Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

On Some Far Day

November 26, 2012

Image from Seventeen Moments in Soviet History

ON SOME FAR DAY.

Some day when there’s no Bolsheviks
With whiskers on their face,
And when of frowsy anarchists
There’s not a single trace.
Ah, that will be a happy time
For all the human race.
Some day when there is no peace pact
To talk about and fight;
When cost of living does not soar
Up higher than a kite.
Ah, that will be a happy day,
Indeed it will all right.
Some day when no one is on strike
And ev’ry man’s employed.
When boss and man by foreign Reds
No longer are annoyed.
Ah, then will come such happiness
We’ll all be overjoyed.
When Europe starts to go to work
To keep herself alive —
When to support her we’re not asked
To start another drive.
Then we’ll have something for ourselves,
And save some coin and thrive.
When each one goes his proper gait,
And does not push and shove;
When wrong for right has stepped aside,
And all is peace and love;
The chances are that nearly all
Of us will be above.

— Brooklyn Standard-Union.

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Dec 2, 1919

Italians: Doing the Jobs Germans Won’t Do

November 14, 2012

By MILTON BRONNER
(NEA Service Staff Correspondent)

London, July 27 — Germany has just seen arriving the last contingents of the greatest mass emigration of Italians in recent years — the result of an agreement between Reichsfeuhrer Hitler and Premier Mussolini.

But they are only temporary emigrants. Within the year they must all be back in Italy, the last ones returning to their native land by next December 15.

Their mass coming to Germany seems almost paradoxical. The Nazis boast they have cut down unemployment by millions. But, according to their own figures, there were about 500,000 people still unemployed. But apparently these workless ones are not suited for farm labor. Hence the demand for Italians — 22,000 men between the ages of 18 and 40 and 8000 women between the ages of 18 and 30. In many cases the men and women are married couples, but without young children.

They hail mainly from the northern provinces of Italy, there being 2100 from around Ferraro,  2300 from Padua, 1800 from Bologna, 1500 from Ravenna, 2100 from Rovigo, 1300 from Verona, 1300 from Venice and 2300 from Modena. Many of these towns are known the world over because Shakespeare laid the scenes of his plays in them. But these peasants have not gone to Germany to recite poetry or to carol. They are going to cultivate and later, to dig up sugar beets and potatoes.

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Last March 300 gang chiefs were sent to Rome to get their final instruction. Each gang chief is responsible for the earnest labor and good conduct of 100 peasant workers. Forty special trains took the army laborers to Germany. They have been scattered mainly in central Germany and in Saxony, Bavaria, Wurtemberg, Baden and Hesse.

The temporary emigrants were not taken at haphazard. The Fascist Confederation of Agricultural Workers selected those who were known to be physically the strongest, morally the best-behaved and technically the most competent. A sort of set uniform of clothes was chosen for the men and the women and given them by the Italian central organization. They were also given a valise of a uniform type, a contract for their employment, a passport and a little guide book, filled with choice sayings by Mussolini and Hitler, glorifying the role of the peasant in the life of Germany and Italy.

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Germany guaranteed all the workers free railway passage to and from Germany, free lodging and meals. In addition, they get the equivalent of a German peasant workers’ wages — 7.60 lire per day — or about 40 cents. The Italian government will pay part of this to the families of the workers. In this way Italy will cut down the commercial debts it owes Germany, for what Italy pays the workers will  be deducted from its debt to Germany.

Even though the 30,000 will be in Germany many months, they are made to feel that the eyes of their rulers are upon them and also that they must uphold the honor of Italy. For in their little guide-book there is this significant passage:

“You, peasant, quit your country today for the moment; you are not as formerly, an emigrant that is to say a poor pariah like so many others, humiliated, wandering, knocked about seeking work. By the merit of the regime you depart in organized service as an Italian, as a soldier of the great Fascist army of Labor, as a creator, as an instrument of activity, solicited, guaranteed, defended in all circumstances.”

Dunkirk Evening Observer (Dunkirk, New York) Jul 27, 1938

Worried About Americans’ Thinking

November 9, 2012

WASHINGTON WINDOW
By LYLE C. WILSON
United Press International

WASHINGTON (UPI) — President Eisenhower was saying the other day that Americans should reject the theories of Karl Marx. He told a news conference that he was greatly disturbed by the spread in the United States of an idea which dated back to Marx’s Communist teachings of more than 100 years ago.

Specifically, Eisenhower objected to Marx’s doctrine of the class war, the ultimately violent contest for supremacy between what Marx called the proletarians and the bourgeoisie. That may be translated into labor (proletarian and management or capital Bourgeoisie). Eisenhower’s reference to Marxian theory came during a discussion of steel labor contract negotiations.

Karl Marx and a collaborator, Friedrich Engels, made their pitch for the class war for a classless society 111 years ago, in 1848. They then wrote “The Communist Manifesto.” Their work is the basic document of all of the Socialist parties in the world today, including the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Non-Socialist parties and governments have nibbled at various parts of the Marx-Engels prescription for a classless society, adopting bits and pieces of it. Of the 10 steps toward socialism or communism proposed by Marx and Engels, however, one notably, has been accepted and made grimly effective in even the most capitalist nations, including the United States.

Marx and Engels’ 10 steps to Utopia were these:

Abolish property rights in land and apply all rents to public purposes.

Impose a heavy progressive or graduated income tax.

Abolish all rights of inheritance.

Confiscate property of all emigrants and rebels.

Centralize credit in the hands of the state by means of a national bank with state capital and exclusive monopoly.

Centralize the means of communication and transport in the hands of state.

Extend factories and instruments of productions owned by the state; bring waste lands into cultivation and improve the soil generally with a common plan.

Make all persons equally liable to labor; establish industrial especially in agriculture .. 17 agencies  especially in manufacturing industries; gradually abolish distinction between town and country, by more equitable distribution of population.

Provide free education for all children in public schools; abolish children’s factory labor in its present (1848) form; combine education with industrial production.

“In a sense,” Marx and Engels wrote, “the theory of the Communists may be summed up in a single sentence: abolition of private property!”

That is the Socialist-Communist program which Nikita Khrushchev was saying just a while ago would establish a way of life for the present crop of American grandchildren.

Amarillo Globe-Times (Amarillo, Texas) Jun 22, 1959

Regretting Lost Freedom

November 8, 2012

REGRETTING LOST FREEDOM

PEOPLE have lost their freedom from time to time down thru the long centuries. But they have never failed to regret that loss and to strive to regain liberty.

The world has changed, the editors of “Das Reich,” a Berlin newspaper, seems to believe. For this paper is urging the people of the Netherlands and of Scandinavia to “cease regretting their lost freedom and be glad to join the German Reich …”

People are stubborn about things like that. They may be conquered. They may be held down by military occupation. They may be denied freedom.

But the longing for lost freedom is something that is not so easily removed as a pair of tonsils. It lies down deep in man, out of reach of the surgeon’s knife — or even of the bayonet.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Nov 5, 1940

Campaign Garbage

November 8, 2012

Think of the Money Invested in All This

Star- News (Pasadena, California) Nov 5, 1964

Thank Goodness!

November 8, 2012

Those Campaign Speeches are Over!

— Stuff Jefferson Would Have Said —

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Nov 3, 1936

Welcome to the End

November 7, 2012

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Today is the Day – Vote Willard!

November 6, 2012

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To Oppose and Overthrow Political Wrong

November 5, 2012

Image from Big Hair Envy

To oppose and overthrow political wrong, and corruption the people

“Have a weapon firmer set
And better than the bayonet;
A weapon that comes down as still,
As snow flakes fall upon the sod,
But executes a Freeman’s will,
As lightning does the will of God;
And from its force, nor bolts nor rocks
Can shield them — tis the ballot box.”

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Aug 9, 1843

One More Day – Remember to Vote

November 5, 2012

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