Archive for the ‘Old Folks Friday’ Category

Lewis W. Homan, an Early Iowa Pioneer

December 16, 2011

OUR NONAGENARIANS

Short Sketch of Adams County Citizens of Advanced Age.

LEWIS W. HOMAN, MT. ETNA.

One of the Early Pioneers in Iowa, an Ex-County Judge and an Exemplary Citizen.

Lewis W. Homan, the subject of this sketch, was born January 26, 1818, and is now 91 years old. His father and mother were citizens of Virginia at the time of their marriage, in 1816, but soon after moved into Kentucky. Mark Homan, father of Lewis W., was born in Virginia near the Potomac river, about 40 miles above the city of Washington, in the year 1789, the year that George Washington was first elected president. When Mark Homan was 13 years old he moved with his mother to what is now West Virginia, where he lived until he attained the age of 27 years, and where he met and married Miss Nancy Burson, in 1816. Soon after their marriage they moved across the Cumberland mountains into Kentucky, crossing the mountains on horseback. In 1818 their son, Lewis W., whose picture we this week present to our readers, was born, on the banks of Salt river, in Kentucky. When Lewis was about eight years old his grandmother, Elizabeth Homan, entered land in Putnam county, Indiana, which she deeded to her son Mark, and to which Lewis W. came with his father and mother in the fall of 1827, and where his father made his home until the time of his death in 1874, the mother dying in 1837. Here Lewis grew to manhood and in 1838 was married to Miss Temperance M. McClain.

Image from Legends of America

In 1843 with his wife and three children he moved to Jones county, Iowa, coming through from Indiana with an ox team and in the old fashioned prairie schooner. Jones county was then mostly unfenced, raw prairie, and its county seat was but a very small village. However, its people were open hearted and kind to all newcomers, and the family was soon among kind and sociable friends. They resided in Jones county until the year 1856, when they came to Adams county, where they again went through the experiences of making a home on the frontier of a new country. It was not long, however, until they were surrounded with friends and helpful neighbors, and the exemplary life of the old gentleman has retained the respect and esteem of all his acquaintances down through the years. Mr. Homan was married but once, his wife living with him to old age. At the time of her death, about eight years ago, they had been living together 63 years. On the occasion of their fifty-seventh wedding anniversary a large number of their relatives and friends met to assist in celebrating the event. Mr. and Mrs. Homan were the parents of 12 children and number among their progeny 51 grandchildren, most of whom are living, and 44 great grandchildren, a record that scarcely finds an equal in Adams county.

Lewis Homan and wife passed a few years in Corning, the rest of their lives they spent on the farm, where they raised their large family. Under the old law, Mr. Homan served a term as county judge of Adams county, and thus it will be seen that his friends and neighbors delighted to honor him with a high position in their midst. He and his brother Westley were the founders of the First Baptist church of Adams county, which was organized in 1858, and of which he is the only charter member. It stands as a splendid monument to his religious zeal and fidelity in days when the support of a church meant more than it does now, from a financial standpoint at least. After the organization of this church he was made superintendent of its Sunday school, a position he held for 17 years, and until old age forbade he was one of the deacons of the church. He and his wife early in life identified themselves with church and Sunday school work, also with the cause of temperance. In an early day, while still living in Jones county, they signed a pledge of total abstinence from intoxicants, and faithfully adhered to it all their lives. Mr. Homan is now living in the joy of a well spent life, and the hope of a glorious eternity. Time has been good to Mr. Homan, and left him the use of a sound mind, and some degree of health. He has a good appetite for food and enjoys the eating, but has not strength enough in his limbs to walk, and is unable to leave his room. He generally sleeps well and sits in his rocker most of the day. He is cheerful with the friends who call to see him, and greatly enjoys their visits.

Mark Homan, father of the subject of this article, was a soldier of the war of 1812, and Lewis W. had two sons in the military service of the United States in the war for the preservation of the union.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) apr 7, 1909

Rockefeller and his Modish Gloves

December 9, 2011

Despite his 92 years, John D. Rockefeller is a familiar figure on his golf course at Ormond Beach, Fla., where this most recent photo was made. It is interesting to recall that Mr. Rockefeller retired as president of Standard Oil company almost exactly 20 years ago, December, 1911.

The aged magnate takes his golf seriously and would not dream of missing his daily round. Note the modish split-back gloves and carefully water-proofed golf shoes.

The Times Recorder (Zanesville, Ohio) Dec 17, 1931

Rebecca Ann Dillon – Wife of a Forty-Niner

December 2, 2011

OUR NONAGENARIANS
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Short Sketch of Adams County Citizens of Advanced Age.
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MRS. REBECCA ANN DILLON
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This Aged Lady Now Makes Her Home With Mrs. R.J. Bohanan in Corning, Iowa.
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Mrs. Rebecca Ann Dillon, whose picture we present this week, was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, August 26, 1815, and is therefore about 93 and a half years of age. Her maiden name was Pulley. She resided in the county of her nativity for several years and on February 11, 1836, was married to James Dillon.

In 1849, at the time of the gold excitement in California, her husband, in company with relatives and friends, went across the great plains to the golden state to seek his fortune. He was gone fifteen months and returned by water. Mr. Dillon was more fortunate than any of the rest of his company, and returned with more gold than they. However, during his absence all the children of the family, five in number, had scarlet fever, and the eldest daughter died. Mrs. Dillon did not inform her husband of her trials during this absence, and he knew nothing of the death of his daughter until his return home.

In the fall of the same year Mr. and Mrs. Dillon moved Grant county, Indiana, where they erected a house in the woods and cleared off the timber for a farm, a no small undertaking in those days, as the timber on the land in that vicinity was very heavy. On this farm they made their home and helped their children get a start in life. One son was born there. When not engaged with his duties on the farm, Mr. Dillon worked at the gunsmith trade. In the spring of 1872 he died, and Mrs. Dillon remained on the home place until 1874, when, in company with her two daughters and their families, she came to Adams county. Her three sons were already here, and she made her home with her children until the daughters returned to Indiana, when she accompanied them, making her home mostly with her daughter, Mrs. Susan Veach. The latter died about two years ago, since which time Grandma Dillon has depended upon her grandchildren for care.

Image from Bygone Places Along the Hoosier Line

Mrs. Dillon’s mental qualities are better than her physical strength, although she last fall made the trip from Hamlet, Indiana, to Corning unattended. Previous to the world’s fair in Chicago she made a visit to this city along, returning to her home alone in September of the same year. Even as late as last summer Mrs. Dillon visited with friends and relatives in Grant county, Indiana; but at present she has not the strength to walk alone, and is cared for by her grand-daughter, Mrs. R.J. Bohanan, of this city.

Mrs. Dillon has three brothers living, Jonathan Pulley, of Chariton, Iowa; Jackson and Samuel Pulley, both living near Marion, Grant county, Ind. Two sons and one daughter are living. They are Mrs. Mollie Bowman, at the soldiers’ home in Lafayette, Indiana; Martin Dillon of Grant county, Indiana, and J.W. Dillon of Seattle, Washington state.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Mar 10, 1909

DIED.

[Excerpt: some of the bio was repeated in the obituary]

Mrs. Rebecca Ann Dillon died at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. J.A. Bohanan, in Corning, on Saturday, October 7, 1911. Her death was due to old age, she being aged 96 years, 1 month and 11 days.
….
To Mr. and Mrs. Dillon six children were born, three sons and three daughter. Mrs. Mollie Bowman and W.M. Dillon, both of Gas City, Ind., and J.W. Dillon, of Seattle, Wash., survive their parents, while Elizabeth Dillon, S.B. Dillon and Mrs. Susan Veach, preceded the parents in death.
….

After the death of her youngest daughter Mrs. Dillon made her home with her granddaughters, spending some time with Mrs. Jennie Barker and Mrs. Ida Roose, of Hamlet, Indiana, and nearly three years with Mrs. Emma Bohanan in our city. Beside the children Mrs. Dillon is survived by one brother, Jonathan Pulley, of Chariton, Iowa, and a number of other relatives. She has had thirty-five grandchildren, most of whom are living; several great grandchldren and one great great grandson.

Mrs. Dillon was  devoted Christian, joining the church at the age of 14 years. She desired that she might pass from from this life as a candle going out and her wish was granted. The funeral services were held in the Christian church Monday afternoon, at 1:30 o’clock, conducted by Rev. J.C. Hanna, and the body was laid to rest in the First Baptist church cemetery, eight miles north of Corning. The relatives from out of town Mrs. Addie Williams and two children, of Greenfield; J.F. Dillon and Miss Ruth, of Carl, and other relatives met the funeral party at the cemetery.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Oct 11, 1911

Franklin LaRue – Veteran Surveyor

November 25, 2011

OUR NONAGENARIANS

Short Sketch of Adams County Citizens of Advanced Age.

F. LARUE, VETERAN SURVEYOR

A Life Full of Usefulness and An Old Age That Is a Pleasure to Himself and Friends

Franklin LaRue, for nearly a generation county surveyor of this county was born on an estate still in the possession of his family near Bath, Steuben County, New York, on December 28th, 1818, being now over ninety years old. He prepared for Amherst College at Prattsburg Academy and studied civil engineering at the Van Rensselaer Institute, Troy, N.Y., now know as Troy Polytecnic Institute.

Mr. LaRue’s first professional work was on the government survey of the lower peninsula of Michigan. Owing to an injury received while thus engaged he was, for a number of years, compelled to abandon field work. During this time he served for four years as county treasurer of Ingham County, Michigan. He then engaged in business in Lansing, Mich., where he resided for many years, being prominently identified with the growth and prosperity of the then comparatively new capital city, and running for state senator on the ticket headed by James Buchanan for president.

Near the close of the civil war he was located in the vicinity of Bloomington, Illinois, where he engaged for a number of years in farming and sheep raising, though he did a great deal of land and road surveying during this period. In 1874 he came to Mercer Township, this county, to improve some land he owned there and was soon elected county surveyor, and held that office as long as he was able to follow his transit. While in office he established the grade of the principal streets of Corning, surveyed the majority of the roads of the county, and left in the office a fine set of maps of the public highways of the whole county which has proved invaluable to his successors.

Mr. LaRue has lived in his present home in Corning for over twenty-five years and the picture presented here-with is a snapshot, taken by a grandson while he was engaged in work about his grounds. After giving up active work he was frequently appointed by the courts to do expert work in finding government corners, throughout this section of the country, and still received requests to do this work, and visits for consultation from many county surveyors, being almost the only living man who was engaged on the original government survey.

Mr. LaRue is very fortunate in retaining full possession of all his faculties, excepting his eyesight, which is growing somewhat dim. His memory is remarkably good, never being at a loss to supply dates and data for the great world changes, and wonderful inventions that have come into being during his remembrance. He also keeps in active touch with all the leading topics of the present day. The boys and girls of his acquaintance delight in propounding mathematical problems to him, which he always solves mentally, extracting the square, cube and sixth root of any number less than one hundred raised to a corresponding power, without the aid of a pencil or paper. His mind is a veritable store house of beautiful poems, with which he is frequently called upon to entertain his friends. He delights in attributing this clearness of memory to the total abstinence of intoxicating liquors and tobacco during his whole life.

Mr. LaRue is one of the grand old gentlemen of the community, enjoying the respect and esteem of all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. We join his many friends in wishing him health and prosperity for years to come.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Feb 10, 1909


Walnut Grove image from Find-A-Grave, where the gravestones of his family members can be found, but I couldn’t find an entry or photo for his gravestone.

Death of Franklin LaRue.

On Monday, September 30, about 12:30 p.m., there passed to his reward one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of Adams county, Franklin LaRue, the cause of his death being largely old age. For a few days he had been suffering from a cold but his condition was not considered critical by his family. He was conscious to the last. The machinery of the body had done its full work and he peacefully passed away.

The subject of this sketch was born near Bath, Stuben county, N.Y., December 28, 1818, and at the time of his death was aged 93 years, 9 months and 2 days. The funeral was held from the home in the northwest part of the city on October 2 at 10:30 a.m., conducted by Rev. Norman McLeod of the Presbyterian church. Interment in Walnut Grove cemetery along side of his faithful wife who was buried there January 6, 1901.

In his young years he attended Amherst college and studied civil engineering at Van Rensaeller institute, Troy, N.Y.. He was the youngest of a family of twelve children. when a young man he came west and located in Michigan and was engaged in surveying. Here he was married to Miss Amelia Chapin at Mason, Mich., Sept. 25, 1848. To this union were born eight children, six daughters and two sons, four of the daughters died at Lansing, Mich., for many years the family home, in their infancy. The two sons, H.H. and F.L. died and are buried in Corning. The living are Mrs. F.A. Kennon of Corning and Miss Myra LaRue who has made her home with her father.

The family came to Adams county in 1874 and settled in Mercer township. Soon after coming here Mr. LaRue was elected county surveyor and held the office for a number of years. He was an exceptionally good surveyor and much of the work done in this county was by him. In politics Mr. LaRue was a democrat and was a candidate for the state senate in Michigan on the ticket by James Buchanan in 1856. His first vote for president was cast in 1840 and in the present campaign he took a deep interest and from the start was an ardent admirer of Wilson and frequently remarked that he hoped he would live to cast a big vote for the New Jersey governor.

For thirty years he had lived int he home in which his death occurred in Corning, an honored and upright citizen whom it was a pleasure to meet and discuss the topics of the day and the events of many years ago. Until a few years ago he was a great reader and since he could not read on account of failing eyesight he had his daughter and others read to him and he was thoroughly posted on the topics of the day.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Oct 12, 1912

Fulton’s First Ferry – Pilot Dead

November 18, 2011

Image from the Greater Astoria Historical Society website

Death of the Pilot of Robert Fulton’s First Ferry-Boat.

Peter Coffee, the venerable pilot, who ran the Nassau, the first ferry boat built by Robert Fulton, is dead. He expired at the residence of his son, No. 76 Lafayette avenue, on Wednesday. The old pilot was born in Peekskill, in this State, in the year 1777, and was 98 years of age at the time of his death. His father was murdered by robbers while he was carrying the United States mail.

Peter Coffee came to New York in boyhood, and entered the merchant service as a sailor. He served in the United States war vessels Little Adams and York during the threatened war with France, in the early part of the present century. On May 10, 1814, he was made pilot of the Nassau, the first steamboat at Fulton Ferry, of which a model is now in a niche in the front of the Fulton Ferry house in Brooklyn, with a statue of Robert Fulton.

Image from The Project Gutenberg‘s Stories of Great Inventors

He was employed as a ferry pilot until about thirty-five years ago, after which he had charge of the repair department, and, as he became more decrepit, he was given a position as a watchman. He left the service of the ferry company about nine years ago, and has since been living with his son.

Brooklyn Argus.

The Perry Chief (Perry, Iowa) Jul 17, 1875

Vet of Local Battle Dies

October 28, 2011

Image of the Charles M. Pratt mansion,  ‘Seamoor’ from the Old Long Island blog.

VET OF LOCAL BATTLE DIES

90-Year-Old Soldier Observed 71st Wedding Anniversary August 3.

Glen Cove, L.I., Oct. 31. — George Washington Dickinson, veteran of Kilpatrick’s 2nd New York light cavalry in the Civil war, died of pneumonia Monday at his home on the Pratt estate here. He was ninety years old. His wife, Sarah Carpenter Dickinson, died last August 17, two weeks after the couple had celebrated their seventy-first anniversary. Mr. Dickinson had served for thirty-five years as caretaker of the Charles M. Pratt estate, making his home in a cottage in the twenty-six acre park surrounding the family’s mausoleum.

Mr. Dickinson, who became ill last Wednesday was born in Oyster Bay, L.I., on March 10, 1843, the son of Susan Dove and Albert Dickinson. When Mr. Dickinson was nineteen years old he married Sarah Carpenter, daughter of a Long Island family, and two weeks later, on August 18, 1862, left his bride to go to war.

Mr. Dickinson saw service at Gettysburg and Bull Run and with the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah. He was wounded twice, held in Libby prison and returned home on parole the day Lincoln was assassinated. The aged man often attributed his robust health to his out-of-doors job on the estate, where he arose at 6:30 a.m. each day and passed the remainder of the daylight hours in tasks about the estate.

In addition to holding the record of being seventy-one years married, Mr. Dickinson boasted another record — the friendship of the oldest and best man on Long Island. He is Andrew Carpenter, brother of the bride, now in his early nineties.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Oct 31, 1933

Elihu H. Grover: An Eccentric Old Fireman

June 10, 2011

Image of Main St., Rochester, New York – 1877 (see link below)

An Eccentric Old Fireman.

Elihu H. Grover, who celebrated lately the 81st anniversary of his birthday, is the oldest fireman in Rochester, New York. His father was killed in the war of 1812, and he went to Rochester in 1814, when the village had 250 inhabitants.

He was at the first fire which occured there. It was at the village grist mill, and young Grover assisted to quench the flames with buckets of water. His certificate of exemption is dated May 20, 1826.

He never saw New York City and Niagara Falls, never rode on a steamboat, and was never in a theater. He remembers the first Fourth of July celebration, at which evergreen bowers were set up and roast pig was publicly served. The veteran fireman never drank liquor or smoked tabacco.

Weekly Reno Gazette (Reno, Nevada) May 22, 1884

Image of “Main St.”, Rochester, New York in 1812

Both images from the Monroe County, NY Records on Rootsweb genealogy website – See their collection HERE.

*****

CERTIFICATE OF EXEMPTION

I didn’t know what this was, so I did some searching and found the following on the Monmouth Co, NJ website:

Eighteenth century New Jersey residents were well aware of the devastating effects of fire, but the State had no involvement in fire fighting until 1826, when a law was passed to encourage the formation of fire companies. Under the December 14, 1826, “Act for the encouragement of fire companies,” fire companies were granted charters, provided that the fire company had one fire engine and between sixteen and thirty men. As an incentive to attract volunteers, firemen were exempted from military duty in time of peace. Twenty years later, through an “Act relative to juries and verdicts,” passed April 17, 1846, members of fire companies also were declared exempt from jury duty.

Even though this is for New Jersey, I would suspect New York had something similar.

Marshall Wright: Aged War Veteran Tells of Experience

November 12, 2010

140th Pennsylvania - Officers

Image from the History of Co. K,  140th Penna Volunteers – 1862 – “65

Aged War Veteran Tells Of Experience

Marshall Wright, 85 years of age, of Croton avenue, clear of vision and mind, and still able to go about without a staff tells of his early days in the Panhandle of West Virginia, relates thrilling experiences of how he suffered for the flag and endured hardness for his country. The whole story is an inspiration to the faltering ones of today, who are losing their nerve.

“I was born in “old Virginny” September 10, 1837, on a large 400-acre Brooke’s county farm, just across the Ohio river from Steubenville, O. Brooke county has always been in that narrow strip of land called the Panhandle lying between the state of Pennsylvania and the Ohio river. Up to 1861 it was a part of Virginia; but when Virginia seceded from the Union, representatives from 47 counties of the northwestern part of the state organized a state government, and in 1863 were admitted to the Union as West Virginia. That part of the country was a hotbed of secession. Families were arrayed against each other, friend was against friend. Seven of my schoolmates favored the southern cause.

“My father was Jacob Wright and my mother was Margaret Davis Wright. There were 11 of we children. We did not have free schools but the parents paid tuition of abut $2 for each child for a term of three months a year.

Lived In Log House

“When I was 12 years old I was doing all kinds of farm work and working the same number of hours as father. We lived in a log house. I can still see the big fireplace, the spinning wheel, the long barreled rifle on pegs above the mantle, the flickering tallow candle or the piece of wicking burning on the edge of a saucer of grease. Then that gun. The barrel was as heavy as a crow bar, but oh boy, how it would shoot. One day father gave me a dozen lead bullets as I was preparing to go hunting with the old relic on the pegs. I came back with 13 squirrels. The thirteenth squirrel was killed with the ‘neck’ cut from one of the bullets, which had adhered when taking from the moulds. In those early days the wild ducks and geese flying to or from their winter home in the south would sometimes hand and occupy the river. There would be thousands of them in the river at one time. In the winter when the farm work was all done up, I would make trips down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans on a flat boat. I usually went with Bill Householder who was a regular at that kind of seafaring, and had just completed my third trip when the was came on. I was 24 years old and the first act of the seceders was to go down along the Baltimore & Ohio as far as Grafton and burn buildings and bridges. I joined the three-month men as a private in the First Virginia regiment and when we overtook the bridge burners at Phillippi and shelled them, there was nothing further to it. We were paid $11 a month in gold and at the expiration of the term were mustered out at Wheeling.

In 140th Pa. Volunteers

“I then enlisted in Company K, 140th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry for three years. My captain was William Stockton of Cross Creek and the colonel was Dick Roberts of Beaver, Pa. We assembled and organized at Washington’s fair grounds. Then went to Camp Copeland, Pittsburgh, then moved to Harrisburg where we were equipped and sent out to patrol the Northern Central railway, now the P.R.R., to Parkton, Md. On December 1, 1862, we joined the Army of the Potomac. Our first fight was at Chancellorsville where the famous General Stonewall Jackson was killed. We were defeated, and re-crossed the Rappahannock to go into camp. Next, we followed Lee’s army which was invading Pennsylvania. Our regiment arrived at Gettysburg about 9o’clock on the morning of July 2 and took a position in the famous wheatfield. Our losses were very heavy and among the slain was Colonel Roberts. I was struck on the right elbow and had to retire. Later I was sent to Satterlee hospital, West Philadelphia. My father came and took me home. At the expiration of my furlough I went to the detention camp at Alexandria, Va., and a little later on was given full equipment including a gun and 40 rounds of ammunition, and with others boarded a supply train on the Orange and Alexandria railroad to rejoin the regiment, which was in camp, in the county of Culpeper. That was as rough a road as a man ever rode on! It now appears to me that the engine bell never stopped ringing owing to the low joints. It’s a wonder the water did not splash out of the boiler.
At Cancellorsville.

“General Grant now had charge of the army of the Potomac and great activity was going on at every point. Our regiment crossed the Rapidan and slept on the Chancellorsville battlefield. On May 4th, 1864, we went into the battle of the Wilderness and got into action on the second day, just before sundown, at Todd’s Tavern, where Corporal Wright, that’s me, had one bullet put thru the sleeve of his blouse and another right through his cap. Well, they say “a miss is as good as a mile.” We next crossed the Mataponny river in the night. At daybreak a large force of Confederates came out and formed as if to go into battle. We fired one volley into them and they disappeared, while we fell back across the little stream. Spottsylvania came next where Lee had his army behind earthworks. Our regiment was marching in the night to the immediate vicinity of the works. It has been said that we were twenty men deep on the assaulting line. We knew something was going to happen. It rained all night. Just as the first streaks of dawn lifted the darkness of the night the order to charge rang all along the line. The fight was on. The noise of that battle was awful. I was in the first line and went over the top twenty or thirty feet, when a bullet struck me in the neck, passed clear through and came out of my back. We took several thousand prisoners. My injury was of such a nature that I was paralyzed. The battle was at its height and the captured ‘rebs’ were pouring back to our lines and eager they were to get back to a place of safety. As one of them came close to me I held out my hands, and asked him if he wouldn’t take me back. He stopped and helped me to our side of the works and laid me down where the flying bullets would not be so liable to get me, then beat it back into our lines as fast as he could travel.

That was on May 12th. They carried me back to the field hospital with other wounded. The tide of battle changed and the field hospital was left unguarded. The ‘rebs’ came that way and while they wanted nothing to do with anything that looked like I did, they took my boots and every bit of my clothing except my underwear. This little scene had hardly been staged when Sheridan’s cavalry came down and took care of us. I was loaded into an ambulance with another wounded soldier and for 36 hours was bumped and jolted over rough country roads, many miles of the way being corduroy.

Suffer Intensely.

The ride was worse than death. We both suffered intensely. Upon arrival at Acquai creek we were placed on straw or hay that had been scattered on the ground and when the hospital boat arrived we were loaded onto the boat, and put onto cots that seemed so nice and soft to anything we had thus far. Up to this time nothing had been done for me. Not a drop of medicine, nothing to ease the pain, had not been bathed or had my wound dressed. There were 1500 [or 1600] of us in that cargo bearing every conceivable kind of an injury. One of the attendants came to me and said: “Open your mouth.” I did so and he said: “drink all you can,” as he put a bottle to my lips. I immediately went to sleep and when I awoke it was in the Harvard Hospital, Washington, D.C. It had been five days since I was hurt and the only thing that had been done was to give me that medicine out of the bottle.”

Stopping as if to collect his thoughts this old veteran said, “What makes us old Grand Army men love the flag so much is, that we have suffered so much for it and it has done so much for us.” “My wound was an unusual one owing to the way it cut a pathway thru my neck among the arteries and cleared itself without striking a vital spot. The surgeons took a photograph of it. My left arm was paralyzed by the wound. At the end of thirty days my mother went to Washington and took me home on furlough.

After six months treatment at the Penn Hospital, Pittsburgh, I was sent back to the regiment which was lying in front of Petersburg. In November 1864, After the final withdrawal from Richmond, the army followed Lee with the 140th Regiment deployed as skirmishers. We overtook them at Appomattox and the surrender followed, April 9th, 1865. I was in the Grand Review at Washington in May, then we proceeded to Pittsburgh turned in our guns and equipment and were mustered out of the service.

I went back to farming and 12 years ago came to New Castle to make my home. In 1880 Miss Margaret Pollock became my wife.

We have two daughters, Mrs. Geo. Richardson of Main street and Mrs. J.H. Fulton of Los Angeles, Calif.

We live in the Dufford Block, Croton avenue.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) 2 Dec 1922

New Castle News (New Castle,  Pennsylvania) Mar 3,  1911

Oak Park Cemetery (Image from Find-A-Grave)

D. Marshall Wright.

D. Marshall Wright, aged 86 years, of 337 1-2 Croton avenue, one of the oldest residents of New Castle and veteran of the Civil War, died Saturday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George Richardson of 601 East Main street after a brief Illness of pneumonia.

Mr. Wright was born in Virginia, September 10, 1837, and had resided in this city for the past 14 years. He was a member of Epworth Methodist church, G.A.R. and I.O.O.F. lodge.

He enlisted at the beginning of the Civil War in Washington county in the Union Army with Company K, 140th Pennsylvania Volunteers and served for four years.

Besides hsi widow, Mrs. Margaret Wright, he leaves two daughters, Mrs. J.H. Fulton of California, and Mrs. George Richardson of this city, and three sisters, Mrs. Thomas Wheeler and Mrs. Alex Ralston of West Virginia, and Mrs. Wesley Crawford, of Brazil, Ind.

Funeral services took place this afternoon at 2:30 from the Richardson home on Main street in charge of Rev. Homer Davis assisted by Rev. C.M. Small. Interment was made in Oak Park Mausoleum.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Feb 11, 1924

Name:      Marshall Wright
Enlistment Date:     9 Apr 1862
Rank at enlistment:     Corporal
State Served:     Pennsylvania
Was Wounded?:     Yes
Survived the War?:     Yes
Service Record:     Enlisted in on 18 May 1861.
Mustered out on 28 Aug 1861.
Enlisted in Company K, Pennsylvania 140th Infantry Regiment on 04 Sep 1862.
Mustered out on 31 May 1865 at Washington, DC.
Sources:     History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-1865
Research by R. Ross Houston

Marshall Wright‘s daughter, Hattie L. Wright married James Hunter Fulton. They has a son, H. Marshall Fulton:

Name:   Hattie L Fulton
[Hattie L Wright]
Birth Date: 12 Jul 1873
Birthplace: West Virginia
Death Date: 21 Dec 1941
Death Place: Los Angeles
Mother’s Maiden Name: Pollock
Father’s Surname: Wright

Name:  Hattie Fulton
Home in 1900: Ellwood City, Lawrence, Pennsylvania
Age: 26
Birth Date: Jul 1873
Birthplace: West Virginia
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relationship to Head of House: Wife
Father’s Birthplace: West Virginia
Mother’s Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Mother: number of living children: 1
Mother: How many children: 1
Spouse’s name:     James H Fulton
Marriage Year: 1893
Marital Status: Married
Years Married:     7
Household Members:
Name     Age
James H Fulton 30 Jul 1869 PA PA PA
Hattie Fulton 26
Marshall Fulton 5 Jun 1894 PA PA WV

Name:  Hattie L Fulton
Age in 1910: 36
Estimated birth year: abt 1874
Birthplace: West Virginia
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Father’s Birth Place: Virginia
Mother’s Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Spouse’s name: James H Fulton
Home in 1910: New Castle Ward 3, Lawrence, Pennsylvania
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Female
Household Members:
Name     Age
James H Fulton     40
Hattie L Fulton 36
H Marshall Fulton 15

Name: H Marshall Fulton
Home in 1930: Alhambra, Los Angeles, California
Age: 35
Estimated birth year: abt 1895
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse’s name: Hazel L Fulton
Household Members:
Name     Age
H Marshall Fulton 35 (machinist – can factory)
Hazel L Fulton 33 UT ENG SWE
Jack Fulton 10

Jack Fulton

As I was doing some research on Marshall Wright, I ran across this obituary for his great-grandson, who coincidentally passed away this year.

Jack Marshall Fulton 06/02/1919 ~ 03/28/2010

ESCONDIDO — Jack Marshall  Fulton  was born June 2, 1919 in Ogden, Utah, the son of Hazel and Marshall  Fulton. He passed away peacefully on Sunday, March 28, 2010. Jack graduated from Alhambra High School, Alhambra, Calif. He served in the Army Air Corps during WWII. After being discharged, he returned to school graduating from Pierce College and then the Agricultural Teacher Program at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo where he received his Bachelors and Masters of Ed.

He began his teaching career at Escondido High School in 1957 and served until he retired in 1980. He then married the love of his life, Martha Moen on January 15, 1983 and enjoyed 14 years of marriage that included many travels and cruises. Jack became a Master Mason in 1949. He served his community with the Masons and also the Lions Club throughout his life. He leaves his loving family, Cary and Cheryl Moen, Norman and Carol Peet; and grandchildren, Dana and Wendy Moen, Deric and Amber Moen, Darin Moen, Andrew and Erin Peet, Aaron and Amanda Peet, Josh and April Peet; and five great grandchildren with one on the way!

You are invited to the memorial service on Wednesday, April 21, 2010, at 2 p.m., at the Masonic Center, 1331 S. Escondido Blvd., Escondido, CA 92025, 760-745-4957. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations be given to Elizabeth Hospice, http://www.elizabethhospice.org.

obits.nctimes.com

Since Hanner Died

October 22, 2010

The Widowed Farmer.

Since Hanner died the sun don’t shine so bright,
The stars don’t twinkle near so keen at night,
The church bell Sunday mornin’ an’t the cheer
It had when she was here.
Since Hanner died.

The very chickens misses Hanner’s care,
And go ’round with a sorter lonesome air,
There an’t no kind of joy about the place
Without her smilin’ face.
Since Hanner died.

The garden tools hang in the apple trees,
The hossweeds are a-killin’ off the peas;
There’s no one here to hoe the taters now,
Er feed the hogs an’ cow.
Since Hanner died.

I s’pose, of course, I’d orter be resigned,
But when I go out in the shed and find
The ax she chopped the wood with all them years,
I wet it with my tears,
Since Hanner died.

— Robley D. Stevenson, in N.Y. Sun.

The Ohio Democrat (New Philadelphia, Ohio) Oct 4, 1894

She Gets a Pension

July 9, 2010

After nearly forty years of continual service as a teacher in the employ of the public schools of Oakland, Miss Rebecca A. Bills of 961 Jackson street, of this city will have for her faithful work, the distinction of being the first woman in Alameda county to be pensioned from the teacher’s pension bill which goes into effect August 10 of this year.

During the lengthy period of service with the Oakland schools, Miss Bills has been most actively identified with activities of the primary grades, being especially devoted to the younger grammar school children. Miss Bill first became identified with the local educational branch in 1872 when she was appointed to one of the graded classes of the Lafayette Grammar school.

Later she was given a class in the old Irving school serving until 1875 under J.B. McChesney. In that year, she was transferred to Mills Seminary in East Oakland, where she taught for two years.

This was followed by a short six-month leave of absence and after a short term in the San Leandro school she was elected to a position in July, 1878, to the Lincoln Grammar school with which institution she has been connected until Friday, which concluded her career of teaching.

TAKES  TRIP ABROAD.

According to present plans, Miss Bill will leave for a trip through the various cities and places of interest in Europe, returning by way of the Panama Canal and arriving here on time to witness the Panama Pacific Exposition in 1915 in San Francisco. At the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. Cotton at 961 Jackson street, with whom she has resided for the past fifteen years, Miss Bills recalled several reminiscences of her career.

“I graduated from Mt. Holyoke University Mass. in 1867,” she said, “and after several weeks of traveling arrived in Oakland early in the year 1868. My first experience as a teacher was at the Pacific Young Ladies’ Seminary which was located where the Merritt hospital now stands. It was in this year that the great earthquake similar to that of 1906 occurred. I was the last to leave the building, taking two small Spanish girls with me. They were both badly frightened and cried out in terror. It was one of the most dreadful experiences I have ever gone through.”

Miss Bills also taught at the same institution for some time after its removal to Eddy and Taylor streets in San Francisco.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jun 29, 1913

MRS. SYMONS ENDS 33 YEARS SERVICE AS SCHOOL TEACHER

Seated comfortably in her cozy home on Fifth street, Mrs. Eleanor Symons, Elyria’s veteran school teacher, entertainingly discussed her long service of thirty-three years in the public schools and let her mind run back over the years that she has been engaged in training the youth of this community.

“I hardly know how to express myself,” said Mrs. Symons, “but I feel as if I had earned a vacation and a needed rest. My years of teaching have been pleasant ones, and I presume I will be lost when I retire in June.”

Eleanor M. Baker Symons was born in Spring Creek, Pa., in 1851 and attended the district school summer and winter. At the age of fifteen she obtained her first county certificate, and that winter began her first school. She was then but sixteen and taught 66 days for $24 in cash with her board thrown in, boarding around in the old-fashioned way. This was not considered a hardship as it had many pleasant sides to it.

“Some of the most delightful and lasting friends came into recognition in this way,” said she. “The school ma’am had the best of everything and was always invited to all the festivities of the district. I taught six years in the county schools and then went into the Corry public schools and taught the spring term as assistant eighth grade teacher and principal. The following summer the president and secretary drove to my home to see if I would take the position of the principal, as she had resigned.

Reluctantly, and after much urging, I consented to try it, with the result that I taught there until the Christmas of 1876 when I resigned and was married. I came to Elyria in 1877 and for one year was home sick as I did not know a child on the street.

Mr. Symons was working in the Democrat office. George G. Washburn was the editor of this paper and in February of 1878 he invited me to visit the schools with him on a certain Tuesday. I gladly went, not knowing then that Superintendent Parker was anxious to find a teacher for his one A grammar school. This fact, however, was known to Mr. Washburn, who had been asked by the superintendent to bring about this visit so he could size me up. Mr. Parker walked home with me at noon and asked if I had certificates, recommendations etc., I had, and he took them with him, after explaining his desire to find a teacher so he could release Miss Josie Staub, who soon became Mrs. D.C. Baldwin.

On Thursday evening of this same week, Mr. Parker called and said I had been hired by the board to teach and was to begin the following Monday. He advised me to visit Miss Staub and get somewhat acquainted with this work for the next week, which I did. I taught this grade for seven years and resigned, never intending to teach again, and I did not teach a day for six years. Then Mr. Parker sent for me to help out for a day, a week or maybe a fortnight.

The fall of 1894, he came for me to take the A grammar school taught by Miss Whitbeck, who was obliged to stop on account of illness. He put aside all my excuses for not taking up the work and I went into the school again on the following Monday. On the following Friday Miss Whitbeck passed away and of course, I remained until the end of the school year, and as you know I have been there ever since. I want to thank everybody connected in any way with the Elyria public schools, the different board members, superintendents, teachers, children and parents, for making my long years of teaching such years of joy and happiness.”

Well does the writer remember Mrs. Symons’ first year in school for he was a member of her class. It was a tough school to take charge of and was full of smart Aleck boys and a few frivolous girls, who did not have much idea of what they went to school for. However, the majority of the school were good students, and being a strict disciplinarian, Mrs. Symons soon brought order out of chaos. All will agree that Mrs. Symons has been able to discipline her schools in the right way. She knows when to be lenient, and when to be stern, with absolute justice at all times to her pupils. Some of her pupils with whom she had to be severe, have since written and thanked her for the advice she had given them, and these letters from all over the world are among her prized possessions. Little did the boy back in ’78 dream that in 1921 he would be telling the story of Mrs. Symons’ long years of service in the public print. But it is a genuine pleasure to give tribute to this splendid character whose life has been devoted to the youth of Elyria.

When she retires in June, she will be one of the first to receive the benefit of the teacher’s pension fund that a thoughtful legislature has provided for that splendid body of men and women, who mould the minds of men and women of tomorrow to become useful, orderly, patriotic, educated citizens.

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Jun 5, 1921

Miss Kate Stanton, teacher in Wayne township school No. 9, who has taught school for 43 years, retired under the teacher’s pension law at the close of her school term last Friday. She will receive $700 a year the remainder of her life. Miss Stanton is the first teacher in Wayne county to receive a pension.

Cambridge City Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Apr 5, 1917

TEACHER 53 YEARS

SACRAMENTO, July 9. — Fifty-three years of teaching is the record submitted by Mrs. Fannie L. Walsh, of Salinas, who has applied to the California State Board of Education for a teacher’s pension. This is the longest term of teaching ever submitted by any applicant.

Trenton Evening Times ( Trenton, New Jersey) Jul 9, 1915