Posts Tagged ‘1818’

Lewis W. Homan, an Early Iowa Pioneer

December 16, 2011

OUR NONAGENARIANS

Short Sketch of Adams County Citizens of Advanced Age.

LEWIS W. HOMAN, MT. ETNA.

One of the Early Pioneers in Iowa, an Ex-County Judge and an Exemplary Citizen.

Lewis W. Homan, the subject of this sketch, was born January 26, 1818, and is now 91 years old. His father and mother were citizens of Virginia at the time of their marriage, in 1816, but soon after moved into Kentucky. Mark Homan, father of Lewis W., was born in Virginia near the Potomac river, about 40 miles above the city of Washington, in the year 1789, the year that George Washington was first elected president. When Mark Homan was 13 years old he moved with his mother to what is now West Virginia, where he lived until he attained the age of 27 years, and where he met and married Miss Nancy Burson, in 1816. Soon after their marriage they moved across the Cumberland mountains into Kentucky, crossing the mountains on horseback. In 1818 their son, Lewis W., whose picture we this week present to our readers, was born, on the banks of Salt river, in Kentucky. When Lewis was about eight years old his grandmother, Elizabeth Homan, entered land in Putnam county, Indiana, which she deeded to her son Mark, and to which Lewis W. came with his father and mother in the fall of 1827, and where his father made his home until the time of his death in 1874, the mother dying in 1837. Here Lewis grew to manhood and in 1838 was married to Miss Temperance M. McClain.

Image from Legends of America

In 1843 with his wife and three children he moved to Jones county, Iowa, coming through from Indiana with an ox team and in the old fashioned prairie schooner. Jones county was then mostly unfenced, raw prairie, and its county seat was but a very small village. However, its people were open hearted and kind to all newcomers, and the family was soon among kind and sociable friends. They resided in Jones county until the year 1856, when they came to Adams county, where they again went through the experiences of making a home on the frontier of a new country. It was not long, however, until they were surrounded with friends and helpful neighbors, and the exemplary life of the old gentleman has retained the respect and esteem of all his acquaintances down through the years. Mr. Homan was married but once, his wife living with him to old age. At the time of her death, about eight years ago, they had been living together 63 years. On the occasion of their fifty-seventh wedding anniversary a large number of their relatives and friends met to assist in celebrating the event. Mr. and Mrs. Homan were the parents of 12 children and number among their progeny 51 grandchildren, most of whom are living, and 44 great grandchildren, a record that scarcely finds an equal in Adams county.

Lewis Homan and wife passed a few years in Corning, the rest of their lives they spent on the farm, where they raised their large family. Under the old law, Mr. Homan served a term as county judge of Adams county, and thus it will be seen that his friends and neighbors delighted to honor him with a high position in their midst. He and his brother Westley were the founders of the First Baptist church of Adams county, which was organized in 1858, and of which he is the only charter member. It stands as a splendid monument to his religious zeal and fidelity in days when the support of a church meant more than it does now, from a financial standpoint at least. After the organization of this church he was made superintendent of its Sunday school, a position he held for 17 years, and until old age forbade he was one of the deacons of the church. He and his wife early in life identified themselves with church and Sunday school work, also with the cause of temperance. In an early day, while still living in Jones county, they signed a pledge of total abstinence from intoxicants, and faithfully adhered to it all their lives. Mr. Homan is now living in the joy of a well spent life, and the hope of a glorious eternity. Time has been good to Mr. Homan, and left him the use of a sound mind, and some degree of health. He has a good appetite for food and enjoys the eating, but has not strength enough in his limbs to walk, and is unable to leave his room. He generally sleeps well and sits in his rocker most of the day. He is cheerful with the friends who call to see him, and greatly enjoys their visits.

Mark Homan, father of the subject of this article, was a soldier of the war of 1812, and Lewis W. had two sons in the military service of the United States in the war for the preservation of the union.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) apr 7, 1909

Franklin LaRue – Veteran Surveyor

November 25, 2011

OUR NONAGENARIANS

Short Sketch of Adams County Citizens of Advanced Age.

F. LARUE, VETERAN SURVEYOR

A Life Full of Usefulness and An Old Age That Is a Pleasure to Himself and Friends

Franklin LaRue, for nearly a generation county surveyor of this county was born on an estate still in the possession of his family near Bath, Steuben County, New York, on December 28th, 1818, being now over ninety years old. He prepared for Amherst College at Prattsburg Academy and studied civil engineering at the Van Rensselaer Institute, Troy, N.Y., now know as Troy Polytecnic Institute.

Mr. LaRue’s first professional work was on the government survey of the lower peninsula of Michigan. Owing to an injury received while thus engaged he was, for a number of years, compelled to abandon field work. During this time he served for four years as county treasurer of Ingham County, Michigan. He then engaged in business in Lansing, Mich., where he resided for many years, being prominently identified with the growth and prosperity of the then comparatively new capital city, and running for state senator on the ticket headed by James Buchanan for president.

Near the close of the civil war he was located in the vicinity of Bloomington, Illinois, where he engaged for a number of years in farming and sheep raising, though he did a great deal of land and road surveying during this period. In 1874 he came to Mercer Township, this county, to improve some land he owned there and was soon elected county surveyor, and held that office as long as he was able to follow his transit. While in office he established the grade of the principal streets of Corning, surveyed the majority of the roads of the county, and left in the office a fine set of maps of the public highways of the whole county which has proved invaluable to his successors.

Mr. LaRue has lived in his present home in Corning for over twenty-five years and the picture presented here-with is a snapshot, taken by a grandson while he was engaged in work about his grounds. After giving up active work he was frequently appointed by the courts to do expert work in finding government corners, throughout this section of the country, and still received requests to do this work, and visits for consultation from many county surveyors, being almost the only living man who was engaged on the original government survey.

Mr. LaRue is very fortunate in retaining full possession of all his faculties, excepting his eyesight, which is growing somewhat dim. His memory is remarkably good, never being at a loss to supply dates and data for the great world changes, and wonderful inventions that have come into being during his remembrance. He also keeps in active touch with all the leading topics of the present day. The boys and girls of his acquaintance delight in propounding mathematical problems to him, which he always solves mentally, extracting the square, cube and sixth root of any number less than one hundred raised to a corresponding power, without the aid of a pencil or paper. His mind is a veritable store house of beautiful poems, with which he is frequently called upon to entertain his friends. He delights in attributing this clearness of memory to the total abstinence of intoxicating liquors and tobacco during his whole life.

Mr. LaRue is one of the grand old gentlemen of the community, enjoying the respect and esteem of all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. We join his many friends in wishing him health and prosperity for years to come.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Feb 10, 1909


Walnut Grove image from Find-A-Grave, where the gravestones of his family members can be found, but I couldn’t find an entry or photo for his gravestone.

Death of Franklin LaRue.

On Monday, September 30, about 12:30 p.m., there passed to his reward one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of Adams county, Franklin LaRue, the cause of his death being largely old age. For a few days he had been suffering from a cold but his condition was not considered critical by his family. He was conscious to the last. The machinery of the body had done its full work and he peacefully passed away.

The subject of this sketch was born near Bath, Stuben county, N.Y., December 28, 1818, and at the time of his death was aged 93 years, 9 months and 2 days. The funeral was held from the home in the northwest part of the city on October 2 at 10:30 a.m., conducted by Rev. Norman McLeod of the Presbyterian church. Interment in Walnut Grove cemetery along side of his faithful wife who was buried there January 6, 1901.

In his young years he attended Amherst college and studied civil engineering at Van Rensaeller institute, Troy, N.Y.. He was the youngest of a family of twelve children. when a young man he came west and located in Michigan and was engaged in surveying. Here he was married to Miss Amelia Chapin at Mason, Mich., Sept. 25, 1848. To this union were born eight children, six daughters and two sons, four of the daughters died at Lansing, Mich., for many years the family home, in their infancy. The two sons, H.H. and F.L. died and are buried in Corning. The living are Mrs. F.A. Kennon of Corning and Miss Myra LaRue who has made her home with her father.

The family came to Adams county in 1874 and settled in Mercer township. Soon after coming here Mr. LaRue was elected county surveyor and held the office for a number of years. He was an exceptionally good surveyor and much of the work done in this county was by him. In politics Mr. LaRue was a democrat and was a candidate for the state senate in Michigan on the ticket by James Buchanan in 1856. His first vote for president was cast in 1840 and in the present campaign he took a deep interest and from the start was an ardent admirer of Wilson and frequently remarked that he hoped he would live to cast a big vote for the New Jersey governor.

For thirty years he had lived int he home in which his death occurred in Corning, an honored and upright citizen whom it was a pleasure to meet and discuss the topics of the day and the events of many years ago. Until a few years ago he was a great reader and since he could not read on account of failing eyesight he had his daughter and others read to him and he was thoroughly posted on the topics of the day.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Oct 12, 1912

This Day In History

December 2, 2009

Dec. 1st:

In 1917, the Rev. Edward Flanagan founded Boys Town in Omaha, Neb.

In 1953, the New York Stock Exchange announced for the first time in history investors could buy stocks on the installment plan.

In 1958, fire swept through the Chicago school of Our Lady of the Angels, killing 93 children and three nuns.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 1, 1967

Dec 3rd:

In 1818, Illinois entered the Union as the 21st state.

In 1833, Oberlin College, the first truly co-educational college in the United States, opened it doors.

In 1929, the Ford Motor Company raised daily wages from $6.00 to $7.00 despite collapse of the stock market.

In 1948, the nation learned that microfilm of secret U.S. documents had been found in a hollow pumpkin on the farm of Whitaker Chambers.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 3, 1962

Dec 4th:

In 1783, George Washington said goodbye to his troops at New York shortly before he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson sailed for France to attend the peace conference at Versailles.

In 1942, President Roosevelt ordered the liquidation of the Works Progress Administration, created in 1935 to provide work for the unemployed.

In 1946, the United Mine Workers union was fined $3.5 million and its leader, John L. Lewis $10,000 for refusing to call off a 17-day strike.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 4, 1963

Dec. 5th:

In 1776, the first scholastic fraternity in America, Phi Beta Kappa, was organized at the College of William and Mary.

In 1933, prohibition was abolished with the 21st amendment.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 5, 1962

Dec 6th:

In 1859, John Brown was hanged in the public square of Charlestown, Va., for his raid on Harper’s Ferry. On the way to the gallows, he said of the countryside, “This is a beautiful country!”

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Dec 6, 1976

Shipwreck 1820

November 24, 2009
The Shipwreck (Image from www.artinthepicture.com)

The Shipwreck (Image from http://www.artinthepicture.com)

NOTE: Parts of this newspaper image were very hard to read,  especially the numbers, which I have marked with a – ?-  question mark.

Loss of the Ship Resource.

Mr. B. Wyman of this town, who arrived in the Jane, from Manilla, has communicated the following particulars respecting the loss of the ship Resource, Sowle. — “On the 20th of Nov. 1818, on the passage from Kamtschatka, being in about lat. 28, N  long. 80, E while under easy sail, at about 6 PM, she struck on an unknown reef of rocks, weather thick and squally — she remained about ten minutes, when she slid off, and on sounding the pumps found she had made considerable water — the pumps were immediately set at work, but the water gained on them fast. The foremast was then cut away, and all hands employed in clearing the wreck, and getting out the boats.

After providing provisions, water, &c. the officers and crew left the ship and she soon after sunk. The long boat, having on board most of the provisions and water saved from the ship, being very leaky soon filled and capsized, and the contents lost; some of the crew in her swam to the other boats, others clung to her till morning, and were then taken off, except one, who was drowned.

There were now the two whale boats left; Capt. Sowle and 12? men in one, and Mr. Joseph Harris, first mate, and 12 men in the other – each boat had about 30 lbs of bread, but no water — the men were on an allowance of half a biscuit per day. The boats kept company all the next day, but soon after dark the captain’s boat suddenly disappeared, and it was thought must have been upset, and all on board perished, as nothing was seen of her afterwards, the sea running very high. On the ?0th Dec., the surviving boat landed on the uninhabited island of Agrigon, the crew not having had any water for 2? days, except what they caught as it fell from the heavens, which gave them from one to three spoonfulls a man per day.

Mr. S. La Roach died Dec. 2?, Mr. Wm. S. Sp??hawk the ??th, Mr. Joseph Adams 15th; and Mr. Harris, the mate, fell from a rock, Jan. 17, 1819, while fishing and was drowned. Mr. Wyman and 7 others remained on the island subsisting on what it afforded, (it having been stocked with goats and hogs) till the 18th of Nov ’19, a period of eleven months, when they were discovered and taken off by a Spanish brig, bound to Manilla, at which place they were landed, Dec. 22. Two of the survivors went thence to Canton*, two remained at Manilla, and ? [3 ?] took passage for the U.S.

The Resource had no cargo but salt on board when lost.

Ohio Repository, The (Canton, Ohio) Jul 6, 1820

* China? Wales? Australia?

The latitude and longitude given in the article puts the ship somewhere in northern India, which doesn’t seem likely.  Kamtschatka, which is one location mentioned, appears to be on the lower part of the Russian peninsula near the Bering Sea. I was not able to locate Agrigon, or anything with a similar name, that would fit the general location, however, there are lots of islands in that area.