Posts Tagged ‘1802’

Duel at William and Mary

April 30, 2010

We learn by a gentleman from Virginia, that the college of William and Mary, at Williamsburg, is completely broken up, and the system of education there, fro the present at least, entirely discontinued.

“The circumstances of this extraordinary affair are as follows: — In consequence of a difference between two of the students, a Mr. Lee, of Norfolk, and a Mr. Yates of Fredericksburg, a duel was fought, in which the latter was wounded.

Tucker House (Image from http://www.welshcolor.com)

For this gross violation of the rules of the College, they both expelled, which so enraged all the rest of the Collegians, that they assembled, went to the church, broke and destroyed all the windows, cut down the pulpit, tore out all the leaves of the bible and gave them to the wind — from thence they proceeded to the house of Judge Tucker (whose opinions have of late been so often quoted in Congress)professor of law in the University, broke all his windows, pelted his house, abused him, and then each repaired to his own home.

Judge Tucker (Image from Wikimedia)

The Judge it is said, has resigned his office of Professor, in consequence of the outrage — and thus dies one of the oldest and wealthiest seminaries of learning in the United States of America.

These may be considered as some of the blessed effects of the modern system of religion; for party politks, instead of science, appear long since to have been the primary objects of instruction in that University; and from that soul source have flowed many of the heretical doctrines of the present day.”

The Adams Centinel (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Apr 21, 1802

From the William and Mary News and Events:

Hobson to publish St. George Tucker law papers
by Ann Gaudreaux | February 25, 2010

Tucker arrived in Virginia from Bermuda in 1771 and entered the College of William & Mary in 1772 where he studied general academics in the schools of natural and moral philosophy. He then read law under George Wythe, and was admitted to the bar of county courts in 1774 and of the General Court in 1775. His law career was interrupted by the American Revolution, but after the war he established a busy practice in the county courts around Petersburg. By the mid-1780s he was attending the superior courts in Richmond. Tucker succeeded Wythe as Professor of Law in 1790, and in 1804 he was promoted to the Virginia Court of Appeals. In 1813, he accepted President James Madison’s appointment as a U.S. District Court judge. There Tucker also sat with Chief Justice John Marshall on the U.S. Circuit Court for Virginia. He tendered his resignation in 1825, two years before his death.

Tucker conducted his law classes in between judicial sessions, basing his course around William Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England. He took great care to point out the differences between English law and Virginia and American practice, which required modifying or discarding Blackstone at many points. Tucker incorporated his lecture notes into his edition of Blackstone, published in 1803, entitled Blackstone’s Commentaries: With Notes of Reference, to the Constitution and Laws, of the Federal Government of the United States; and of the Commonwealth of Virginia.

***Read the whole article at the link above. Pretty interesting.