cultivated, in a quiet, but profitable way, a piece of land which he had reclaimed from the wilderness. — The banks of the lake are dotted with these simple habitations, and neighbors were all around him, but his house was not visible to any in consequence of the intervening foliage. The hall of a man or the barking of a dog, could, however, be distinctly heard.

Young Barada was there last evening, and left them all in the enjoyment of health and happiness. This morning a young lady was passing, and found the house and its inhabitants in ashes.

The news spread like wild-fire, and in a few hours many from our city and neighborhood were on the spot. The natural question with every one was, how so many persons could have been burned in one room.

The cabin contained but one room, about sixteen feet square, with two doors, a window and a fire-place. The window and the fire place were in the opposite ends, and the two doors in the opposite sides. One either side of the window, with their feet towards the doors, had stood the beds in which the family slept. From where the beds stood, egress was easy and convenient through the window and doors.

It was hardly possible, then, that seven persons — a man of forty-five, a woman of forty, a young man of eighteen, a girl of sixteen, and three small children, could have been burnt from fire originating in the fire-place. There were too many ways of escaping. Nor for the same reason could they be burned to death, if the fire had been communited to any part of the building. The conclusion, then, before any examination, was, that murder, most foul and unnatural, had been busy with his bloody knife, before the fire was ignited.

This conclusion was confirmed by silent evidences which lay around. There in the corner, near the fire-place, was a skeleton, and there, just in front of the fire-place, was another; and where the beds had stood, were all the others — a large one with the smallest clasped in its arms, and the rest clustered near. These were evidently the mother and children. Those near the fire-place, the father and the son. By one of the latter was a large knife; and by the other, a three pronged pitchfork, with points extremely sharpened and in front of the house a revolver was found.

The jury of inquest are now sitting. — They have arrived at no further conclusion, as yet, than that it was a horrible murder. They will take measures — indeed are doing so already, by examination of witnesses and the weapons found — to trace the murderers. God grant that they may be found and brought to justice. This is the sentiment and prayer of every good men in our country.

No event has ever given our community so serious a shock. Our people have been always noted for their liberality, and personal security. It has been unusual to fasten the doors at night, and sometimes in summer, even to close them. — There are not five houses in a hundred with locks upon them. They, nearly all, have the strings always hanging out. — This horrible midnight assassination, therefore, has been more startling than an earthquake, and the whole country are aroused. There must have been more than one engaged in this fiendish work.– They will be traced, I have no doubt. If “murder will out,” then this must certainly be soon developed. I will inform you of further discoveries. Mr. Friend was a good, industrious and prosperous man. —

As I was told to-day by a neighbor, his excellent character and upright deportment made him enemies among the reckless and dissipated. It is said he had a dispute with one of this class, a short time since, about a hog. It was also thought that he had several hundred dollars in gold saved up. What induced the murder, therefore, must have been jealousy, hatred or cupidity; or, perhaps, all.

Allen County Democrat (Lima, Ohio) Jun 7, 1856

Stand as an Anvil

June 11, 2012

Image from Catholic Spiritual Direction

From the Missionary.

Stand as an Anvil, When it is Beaten Down.
[St. Ignatius to St. Polycarp: both Martyrs.]

“Stand, like an anvil,” when the stroke
Of stalwart men falls fierce and fast;
Storms but more deeply root the oak,
Whose brawny arms embrace the blast.

“Stand, like an anvil,” when the sparks
Fly far and wide, a fiery shower;
Virtue and truth must still be marks,
Where malice proves its want of power.

“Stand, like an anvil,” when the sound
Of ponderous hammers pains the ear;
Thine, but the still and stern rebound
Of the great heart that cannot fear.

“Stand, like an anvil.” Noise and heat
Are of earth and die with time,
The soul, like God, its source and seat,
Is solemn, still, serene, sublime.

Riverside, St. Barnabas’s Day, ’49. G.W.D.

Hillsdale Whig Standard (Hillsdale, Michigan) Jul 17, 1849