A ‘Grave Yard’ in the Wat’ry Deep

December 17, 2012

watery grave - Drowning

Image from University of Virginia

From the Albany Argus.

LINES,

Suggested by the following paragraph, taken from the Argus of October 7

“There is a place in the Mississippi where so many vessels have been wrecked, that it is called the ‘Grave Yard.'”

A ‘Grave Yard’ in the wat’ry deep — a home beneath the wave,
For they, the mourned, the loved, the lost, the youthful and the brave!
Oh, loving hearts have broken, and eye grown dim with weeping,
For the thousand forms that lie, in that unseen ‘Grave Yard’ sleeping.

A ‘Grave Yard’ — but above the dead selection sheds no tear,
No mourner’s footsteps tread the ground, no sighs are echoed here.
Affection’s hand can never bring, at pensive evening hour,
And place o’er some reposing form, love’ purest gilt — a flower.

Nor can it rear, with pious care, the costly marble stone,
In memory of the faded form, closed eye, and silent tongue;
Ah no! the tears that fall for these, can no green grave bedew,
And memory must erect her shrine, in the warm hearts of the true.

Oh! the sea may boast its sparkling gems and its snow-white coral caves,
And the pure and precious pearl that lies, far down in its deep, blue waves;
But thou, majestic river, what wealth thy waters hide —
The heart’s most valued treasure, the bosom’s dearest pride!

One common fate, one common home, is found by youth and age;
One common resting place they share, the infant and the sage,
The same proud wave, perchance, that laid the grey-haired sire low,
Has dashed from childhood’s downy cheek, its warm, bewitching glow.

A wave, a single, crystal wave, has levelled manhood’s pride,
And frozen in its chill embraces, the life blood of the bride;
A wave has bowed the maiden’s form, and one tumultuous billow,
Has been to many a bright, young head, its last and coldest pillow.

See, bounding o’er the “Grave Yard,’ a vessel in its might,
It skims the water’s surface, like a sea-bird in its flight.
Oh many a long-lamented one those waters have in keeping —
Sail slowly o’er the hallowed spot, where the silent dead are sleeping.

It is an awful thought that the gay, the living tread
Above the wave-walled sepulchre of the calm and quiet dead!
It is a solemn thought, that should one more fast sweep by,
Far down in that dark and dread abode, those breathing forms must lie.

Sail slowly — and let every soul, that those waves on their bosom bear,
With chastened spirits lift the heart to heaven in fervent prayer,
That He who holds f— human life, in his own holy keeping,
May save them from the wat’ry waste, where the silent dead are sleeping.

ESTE LD.

Albany, Oct. 15, 1842

Wiskonsan Enquirer (Madison, Wisconsin) Dec 24, 1842

Gaiter Boots

December 15, 2012

Boots 1860s

Image from Laura Elizabeth on Pinterest

GAITER BOOTS.

O dainty foot!
O gaiter boot!
To piety you’re shocking;
I only know —
Of one thing worse,
And that a snow white stocking.

So neat and clean,
Together seen,
E’en stoics must agree
To you to vote
What Gray once wrote,
A handsome L – E – G.

The [lasting] theme
Of midnight dream,
The very [soul] of song,
Man wants you little
Here below,
And never wants you long.

By Plato ne’er
Sent tripping here;
By Pluto rather given,
To lead poor man
(An easy plan)
To any place but heaven.

Yet still I vow
There’s magic now
About a woman’s foot,
And cunning was
The wizard hand
That made a gaiter boot.

For while the knave
The gaiter gave
To mortals to ensnare them,
Mankind he hoaxed,
And even coaxed
The angels down to wear them.

The Hillsdale Standard (Hillsdale, Michigan) May 1, 1866

This Date in History – George Washington

December 14, 2012

George Washington potrait - The Newark Advocate OH 22 FEb 1904

*     *     *

Today is the Anniversary of GW Death - Kokomo Tribune IN 14 Dec 1929

WASHINGTON’S DEATH

One hundred and thirty years ago today, on December 14, 1799, George Washington died.

On Dec. 12 of that year, Washington was exposed in the saddle for several hours to cold and snow, and attacked with acute laryngitis, for which he was repeatedly bled.

Washington sunk rapidly and died two days later. His last words were characteristic. He said: “I die hard, but I am not afraid to go. I believed from my first attack that I should not survive it. My breath cannot last long.” A little later he said: “I feel myself going. I thank you for your attentions; but I pray you to take no more trouble about me. Let me go off quietly. I cannot last long.”

After some instructions to his secretary about his burial, he became easier, felt for his own pulses, and died without a struggle.

Mourning was almost as widespread in Europe as it was in America.

Kokomo Tribune (Kokomo, Indiana) Dec 14, 1929

This Date in History - The News - Frederick MD 14 Dec 1893

1893

*     *     *

This Date In History - Sandusky Star Journal OH 14 Dec 1911

1911

*     *     *

Today in History - GW - Sheboygan Press WI 14 Dec 1928

1928

*     *     *

Today in History - George Washington - The News - Frederick MD - 14 Dec 1929

1929

*     *     *

Today in History - GW - The Bridgeport Post CT 14 Dec 1967

1967

*     *     *

Rain, Rain, Go Away!

December 13, 2012

Rain - San Antonio Express TX - 11 Dec 1963

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Dec 11, 1963

Rain  - The Chronicle Telegram - Elyria OH 18 Nov 1931

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Nov 18, 1931

Rain - Chile - Troy Record NY 17 Dec 1962

Troy Record (Troy, New York) Dec 17, 1962

Rain - Golf - The Chronicle Telegram - Elyria OH 5 Dec 1928

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Dec 5, 1928

Rain - South Korea - Lima News OH 18 Sep 1950

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Sep 15, 1950

Letter to Santa

December 12, 2012

To Santa Claus - Appleton Post Crescent WI 23 Dec 1921

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 23, 1921

Letter to Santa.

Dear Santa Claus: My coal bill
Is ninety twenty-four,
If you will take it off my hands,
I shall not ask for more.
I don’t care how you fix it,
Just so you let me out —
O, that would be a Christmas gift
Beyond a doubt.

Dear Santa Claus, my grocer
Wants money very badly,
If you will see him when you come,
I’ll leave it to you gladly.
I don’t care what you give him,
Just so the trade is fair —
O, that would be a Christmas gift
Beyond compare.

Dear Santa Claus, my butcher —
But do I grow prolix?
What say I send them all to you,
With leave for you to fix?
I don’t care how you fix them,
So long as they are paid —
But I expect too much of you,
I am afraid.

— St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 21, 1912

The Warmth of Perfection

December 11, 2012

Vintage Perfection Oil Heater

Image from Etsy

Oil Heater - Perfection - The News - Frederick MD 24 Dec 1907

Glowing Heat From Every Ounce of Fuel

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 24, 1907

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Gettysburg Times PA 09 Dec 1911

Clean Dry Heat

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 9, 1911

Oil Heater - Perfection - Olean Evening Times NY 24 Dec 1912

Houses Without Chimneys

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Dec 24, 1912

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 12 Dec 1914

Baby’s Morning Dip

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 12, 1914

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 18 Dec 1915

A Touch of a Match Brings a Touch of Spring

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 18, 1915

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 18 Dec 1918

Emergency Heating

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 18, 1918

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Gettysburg Times PA 18 Dec 1918

Don’t Waste Coal

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 18, 1918

Kitchen Police

December 10, 2012

kp duty - potato peeler

KITCHEN POLICE.
(K.P.)

(This poem presumably written by a soldier is valuable as indicating the saving sense of humor possessed by our men and which carries them through the difficult days of the training period and sustains them in the sterner and more trying days that follow.)

_______

Sitting here in the kitchen, peeling a bucket of spuds,
Wearing a dirty apron to cover my blue serge duds,
A hundred thousand in the bank, “Society man” — that’s me;
Just because I was late at roll call, they gave me a week’s K.P.

Sitting here in the kitchen, with slops all over my jeans;
Picking rocks and splinters out of a barrel of beans,
My thoughts have gone a-wandering to what I used to be
Before I missed that last post car and they gave me a week’s K.P.

I think of the nights I squandered, doing the barroom stunt;
Gee! what a sissy I was — what a hopeless, hopeless runt!
Oh, I was there with the girls, boys, and they called me a “lady’s man.”
What would they say if they saw me now, scraping a greasy pan.

The mess sergeant’s a slaver; he gives a man no rest.
The first cook is a villain, but I have the second best.
Oh, sure, boys, I enlisted to march away to war,
But they’ve got me here in the kitchen, doing the company chores.

A week policing the kitchen, watching the biscuits browned —
Me, who used to order two thousand men around.
I wonder what those two thousand would say if they saw me now
Washing a hundred dishes, ready for 6 o’clock chow?

Two months ago, in a greenhouse, I held Anita’s hand,
Told her that I had enlisted to fight for my native land.
She leaned her head on my shoulder, said she’d be proud of me;
She’d be proud, all right, if she saw me now, doing a week’s K.P.

Dumping the slush in the hogpan, scrubbing the kitchen floor,
Swabbing a slimy mush-pan until my hands are sore,
Fixing the hash for supper, putting ice in the tea —
Archibald Percival Knutty, “society man” — that’s me!

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Jul 25, 1918

Just The Same

December 9, 2012

Buying Power - Old Sock Hung With Care - Fresno Bee Republican CA 23 Dec 1947

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California)  Dec 23 1947

LIGHT SIDE OF LIFE.
By Roy K. Moulton.

JUST THE SAME.

The can threaten.
They can bellow.
They can go investigate,
But the cost of living rises just the same.
They can fume and
They can holler.
They can go and legislate,
But the cost of living rises just the same.
They can talk of deportation for the hardy profiteers.
They can bunk the patient public with a lot of phony steers.
They can wave their fists and orate for a half million years,
But the cost of living rises just the same.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 28, 1920

Tin Soldiers, Toy Soldiers, Wartime Toys

December 8, 2012

Tin Soldier Cut-Outs - Edwardsville Intelligencer IL 06 Dec 1941

He was only a little tine soldier then,
To be used as a battering ram;
Today he’s the pride of a nation wide —
He’s the nephew of Uncle Sam.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 6, 1941

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

THE Toyville army, marching
Into billets ‘neath a chair,
Discovered two tin soldier spies
Beneath the carpet there.

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

The captain sternly marched them out,
Their case and fate to settle.
They stood at ease with steady knees,
For they were men of mettle!

Toyville Army 3 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

I’m glad Ted chanced to pass just then
And took a hand. He thrust
The two spies in his pocket,
To the captain’s great disgust!

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 12, 1918

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

THE Toyville army bravely marched
Across high table land,
Upon the table edge, some one
Forgot the right command!

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

No welcome “Halt!” to bid them stay,
So like the gallant host of yore,
Theirs not to question, but obey,
They fell in companies to the floor.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 19, 1918

Wartime Christmas - Reno Evening Gazette NV - 16 Nov 1942

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 16, 1942

LITTLE TIN SOLDIER.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright should your captain say,
“Fall out, dismissed, well done — let’s play!”

Or would the Something that comes with drill
O’ershadow you, follow you, hinder you still —
And you hear like the beat of a distant tattoo,
“Count off, front and rear, one two .  .  .  one two?”

Time was, I am sure, though you look so grim
There’s a gleam in your eye, though ’tis often dim,
When your memory quickens and troubles you
As you quick-step, march — one two, one two.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright if I said what is true,
“I love you, my darling — I do, I do?”

— Ann Drew.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jul 4, 1926

Be a Tin Soldier - Billings Gazette MT 08 Jul 1945

Billigns Gazette (Billings, Montana) Jul 8, 1945

We Are At War.

December 7, 2012

Jap Bombers Shower Death on Honolulu - Edwardsville Intellignecer IL 09 Dec 1941

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 9, 1941

We Are At War.

(An Editorial)

Japan’s unprovoked and unannounced attack upon the United States removed any remaining doubt about this nation’s position in the world conflict.

We are at war. While it was Japan who attacked us, the other Axis partners, Germany and Italy, are equally our enemies. There is no longer reason for pretense. The United States is in the war and there is no question about who the enemies are.

Japan’s savage attack upon unsuspecting Hawaii is exactly what we should expect from the Axis nations. Germany always strikes first and then announces intentions. Italy stepped into the war with an attack upon France when France was prostrate. Japan’s every move against China has followed the same pattern.

Japan’s method of procedure did bring about united determination in this country to devote all energy to the production of the war. It is reprehensible to us that a nation should make an attack at the very moment its envoys were seemingly engaged in peace negotiations.

Hemisphere solidarity seems assured. The Latin-American nations will give valuable aid, economically, and in furnishing bases and patrols.

We must steel ourselves for a real fight. Japan will not be a push-over. She has been preparing for this conflict for years. The fighting will be on her side of the Pacific, a decided advantage.

We will suffer serious losses. They must be expected. This is real war — grim, relentless war. No quarter will be asked or expected.

The United States faces a tremendous responsibility in the now world-encircling clash between totalitarian and Democratic ideas. We must continue to supply Great Britain, Russia and China, and in addition give our own fighting forces every support.

Our so-called “defense effort” has been little more than half-hearted. Now we must forget all our nationalistic differences, put aside all thought of personal advantage, ignore partisanship and put every effort behind the President and the military forces on the sea, in the air and in the field.

Nothing must be permitted to stand in the way of our prime purpose.

We have a war to win.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 8, 1941

American Diplomacy - Edwardsville Intelligencer IL 08 dEc 1941

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 8, 1941

War Till The Final Victory - Edwardsville Intellignecer IL 09 Dec 1941

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 9, 1941