Posts Tagged ‘1858’

Song of the Sewing-Machine

May 22, 2012

Image from Hart Cottage Quilts

Song of the Sewing-Machine.

BY GEORGE P. MORRIS.

I’m the Iron Needle-Woman!
Wrought of sterner stuff than clay;
And, unlike the drudges human,
Never weary night or day;
Never shedding tears of sorrow,
Never mourning friends untrue,
Never caring for the morrow,
Never begging work to do.

Poverty brings no disaster!
Merrily I glide along,
For no thankless, sordid master,
Ever seeks to do me wrong:
No extortioners oppress me,
No insulting words I dread–
I’ve no children to distress me
With unceasing cries for bread.

I’m of hardy form and feature,
For endurance framed aright;
I’m not pale misfortune’s creature,
Doomed life’s battle here to fight:
Mine’s a song of cheerful measure,
And no under-currents flow
To destroy the throb of pleasure
Which the poor so seldom know.

In the hall I hold my station,
With the wealthy ones of earth,
Who commend me to the nation
For economy and worth,
While unpaid the female labor,
In the attic-chamber lone,
Where the smile of friend or neighbor
Never for a moment shone.

My creation is a blessing
To the indigent secured,
Banishing the cares distressing
Which so many have endured:
Mine are sinews superhuman,
Ribs of oak and nerves of steel–
I’m the Iron Needle-Woman
Born to toil and not to feel.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) May 4, 1858

Did Mohammed Believe in Himself?

May 21, 2012

Image from Zombietime

Did Mohammed Believe in Himself?

However strange it may appear, the heavenly origin of his revelations, obtained though they were from fallible and imperfect sources, appears to have been believed by Mohammed himself.

It would be against the analogy of his entire life, to suppose a continuing sense of fraud — a consciousness that the whole was a fabrication of his own mind, an imposition upon his followers, an impious assumption of the name of the Almighty. Occasional doubts and misgivings, especially when he first submitted to Jewish promting, there may have been; but a process similar to that by which he first assured himself of his own inspiration, quickly put them to flight. The absence of spiritual light and of opportunities for obtaining it which excused this marvelous self-deception in the early prophetical life of Mohammed, cannot be pleaded for his later years. Ignorance was no longer then involuntary. The means of reaching a truer knowledge lay plentifully within his reach. But they were not heeded; or rather they were deliberately rejected, because a position had been already taken up from which there could be no receding without discredit or inconsistency.

The living inspiration of God vouch-safed to himself was surely better and more safe than the recorded revelations of former prophets; it was at any rate more incomparable more authoritative than the uncertain doctrines deduced from them by their erring adherents. Thus did ignorance become wilful. Light was at hand; but Mohammed preferred darkness. He chose to walk “in the glimmerings of his own fire, and in the sparks which he had kindled.” — Muir’s Life of Mohammed.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Jun 29, 1858

Irish Proverbs

May 17, 2012

Image from Egregores

Irish Proverbs

Men of straw don’t make the best bricks.

It’s a narrow bed that has no turning.

When money is sent flying out of the window, it’s poverty that comes in at the door.

The pig that pleases to live, must live to please.

One man may steal a hedge, whereas another daren’t as much as look at a horse.

Short rents make long friends — and it holds equally good with your landlord and your clothes.

The mug of a fool is known by there being nothing in it.

You may put the cart before the horse, but you can’t make him eat.

Money makes the gentleman, the want of it the blackguard.

When wise men fall out, then rogues come by what is not their own.

Punch.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Apr 6, 1858

It Isn’t All in Bringing Up

May 16, 2012

Image from Library and Archives of Canada – First Among Equals

It Isn’t All in Bringing Up.

It isn’t all in “bringing up,”
Let folks say what they will;
If silver scoured, a pewter cup
Will be but pewter still.

E’en he of old, wise Solomon,
Who said, “train up a child,”
If I mistake not, had a son
Prove rattle-brained and wild.

A man of mark, who fair would pass
I or lord of son and land,
May have the training of a son,
And bring him up full grand —

May give him all the wealth of love,
Of college and of school;
But after all may make no more
Than just a decent fool.

Another raised by penny,
Upon her bitter bread,
Whose road to knowledge is like that
The good in Heaven must tread.

He’s got a spark of nature’s light,
He’ll fan it to a flame,
Till in its burning letters bright,
The world may read his name.

If it were all in “bringing up,”
In counsel and restraint,
Some rascals had been honest men —
I’d been myself a saint.

O! it isn’t all in “bringing up,”
Let folks say what they will;
Neglect may dim a silver cup —
It will be silver still.

Richland County Observer (Richland, Wisconsin) Feb 2 1858

Thomas Jefferson versus the Supreme Court

May 16, 2012

Image from American Presidents

Thomas Jefferson versus the Supreme Court.

In the year 1798 Congress passed an act to punish certain kinds of libel, commonly called the ‘Sedition Act.’

The courts of the United States proceeded to execute it. A number of persons were indicted under it, convicted, and sentenced. But the President (Thomas Jefferson) deeming the act unconstitutional, arrested the execution of judgments of the court in every instance. The courts would convict and pronounce sentence upon the criminal, and the President would pardon; and yet the Union did not fall to pieces. At length Congress became satisfied of the unconstitutionality of the act, and suffered it to expire by its own limitation.

One of the parties, named Matthew Lyon, was convicted under the ‘Sedition Act.’ and sentenced to pay a fine. The fine was collected. The pardon of the President released him from imprisonment, but did not refund the fine paid or collected; but thirty years afterwards, Congress restored to the heirs of Lyon the amount of the fine and interest.

Says President Jefferson: “I discharged every person under punishment or prosecution under the Sedition law, because I considered and now consider that law to be a nullity as absolute and palpable as if Congress had ordered us to fall down and worship a golden image.” (Jefferson’s Works, 4, 556.)

It is the practice of late to hold up before the mind such frightful pictures of ‘collision,’ ‘resistance,’ ‘civil discord,’ ‘revolution,’ ‘anarchy,’ and ‘dissolution,’ that it would seem that any effort of resistance to the exercise of unauthorized power, and every attempt faithfully to execute official duty imposed by the Constitution and laws, is to be dreaded as an approach to treason; that every diversity of opinion or action between the functionaries of the two governments (State and United States) must terminate in the dissolution of the Union; that the hope of the nation rests, not so much in the intelligence and patriotism of the people, as in the successful pursuit of a run-away negro. But the real danger to the Union consists not so much in resistance to laws constitutionally enacted, as in acquiescence in measures which violate the Constitution. Is is much safer to resist unauthorized and unconstitutional power, at its very commencement, when it can be done by constitutional means, than to wait until the evil is so deeply and firmly rooted that the only remedy is revolution. — A.D. Smith, Judge of the Supreme Court of Wisconsin.

Richland County Observer (Richland Center, Wisconsin) Apr 27, 1858

Good Brown Bread

January 20, 2012

Image from Yankee Magazine online – Granny’s Brown Bread – Recipe at the link

BROWN BREAD.

I’m a Yankee, born ‘mong the rye and corn
Of the Eastern States, ’tis said;
And a tribute I’ll pay, in a rhyming way,
To their loaves of good brown bread.

I’ve lived at best, six years in the West,
Where wheat is used instead,
But in all my round I’ve seldom found
A loaf of good brown bread.

Since I have roamed to my boyhood’s home,
The rocks and hills I dread;
Yet in spite of that I’m growing fat,
Every day, on good brown bread.

You still may make white bread and cake,
By style and fancy led,
But I tell you, sir, that I prefer
A loaf of good brown bread.

N. E. Farmer.

The Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, Massachustetts) Oct 22, 1858

*****

Here are a couple of old recipes found in a Google book search:

Yankee Brown Bread – 1848

To read about the “pearlash” mentioned in the above recipe: Food Facts & Trivia

Apparently, in 1848, they did not steam the bread, but baked it in the oven. This recipe also lacks molasses, so I guess it’s a more “primitive” brown bread.

Boston Brown Bread – 1893

This recipe includes buttermilk and molasses, and is steamed for five hours. The Granny’s Brown Bread linked with the picture, only steams for two to three hours.

“A Journalist,” said the Great Napoleon…

January 19, 2012

Image from Eponymous Flower

“A journalist,” said the great Napoleon, “is a grumbler, a censurer, a giver of advice, a regent of sovereigns, a tutor of nations. Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a hundred thousand bayonets.”

The Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, Massachusetts) Mar 5, 1858

Axe it

January 18, 2012

Image from Old Picture of the Day

If you want to know whether a tree is hollow or not, axe it.

The Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, Massachusetts) Mar 5, 1858

The House that Jeems Built

January 16, 2012

Image from U.S. History ImagesBleeding Kansas

THE HOUSE THAT JEEMS BUILT. —

Kansas with Slavery. — This is the house that Jeems built.

Southern influence and Gold. — This is the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

Shannon. — This is the rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

Walker. — This is the cat that killed the rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

Lecompton Constitution — This is the dog that worried the cat that killed the rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

Douglas — This is the cow with crumpled horn that tossed the dog, that worried the cat that killed the rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

Kansas without Slavery — This is the maiden all forlorn that milked the cow with the crumpled horn that tossed the dog that worried the cat that killed the rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

The Union. — This is the man all tattered and torn that married the maiden all forlorn that milked the cow with the crumpled horn that tossed the dog that worried the cat that killed the rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

The American People. — This is the priest all shaven and shorn that married the man all tattered and torn unto the maiden all forlorn that milked the cow with the crumpled horn that tossed the dog that worried the cat that killed the rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that Jeems built.

Kansas Crusader for Freedom.

The Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, Massachusetts) Mar 5, 1858

The Latter House

January 15, 2012

Image from Image Museum – Lee, MA

THE LATTER HOUSE.

Sad was the hour when startling bells
Rung out their fearful warning;
And all around we heard the cry:
“Our dear old church is burning!”
Burning — burning!
And all around we heard the cry:
“Our dear old church is burning!”

But other churches op’d their doors
To cheer us in our sorrow,
And Christian friends bade us be strong,
And hope still for the morrow.
The morrow — the morrow;
And Christian friends bade us be strong,
And hope still for the morrow.

That morrow, is has come TO-DAY;
And grateful memories bringing,
The glory of this latter house,
We dedicate with singing.
Singing — singing!
The glory of this latter house
We dedicate with singing.

Dear Jesus, come and bless this place,
Where youthful hearts are moulded,
And safe within thy loving arms
Let all the Lambs be folded,
Folded — folded!
And safe within thy loving arms
Let all the lambs be folded.

The Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, Massachusetts) Jul 9, 1858

Lee One Year since the Fire. [Excerpt]

One year ago last Friday night we lay in the cars at Richmond, blocked in by snow three feet deep, while the thermometer stood at thirty below zero. The monotony of that tedious night was relieved by speculations as to the locality and cause of a brilliant light in the south east. After our liberation, we ascertained that it arose from the great fire which destroyed the Congregational Church, and much of the business portion of Lee.

The night was a memorable one, and the year which has since passed has been an eventful one — for Lee. We chanced to celebrate the anniversary by a visit to the good town to see how it stands the rubs of fortune, and we found it looking, as energetic men do, all the better for the impediments with which it has struggled, although some of them have doubtless much checked its immediate progress.

….

THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

is the only other prominent building which is replacing those burnt. It is of wood, and is to cost $20,000, including the organ, &c. Mr. A.L. Clark, of Pittsfield, is the architect. Judging from what is completed, which is only a part of the exterior, it will be one of the finest buildings of the kind in the State. The Saxon windows, with their heavy caps, are very attractive, and if the work to be done is in keeping with them, as we are told it is, the building will be one which would be an ornament to any town. It will be completed and dedicated next June, when we shall have more to say of it.

….

The Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, Massachusetts) Jan 29, 1858

Biographical sketch of the church’s architect, Abner L. Clark from the following book:

Title: Samuel Davis, of Oxford, Mass., and Joseph Davis, of Dudley, Mass., and Their Descendants
Genealogy and Local History series
Author: George Lucien Davis
Editor: George Fisher Daniels
Publisher: s.n., 1884
Page 328