Posts Tagged ‘1862’

Liberty Fetes Constitution

September 17, 2012

The Constitution — America’s Gibraltar

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California) Sep 17, 1937

Constitution Adopted September 17, 1787

A Rock Foundation

Hamilton Daily News Journal (Hamilton, Ohio) Sep 17, 1937

Have you ever seen the Statue of Liberty’s torch ablaze before? Then just look how the smoke pours from it above. The occasion was the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the United States Constitution. Army and Navy color guards join to present the colors on the parapet of the statue’s pedestal, Bedloe’s Island, New York harbor.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Se[ 17, 1937

*     *     *     *     *

Taking as his theme the history of the Constitution, the attacks which have been made upon it and the security it provides the American people, Associate Justice John A. Matthews, principal speaker at yesterday’s Kiwanis meeting said that while the communist party boasts of 500,00 members in this country, an even greater threat to liberty is being made by “intelligent demagogues.”

He cited as an example of the latter, Jay Franklin, author of several “leftist” books and regarded in some circles as a leader in socialistic government tendencies. He referred in particular to a statement attributed to Franklin that the Constitution had been framed by a group of “old farmers.”

Greatest of Time

“As a matter of fact,” the speaker said, “the Constitution was written by the greatest students of government ever gathered together at one time.” In the group were college presidents, ambassadors, governors, members of the Continental congress and others who had proved themselves the most brilliant men of their times.

The average age of this group, he said, was 42 years refuting the implication and “doddering old timers” were responsible for the document.

Swinging into a brief discussion of the Supreme court, over which wide spread discussion has rested because of the president’s plan to pack it, Judge Matthews asserted that unfavorable comment about fire-to-four decisions of the court was unfounded.

Two Favorable

“Actually,” he said, “until the time for the Supreme court furor last winter only three of nine New Deal decisions were by a five-to-four decision. And of these three, two were favorable to the government.”

Generally, Kiwanis voted his talk one of the most interesting of the year.

The speaker was introduced by Warren Batch, program chairman. Musical entertainment included two vocal solos by Mrs. Dorothy Statler, accompanied at the piano by Mrs. Pearl Johnson.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Sep 14, 1937

*     *     *     *     *

Lower the Net?

Abilene Morning News (Abilene, Texas) Feb 17, 1937

*     *     *     *     *

Previous Constitution Day posts:

What You Should Know About Our Constitution

Preserving Our Constitution

Constitution Day 1922 – Study the Constitution

Across the Path of Popular Impatience

Constitution Proclamation

The New Deal and the Constitution

Progressive Economics: Dealt from a Pack Thumbed by Kings, Despots and Tyrants

The U.S. Constitution: Wet or Dry

A Constitution Day Thought

Herbert Hoover’s Poignant Duty

*     *     *     *     *

 For the Portsmouth Times.

NOTA BENE.

A KING once said, “I am the State;”
Did his assertion make it true?
Another heard the words, “Too late!”
As from his land and throne he flew.

One ruler, in our own fair land,
Sets up his will as all in all;
A greater issues his command,
Liberty’s Goddess to enthral.

When “Constitution” is prefixed “Un-”
And ended by a small “A.L.,”
Are laws illegal, all but one?
And that the law which would compel?

What follows, then? Have we no laws?
No Constitution to uphold?
Judge for yourselves, ye who can draw
Prophetic truth from histories old.

X. ENTRIC.
PORTSMOUTH, O., Nov. 27th, 1862.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Dec 6, 1862

Advertisements

Oh! Abraham, Resign

August 16, 2012

Image from Son of the South

From the Philadelphia Inquirer.

OH! ABRAHAM, RESIGN.

BY A NEW CONTRIBUTOR.

The days are growing shorter,
The sun has crossed the line,
And the people are asking,
“Will Abraham resign?”
Poor old Father Abraham,
Once a people’s pride;
Your glory has deserted,
We’re prepared to let you “slide.”

You’ve forgotten all the promises
Made in those speeches fine,
When traveling to the capital,
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

You’ve kill the Constitution,
Framed by patriots “lang syne;”
You’ve gagged the mouths of freemen,
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

Between states once fraternal,
You’ve drawn your party line;
You’ve brought us war infernal,
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

You’ve imprisoned honest freemen,
And in dungeons let them pine
For home, and wife, and children,
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

You’ve leagued with John Brown, Forney,
To Greeley you incline,
You’re hand and glove with Sumner,
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

The people will not swallow
That wicked scheme of thine,
To ‘mancipate the “woolly heads,”
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

Pennsylvania has condemned you,
Ohio’s in the line;
And the Hoosier boys are shouting,
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

The Empire State has spoken
Against thee, Abr’ mine;
The Jersey Bines are after thee,
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

Against these solemn warnings,
Steel not that heart of thine;
Far “better late than never,”
Oh! Abraham, resign!
Poor old Father Abraham.

Allen County Democrat (Lima, Ohio) Dec 10, 1862

Hark! from the Battle Field

May 27, 2012

Hark, From the Battle Field.

TUNE — TROUBADOR.

Hark, from the battle-field
Cometh a wail,
Borne to our list’ning ears
By the Southern gale;
Lo! for the Union cause,
Die we to-day —
Home and friends, all we love,
Far, far away.

Sadly we mourn for those
Who die for the right;
Often think we of them,
In the still night;
Weep, weep, for those we love,
Dying to-day,
From their homes and their friends,
Far, far away.

They to our waiting hearts,
Never may come;
On Southern battle-fields,
Is their last home;
God bless the soldiers brave!
Dying to-day,
Home and friends, all they love,
Far, far away.

Green be their memory,
In warm hearts for aye;
For their brave passing souls,
Daily we pray —
God bless the soldier brave!
Dying to-day,
In Thy home, up in heaven,
Take them we pray.

Monroe Sentinel (Monroe, Wisconsin) Jun 25, 1862

Image from The Commercial Appeal

Jeff Davis’ Prayer

May 25, 2012

JEFF DAVIS’ PRAYER.

BY CLARENCE BUTLER.

Bowed down with grievous cares of State,
(For tidings weren’t going very straight,)
There sat that awful potentate
King Jeff, the great Secesher;
He looked exceedingly forlorn,
Harrassed and vexed, annoyed and worn;–
‘Twas plain his office didn’t return
Much profit or much pleasure.

Says Jeff (he thus soliloquized:)
“This isn’t quite as I surmised;
It really cannot be disguised,
The thing is getting risky:
Winchester, Donelson, Roanoke,
Pea Ridge, Port Royal, Burnside’s stroke.
At Newborn—by the Lord, I choke!”
Jeff took a drink of whisky.

“McClellan, too, and Yankee Foote;
Grant, Hunter, Halleck, Farrigut,
With that accurst Fremont to boot;”
(Right here he burst out swearing;
And then, half mad and three parts drunk,
Down on his shaking knees he sunk,
And prayed like any frightened monk,
To ease his black despairing.)

He prayed: “0 mighty Lucifer!
Than Whom, of all that are or were
There is no spirit worthier
To be our Lord and Master;
0h, thou Original Secesh!
Please pity our poor quaking flesh.
And break this tightening Union mesh,
And stop this dire disaster!

“We trust we have not been remiss
In duty or in sacrifice;
We feel we have wrought thine abyss
Some services, good devil!
The hottest hell-fire marked our track
O’er the green land we have made black,
We think our hands have not been slack
In doing work of evil.

“Have we not drugged and drowsed the press,
And held the Bible in duress?
And, Satan, did we not suppress
The thinkers and the teachers;
Close up the schools, starve our the brains,
Lynch those attaint with loyal stains,
Festoon the Sacred Cross with chains,
And gag the Lord Christ’s preachers?

“O Prince of rebels! have we not
Almost eclipsed Iscariot,
And quite shamed Peter’s little blot,
With treachery and lying?
Have we not hacked, and hawed and burned,
And pillaged what the poor have earned;
Brought havoc on the rich, and spurned
The famished and the dying?

“So, being thine in word and deed,
We trust we shall not vainly plead
In this our time of frightful need,
And perilous reverses; —
Therefore, sink every Federal boat,
Let Stanton be with palsy smote,
Make George McClellan cut his throat,
And blast Old Abe with curses!

“Then, Satan, whilst we give thee thanks,
Kill Shields, choke Halleck, poison Banks,
And spread through all the Yankee ranks
Terrific devastation!
Let loose the plagues and pestilence,
Stir up the Northern malcontents,
And drive the invading mudsills hence,
In utter consternation!

“By all the incense we have brought;
By all the rain we have wrought;
By every woe, and every clot
Of murder, grim and gory; —
By every shriek and every wail
That makes the stunned heart blanch and pale,
O, let thy servants now prevail —
And thine shall be the glory!”

Monroe Sentinel (Monroe, Wisconsin) May 28, 1862

Previous post with Jefferson Davis: A Difference

To My Dog, Jowler

May 14, 2012

To My Dog Jowler,

Jowler, they’ve taxed you, honest friend;
Assessed you, put you in the roll;
To exile every dog they send —
Unless some friend will pay his poll.

By all that’s good, the rascals meant
Betwixt us two to breed a strife,
And drive you into punishment,
Or bribe your friend to take your life.

But, Jowler, don’t you be alarmed!
If politicians do neglect you,
Confound your tax! you shan’t be harmed,
I know your worth, and I’ll protect you!

But taxes, by the Constitution,
Convey the right to represent;
So dogs, by this same resolution,
Might just as well as men be sent.

Now, dogs and men, and voters hear,
That Jowler’s put in nomination
To go upon the coming year,
And aid in public legislation.

Jowler, beware of demagogues,
Keep clear of the minority;
Take care to smell of other dogs,
And vote with the majority.

Hornellsville Tribune (Hornellsville, New York) May 22, 1862

Cinco de Mayo – Celebrating the Decisive Battle of Puebla

May 5, 2012

THE DECISIVE BATTLE OF PUEBLA.

Mexico’s children everywhere are celebrating today the 59th anniversary of the Battle of Puebla; popularly known as the Cinco de Mayo — 5th of May.

To Americans in general, and to Texans particularly, this battle is of peculiar interest because of its decisive effect in checking the French invasion of Mexico at a most critical time for America. Taking advantage of the fact that the American Union was engaged in civil war, Napoleon III, pursuing his plan to give the French empire supremacy in the New World as well as in the Old, had begun war against the Juarez government of Mexico, in support of the self-styled “government” of Miramon which had been defeated and overthrown in December, 1860, in the battle of Calpulapan.

Previous military operations had resulted in the advance of the French army under Gen. Lorencez, together with a Mexican “conservative” force under Gen. Taboado, to the town of Amazoc, just east of Puebla, on May 2, 1862. The next day, the Mexican national army under Gen. Ignacio Zaragoza — who was born on the Bay of Espiritu Santo, Texas, in 1829 — retreating before the French advance, entered the City of Puebla. On the 4th, Lorencez advanced to Los Alamos, within sight of PUebla, where he camped astride the Vera Cruz road. He had about 6,000 French troops, and 300 Mexican cavalry. The same day, Zaragoza made his preparations for defense. The Arteaga division — commanded temporarily by Gen. Negrete — occupied the Loreta and Guadalupe forts, northwest of Puebla. The infantry of the Toluca brigade of Gen. Berriozabal continued the line from Guadalupe toward the Vera Cruz road. The San Luis Potosi brigade extended the line to the right. The extreme right, on the Amozoc road, was held by the Oaxaca division of Gen. Portorio Diaz. The Mexican cavalry was placed near Azcarate’s brickyard. The artillery was commanded by Gen. Rodriquez. The city itself was held by Tapia’s bridgade, commanded temporarily by Gen. Escobedo. The total Mexican force was about 5,000 men, a great number of whom were recruits.

The French advanced at 4 o’clock in the morning of May 5th, a strong column marching to the northwest for the attack on the forts of Guadalupe and Loreto. After cannonading the forts for two hours, an assault was made on them; the French massing between the two forts as they advanced. Meanwhile, Berriozabal had been sent with his infantry to reinforce Negrete at the forts, together with some cavalry under Gen. Alvarez. After a hard fight the French were repulsed, and retreated. Another French column arriving at this moment, the lines were reformed, and a second, and much more determined attack was made on the two forts and the Resureccion chapel south of Guadalupe. This attack, and a following one, also were repulsed; the Mexican cavalry charging upon the defeated assailants.

On the southeast front, Gen. Diaz ???s? sustained a hard attack, which ???iled like the others. The French returned to their Los Alamos camp at nightfall, and a few days later retreated to Orizaba, followed by Diaz for some distance.

The French loss was 131 killed, and ?45 wounded and sick. The Mexican loss was 87 killed, 132 wounded and 12 missing. By order of Juarez, the sound prisoners were sent back to the French lines; and later all sick and wounded also were returned, provided with money for the journey. All French medals and decorations taken were returned; the Mexicans keeping only one French flag, captured from a famous ????? regiment. This banner is still in the citadel of Mexico.

The result of the battle was decisive for Mexico. It delayed the occupation of the City of Mexico for more than a year, and led to the failure of the French expedition and of Maximilian’s empire. Gen. Zaragoza, the victor, was given a sword by his country, and received other honors; but worn out by the strains of the campaign, he died at Puebla on the following 8th of September. The city where he died is known officially as Puebla de Zaragoza. There are many other places in Mexico which bear his name.

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) May 5, 1921

Capture of Fort Donelson

January 31, 2012

Images from Harper’s Weekly on Son of the South, where you can read about the Capture of Fort Donelson.

[From the Boston Daily Advertiser.]

The Capture of Fort Donelson.

“McClernand’s division, composed of Oglesby’s, Wallace’s and McArthur’s brigades, suffered terribly. They were composed of the 8th, 9th, 11th, 18th, 20th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 45th, 48th and 49th Illinois regiments.”

“The 8th, 18th, 20th and 31st Illinois regiments occupied a position above the fort.”

“The four Illinois regiments held their ground full three hours. Nearly one-third had been killed and wound. Yet the balance stood firm.”

O, gales that dashed th’ Atlantic swell
Along our rock shores,
Whose thunders diapason well
New England’s glad hurrahs, —

Bear to the prairies of the West
The echoes of our joy;
The prayer that spring’s in every breast,
“God bless thee — Illinois!”

O, awful hours, when grape and shell
Tore through th’ unflinching line;
“Stand firm, remove the men who fell,
Close up and wait the sign.”

It came at last: “Now lads the steel!”
The rushing hosts deploy;
“Charge boys!” — the broken traitors reel.
Huzza for Illinois!

In vain thy rampart, Donelson,
The living torrent bars;
It leaps the wall, the fort is won,
Up go the Stripes and Stars.

Thy proudest mother’s eyelids fill,
As dares her gallant boy,
And Plymouth Rock and Bunker Hill
Yearn to thee — Illinois.

Boston, Feb. 22, 1862

The Berkshire County Eagle (Pittsfield, Massachusetts) Mar 20, 1862

The Guide Post

January 8, 2012

The Guide Post.

Translated by Bayard Taylor from the Alemadnic-German dialect of John Peter Hebel.

D’ye know the road to th’ bar’l o’ flour?
At break o’ day let down the bars,
And plough y’r wheat-field hour by hour,
Till sundown — yes, till shade o’ starts.

You peg away the livelong day,
Nor loaf away, nor gape around;
And that’s the road to the thrashing’-floor,
And into the kitchen, I’ll be bound.

D’ye know the road where the dollars lay?
Follow the red cents here and there;
For if a man leaves them I can guess,
He won’t find dollars any where.

D’ye know the road to Sunday’s rest?
Jist don’t o’ week-day’s be afeard;
In field and workshop do y’r best,
And Sunday comes itself, I’ve heard.

On Saturday’s it’s not far off,
And brings a basketful o’ cheer, —
A roast and lots o’ garden stuff,
And, like as not, a jug o’ beer!

D’ye know the road to poverty?
Turn in at any tavern sign;
Turn in — it’s temptin’ as can be;
There’s bran new cards and liquor fine.

In the last tavern there’s a sack,
And, when the cash y’r pockets quit,
Jist hand the wallet on y’r back.
You vagabond! see how it fits!

D’ye know what road to honor leads?
And good old age? — a lovely sight!
By way o’ temperance, honest deeds,
And tryin’ to do y’r duty right.

And when the roads forks, ary side,
And you’re in doubt which one it is,
Stand still, and let your conscience guide;
Thank God, it can’t lead much amiss!

And now the road to church yard gate
You needn’t ask! Go anywhere!
For, whether roundabout or straight,
All roads, at last, ‘ll bring you there.

Go, fearin’ God, but loving more!
I’ve tried to be an honest guide, —
You’ll find the grave has got a door,
And something for you t’other side.

Appleton Motor (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jul 3, 1862

bio – pg 71

General Burnside: “We Came Very Near Success”

December 13, 2011

REASONS FOR CROSSING THE RAPPAHANNOCK.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,}
FALMOUTH, Dec. 19.}
To H.W. HALLECK, Commander-in-Chief, Washington.

GENERAL: I have the honor to offer the following reasons for moving the Army of the Potomac across the Rappahannock sooner than was anticipated by the President, Secretary of War, or yourself, and for crossing at a point different from the one indicated to you at our last meeting at the President’s. During my preparations for crossing at the place I had first selected, I discovered that the enemy had thrown a large portion of his force down the river elsewhere, thus weakening his defenses in front, and also discovered that he did not anticipate the crossing of our whole force at Fredericksburg, and I hoped by rapidly throwing the whole command over at that place to separate by a vigorous attack the forces of the enemy on the river below from the forces behind and on the crest in the rear of the town, in which case we could fight him with great avantage in our favor.

To do this we had to gain a hight on the extreme right of the crest, which hight commanded the new road lately made by the enemy, for the purpose of a more rapid communication along his lines; which point gained, his positions along the right crest would have been scarcely tenable, and he could have been driven from them easily by an attack on his front, in connection with a movement in the rear of the crest. How near we came to accomplishing our object, future reports will show. But for the failure and unexpected and unavoidable delay in building the bridges, which gave the enemy 25 hours more to concentrate his forces in his strong position, we would almost certainly have succeeded; in which case the battle would have been, in my opinion, far more decisive than if we had crossed at the places first selected. As it was, we came very near success.

Failing in accomplishing the main object, we remained in order of battle two days, long enough to decide that the enemy would not come out of his stronghold to fight us with his infantry, after which we crossed to this side of the river unmolested, without the loss of men or property. As the day broke, our long lines of troops were seen marching to their different positions as if going on parade. Not the least demoralization or disorganization existed.

To the brave officers and soldiers who accomplished the feat of recrossing the river in the face of the enemy, I owe everything; for the failure in the attack I alone am responsible, as the extreme gallantry, courage and endurance shown by them was never exceeded, and would have carried the points had it been possible.

To the families and friends of the dead, I can only offer my heartfelt sympathies; but for the wounded I can offer my earnest prayers for their comfortable and final recovery.

The fact that I decided to move from Warrenton on to this line rather against the opinion of the President, Secretary of War, and your self, and that left the whole movement in my hands, without giving me orders, makes me responsible. I will visit you very soon, and give you more definite information, and will finally send you my detailed report, in which a special acknowledgment will be made of the services of the different Grand Divisions, division corps, and my general and staff departments of the Army of the Potomac, to whom I am so much indebted for their support and hearty co-operation.

I will add here that the movement was made earlier than you expected, and after the President, Secretary and yourself requested me not to be in haste, for the reason that we were supplied much sooner by the different staff Departments than was anticipated when I saw you.

Our killed amounts to 1,152; our wounded about 9,000; our prisoners, about 700, which last have been paroled and exchanged for about the same number taken by us. The wounded were all removed to this side of the river and are being well cared for. The dead were all buried under a flag of truce. Surgeons report a much larger proportion of slight wounds than usual, 1632 only being treated in hospitals.

I am glad to represent that the army at the present time is in good condition.

Thanking the Government for that entire support and confidence which I have always received from them,

I remain, General, your very ob’t servant,
A.C. BURNSIDE,
Major Gen. Com’g.

The Burlington Weekly Hawkeye (Burlington, Iowa) Dec 27, 1862

General Burnside is reported to have resigned the command of the Army of the Potomac. This may or may not be so; but Gen. B. has received enough shabby treatment from the Administration fully to warrant him in pursuing the course indicated. — [Chicago Times.

If the Times would only tell the public what this “shabby treatment” was, the statement would be more credible and more satisfactory. We presume, in the view of the Times, it was “shabby” to make Gen. Burnside Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Shabby to allow him to pursue his own plan, in his own way, and in his own chosen time. Shabby, likewise, to furnish him with all the supplies he wanted, and more promptly than he expected. This is the sort of support the Administration has given him. To us it appears to be a hearty and trustful co-operation with one whose success was hoped for before almost all things else. Burnside says this is what he has received. He does not appear to think it “shabby.” He does not attribute his recent misadventure to the Administration. He is too manly for that. Unfortunately, he is not posted in the vocabulary of the Times. Apparently he does not know what “shabby treatment” is. He ought to have an Attache of the Times with him to keep him posted!

The Burlington Weekly Hawkeye (Burlington, Iowa) Dec 27, 1862

Image from American Civil War

ROLL CALL.

“Corporal Green!” the Orderly cried,
“Here!” was the answer, loud and clear,
From the lips of a soldier who stood near,
And “Here!” was the word next replied.

“Cyrus Drew” — then a silence fell —
This time no answer followed the call,
Only his rear-man had seen him fall,
Killed or wounded, he could not tell.

There they stood in the falling light,
These men of battle, with grave, dark looks,
As plain to be read as open books,
While slowly gathered the shade of night.

The fern on the hill sides was splashed with blood,
And down in the corn, where the poppies grew,
Were redder stains than the poppies knew,
And crimson dyed was the river’s flood.

For the foe had crossed from the other side,
That day, in the face of a murderous fire
That swept them down in its terrible ire,
And their life blood went to color the tide.

“Herbert Cline!” — At the call there came
Two stalwart soldiers into the line,
Bearing between them this Herbert Cline,
Wounded and bleeding to answer his name.

“Ezra Kerr!” — and a voice answered “Here,”
“Hiram Kerr!” — but no man replied.
They were brothers, these two, the sad wind sighed,
And a shudder crept through the cornfield near.

“Ephraim Deane!” — then a soldier spoke —
“Deane carried our regiment’s colors,” he said,
“When our ensign was shot, I left him dead
Just after the enemy wavered and broke.

“Close to the roadside his body lies,
I paused a moment and gave him to drink,
He murmured his mother’s name I think,
And Death came with it and closed his eyes.”

‘Twas a victory — yes but it cost us dear,
For that company’s roll when called at night,
Of a hundred men who went to fight,
Numbered but twenty that answered “Here.”

The Burlington Weekly Hawkeye (Burlington, Iowa) Dec 13, 1862

Acrostic for the Dead: Gov. Louis Powell Harvey

February 18, 2011

For the Daily Gazette.
Affection’s Tribute.

AN ACROSTIC.

G one from the post of duty, gone with harness on,
O ver the river, to the farther shore!
V eiled sadly from our vision, sleeping his last sleep,
E nded his earthly task, his labors o’er!
R evering freedom, justice, to the latest hour,
N o thought had he save for his country’s good!
O n mercy’s holy mission — to relieve distress —
R an he his race, and sank beneath the flood!

H e, being dead, speaketh to our aching hearts.
A h! how we loved him for the deeds he wrought!
R adiant with patriotic lights his kindly soul,
V alient for freedom, truth his highest thought!
E ternal One! who ruleth over all,
Y ield us support, while good men round us fall!

Janesville, April 22d. 1862.

— W —

__________

MRS. HARVEY. — The Madison Journal relates the circumstances under which Mrs. Harvey obtained the sad tidings of the death of her husband. She was at capitol when the dispatch was received by Adjutant-General Gaylord, obtaining subscriptions to aid a destitute family in the city. An attempt was made to get her to her boarding place before the contents of the dispatch were made known. She at once saw by the countenances of those whom she met that some bad tidings had been received.

Adjutant-General Gaylord and Mr. Sawyer, her brother-in-law, attempted to accompany her home, and told her that a rumor had been received that gave him some anxiety in regard to the Governor. As Gen. Gaylord was attempting to conceal the full extent of the calmnity, she stopped while they were walking through the Park and said: “Tell me if he is dead!” While he evaded a direct reply, she read the fatal news in the expression of his face and dropped senseless upon the walk. She was soon revived sufficiently to be conveyed home, but remained in a state nearly approaching distraction.

Attorney General Howe left on the morning train for Cairo, for the purpose of obtaining and bringing back the body if it can be found. He was accompanied as far as Chicago by Mrs. Harvey and her sister, Mrs. Sawyer.

Janesville Daily Gazette (Janesville, Wisconsin) Apr 22, 1862

Particulars of the Death of Governor Harvey.

We are indebted to Dr. R.B. Treat, of this city, for the following particulars connected with the loss of Gov. Harvey:

Gov. Harvey returned from Pittsburgh Saturday afternoon on the ferry boat, having previously made an arrangement with the captain of the steamer Minnehaha to call in the evening at Savannah for him and his party. The governor had been exceedingly busy for several days reorganizing the 16th and 18th regiments, and attending to such other duties that the welfare of Wisconsin troops seemed to require. He had labored assiduously day and night and had accomplished the object of his mission except as to the details which he intended to do at his leisure while returning.

He seemed more restless and thoughtful than usual, but appeared to be in the best of spirits, as if conscious of having fully discharged many and onerous duties of his humane mission. We concluded to remain on the Dunleith and await the steamer from the landing. All of our party except the governor and myself, had retired, exhausted with their labors, and were soon asleep. The governor was extremely communicative and spoke hopefully of the complete restoration of the 16th and 18th to their full number and efficiency; also, of the success of our arms in the coming contest at Corinth, which he deemed could not long be delayed.

It was near 10 o’clock when we also concluded to get some rest, when stepping out upon the deck of the Dunleith, we saw the Minnehaha coming down, hailed her as she rounded too, when the captain inquired if Gov. Harvey was aboard the Dunleith. Upon being answered in the affirmative, he came along side and attached the bows of the Minnehaha to the Dunleith. Governor Harvey then went above and woke up his friends and came down very soon after and met Drs. Wilson and Clark, who had come down upon the Minnehaha. They shook hands and the governor passed back toward the stern of the Dunleith, along a narrow way which had no guards. It was lighted by torch, but the deck being wet and slippery, and the probabilities are that he stepped too near the edge when his foot slipped, causing him to fall into the river between the boats. Drs. Wilson and Clark immediately gave the alarm and rushed to his assistance. Dr. Wilson reached him his cane which Gov. Harvey grasped firmly as he came up the first time, but Dr. Wilson found it impossible to hold on to it without being himself precipitated into the river, was compelled to let go, Dr. Clark then sprung overboard and had nearly reached him when he went down again, the current carrying him underneath the barges lying below the Dunleith. Boats and lights were immediately procured and strict watch observed for some time, hoping that he might be carried down stream by the rapid current and yet saved. We finaly gave over the fruitless search and in consultation, concluded to leave a sufficient number to look for the body in the morning. Gen. Brodhead and Dr. Wolcott were selected with three others of the party, while the remainder were to return, bearing the sad intelligence to his family and friends. Drs. Clark and Wilson are deserving of much credit, having periled their own lives to save that of Gov. Harvey.More particularly would I speak of Dr. Clark, who undoubtedly would have met a watery grave had he came in contact with Gov. Harvey.

Janesville Daily Gazette (Janesville, Wisconsin) Apr 23, 1862

Gov. Harvey.

After noticing the sudden death of Gov. Harvey, the Chicago Tribune thus sketches the leading events of his life:

“Gov. Harvey was born at East Haddam, Ct., July 23d, 1820. His parents emigrated to Ohio and located at Shawmsville in 1828. He was educated at Western Reserve College, Hudson, and removed to Kenosha, Wis., in 1840. His first labors in the new state of his adoption were as a teacher in the academy of Kenosha, and later he edited with credit and honor to himself, the Whig organ published in that city. In the same place he was married in ’48, to the esteemed lady who survives him. In 1850 Gov. Harvey moved to Shopiere, Rock county, where he engaged in the manufacturing business, and has since resided there. He was a member of the first constitutional convention, and represented Rock county in the state senate two terms, from 1853 to 1857. He was then elected secretary of state, a place he held until last fall, when he was elected governor. A man of incorruptible integrity, an earnest patriot, Wisconsin was fortunate that the result of her last memorable campaign in state politics placed him at the head of her affairs. He has been earnest and zealous in calling her sons to the field, and in securing fidelity and thoroughness in every detail of their equipment. And when there came from the battle field a call for humanity, in behalf of our wounded, Gov. Harvey was the first to answer to the appeal, and it was the closing act of his useful and honored life.

“Wisconsin had no nobler or truer man than Louis P. Harvey, nor had she ever a more upright, patriotic or incorruptible executive. His untimely decease will fill the breasts of her people with sorrow, and the whole west will sympathize with their grief.”

Janesville Daily Gazette – Apr 23, 1862

From the Madison Journal
Incidents in the Early Life of Governor Harvey.

In our brief and hasty sketch of Gov. Harvey the other day, some mistakes occurred as to dates, and there were some omissions relative to his early life, which we propose briefly to remedy, from the best information we have been able to obtain.

LOUIS POWELL HARVEY was born in East Haddam, Connecticut, July 22, 1820. In 1828, his father removed to Strongville, Ohio. His parents not being wealthy, it was necessary that Louis should be the artificer of his own fortune. In 1837 he entered the freshman class in the Western Reserve College at Hudson, Ohio.

Concerning his collegiate course, a class-mate, Rev. Mr. Brown, at a meeting in La Crosse, thus speaks:

As class-mates and members of the same literary society, and boarders in the same family, our acquaintance was of the most intimate kind. I can bear testimony to his early character, that it was without a stain. He was a noble youth. With brilliant talents, good scholarship, and pleasing manners, he became a favorite among his fellow students. Impulsive in temperament, of unbounded wit and humor, yet chastened by Christian principle. He possessed that rare quality of true nobility, a promptness to retract an error, or confess a wrong. When a sharp word or sally of wit had wounded the feelings of a fellow student, I have seen him repair to this room, and with a warm grasp of his hand, and a tear in his eye, say:

“Brother, forgive me if I have hurt your feelings!”

Being straitened in means, he worked a portion of his leisure hours at book-binding. In the junior year he was compelled to leave to seek employment to enable him to seek employment, to enable him to pursue his studies.

We understand that ill health was the cause of his leaving college previous to graduating.

He sent a short time as a teacher in Nicholsonville, Ky., after which he obtained a situation as tutor in Woodward College, Cincinnati, and after remaining in this position some two years, he turned his steps in a westerly direction, and located at Southport (now Kenosha) in this state, in the fall of 1841.

The Kenosha Telegraph speaks of his career in that place as follows:

He came a stranger, without influential friends to aid him, and without capital, except a good character and a well cultivated mind, which are, after all, better foundations for a young man to build upon than money.

The first business in which he was engaged here was teaching. He found a building which had been erected for the purpose of an academy, but which had never yet been occupied for educational purposes. He immediately hired the building, put out advertisements, inviting students, and opened his school on the 25th of December, 1841. His patronage was not large but all that could reasonably be expected, in view of the newness of the town. In the summer of 1843, he took the editorial charge of the Southport American, a whig paper which had been established in the fall of 1841. He, however did not relinquish the business of teaching, but continued his school. Although this was his first attempt at editing a newspaper, he displayed tack and ability in this new vocation. The American while under his charge was a lively and spirited paper. He was an ardent politician, but never indulged in personal invective, and was generally courteous in the discussion of political differences.

He was generous, genial, possessing an unusual flow of humor; and it was, perhaps, these qualities, combined with others of more intrinsic worth, which rendered him popular among all classes. As an evidence of the strong hold he had on the favor of the people, during his early political career, it may be mentioned that after the expiration of his first years’ residence here, he was put forward annually by his political friends, for some ward or town office. The contest at the polls for these offices was unusually spirited and conducted on party grounds. It is a noticeable fact, seen by reference to our town election returns of those years, that Mr. Harvey invariably run ahead of his ticket, and usually succeeded to an election, even when his party was clearly a minority one.

“Mr. Harvey in early life, exhibited more than ordinary talent as a public speaker, and possessed the elements of a popular orator in a good degree. While engaged in the business of teaching, he was zealous in his endeavors to organize the young men of the town into lyceums, for public discussions on the important topics of the day. Doubtless this early practice of public speaking, was the means of giving him prominence in after times, as a good debater in the state senate, and as an effective platform orator. His example in this respect, is well worthy the imitation of all young men who aspire to positions of influence and usefulness among the people.”

For a short time in 1844, he held the office of postmaster, under the administration of Mr. Tyler. The Telegraph remarks:

As a friend of education, and the interests of our public schools, Mr. Harvey was always ready to aid and give encouragement. In short, in all enterprises — educational, philanthropic or benevolent, he could always be counted upon to give his influence and to speak a good word.

Although Mr. Harvey, while a young man, was the object of popular favor and applause, yet he preserved a gentlemanly equinimity, and did not allow himself to become inflated with pride and conceit; nor did he give way to the temptations which surround young men who are the subject of flattering regard. He was a temperance man from principle — abstaining from all intoxicating liquors. He was moreover a religious man, and a church communicant (Congregational.) There is much in the life of Gov. Harvey while a young man, that is instructive and worthy of example by the young men of the state. To a large extent it may be truly said, he was a self-made man. Before the age of 19 years he was thrown upon his own resources; by untiring industry and perseverance, he achieved a reputation that will live in history, and command the respect and admiration of men in after ages.

In 1847, Mr. Harvey was married to Miss Cordelia Perrine, and removed to Clinton, in Rock county, where he commenced trade. In the fall of that year he was elected to the second constitutional convention, where he distinguished himself as an able debater, and was one of the most influential members of that body.

Afterwards he removed to Shopiere, in Rock county, where he has ever since resided. Of his labors here, his friend Rev. Mr. Brown thus speaks:

“He purchased the water power, tore down the distillery, that had cursed the village, and in its place built a flouring mill and established a retail store, and exerted a great influence in reforming the morals of the place. A neat stone edifice was built, mainly by his munificence, for the Congregational church, of which he was a member, and his uncle, Rev. O.S. Powell, settled as its pastor. It is a coincidence worthy of remark, that Mr. Powell came to his death also by drowning at Fort Atkinson, July 2, 1855.

Of the subsequent career of Gov. Harvey — as state senator, secretary of state and governor, and as a leading citizen of the state, it is unnecessary to refer to them in this connection.

Janesville Daily Gazette – Apr 30, 1862

As an aside for people interested in San Diego, California history, Charles P. Francisco was a nephew of A.E. Horton. In 1872, Mr. Francisco married Miss Mary Evelyn Harvey, the niece of Gov. Harvey. Mr. Francisco arrived in San Diego in 1869. He passed away in 1913, at the age of sixty-eight.

You can read more about him in the following book:

Title:  San Diego and Imperial Counties, California: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement,  Volume 2
Page 434
Author   : William Ellsworth Smythe
Editor   : Samuel T. Black
Publisher   : The S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1913