Paste This in Your Hat

A Silver Song.

It’s silver, silver, silver
On every ringing side;
On every hand throughout the land
Swift sweeps the silver tide.
There’s a jingle in the cities
And a jingle on the plains,
And all the skies of springtime
Pour down their silver rains!

— Atlanta Constitution.

Freeborn County Standard (Albert Lea, Minnesota) Jun 10, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

“Free silver” is a phrase that appeals to the shiftless man who is always out of money. The expression seems to him to imply that under a free-silver regime money would be as readily obtainable as the air we breathe. The word “free” always fascinates men who do not go beneath the surface of great problems. “Free lunch.” “free silver,” “free trade,” “free country,” “free rides,” “free speech” — all these variegated expressions come to mean the same thing to many individuals who are not able to get past the adjective to the noun it qualifies.

— New York World.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Paste This In Your Hat.
As a republican I am proud of many things, but I can sum up as the highest satisfaction I ever had in the party and its career, that the prospect of republican success never did disturb business. — From Harrison’s Speech.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 3, 1896

The Rape of Democracy.

Poor Democracy’s slate
Is — God save her! — completed.
She has now but to wait
Till the same is defeated.

All their rivals o??-vyin’
In the Jacobine duel,
Mr. Congressman Bryan
And ex-Alderman Sewall

Have been put in command
Of the buccaneer crew,
Who have thoughtfully planned
To make one equal two.

Well may Grover decline,
As the fish spins his reels,
To give out any sign
Of the pity he feels.

Well may men who uphold
Honest methods of trade
Join the standard of gold
Where it flies unafraid.

Well may veterans flee
With a bitter disgust
When their banner they see
Labeled: “Silver or Bust!”

Since the party is cursed
With dishonest intention,
Let the fates do their worst
They can’t beat the convention.

FRANK PUTTNAM.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

A fine ounce of gold is worth $20.67.

Sixteen ounces of silver are worth $11.20.

Congress can legislate until it is black in the face without making the ounce of gold worth less or the sixteen ounces of silver worth more.

— New York Press.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Aug 20, 1896

An ounce of gold is worth $20.67 in the open market; an ounce of silver just 70 cents. Only the law of supply and demand can change their relative values.

Congress is powerless to effect it even if it were clothed with the authority to attempt it.

Cambridge Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Aug 27, 1896

I do not know what you think about it but I believe it is a Good deal better to open the mills of the United States to the labor of America than to open the mints of the United States to the silver of the world. — Major McKinley, at Canton, August 12, 1896.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 17, 1896

The Financial Calendar.

The following financial calendar of the past quarter of a century shows what the leading nations of the world have done with silver during that period:

1871. Germany adopted a gold standard.

1873. Belgium suspended standard silver coinage.

1873. Holland suspended silver coinage.

1873. Denmark adopted a gold standard.

1873. Germany demonetized silver coins.

1873. Norway adopted a gold standard.

1873. Sweden adopted a gold standard.

1873. United States suspended free coinage of silver dollars.

1874. The Latin Union limited their silver coinage.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage in Italy.

1875. Switzerland declined to coin her quota of silver under Latin Union.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage on account of Dutch colonies.

1876. France suspended the coinage of silver.

1877. Finland adopted the gold standard.

1878. Spain suspended the free coinage of silver.

1878. Latin Union suspended coinage of silver except subsidiary coins.

1878. United States resumed coinage of the silver dollar, but on government account.

1879. Austria-Hungary suspended the free coinage of silver.

1885. Egypt adopted a gold standard.

1890. Romania adopted the single gold standard.

1890. United States suspended the coinage of silver dollars and began purchase of bullion.

1891. Gold standard adopted in Tunis.

1892. Austria-Hungary adopted the gold standard.

1893. Mints of India closed to the free coinage of silver.

1893. United States suspended purchase of silver bullion.

1895. Russia decided to coin 100,000,000 gold rubles.

1895. Chile adopted the gold standard.

1895. Costa Rica adopted the gold standard.

1878 1881-1892 — Three international conferences held to try to reestablish the use of silver.

Meantime the United States increased her full legal tender silver 50 fold in the face of a 50 per cent fall in its value, until her credit and financial standing could endure the strain no longer, and she was obliged also, reluctantly, to suspend silver coinage.

What would happen if she were to resume, and open wide the doors of her mints to the discarded silver of the world? It does not require much of a financier to answer that.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Related Posts:

Girding Their Loins for William Jennings Bryan

William McKinley – Our Martyred President

Cashing in on Political Gold:

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: