Posts Tagged ‘1817’

Proh Pudor!

June 30, 2010

Hotel Galvez - Galveston, TX (Image from http://www.cardcow.com)

Galvezton vs. Galveston.

The following letter in reference to the origin of the name of our city will prove interesting to old citizens and those fond of etymology. Possibly some one else has something to relate on this subject:

Eds. News — It is generally conceded that our island was named after the Count de Galvez, who was Governor of Louisiana and Florida, and subsequently, Viceroy of New Spain (Mexico.) Etymologists were somewhat puzzled by the ending ton, which did not appear to be Spanish; but they disposed of the said vexatious ton, by pronouncing it a corruption of the word town, found in Charleston, Washington, etc.

The explanation, if handy, does not seem to be very plausible. Spainards were fond of sonorous names; the name “Nacogdoches,” long enough for our practical uses, they pronounced “La Mision de Nuestra Senor a del Pilar de los Nacogdoches;” the Brazos River was “El Rio de los Brazos de Dios,” etc.

It is, therefore, probable that to find a name for an island that had no town in it, they needed not to corrupt the little English word town.

Nestor Maxan, Esq., of Brownsville, has in his possession, and showed me, a Spanish law book, published in Madrid during the latter century, and dedicated to the Count of Galvez, then a boy five years old, and son of the former Viceroy, the godfather of our island. I found on the title page the escutcheon of the Galvez family, as follows, viz:

A ship under full sails, and on its side the word, “Galvezton;” above the ship a fleur-de-lis, the emblem of the Bourbons, the reigning family of Spain, with the motto “Yo solo” — I alone.

1849 Definition - Proh Pudor

This would tend to prove that the word Galvezton existed several centuries ago in Spanish heraldry, but has become obsolete. I find, in a collection of decrees of the Mexican Congress, an act of 1825, to open the port of Glavezton. Galvezton again! Shall we be compelled to acknowledge the deplorable fact that we do not know how to spell the name of our own lovely island and city? Proh Pudor!

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Jun 9, 1876

1817 - Niles Weekly Register

This is part of an article I found on the Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers website. There is more of it posted at this LINK, although, since they sell these papers, I don’t know how long the link will be good.  (www.rarenewspapers.com for the home page.)

*****

The ibiblio website has transcriptions for the following at this LINK:

MESSAGE

FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,
COMMUNICATING INFORMATION
OF THE PROCEEDING OF CERTAIN PERSONS
WHO TOOK POSSESSION OF AMELIA ISLAND
AND OF GALVEZTON, DURING THE SUMMER
OF THE PRESENT YEAR,
AND MADE ESTABLISHMENTS THERE.

December 15, 1817.

Read, and ordered to lie upon the table.
WASHINGTON:
PRINTED BY E. DE KRAFFT
1817

Dull Times; Money’s Scarce

March 7, 2009
from:www.nchalloffame.com

from:www.nchalloffame.com

DULL TIMES, &c.

‘Dull times,’ from the every mouth is heard,
And duller still, by many fear’d —
The season has been cold and dry,
The crops are small, the taxes high,
The hay is short, the corn is green,
The pigs are poor, the cattle lean;
Money’s so scarce, the merchant frets,
And racks his brains to pay his debts;
Runs round from door to door to borrow,
(And gives his check to pay to-morrow,)
Puts off the evil hour once more,
And feels relief’d for twenty-four.
‘Tis strange! when money-makers stand,
At every corner of the land —
When notes of every name and hue —
Of white, and yellow, red and blue,
Are issued forth mankind to pillage,
By stage-man, huckster, bank and village;
A flood of filthy floating trash,
Printed and sign’d for paper cash
That with one voice we close the farce,
By crying out, ‘that Money’s scarce.’
Albany Adv.

Ohio Repository, The (Canton, Ohio) Feb 20, 1817

The Lying Attorney

March 6, 2009

gravestone

EPITAPH ON AN ATTORNEY AT LAW.

Beneath this smooth stone, by the bone of his bone,

Sleeps Master John Gill;

By lies when alive, this attorney did thrive,

And now that he’s dead, he lies still.

Ohio Repository, The (Canton, Ohio) Feb 20, 1817

The Funny Thing About Scolds

March 4, 2009
Drawing from Tales of Pioneer Pittsburgh

Drawing from Tales of Pioneer Pittsburgh

Here is a humorous poem about scolds:

From the Philadelphia True American.
Messrs Printers — One poet has immortalized himself by singing the delights of drinking: half a dozen by pourtraying the joys of love: but it was not until yesterday I knew that the  pleasures of scolding had ever been the subject of song. It is strange, very strange, that the muses, being ladies, could ever condescend to inspire the poet with so ungracious a them. During the storm yesterday I took shelter in Woodward’s bookstore, where to amuse myself, I picked up an old song book, from which I transcribe the following. The concluding line, in which the good woman consoles herself for the lost time in which she sleeps, by saying she will ‘pay them off to-morrow,‘ is excellent and admirably in character.
June 26. ‘PETRUCHIO.’

JOYS OF SCOLDING.

Some women take delight in dress,
And some in cards take pleasure,
While others place their happiness
In heaping hoards of treasure.
In private some delight to kiss,
Their hidden charms unfolding,
But they mistake their sovereign bliss,
There’s no such joy as scolding.

Each morning as I ope my eyes,
I soon disperse all silence,
Before my neighbours can arise,
They hear my clack a mile hence.
When at the board I take my seat,
There’s one continued riot;
I eat, I scold, I scold, I eat,
My clack is never quiet.

Each night whene’er I go to bed,
I always fall a weeping,
For silence is the thing I dread,
I cannot scold when sleeping.
But then my pains to mitigate,
And drive away all sorrow,
Although to-night may be too late,
I’LL PAY THEM OFF TO-MORROW.

Ohio Repository, The (Canton, Ohio) Aug 15, 1816

squiggle4

APOLOGY FOR SCOLDING.

Observe, fair Celia, all in all,
Mild, beautiful and young;
‘Tis true; but then her mouth’s so small,
It cannot hold her tongue!

Ohio Repository, The (Canton, Ohio) Jan 23, 1817

squiggle5

BOTH PUNISHED.

“Pop!”
“Yes, my son.”
“In olden times a woman who was a common scold was punished, wasn’t she?”
“Yes, my son. So was the man she married.” — Yonkers Statesman.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Nov 11, 1912

squiggle6

Another poem, which I found in the Tales of pioneer Pittsburgh, published by the William Penn Association, c1937.

Kesouse! the stool went down again,
Into the slush-ice splashing;
But still the bag, with never a gag,
Kept up her vile tongue-lashing!

Kesouse! a third time for the charm,
Down to the very bottom;
But worse and worse the drab to curse
Begain with a “Dod rot ’em!”

Kesouse! Now let the stool stay down,
And save us futher trouble!
But still her tongue assailed the throng
In every rising bubble!

Until the ice of Februer,
Closed firm and fast above her;
And her corse, cut out perforce,
None can but death discover!

When, hark! upon the cooling-board,
The corse begain to cough;
And then her jaw, the first to thaw,
Went on where she’d left off!

The ducking-stool at once condemned,
Was into kindling cut;
And the mouth of the scold of the days of old,
Has never since been shut.

Except beneath the ice of death,
To be opened sometime later;
When the corse on the board again is heard
In her begotten daughter!

But who was the scold? Ah, helpless wight,
No longer worry and bother;
But go to your home and meet your doom —
She was your dear wife’s mother!