Archive for October, 2012

Halloween Art

October 31, 2012

The witch is astride this night for a ride,
Old Satan and she together;
Now out and now in,
Thru thick and thru thin,
No matter what be the weather.

— Robt. Herrick

The Herald – Junior Section (Los Angeles, California) Oct 31, 1909

Pioneers Frightening the Indians With Hallowe’en Tricks

— Hazel Cox

The Herald – Junior Section (Los Angeles, California) Oct 31, 1909

In the Houses of Rich and Poor Alike, Its Joyful Customs will be Observed

The Herald (Los Angeles, California) Oct 31, 1897

Halloween

— Helen Knecht

Los Angeles Herald (Los Angeles, California) Oct 30, 1910

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Along Came a Spider…

October 31, 2012

Purge Net

Dupe – Dupe – Dupe

Confession

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Dec 2, 1952

Red Satellite

Florence Morning News (Florence, South Carolina) Dec 5, 1952

LAW — Communist Joke Book

Delta Democrat Times (Greenville, Mississippi) Dec 2, 1952

Bone and Skin

October 31, 2012

Epigram on Two Monopolists

Bone and Skin, two Millers thin,
Would starve us all, or near it;
But be it known to Skin and Bone
That Flesh and Blood can’t bear it.

— John Byrom.

Iowa City Press Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa) Sep 1, 1924

*   *   *   About Bone and Skin (google book link)   *   *   *

Whisky; It Burns

October 30, 2012

Image from Life in Western Pennsylvania

FIRE CAUSES A PANIC.

EIGHT PERSONS BADLY BURNED IN PITTSBURG.

Employee Unable to Escape from a Big Building — Walls Fall and Crush Adjoining Houses — Many Persons Hurt in the Crowd.

PITTSBURG, Pa., Oct. 28. — The explosion of a barrel of whisky in the big warehouse of the Chautauqua Lake Ice company yesterday afternoon caused the destruction of over $500,000 worth of property and serious injury to eight persons. Several of the injured, it is feared, will die. A score of more of others received slight cuts and bruises or were trampled on by the mob surrounding the burning buildings. Those seriously hurt were:

T.J. HEILMAN, married; dropped from the third floor to the ground; hands and face terribly burned. His injuries are considered fatal.

MARTIN GRIFFITH, married; dangerously burned.

EDWARD SEES, body and head badly burned; may not recover.

WILLIAM COX, dangerously burned about face and body.

W.M. SMITH, painfully burned; will recover.

LIEUT. FRANK McCANN of engine No. 7; struck by falling bricks and left leg broken.

WILLIAM WISMAN, struck by falling timbers and skull fractured.

JOHN REISCHE, badly hurt by falling timbers.

It was just twenty minutes after 1 o’clock when a number of employes on the third floor of the ice company’s buildings were startled by a loud report, and almost instantly the large room was ablaze. The men started for the stairs, but the flames had already cut off their retreat, and the only means of exit left them were the windows, fifty feet from the ground. By this time the heat was so intense that they were forced to creep out upon the window sills and hang by their hands until the fire department arrived. The flames bursting from the windows burned their hands and faces, but they hung their until the firemen placed their ladders in position and brought them down.

To aid to the excitement it was discovered that a large tank of ammonia was located in the cellar of the ice company’s building, and the police, fearing an explosion, quickly ordered the occupants of the houses on Twelfth street to vacate. All the houses in the neighborhood are a cheap class of tenements and crowded to suffocation with Poles and Slavs. When they were told to move out a panic indescribable started among them. House-hold goods store goods, children and everything that could be carried away were rushed to a place of safety.

The walls of the Mulberry alley side fell in with a crash and a few minutes later the eastern wall came down. The debris buried a low row of tenements in the alley and a three-story brick dwelling on Thirteenth street. The tenements were occupied by families, but fortunately they had been deserted some time before the walls fell in. Not one of the families had a chance to save any of their goods and all their furniture was destroyed. The ruins took fire immediately, and for a while the entire tenement district of Penn avenue was threatened with destruction.

When the walls of the big buildings fell the great mob of people made a rush to get out of danger. Many men tripped and fell and were trampled under foot. Several received painful but not dangerous bruises. Sheets of iron were cast from the burning buildings by the fury of the flames and hurled into the crowds. Scores of people received slight injuries, which were dressed in neighboring drug stores.

The Daily Review (Decatur, Illinois) Oct 29, 1893

Another article about the same fire:(I think the above newspaper got the date wrong)
Davenport Daily Leader (Davenport, Iowa) Oct 27, 1893

Again with the whisky barrels? Really?

MAY REACH TWENTY-FIVE DEAD.

Pittsburg. Feb 10. — The lost of life and property by the fire last night in the great cold storage plant of the Chautauqua Lake Ice company, was the greatest in the history of Pittsburg. At least fifteen persons were killed, over a score injured and property valued at a million and one-half destroyed. The loss of life was caused by the explosion of several hundred barrels of whisky in the ware house, knocking out one of the walls.

The dead are: Lieut. of Police John A. Berry, John Dwyer, William Scott, Jr., the son of President Scott of the Chautauqua State Ice Co.; Stanley Seitz, George Loveless, Mrs. Mary Sipe and her mother; Stanley Sipe, Lieut. Josep Johnson, a fireman name unknown; William L. Wallenstein, and three unknown men.

The missing are: Nathaniel Green, accountant of the Dailmerer building, supposed to be in the ruins; Thomas Lynch, iceman in the employ of the Chautaqua company, supposed to be in the ruins; Edward Berry watchman of the storage building.

It is believed that at least ten more bodies are in the ruins, which are still too hot to be moved. The principal losses are: Union Storage company, $775,900; Hoever’s Storage Warehouse and contents, $600,000; Chautauqua Ice company, $150,000.

Three more bodies were taken from the ruins this forenoon. The dead it is now thought will reach 25. Those taken out this morning were: John Hanna, Bookkeeper and cashier of the Chautauqua Lake Ice Co.; John Scott, another son of President Scott, and an unknown fireman.

_____

Later. — But eight bodies were recovered instead of 14, as first reported. Four are missing, and the firemen believe that a number of others are still under the ruins. The correct list of the identified dead is Lieut. Police Berry; John Dwyer, William Scott, Jr., Stanley Sipe, George Loveless, William A. Wallrobenstein, Josiah Hanna, and William Smith. The missing, Nathaniel Green, Thomas Lynch, John Scott and Edwin Barry.

Davenport Daily Leader (Davenport, Iowa) Feb 10, 1898

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More about the Chautauqua Lake Ice Company:

The Olean Democrat (Olean, New York) Mar 14, 1889

The Olean Democrat (Olean, New York) Jan 15, 1891

European Politics for First Graders

October 30, 2012

Image from Rootsweb

EUROPEAN POLITICS FOR FIRST GRADERS

In Ruhral places peace is pending
And passive resistance now is ending.

Mussolini still is Fiume-ing
And Napoleonic airs assuming.

The Prince of Wales has left incog.,
Canadian girls are all agog.

The comitadjas of Bulgaria
Enjoy their annual war malaria.

Albania will be smeared with Greece
For Italian mission’s sad decease.*

Cease balking! Cease! the league demands
But the Balkans balk at all commands.

Mark well the Ger.’s financial larks
A dollar is 50,000,000 marks.

Premiers Baldwin and Poincare
Are glad to fix le grande affaire.

— Clyde.

(*But after all, the prospect’s bright
That Corfu shall not ring tonight. –Ed.)

Middletown Daily Herald (Middletown, New York) Oct 1, 1923

Fortunes were Being Wiped Out . . . Every Attempt to Stem the Tide Met with Failure

October 29, 2012

Fortunes were being wiped out, millions lost hourly, financial disaster threatened .  .  .  .  . The picture above, of the floor of the New York stock exchange, was sketched by George Clark, staff artist for NEA Service, while the greatest speculative crash in recent history was at its height. Traders shown mulling about the oval-shaped “posts” where the nation’s leading stocks are bought and sold. In the background, upper center, can be seen a giant ticker-tape, moving behind glass, which gives the marked quotations. No photographs of the interior of the exchange ever are allowed and visitors were barred from the gallery during the frenzied trading.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Oct 30, 1929

(Special by Leased Wire to The OAKLAND TRIBUNE)

WALL STREET, NEW YORK, Oct. 29. — Engulfed in the greatest selling wave in the history of the New York stock exchange, prices were carried down today under a torrent of liquidation from every quarter of the globe. The losses of Monday, huge as they were, were doubled.

Up to 2:10 o’clock 13,838,000 shares had changed hands on this record-breaking day. The tape at that time was 82 minutes late.

Stocks of all kinds crashed together. Along in mid-afternoon there was a rally from the lows which brought prices back from the minimum. It still left them down enormously on the the [typo?] day. A report that the board of governors were considering closing the exchange was denied semi-officially and it was announced that various investment trusts and banking interests were buying stocks.

Total sales on the stock exchange today were 16,388,700, a new record high.

Right at the end there was a sharp rally, with Steel selling at 175, General Motors at 45 and Anaconda 85 bid.

Call money, renewing at 5 per cent, was advanced to 6 per cent in the last hour, suggesting that the investment trusts were withdrawing funds from the call markets to buy stocks.

Up to midafternoon every attempt to stem the tide met with failure.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Oct 29, 1929

The Personal Liberty Exponent

October 28, 2012

“I MUST AWAY”

You say a thousand things
Persuasively,
And with strange passion hotly I agree,
And praise your zest.
And then
A blackbird sings
On April lilac, on field-faring men,
Ghost like with loaded wain,
Come down the twilight lane
To rest,
And what is all your argument to me?
Oh, yes — I know, I know,
It must be so —
You must devise
Your myriad policies,
For we are little wise,
And must be led and marshalled .   .   .
And surely it is wrong
To count my blackbird’s song,
My cones of lilac, and my wagon team
More than a world of dream.
But still
A voice calls from the hill —
I must away —
I cannot hear your argument today.

John Drinkwater.

Iowa City Press Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa) Jul 27, 1923

Whoop! Whee! Atta Boy!

October 27, 2012

Baseball World Series

Favorite Gladiator of All Sports

Middletown Daily Herald (Middletown, New York) Oct 9, 1923

Them Women Bandits

October 26, 2012

Image from Stumbling Virtue

THEM WOMEN BANDITS

Now the headlines in the papers tell us daily
That the “weaker sex” is learning how to shoot;
And the ugly mug who holds us up sa gaily
May just as well turn out to be a beaut.
From coast to coast the little bullets patter,
And they do not always have the aim so pat,
But they generally pull a line of chatter,
You can always tell the women guns by that.

When a gentleman is held up by a lady
On a lonely country highway late at night,
And she aims an automatic at his cady
And stops his car and tells him to alight;
When she swings him for his watch and chain and boodle
(And this may happen any night to you).
If he does not want a bullet through his noodle,
Pray, what is any gentleman to do?

For you cannot best a lady even slightly,
And if you strike a woman you’re no gent,
You must stand and take your medicine politely
And with a genteel protest be content.

Middletown Daily Herald (Middletown, New York) Oct 9, 1923

NEW YORK, Dec. 7. — (AP) — Another “bobbed haired bandit” has started work in New York. As her four male companions, armed with automatic pistols, held up the proprietor and 12 patrons of the Joy Inn, Brooklyn, the counterpart of Celia Cooney, now in Auburn prison, sat at a table calmly smoking a cigarette. Once or twice she nodded her crisp bobbed head in approval as the victims yielded money and jewelry.

When the holdup was finished and $500 had been stolen from the cash register and from guests, who had been torn from their women companions, the girl led the retreat to a side street, where the party entered an automobile and disappeared toward Manhattan.

The girl, described as an attractive brunette, was about 25.

Celia Cooney, the original bobbed hair bandit, whose exploits became known nation-wide, was arrested with her husband, Edward, in April 1924, and both were sentenced to from 10 to 20 years in prison. They had participated in more than 10 robberies at the pistol point and in one instance wounded a man.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, Californina) Dec 7, 1925

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*Hm, I wonder what the “Joy Inn” was, exactly; and if the “guests” went home to tell their wives how they lost their money, lol.

Modern Knot-Holers

October 25, 2012

The World Series

and

All the Fans who Couldn’t Attend

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Oct 8, 1929