Posts Tagged ‘1891’

Santa Claus Soap – What Wonders it Will Do

December 29, 2010

Friends, Washerwomen and Housekeepers, lend me your ears!

Here are some examples of the Santa Claus Soap advertisements that ran in many newspapers over a period of  several years. This first one, from 1888 is the earliest one I saved, but I think I saw some that were published prior to this. Click to enlarge images.

Little Miss Muffet used Santa Claus Soap in 1889.

As did Mistress Mary!

Even the Old Woman, who used it to sweep the cobwebs from the sky?

In 1890, it was the Three Little Maidens skipping rope…

and then in November of the same year, a pretty, sensible woman with no rhyme and no rope.

The 1891 World’s Fair  prompted the advertisers to rearrange My Country Tis of Thee (National Hymn?) to include Santa Claus Soap.

In April of 1891, it is back to the Sensible Women with big heads.

June of 1891, the rhyme returns, and brings  with it, an Ugly Couple. These two don’t even look human. I hope the executives at Santa Claus Soap fired the artist.

Also in June of 1891 – Santa Claus himself makes an appearance, bringing joy to the hearts of all housekeepers.

September, 1891, Banks, Banks, Banks…and Fairbank with a jester looking character.

Summer of 1892, and Santa is a Traveling Man. Did Santa Claus Soap inspire Ricky Nelson?

Come September, it’s riding the Cockhorse to get some Santa Claus Soap.

Like in the Mother Goose rhyme.

My deah boy! It’s all about the Collars and Cuffs in December of 1892.

*****

Sapolio – Where Dirt Gathers – Waste Rules

Pearline – Don’t Wear Yourself Out Over the Washtub

Pearline – Don’t Wear Yourself Out Over the Washtub

December 2, 2010

Sandusky Daily Register –  Jan 30, 1891

As stated in this 1891 Pearline advertisement, the produce came into being about 1877. They seemed to have kept their illustrator pretty busy producing a wide variety of advertisements.

Since I ran across some “Hints for Housekeepers,” while looking for the Pearline ads, I am including them. Some are entertaining, some might be useful, and some are rather dangerous, and come with a cautionary warning:

Galveston Daily News – Jul 13, 1888

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Can you tell it was election season when this next one ran?

Daily Northwestern – Nov 27, 1888

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These hints don’t appear to be serious:

Handy Hints for the Housekeeper.

A perplexed housekeeper wants to know what she shall do with the tin cans that from day to day accumulate about the house — fruit cans, meat cans — of all kinds cans, cans, and a thousand cans. Well, if you keep a boarding house, you might throw them into the street, right in front of the house as a bait for the homeless man seeking a boarding house, If you have a home, however, you might utilize the cans in many ways.

You might take the tomato cans, fill them with soft, rich earth, and plant them, and by and by a whole handful of all sorts of weeks would come up. Then you could take the can to the pottery and have the potter twist a nice terra cotta vase about it so as to completely hid the can, and thus at a trifling expense, not over a few dollars, you could utilize your old tomato can as a garden vase.

Or you could take a lobster can, and bore three holes at equal distances in the sides, close to the open end. Then cover the can as thickly as you need with fine plastic material used in the manufacture of cheap statuettes, and employ some good artist to fashion ?? in graceful shape and beautiful designs. Then fasten bright brass chains in the three holes and hang it in a hook in the porch roof, and you will have a handsome hanging basket that need not cost you more than $5.

If you should break a kerosene lamp, save the foot of it, and with a bit of red flannel and merino and some white crochet make a pin cushion of it, stuffing the flannel and merino out in a large, irregular shaped sphere and with the crochet cotton work “lOve thE giVEr” on it. Then set it in the spare room on the dresser, care being taken to have the cushion fastened on so loosely that it will cant a little to one side. Then, when the guest wakes up in the night and sees that awful apparition in the moonlight, he will confess all his sins, put on his clothes hindside foremost, and dropping himself out of the window will flee in terror into the wilderness and never come back to spoil your best pillow shams with his bear’s oily head again.

“It isn’t what you get,” they say down in West Virginia, “that makes you rich, it’s what you save.” A few cents here and there in household expenses are not noticed at the time, but at the end of a year they aggregate enough to pay the for a steam thresher.

Fort Wayne Daily Gazette (Fort Wayne, Indiana) May 7, 1881

Sandusky Daily Register – Aug 8, 1889

Sandusky Daily Register – Mar 3, 1890

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This one even mentions Pearline in its hints:

Hints for the Housekeeper.

If you think the kitchen is a hot place be easy on the cook.

Lard applied at once will remove the discoloration after a bruise.

A rug under one’s feet is restful when long standing is necessary, as in ironing or washing dishes.

Whites of eggs may be beaten to a stiff froth by an open window when it would be impossible in a steamy kitchen.

Mrs. Emma Ewing avers that not book knowledge alone but cook knowledge is needed in this broad nation of dyspeptics.

Cistern water that has become foul may be purified with powdered borax or alum. A quarter of a pound of each will cleanse twenty-five or more barrels.

Put a little pearline in the greasy pots and roasting pans and it will greatly facilitate cleaning them, especially if you stand them on the range to heat the water.

Most vegetables are better cooked fast, excepting potatoes, beans, peas, cauliflower and others which contain starch. Cabbage should be boiled rapidly in plenty of water; so should onions, young beets and turnips.

William Galvani learned from experiments that by cooking most fruits and vegetables lose their natural flavor, which he says in “Food, Home and Garden,” is after all, more delicious than any that can be artificially supplied.

You can prevent your pretty new ginghams from fading if you let them lie for several hours in water in which has been dissolved a goodly quantity of salt. Put the dress in it while it is hot, and after several hours wring it out dry and wash and usual.

The pretty woman fades with the roses on her cheeks and the girlhood that lasts and hour; the beautiful woman finds her fullness of bloom only when a past has written itself on her, and her power is then most irresistible when it seems going.

When a warm bath is taken, if the whole body from the crown of the head to the soles of the feet is instantly sponged with cold water there will not be danger of taking cold. The cold water closed the pores naturally. They are left open unnaturally after a warm bath.

Commonplace but important is the suggestion, “Be careful of fire.” Never take risk of lighting fire in stove or furnace not known to be ready and safe. In building or repairing see that the pipe holes in the chimney are tight and well protected from lath and siding by use of clay pots made for the purpose.

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Jan 2, 1892

Sandusky Daily Register – Jul 21, 1890

Sandusky Daily Register – Dec 12, 1890

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PLAIN TALK.

Every Day Hints for the Practical Housekeeper.

The oil of white birch bark, which gives to Russia leather its peculiar aromatic and lasting qualities, when dissolved in alcohol is said to be excellent for preserving and waterproofing various fabrics. It renders them both acid and insect proof, and in no way destroys their pliability.

Tea and coffee stains will usually come out of linen if put into water at once or if soon washed. IF the yare of long standing rub pure glycerine on them, and then after washing this out, wash the linen in the usual way.

Prick potatoes before baking so that the air can escape. This will prevent their bursting in the oven.

Bad breath or offensive breath may be removed by taking a teaspoonful of the following mixture after each meal. One ounce liquor of potash, one ounce chloride of soda, one and one-half ounces phosphate of soda, and three ounces of water.

A good formula for layer cakes is as follows: One cupful of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of sweet milk, the beaten whites of four eggs, two cupfuls of flour and a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder.

The Housekeeper gives the following hints: To take ink out of linen, dip the spotted parts immediately in pure melted tallow, the wash out the tallow and the ink will have disappeared.

Lima Daily Times (Lima, Ohio) Aug 16, 1892

Sandusky Daily Register – Jul 15, 1892

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This next one is kind of creepy:

Sandusky Daily Register – Oct 11, 1892

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Let the men wash!

Fort Wayne Gazette – Apr 30, 1895

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Here are the household hints that come with the warning. The dangerous hints are mostly at the end of the list:

HINTS FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER.

The following directions for removing stains, spots, etc., must be used with exceeding caution, Chloroform, benzine, turpentine, kerosene and gasoline are all dangerous substances unless handled with extreme care.

Sponge a grease spot with four tablespoonsful of alcohol to one of salt.

Sprinkle salt over the spot on a carpet and sweep all up together.

Rub finger marks from furniture with a little sweet oil.

Put a lump of camphor in an air-tight case with silverware to keep it from discoloration.

Remove paint spots from a window by rubbing a copper cent over them.

Sprinkle salt over fresh claret stains.

Wash ink stains in strong brine and then sponge with lemon juice.

Hold a fruit stained article over a bowl and pour boiling water through the cloth.

Rub egg stains on silver with salt on a damp cloth.

Use wood ashes on discolored tableware.

Clean steel knives with raw potato dipped in fine brick dust.

Rub brass with hot vinegar and salt and scour with fine ashes.

Clean a carpet with a broom dipped in a very weak solution of turpentine in hot water.

Cleanse grained woodwork with cold tea.

Scour ironware with finely sifted coal ashes.

Soak mildewed clothes in buttermilk and spread on the grass in the sun.

Wash rusty gilt frames in spirits of wine.

Wash oilcloth with a flannel and warm water; dry thoroughly and rub with a little skimmed milk.

Purify jars by soaking hem in strong sodawater.

Wash blackened ceilings with sodawater.

Rub white spots on furniture with camphor.

Rub a stove zinc with kerosene.

Cleanse bottles with hot water and fine ????s.

Remove fruit stains from hands with weak oxalic acid.

Clean jewelry with prepared chalk.

Wash hair brushes in weak ammonia water.

Rub stained hands with salt and lemon juice.

Remove ink from wood with muriatic acid, after rinsing with water.

Wash japanned ware with a little warm soda.

Rub mirrors with spirits of wine.

Apply spirits of salt to ink stained mahogany.

Use sulphuric acid, wash off with suds, for medicine stains on silver.

Remove all stains from wall paper by powdered pipe clay moistened.

Use gasoline for removing paint.

Use jewelers’ rouge and lard for rubbing nickel plating.

Wash willow ware with salt water.

Clean hard finished walls with ammonia water.

Rub whitewash spots with strong vinegar.

Rub soft grease over tar and then wash in warm soda water.

Dip a soft cloth in vinegar and rub on smoky mica.

Sponge faded plush with chloroform.

Take paint out of clothing by equal parts of ammonia and turpentine.

To remove machine oil from satin use benzine. Be careful about having a light in the room as it is very explosive.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) May 27, 1894

Fort Wayne Gazette – Dec 30, 1895

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Pearline gets violent:

Fort Wayne Gazette – Jun 12, 1896

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HINTS FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER

A PAN of borax and sugar, kept under the sink, will discourage roaches.

Plenty of hot water and washing soda put down the sink pipes will keep them clear, and lessen the plumber’s bill.

A piece of lime or charcoal in the new refrigerator will prevent the “new” odor and taste from clinging to eatables.

To successfully bake a piecrust without its filling, line it with paraffin paper and fill it with uncooked rice.

Enameled ware that has become burned or discolored may be cleaned by rubbing with coarse salt and vinegar.

A teaspoonful of lemon juice to a quart of water will make rice very white and keep the grains separate when boiled.

A tablespoonful of borax is an agreeable addition to the dishwasher, and helps to keep the hands soft instead of irritating them, as soda does.

The Anaconda Standard (Anaconda, Montana) Dec 1, 1907

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Curse Monday, Wash Day:

Nebraska State Journal – Oct 25, 1897

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The late 1890s must have been desperate times; this  woman is slashing with a dagger:

Eau Claire Leader – Jul 6, 1898

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Hints for the Housekeeper.

A soft clean cloth dipped in melted paraffin will give the stove a smooth, attractive surface. Kerosene-oil on a soft lintless cloth may be used on the nickel afterward to effect a polish.

Put two worn blankets together, cover with silkolene and stitch with worsted. Thsi makes an attractive comforter, if you choose the silkolene and worsted to harmonize with the color scheme of the bedroom.

Brushes should be hung up. They should never be allowed to stand on their bristles as this mats them and tends to make the bristles fall out. In using a broom, sometimes use one side and sometimes the other; this will make it wear evenly and so last longer. An oil mop will wear longer if it is not hung too near the heat after washing it. The bristles of a carpet sweeper or a vacuum cleaner can be well cleaned of hairs with a buttonhook or a pair of scissors.

Fine china nicks particularly easily when it is warm. A towel in the bottom of the dish pan will save much danger of chipping. Use a mild soap in washing painted or gilt-edged china and wash one piece at a time. Avoid using water that is too hot, in washing dishes and put plates into it edgewise so that both sides will expand with the heat alike. Much fine china, especially that which is made in China, is rough on the bottom. When the dishes are stacked in the closet, soft paper, or flannel pads should be kept between them to prevent the decoration on the front from being scratched, worn or chipped.

— Delineator.

The Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) May 27, 1922

Nebraska State Journal – Aug 16, 1897

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Hints For The Housekeeper

A Model Floor Waxer

I haven’t a floor waxer, so will tell how I wax my floors. I lay down a piece of cloth, put on the middle of it the amount of wax it will take, then place a warm flatiron on the wax, gather the cloth all up on the handle of the iron and proceed to iron the floor. As the iron cools change for a warmer iron. The wax goes go much faster this way and soaks in better, because it is warm. I wait about half an hour, then put a large piece of old woolen goods in the mop and then polish the floor. Try it on your Congoleum rugs and see how much brighter they are.

Save On Cleaning Candlesticks

Instead of scraping the wax from brass or silver candlesticks, plunge the metal part in hot water and thus melt the wax. Candlesticks are often scratched when the wax is scraped off. By melting off the wax much time is saved and you will not run the risk of marring the candlesticks.

Sheboygan Press (Shepoygan, Wisconsin) Jan 7, 1927

Humeston Gobblers

November 24, 2010

THE AMBITIOUS TURKEY.

“THIS vulgar old farmyard! It must be that I,
With my talents and beauty, was born to live high.
I’m tired to death of the meaningless clack
Of these ignorant fowls, with their ‘cluck’ and their ‘quack.'”
Thus mused a lone gobbler, the last of the brood,
As he eyed his companions in quarrelsome mood,
“I long for the cultured surroundings of town
And a share of the world’s goodly praise and renown.
I’m not a mere turkey, I’m almost a bird” —
And, suiting the action at once to the word,
He flopped his great wings in excitement and flew
Just a few feet in air when he lit in a slough.
“I’m almost a peacock,” undaunted he cried,
And down went his broad double-chin in its pride.
And then, with the rustle and stir of high birth,
He spread out his feathers for all they were worth,
And strutted and trilled in his voluble way
Till the awe-stricken poultry-tribe fled in dismay.

“Look, ma, that there turkey,” quoth old Farmer Brown,
Who appeared at this moment, “I’ll take right to town;
He’ll go like a hot-cake on Thanksgivin’ Day.
Come, git on yer fixin’s, and don’t yer delay,
I’ll give yer the proceeds to git a new hat —
A snug leetle mite, fur her’s oncommon fat.”
Such low, boorish jargon of course was not clear
To this elegant bird’s most fasidious ear;
So they trotted him off the the great distant town
Where a fashionable family gobbled him down, Admired and praised as the tenderest meat
It ever had been their good fortune to eat.
‘Mid “cultured surroundings” he melted away,
His dreams more than realized — King for a day!

JULIA H. THAYER

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 28, 1888

Now for Turkey Jokes.

“Arn’t you afraid that you are living rather too well for your health?” asked the chicken.

“I ain’t in this for my health,” answered the turkey between the pecks. “I’m out for the stuff, so to speak.”

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 25, 1891

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 22, 1893

HOW TO CARVE A TURKEY.

Thanksgiving day draws on apace and already the turkey is stretching his joints to make them tough against the festival day. A few suggestions from one of experience in carving may prove beneficial to those who are more accustomed to the easy surgical work employed in carving a round steak, than in the physical dissection of gobblers. When the fowl is placed before you, assume a pleasing smile and a confident manner. It will inspire confidence in those about you.

Keep the turkey on the platter. It is not now considered in good taste to carve it on the table cloth, or to hold it firm with one knee. Should it slip from the platter into your lap, restore it to its place before continuing to hunt for the lost joint. As before suggested, however, it is best to keep the turkey on the platter while carving. The carving fork should be inserted firmly in the breast and it is considered preferable to steady the corpse with the forth rather than by grasping its neck. In the mean time, keep the turkey on the platter. The leg is fastened to the body by a joint. Hunt for it patiently.

Don’t try to cut the bone in two. Should the joint be refractory, quietly ask the hostess for a saw. Watch the fowl suspiciously, for in such a moment as ye think not, it will take unto itself wings and fly into your fair neighbor’s lap. At this point a humorous story, told in your most facetious vein, will help matters amazingly and leave the waiting guests in good spirits, especially if you keep the turkey on the platter. Dismember a wing or two. Bear down on the joint. If the thing slips and shoves the dressing over the edge of the platter, make light of hte incident as a common place matter, and tell about how you used to carve ducks years ago. Then go for the wish bone. Promise the young miss that she shall have the straddling thing to hang over the door. Keep on cutting; the wish bone is there somewhere. Gain time by discovering a side bone or two. But keep the wishbone in your mind’s eye.

If you should find it necessary to use your fingers to secure the bone, it is considered more polite we believe, to wipe them on the table cloth rather than to suck off the grease. It is, we understand, now considered decidedly proper to transfer the dismembered gobbler to the guests’ plates with a long fork rather than to use your fingers. But this is a mere matter of taste, a simple freak of fashion, as it were. By following this simple advise, it will be easy for anyone to carve the turkey, and we have only one parting suggestion, which is that in carving a turkey,it is now considered decidedly more dignified to allow the fowl to remain on the platter.

A.L. FLUDE.

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 22, 1893

Family on Porch in Humeston, Iowa (Image from deadfred.com)

This family (unknown name) looks like they could have posed for this picture on Thanksgiving day.  Deadfred states this was taken in Humeston, Iowa, which, evidently, is pronounced Hum – es -ton, according to their rather impressive website. They have a nice promotional video for their town at the link. Looks like a quaint little town with beautiful scenery.

Old Bucktails Answer the Final Roll Call

November 11, 2010

Alanson E. Niles

DEATH OF COLONEL ALANSON E NILES

SKETCH OF A PROMINENT MILITARY OFFICER AND WELL-KNOWN CITIZEN

Last Thursday morning Colonel Alanson E Niles, of this borough, died at the German hospital in Philadelphia, where he went on the 21st of September to undergo a delicate surgical operation. He stood the operation well and seemed to be on the way to recovery, when Bright’s disease was developed and he rapidly grew weaker until the end. Mrs. Niles and his son Lieut. Nathan E. Niles were at his bedside. The remains were brought home on Friday, and on Saturday afternoon the funeral was held at his late residence on Main street, the burial being with military honors.

Alanson Erric Niles was a son of Mr. Nathan Niles, one of the early settlers of Charleston township. He was born on his father’s farm near this borough October 5, 1816. He inherited the homestead and was engaged in farming until 1857, when he came to this borough and engaged in the mercantile business with Mr. Aaron G. Elliott, the firm of Niles & Elliott doing business in the old wooden building which stood on Main street on the corner just below the First National bank.

In 1861 Mr. Niles was among the first to respond to the call  for volunteers to suppress the Rebellion. He enlisted in this borough, recruiting a company of men, and was elected Captain of Company E of the First Pennsylvania Rifles, better known throughout the country as the “Bucktails.” He was mustered into service May 31, 1861.

At Dranesville on December 20, 1861, the Bucktails are credited with winning the first victory of the war for the army of the Potomac. Here Captain Niles was severely wounded, being shot through the lungs. He was in the hospital some time, but as soon as he was able he hastened back to his regiment.

On the morning of the second day of the battle of Gaines Hill six companies of the Bucktails were stationed on a hill above a swamp to guard a bridge, the only crossing for miles in either direction. When the armies retreated, Companies D and E, with Captain Niles in command, were left to hold the bridge. The boys stood their ground until a Rebel brigade came up in their rear to within ten rods, when they retreated over the brow of the hill to fall into Jackson’s advancing corps. They were completely surrounded and taken prisoners. Company E was the color company of the regiment and rather than have their flag fall into Rebel hands they burned it in the swamp. Captain Niles was in Libby prison for 49 days, when he was exchanged, together with most of the members in his company, and they at once went to the front again.

Captain Niles was promoted to the rank of Major on March 1, 1863, and on the 15th of May following he was made Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment. It was while with the Bucktails in their charge on Little Round Top at Gettysburg, on the 2d of July, 1863, that he was wounded in the left thigh.

Lieut Col Niles was afterward transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps with promotion to the rank of Colonel. He commanded the corps during the raids of the famous Mosby in eastern Virginia, and at White House Landing he held the field against Mosby’s men for one whole day, when he was relieved by Gen. Sheridan.

Colonel Niles was then sent to Point Lookout, a general depot for prisoners, where he remained in charge until after Lee’s surrender. He then went to Washington.

On the night that President Lincoln was assassinated Col Niles was in Ford’s theater, and he heard the pistol shot and hastened to the hallway and saw the wounded President being carried out.

Col Niles participated in the following battles during the war: New Creek, Hunter’s Mills, Dranesville, Gaines Hill of the seven days fight before Richmond, Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Antietam and Gettysburg.

When the war closed and the grand review was held in Washington Colonel Niles was selected from among the thousands of officers to be the officer of the day, and he had full military charge of the city at the time.

Col Niles was then commissioned as Captain in the regular Army, and for three years he was stationed at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in command of the military barracks.

On account of disability by reason of his wounds he was retired in 1869 with the rank and pay of a Captain, and he came to this borough to reside. After his retirement he lived here quietly, enjoying the respect and esteem of his neighbors, and always taking a lively interest in the affairs of the Government. He was an ardent lover of rifle-shooting and recently notwithstanding his years, he made some remarkable scores on the rifle range.

It can truthfully be said of Col Niles that he was a stranger to fear and a martyr to duty. His record during the war was one of great personal courage and of thorough devotion to the exact discharge of military duty in every station. At home among his friends although of a naturally retiring nature, he was cheerful, genial and steadfast.

Col Niles was married November 10, 1842 to Angeline Austin, of Charleston. Two sons and two daughters were born to them. His widow and Lieut Nathan E. Niles of the Navy, survive him.

The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon at the family residence and it was largely attended. Rev. Dr. A.C. Shaw conducted the service. The Cook Post, G.A.R. attended in a body, and twenty five members of Col Niles’s company acted as a military escort to the cemetery and tenderly committed the remains of their late commander to the dust. Each member wore the distinguishing bucktail on his hat. Among the many floral tributes was a buck constructed of white flowers, which was a testimonial of Company E of the Bucktails. At the cemetery the service was in charge of the Cook Post No. 315, G.A.R.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Oct 14, 1891

Image from Find-A-Grave

Mr. Henry Clay Roland died at his home in Delmar township last Friday morning — a victim of the prevalent influenza. Mr. Roland was born in Lycoming county forty-eight years ago; but he came to this county when still young, living for a time in Charleston and afterward in Delmar.

During the war of the Rebellion he was an efficient soldier of the Union, being a member of Company E of the Bucktails, under the late Colonel Niles.

After the war he was engaged in farming, and he was an excellent citizen and a man respected and liked by all his acquaintances. The funeral was largely attended last Sunday at the family residence, many of Mr. Roland’s old comrades being present. The interment was in the cemetery in this borough. Mr. Roland leaves a widow and four children — two sons and two daughters.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Apr 6, 1892

Flag image from the Descendant’s Association of the 149th PA Bucktails

Death of Mr. Jacob Huck.

Mr. Jacob Huck, aged 72, died after a week’s illness of pneumonia, on Friday evening at the home of Mr. George W. Smith, at Cedar Run, with whom he made his home. He was a member of Co. E, of the famous 1st Pa. Rifles, or “Bucktails,” and served through the civil war. Five brothers also served in this war.

Mr. Huck had been a member of Wellsboro Lodge, I.O.O.F., for 25 years. He was a conscientious, upright Christian gentleman and was respected and esteemed by all who knew him. Mr. Huck never married. He is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Messrs. Harrison Huck, of Lockhaven; Myron, of Delmar, and Samuel and John, who live in the West, and Mrs. Bert Lloyd, of Olmsville. The Wellsboro Odd Fellows sent a beautiful floral offering and several members of that Lodge besides many Slate Run Odd Fellows attended the funeral at the Cedar Run Methodist church on Monday at 2 p.m.

The following was written by a comrade of the deceased:

“Sergeant Jacob Huck was one of six brothers who enlisted in 1861. Jacob, George and Samuel served in Co. E, of the “Old Bucktails.” Jacob was Color Sergeant for two years and during that time he was wounded three times. At the battle of Cold Harbor a Rebel soldier seized the flag staff and tried to capture the colors. Huck killed him instantly by running him through with a saber. As a soldier and friend none excelled him. He was characterized by his extreme modesty, never mentioning his brave deeds to his most intimate friends. His brothers, Harrison, of Lockhaven, and Myron, of Delmar, with their families, and his sister, Mrs. Bert Lloyd, of Olmsville, attended the funeral. Comrades G.O. Darby, Peter D. Walbridge and W.W. English, of Co. E, with three other veterans acted as pall bearers.”

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 1, 1905

Image from Find-A-Grave

Mr. Chester F. Kimball, aged 64, died Saturday evening about 9 o’clock at his home on Crafton street. He was apparently as well as usual on Saturday afternoon, but was stricken suddenly with paralysis about 4 o’clock while making purchases in Finkelstein Bros.’ store. He was removed to his home, where he passed away within a few hours.

Mr. Kimball was born at Homer, Cortland county, N.Y., on April 30th, 1842. He was twice married, his first wife being Sarah Boydson, whom he married on December 20, 1870. and who died on May 18, 1878. Two sons were born to them, Charles N. Kimball, Esq., of Sistersville, West Virginia, and Mr. Everett E. Kimball, of Cleveland, Ohio, both of whom survive.

On April 30, 1890, Mr. Kimball married Sarah Rollins, of Roundtop, who survives him, with one daughter, Clara A.

Two sisters also survive him, Mrs. Adelbert Green, of Syracuse, N.Y., and Mrs. Miles Dunbar, of Necedah, Wisconsin.

Mr. Kimball enlisted on August 7, 1861, in Co. E, of the 1st Pa. rifles, better known as the “Old Bucktails.” He served with honor and distinction and was one of the best soldiers in his company. He later served with the 13th Veteran Reserve Corps. He was a member of the Union Veteran Legion and of the Methodist church. The deceased was a good man, an upright and progressive citizen and was highly esteemed by all who knew him.

Funeral services will be held this morning at 10 o’clock at the late home of the deceased, Rev. W.H. Reese, D.D., officiating.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Jan 30, 1907

 

Another Veteran Mustered Out.

At his home near Ewing, Neb., February 16th, of bronchitis, Orsamus P. Borden answered the final roll call. He was born November 30, 1829 at Pultney, N.Y., and at the time of his death was 77 years, 2 months and 16 days old.

When a young man he moved with his parents to Tioga county, Pa. He married Miss Sarah Impson, January 28, 1854, in Delmar, Pa. To this union were born four children, three sons and one daughter, only one of whom survive, namely, Arthur H. Borden of Genessee, Potter county. His wife died April 17, 867.

On November 2, 1867, he married Miss Josephine S. Butler, his present wife. To them were born thirteen children of whom five are living, three sons and two daughters.

In 1861, Mr. Borden enlisted in Company E of the “Bucktails.” He served through the entire war. Was taken prisoner at Mechanicsville, June 26, 1862, and spent some time in Libby and Belle Island prisons.

In 1882 he moved his family to Nebraska and settled on a homestead, where he spent the remainder of his days, and with his faithful wife, fought the hard battles, and faced the privations of a frontier life. In courage and fidelity to what he considered right, he proved himself in every respect a man. He was a member of the Grand Army, General Anger Post 192 of Ewing, and no one of its members was more faithful in attendance at its meetings, or more loyal to its laws.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Mar 27, 1907

Another Veteran Gone.

Samuel Freeland, aged 75 years, died last Tuesday morning at 3:45 o’clock at his home in Corning of paralysis.

Mr. Freeland was born in Chatham Tioga county, Pa., December 1, 18[3]3, and the early part of his life was spent on farms in different parts of this country. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in Company A, Bucktails. Early in the war he was captured by the Confederates and was in Libby prison for a number of weeks until he was exchanged. When he entered this famous prison pen he was a large man, weighing over 200 pounds but so severe was his treatment that when he came from the confinement he tipped the scale at only 100 pounds. He was so worn and changed that his own brother failed to recognize him. He again went into active serviced and shortly after he was wounded in the right hip. He lay for four days on the battle field where he received the wound and was finally found by the Rebels and again taken to Libby prison. During the days that he lay on the filed of battle he had only one drink of water, this from the canteen of a Rebel captain. This time he was confined in Libby prison only about six weeks and when exchanged he was honorably discharged from service because of his wound. He carried the bullet to the day of his death.

After recovering from his injury he lived at Addison where he worked in the sash and blind factory and where he married Mary L. Seaman on the first day of February, 1865. He also lived at Coudersport for a time. About four years ago he removed to Corning where he had since lived. Besides his wife he is survived by five children — G.V. Freeland, of Spokane, Wash., C.H. Freeland, of Corning; William Freeland, of Hunt, N.Y.; Mrs. Arthur Slad with whom he lived, and Mrs. Rose Varner, of Albany Falls.

He was a member of the Arch Jones Post, G.A.R. at Coudersport, and was one of the charter members of the W.W. Angle Post, at Addison.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Mar 3, 1909

Image from the Richard Warren Smith family tree on Ancestry.com

Benjamin W. Topping, Sr., died recently at his home in Elmira, aged 79 years. He is survived by his widow, one son, B.W. Topping, Jr.; one daughter, Mrs. B.G. Birney, of Cincinnati. Mr. Topping had been a resident of Elmira for many years. He was a veteran of the civil war and was a captain in Co. H, Pennsylvania “Bucktails.” He was a commercial traveler for 35 years and, as a cigar salesman, was well known in almost every city and town in northern Pennsylvania and southern New York.

Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Feb 21, 1917

Image from Find-A-Grave

DEATH OF P.D. WALBRIDGE.

Highly Esteemed Civil War Veteran Died Last Wednesday.

Peter D. Walbridge, aged 83 years, died at the Blossburg hospital early last Wednesday morning, following the amputation of his right leg, which operation was performed Monday. Mr. Walbridge’s right foot had caused him much suffering for several years and not long ago gangrene developed and amputation of his knee was necessary as the only hope of saving is life, but he failed to recover from the shock of the operation.

He is survived by one son, Peter D. Walbridge, Jr., of Pueblo, Colorado, and three daughters, Mrs. W.D. Riffle and Miss May Walbridge, of Wellsboro, and Miss Maude Walbridge, of New York city.

Mr. Walbridge served with conspicuous bravery during the civil war as a member of Co. E, of the famous “Old Bucktails” regiment, and many are the tales of heroism his comrades tell of him, but Mr. Walbridge seldom spoke of his own experiences during the dark days of ’61-’65. He was a prisoner at Andersonville for nearly a year and that trying ordeal took a heavy toll from his naturally strong constitution. Mr. Walbridge had a host of warm friends to whom his death brings deepest sorrow.

The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock at the First Baptist church, Rev. C.W. Macgeorge officiating; burial in the Wellsboro cemetery.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Dec 3, 1919

BRILLIANT WAR RECORD.

Brief Review of a Brave Soldier’s Career During the Civil War.

The brilliant and gallant Civil War record of the late Peter D. Walbridge, of Wellsboro, who died a few days ago at the Blossburg Hospital, following amputation of his left leg for gangrene, should not pass unnoticed. He was one of the first from Wellsboro to enlist in the original Old Bucktails under Captain Alanson E. Niles and served throughout the entire Civil War.

Notwithstanding Peter Walbridge was always conceded one of the bravest and most daring soldiers of the fighting Bucktails, having performed many heroic deeds worthy of note, he bore his honors meekly, without display, blow or bluster. He had a big heart and it was in the right place, as all his comrades in arms can testify.

The Gazette takes great pride in presenting the following summary of this brave soldier’s war record:

Peter D. Walbridge enlisted April 28th, 1861, from Wellboro, Pa., and was mustered into the United States service May 31st, 1861, at Harrisburg, as a private to serve for a term of three years in Company E, First Regiment, Penna. Vol. Rifles, under Captains A.E. Niles and S.J. Mack and Cols. Theodore L. Kane, J. Biddle, H.W. McNeil and C.F. Taylor. The Regiment was the 42nd Pa. Vol. Inf., 1st Bucktails or 13th Regiment, Penna. Reserves Infantry.

Moved to a point opposite Cumberland, Md., June 22nd, thence to West Va., in support of Lew Wallace till October; then moved to Tennallytown and attached to McCall’s Reserve Division, Army of Potomac. Engaged at Drainesville, Va., Dec. 20th, ’61. Moved to Virginia Peninsula, June 9th to 12th, ’62.

Attached to 5th Corps Army of Potomac. Engaged in seven days battle before Richmond, Jun 25th to July 1st, ’62; battle of Mechanisville, June 26th; Meadow Bridge, June 26th; Gainesville, July 27th; Savage Station, June 29th; Charles City, Cross-Road and Glendale, Jun 30th ’62; Malvern Hill, July 1st, ’62; battles of Gailnesville and Groveton, August 28th and 29th, ’62; Second Bull Run, August 30th, ’62; South Mountain, Md. Sept. 1?, Antietam, Md., Sept. 7th, ’62. Was wounded here by gunshot in right leg and sent to Harrisburg. Received 50 days furlough to go home from Governor Curtin. Rejoined regiment and participated in battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 13th, ’62, and March, January 20th to 24th, ’63.

Ordered to Washington, D.C., Feb. 6th, ’63. Duty there and at Alexandria till June 25th, ’63. Rejoined the Potomac Army, June 25th, ’63. Attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Div., 5th Corps, Army of Potomac. Engaged in Battle of Gettysburg, July 1st to 3rd, ’63. Pursuit of Lee, July 5th to 24th, ’63. Engaged at Rappahannock Station, Nov. 7th, ’63; Mine Run, Nov. 26th and 28th, ’63.

Honorably discharged Feb. 27th, ’64. Re-enlisted as a veteran Feb. 28th, ’64, in the field as Sergeant in same Company and Regiment, three years more, or during the war, under Captains S.J. Mack and Col. A.E. Niles. Participated in Battle of the Wilderness, May 5th-7th, ’64;; Laurel Hill, Va., May 8th; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 12th, ’64; assault on the Bloody Angle, May 12th ’64; Spottsylvania Court House, May 13th to 21st, ’64; Harris Farm, May 19th; North Anna River, May 23rd to 26th, ’64; Jericho Ford, May 25th; Penunkeg River, May 26th to 28th; Totokotomy, May 29th to 31st; Bethesda Church, May 30th to June 6th.

Was wounded May 30th in head, left leg and right arm by shell explosion and was captured and taken to Spotts Hospital, Richmond, Va., until July ’64. Then was placed in Andersonville, later Florence, prison. Was paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md. Received furlough home until April, 1865. Rejoined regiment. Was on May 31st, 1865, transferred to Co. E, 190th Reg., Pa. Vol., Infantry, which he joined close to Petersburg. Engaged at Appomattox Court House, Lee’s surrender, April 9th, 1865. Washington, D.C., May 1st to 12th; Grand Review, May 23rd, 1865. Honorably discharged June 28th, 1865, at Harrisburg, by reason of close of war.

The Wellsboro Gazette (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Dec 11, 1919

Image from Find-A-Grave

CIVIL WAR VETERAN ANSWERS LAST CALL

James T. Hebel, 79 years old, a veteran of the Civil War, while accompanying a neighbor, Joseph Lenig from his home in Hunter’s Valley to Newport, Perry County, Pa., on Friday morning, May 26, got off the wagon in the narrows, along the steep mountain road to walk up a hill, and while walking along back of the wagon, dropped dead in the road. Death was due to heart failure.

His son, Alfred of Osecola Mills, went to visit him on Monday, May 22, as had been his custom, about every four to six weeks. On Tuesday morning his father suggested that they go to Newport on Wednesday morning, as he wanted to buy a suit and hat and shoes to wear to the Memorial services at Liverpool on Sunday, May 28 and on Tuesday, May 30. As planned, they went to Newport on Wednesday morning and after making the purchases, and were about to part to go in different directions to their homes, and as his father said “Good Bye” to his boy he remarked, he would wear his new clothes to the memorial services, neither thinking that the time was so near at hand when he should answer the final “roll call” and be numbered among those whose graves would be strewn with flowers, by his few surviving comrades on that day.

Mr. Hebel was born near Liverpool Perry County, Pa., March 19th, 1843. He was the son of George and Rosanna (Matchet) Hebel, natives of Lancaster and Dauphin Counties. The early part of his life was spent in working as a millwright with his father. He was eighteen years old when the Civil War broke out and at once enlisted in the service of his country in Co. B, 7th Penna. Reserves, being organized at Liverpool by Capt. G.K. Shull and after serving in this regiment and company for some time was transferred to the “Old Bucktails” and at the expiration of his 3 year enlistment re-enlisted, for three years more, or until the close of the war. He took part in nearly all the important battles between the Army of the Potomac and the Confederate forces under command of Robert E. Lee, from the first battle of Bull Run to Appomattox. Then took part in the Grand Review at Washington, D.C. Then went to Harrisburg where he was honorably discharged from the United States Service, July 5th, 1865, after having served his country over four years, in its most trying hours.

He then returned to his home in Perry County, but in December of the same year, came to Clearfield, where he learned the carpenter trade under Ezra Ale. During the spring of 1867 he was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Deis, and moved to Luthersburg, where he followed his trade, farming and lumbering until October 1897 when he was appointed and assumed the position of post master. He resigned that position April, 1906 and moved to Curwensville where his wife died on the 19th of December 1907. He then returned to Perry county and purchased forty acres of land in Hunter’s Valley, near the place of his birth, and about midway between Newport and Liverpool, where he lived during the summer and spent the winter with his four surviving children, Alfred M. of Osceola Mills, Mrs. Mary Freedline of Bell Township near Mahaffey, Clearfield County, Pa., Mrs. C.U. Downs of Kansas City, Mo and Warren L. of Harrisburg, Pa. He is also survived by nine grandchildren.

His Body was taken to Osceola Mills to the home of his son Alfred, on Saturday evening at which place funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock, conducted by Rev. J.W. Shillington of the M.E. Church. On Monday morning the body was taken to Luthersburg where it was laid to rest beside that of his wife and deceased children.

Mr. Hebel was a kind and affectionate father and was dearly loved by his children. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church from the time he first moved to Luthersburg until he returned to Perry County, where he associated himself with the church he attended as a boy and was regular in attendance at services until his advanced age made it almost impossible for him to walk the six miles to the church and back.

Clearfield Progress (Clearfield, Pennsylvania) Jun 2, 1922

AGED CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES

Eugene H. Stone Was Nearly One Hundred Two Years Old.

Eugene H. Stone, of near Wellsboro, civil war veteran, died at the Soldiers’ Facility, Bath, N.Y., Thurdays afternoon, Sept. 2, after a long illness.

There is now only one civil war veteran living in Tioga county, John Eldridge Harvey, aged 101, of Westfield.

Mr. Stone was a half-brother of the late William A. Stone, a former governor of Pennsylvania. He was born in Delmar, Jan. 31, 1842, son of Israel and Abbie Stone. At the age of 19 in August, 1861, he enlisted with Co. E, 42nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, known as the Bucktails.

Mr. Stone was captured July 22, 1862, at the battle of Mechanicsville, after being in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. He was held prisoner at Libby and Belle Isle Prisons 40 days, when he was exchanged and rejoined his regiment. He was mustered out Aug. 7, 1864, at Petersburg, Va.

On Nov. 9, 1864, he married Sarah Francis, daughter of Ephraim Francis, of Charleston. For six years they resided on his parents’ farm and then he purchased adjoining farms in Shippen and Delmar townships.

He went to Pawnee county, Kans., where he took up 160 acres of government land. Three years later he returned to Tioga county.

He served as school director and Shippen township Supervisor, was a member of the Masons and the Grange.

The funeral was held Saturday at the Johnson Funeral Home in Wellsboro, Rev. C.W. Sheriff officiating’; burial in the West Branch cemetery.

Mr. Stone is survived by a son, Fred A. stone, of Ansonia; two daughters, Mrs. Hobart Maynard and Mrs. Rankin Stermer, of Wellboro, R.D.; five grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

The first three “Bucktail” companies were organized by Thomas L. Kane at Smethport, McKean county, in April, 1861. One volunteer, seeing a deer suspended in front of a market, cut off the buck’s tail and stuck it in his hat and when he enlisted the name “Bucktail” was adopted.

The Tioga county contingent was organized in early May, 1861, by R.C. Cocks, of Liberty, afterward Colonel of the 207th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers and later advanced to Brigadier General, in answer to President Lincoln’s call for 75,000 men.

The Wellsboro regiment was commanded by Alanson [E.] Niles. This troop, with four others, marched overland to Troy and took the Northern Central Railroad to Harrisburg, announcing the arrival at the state capitol by a salvo of musketry. The contingent became Co. E, First Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment, and entered active service.

Mr. Stone participated in many of the principal battles of the war. He had three brothers in the Union forces. One was a member of his own company. All returned to their homes at the close of the war.

Of adult population of 6,000, 2,000 Tioga county men enlisted in the civil war and 445 never came back, a record equaled by only one other county in the union in proportion to population.

Wellsboro Agitator (Wellboro, Pennsylvania) Sep 8, 1943

Elizabeth Had Her Standards

October 10, 2010

 

 

THE YARD MEASURE.

Standards Have Varied in the Different Ages of the World.

The yard is the British and American standard of length. Down to 1824 the original standard of Britain (and from which ours was copied) was a rod, which had been deposited in the court of exchequer, London, in the time of Queen Elizabeth. In those days, says the St. Louis Republic, all measures intended for  general use were taken to the court of exchequer to be examined by the proper officer. That official took the proposed measure and placed it parallel with the standard, and if found correct placed certain marks of identification upon it.

By an act of parliament in 1824 the old Elizabethan standard was superseded by another, which had been constructed under the directions of the Royal society 64 years previous. This act provided that “the straight line or distance between the centers of two points in the gold studs in the brass rod now in the custody of the clerk of the house of commons shall be the genuine standard of the yard measure in Great Britain.” The act further provided that the measurements of the rod must be made when the temperature of the brass rod was at 62 degrees Fahrenheit.

That standard was destroyed by fire in 1834 and the commission appointed to replace it made the yard measure now in use. The new standard was deposited in the house of parliament in 1855 and authenticated copies of it are in possession of our government officials at Washington.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Sep 11, 1896

Read the rest:

Title: Chambers’s Journal, Volume 68
Authors    William Chambers, Robert Chambers
Publisher: W. & R. Chambers, 1891
Pages 742-745

You Say Korea, They Say Corea

October 7, 2010

Corea – Korea: How do we spell thee?

In the 1870s,  it was spelled COREA.

EXPEDITION TO COREA.

A New York special of the 31st inst., says: The frigate Colorado, and the corvettes Alaska and Benicia, ordered to the Asiatic squadron, have been equipped with an extra supply of howitzers and regulation rifles and pistols for the special purpose of punishing the natives of Corea and Formossa for their depredations on American shipping. The English, French, American, Dutch and Russian squadrons will unite in an expedition which will land five or six thousand men to attack the principal cities in Corea and bring the authorities to terms.

Galveston Daily News (Galvestion, Texas) Apr 8, 1870

 

NEWS BY MAIL.
DOMESTIC.

WASHINGTON, June 16. — A Cabinet meeting was held to-day, at which Secretary Robeson read a dispatch from Admiral Rodgers, commander of the Asiatic squadron, giving an account of the fight between the Chinese on the Corea peninsula and the combined forces of Americans and Europeans connected with the squadrons in these waters. Although the dispatch has not yet been made public, it is understood that Admiral Rodgers was conveying to Corea a number of Coreans whom he had rescued from shipwreck, intending to illustrate the friendship of civilized nations as contrasted  with the acts  of the Coreans, who not long ago murdered a French crew wrecked on that coast. The boats’ crews from the French, English, Russian and American vessels on this mission were fired upon by the Chinese, who probably were not aware of the object of the expedition. A fight ensued, in which the Chinese were punished, and Admiral Rodgers intimates that the conflict would be renewed next day.

The dispatch from Admiral Rodgers, of which the following is the substance, was received at the Navy Department and dated at Borsee Island, Corea, June 3, and sent from Shang hai:

Our minister and the Corean Envoys exchanged professions of amicable intentions. The Coreans made no objection to a survey of their waters. The Monocacy, Palos and four steam launches, under Commander Blaker, were sent on June 1st to examine the river Sable at a point called Difficult Passage on French chart No.2750. At a point where the navigation was most perilous, masked batteries, manned by several thousand Coreans, were unmasked and opened a heavy fire, without warning, on our people. The French ship in advance fought gallantly, our vessels bearing up drove the enemy from their works. The tide swept all the boats past the batteries. They anchored and threw shells among the retreating enemy. Eight-inch shells were evidently not expected.

The Monocacy was slightly injured by knocking upon a sunken rock, but is now temporarily repaired. The vessels on returning received no fire, the enemy having been driven from the forts. Our people displayed great gallantry, and one or two were slightly hurt.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Jun 23, 1871

 

 

 

SPECK OF WAR.

The rencontre between the French and English squadrons on the one side, and the Coreans on the other, will probably teach the “Heathen Chinee” that both nations have a good deal of fight left in them.

The Coreans are a treacherous, false-hearted race. By profession pirates on the sea and assassins on the land.

Corea is a narrow strip of land on the northeast coast of Asia, jutting out into the water for a distance of four hundred miles. It separates the Yellow Sea from the Sea of Japan. Its coast is rugged and dangerous. Many vessels are annually wrecked thereon, and their crews are frequently murdered. With a view to lessening the dangers of the navigation, Christian nations have engaged in the survey of these coasts, with the consent of the Corean Government. As the squadrons entered the river Sable in the pursuit of this object, they were fired on from masked batteries. Of course they replied in a manner that sent the Celestials howling inland.

Corea is tributary to China. In fact, its relation to China is similar to that of Canada to England. The standing army amounts to half a million.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Jun 28, 1871

 

 

THE COREAN EXPEDITION — THE SECOND FIGHT.

NEW YORK, August 22. – The mails bring details of the second fight in Corea.

It appears that on the morning of June 10 the expedition started from the fleet. It consisted of about nine hundred men, of which seven hundred, including one hundred and five marines, were to operate on land, four hundred and twenty-five from the Colorado, and one hundred and twenty-five each from the Alaska and Benicia, all the crew of the Monterey and Palos being required to work the guns on board. The Monocacy took the lead, followed by the Palos, with all the smaller boats in tow, except the steam launches.

The main object of the attack is built on top of a small conical hill on a tongue of land that projects from the right and west bank of the river, and extending out into the water about half a mile. Its average width from north to south is about 400 years. The river makes a sharp bend around the points of this peninsula, and during the rise and fall of the tide the water rushes past it with fearful rapidity. About 300 years from the extreme point of this small conical hill arises about three hundred feet high.

The Coreans have fortified this in such a manner, that looking from the water the walls of the fort appear but a continuation of the extrusion upward of the steep sides, only approaching more nearly to a perpendicular, the sides of the hill forming an angle of about forty-five degrees with the horizon, and the fort so built on top as to occupy a whole level space of almost eighty feet in diameter, leaving no level ground.

Outside of the parapet wall the ground between this and the water’s edge is very rough, steep and rocky, and difficult for military operations. The Coreans had a water battery of twenty-four and thirty-two pounders, and a small old brass piece, commanding the channel past this point, and protecting the approaches to the fort from the water on the front. As this was the grand object of the attack it was determined to land several miles below and take it in the rear.

Accordingly, when the boats reached the first fort, about two miles below the point above mentioned, the Monocacy and Palos opened fire on it with vigor, but the Palos, unfortunately running on a rock, was held fast there, and her effectiveness impaired for a while. The Monocacy’s fire continued, silencing the fort and driving in its defenders, and under cover of this fire, the smaller boats which had been towed up by the Palos, cast off and rowed rapidly to the beach and landed a portion of the force designated to operate by land. The landing was effected in good order, and without difficulty, but the men had then to toil through some 200 years of mud, from one to two feet deep, and over sluices, in some parts much deeper, before reaching good firm dry land.

This done, the first fort was easily occupied, its defenders having been silenced by the fire from the Monocacy and Palos, and retreated on the approach of the skirmish line of marines, who were thrown out in advance of the attacking party, firing a few harmless shots as they fled. Night now coming on, the whole land force bivouacked till next morning, posting strong guards in advance.

On Sunday, the 11th inst., the whole expedition moved forward on the next fort, and took it without resistance. They then extended their line across the peninsula and advanced on the main fort, called by the French Fort de Condeoff (Fort of the Elbouaf,) from its being located in the bend or elbow of the river. This being a place of great strength, and the way of approach rough and difficult, some time was necessary to get the whole force up into position, when the order was given to charge.

About half-past 10 o’clock our whole line went with a rush and yell, which was responded to by the death-wail or war-whoop of the Coreans in the fort. The Coreans here made a firm stand and desperate resistance, firing their clumsy gongals with great coolness and deliberation at our men as they charged up the hill, then fighting hand to hand with long spears and swords.

When the fort had been stormed, and our men were inside the ramparts, Lieut. McKee, of Kentucky, who led the charge into the fort, was the first to enter, and fell, fighting bravely, being overwhelmed by superior numbers. Two hundred and forty-three dead Coreans were found in the fort, and several prisoners taken, among whom was the Deputy Commander-in-Chief, who was wounded.

Our own loss was Lieut. Hugh McKee, Seth Allen, ordinary seaman, of the Colorado, and private Houlahan, of the marine corps, killed. Seven were wounded, including Passed Assistant Surgeon, C.J.S. Wells, of the Colorado.

After the capture the destruction of the forts was immediately begun; the houses were fired, the works and guns destroyed and the magazines exploded.

The land force encamped in the neighborhood of the fort on the night of the 11th, and early next morning took up their line of march to the fleet, the object of the expedition having been fulfilled, namely, avenging the insult to the American flag on the 1st of June.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Aug 26, 1871

**********

JAPAN.

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 7. — The steamship China brings Yokohoma (Japan) dates to October 14th. The murderer of Mr. Haberth, the North German Consul, was beheaded on the 26th of September, and the government of Corea has promised to send to Japan the heads of all persons implicated in the insult to the Japanese the government.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Nov 8, 1874

**********

Fast forward to the 1880s, and things become muddled:

 

Daily Northwestern - Feb 20, 1885

 

Newspapers use both Corea and Korea… in the same articles!

 

Galveston Daily News - Apr 2, 1886

 

In 1891 we have new rules for spelling geographical names:

By a recent decision of the United States board f geographic names the letter “c.” whenever it has the sound of “k,” must be replaced by “k.” For instance, Congo must be spelled “Kongo,” and Corea becomes “Korea.” When we come square down to fact there is really no use for the letter “c” in the English language anyhow. It has no independent sound of its own. Give it the soft sound, as in “society,” and it steals the work of the letter “s.” Pronounce it hard, as in “Columbia,” and here it steals the sound of “k.” Why not abolish it altogether, and let young America have one less letter to learn?

The Daily News (Frederick, Maryland) Aug 5, 1891

**********

Let’s see how well the papers adhere to the new spelling rules:

THE real ruler of Korea is said to be the premier, whose name is Min Yung Jun. According to all accounts he must be the “boss” premier. A few years ago he was worth practically nothing, and now at the age of forty he is a millionaire, rides about town in a chair, seated on a leopard skin, accompanied by hundreds of cheering followers and nimble-footed dancing girls, and has a home containing scores of rooms. The “boss” does not seem to be confined to American politics.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Sep 27, 1894

**********

So far so good……….oops!

 

Nebraska State Journal - Jan 15, 1898

 

London appears to be a real spelling rebel, or maybe they just didn’t get the memo:

 

Lima News - Sep 15, 1898

 

Hmmm…copycat crime in Michigan?

Conspirators Are Hanged.

A dispatch from Seoul, Corea, says that Kim Hong Nuik and two other men who were the leaders of a conspiracy to poison the Emperor of Corea, were hanged. The populace secured the bodies of the conspirators, dragged them through the streets and mutilated them.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 22, 1898

**********

Almost everywhere else, they seem to be playing it safe:

 

Daily Northwestern - Mar 31, 1900

 

Wisconsin

 

Nebraska State Journal - Jul 19, 1900

 

Nebraska

 

Atlanta Constitution - Mar 14, 1902

 

Georgia

 

Daily Review - May 31, 1902

 

Illinois

 

Atalanta Constitution - Sep 25, 1902

 

Massachusetts continues to defy Uncle Sam:

OPEN MARKET ASKED OF COREA.

Seoul, Corea, Dec. 5. — United States Minister Allen had a long interview with the emperor of Corea today on the subject of the request of the United States for the opening to the commerce of the world by Corea of Wiju on Yalu river. No definite decision was reached. The government is placed in a dilemma by the request of the United States.

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Dec 5, 1903

 

Reno Evening Gazette 0 Dec 26, 1903

 

Above are two articles printed side by side. The one coming out of Washington uses a “K,” while the one from Paris uses a “C.”

 

 

The Daily Northwestern Dec 28, 1903

 

My theory was going to be that the foreign papers continued to use  Corea, but that doesn’t appear to be the case. They seem just as confused as the American papers.

 

Reno Evening Gazette - Jan 14, 1904

 

The map below uses the  COREA spelling:

 

Richwood Gazette - Jan 21, 1904

 

Uncle Sam seems to notice not everyone is playing along. He makes another attempt to spell it out for us:

 

 

Washington Post - Jul 17, 1904

 

 

 

Washington Post - Jul 17, 1904

 

The prime object is to secure uniformity in the spelling of geographical names in all government publications. A board sitting in Washington takes up all place-names of more than one form that may be submitted to it, applies to them a code of rules formulated for the purpose, and then votes on the forms suggested by the members. The form receiving a majority vote becomes the official one, and, under the act of Congress creating the board, will thereafter be used in all government publications, including maps. to effect the desired reform, the board proceeds under the following rules:

1. The avoidance, so far as it seems practicable, of the possessive form of names.

2. The dropping of he final “h” in the termination “burgh.”

3. The abbreviation of “borough” to “boro.”

4. The spelling of the word “center” as here given.

5. The discontinuance of the use of hyphens in connecting parts of names.

6. The omission, wherever practicable, of the letters “C R” (Court House) after the names of county seats.

7. The simplification of names consisting of more than one word by their combination into one word.

8. The avoidance of the use of diacritic characters.

9. The dropping of the words “city” and “town” as parts of names.
…..

Washington Post, The (Washington, D.C.) Jul 17, 1904

 

Bessemer Herald - Sep 16, 1905

 

TITLES COMMAND PRICE IN MARRIAGE MARKET

ONE EXCEPTION.
There is one conspicuous exception, in the case of the wife of the heir apparent to the throne of Corea, who is an American girl, Emily Brown, daughter of a Presbyterian missionary from Wisconsin, long resident in that country. She brought practically no dowry to her royal husband.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Dec 28, 1905

 

Sheboygan Press - Jan 29, 1927

 

Old habits die hard:

 

Sheboygan Press - Jul 23, 1928

 

At The Marmot’s Hole, Robert Neff has a post wondering who is responsible for the spelling change: Corea or Korea – who is responsible? He includes links to other articles discussing the same topic.

Using the two spellings wasn’t unique to articles about Corea – Korea. Newspapers had the same problem with Pittsburgh and Galveston.

Jordan-Beasley Feud

October 4, 2010

A reader requested information on the Jordan-Beasley feud. This is all I could find, unfortunately, nothing informative regarding the “old grudge.” These articles just report on the current incident. Most of these reports state that Darwood/Derwood Jordan was badly cut up and “cannot live,” but I didn’t run across any  that actually state that he did, indeed, succumb.

ONE OF KENTUCKY’S FEUDS.

HARRODSBURG, Ky., Sept. 14. — For fifteen years bad blood has existed between the Beasleys and Jordans, and during that time one Jordan and one of the Beasleys have fallen victims of the feud. To-day Darwood Jordan took watermelons to Salvisa to sell. Owen Beasley passed by and tried to renew the old grudge, but Jordan wanted no difficulty. Beasley got his brother and his father, who renewed the quarrel against the protestations of Jordan, who,against the unequal odds, defended himself as best he could with his knife, and in some way managed to get hold of a hatchet, and with this he was cutting right and left. But the odds were too much for him, and he fell from loss of blood, the Beasleys having literally cut him to pieces. Jordan cannot live. The Beasleys are yet at large.

The New York Times – Sep 15, 1891

THE BEASLEY-JORDAN FEUD.

MORE TROUBLE AND BLOODSHED EXPECTED BY THE SHERIFF.

HARRODSBURG, Ky., Sept. 15. — The Beasley-Jordan feud, which has existed in Mercer County for fifteen years, ans which again broke out yesterday in the unprovoked assault and fatal wounding of Derwood Jordan by the Beasleys, is assuming proportions that may in all probability result in more bloodshed.

Constable Granville Currens this afternoon arrested the three Beasleys, John, Owen, and Bill, when other brothers and relatives, five in number, with shotguns and pistols leveled and cocked on the constable, took his prisoners from him. The Jordan family, six or seven in number, have also armed themselves and have declared that they will be revenged or the law shall be enforced for the cowardly assassination of their brother yesterday. Jailer Wagner and posse have gone to the scene of action. If they get in sight of the Beasleys there will become arrests or funerals will take place.

Derwood Jordan, the man who was fatally cut by the Beasleys yesterday, is still alive, but cannot live. Pieces of flesh as large as a man’s hand were cut from his side and arm, and the knife thrusts entered the hollow of his abdomen in six or seven places. Old Mr. Beasley and one of the boys held him while the others cut him.

Up to 10 o’clock to-night the Beasleys had not been arrested, and six of them, heavily armed, are still defying the law, although they have thus far successfully kept out of the way of the Sheriff’s posse, which is after them and which expects to capture them dead or alive before to-morrow night.

The New York Times – Sep 16, 1891

Beasley-Jordan Feud - Newark Daily Advocate

MAY RESULT IN BLOODSHED.

An Old Feud Assuming New Proportions in Kentucky.

HARRODSBURG, Ky., Sept. 15. — The Beasley-Jordan feud at Salvisa is assuming proportions that may in all probability result in more bloodshed today.
Constable Currans succeeded yesterday afternoon in arresting the three Beasleys, when the other brothers and relatives took his prisoners from him.

The Jordan family, six or seven in number, have also armed themselves and have declared they will be revenged or the law will be enforced for the bloody and cowardly assassination of their brother yesterday. The Sheriff has asked for troops and the governor replied he has the right to summon the whole county.

Arizona Republican (Phoenix, Arizona) Sep 16, 1891

Beasley-Jordan Feud - St. Paul Daily Globe

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Jordan-Beasley Feud - Salt Lake Herald

An Old Feud Ended.

LOUISVILLE, Ky., Sept. 25. — The Jordan-Beasley feud, near Harrodsburg, which a year ago caused the sheriff to ask for troops, has been settled for the present by the surrender of three — Owen, William and John Beasley, who were implicated only as accessories to the murder of Jordan, and who escaped to Kansas.

Daily Mitchell Republican (Mitchell, South Dakota) Sep 29, 1891

Sol Star – A Picturesque Pioneer

August 7, 2010

Sol Star (Image from Wikepedia)

Sol Star was a friend and business partner of Seth Bullock’s. These two men had a lot in common.  Both were foreign born. Both lived in Montana during the 1870s, and both caught the Black Hills fever and headed for Deadwood. And both men had a hand in civilizing and bringing about the statehood of South Dakota.

The Deadwood S.D. Revealed website has a Sol Star biography written in 1901. NOTE: They give his place of burial as Mt. Moriah Cemetery, Lawrence Co., South Dakota, but he was actually buried in the New Mount Sinai Cemetery in St Louis, Missouri.

The Daily Independent - May 30, 1874

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The Daily Independent - Jun 21, 1874

It is fashionable to angle for trout in the Little Blackfoot, and Sol Star, who was out with Gen. Smith and party reports the fish as hungry as Crow Indians — they will bite at anything except a crowbar.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Aug 11, 1874

The Daily Independent - Jan 16, 1875

Personal.

Auditor Sol Star arrived last evening at the Capital of Montana with bag and baggage, also the archives of the Auditor’s office. See his notice in to-day’s INDEPENDENT.

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Mar 2, 1875

The Daily Independent - Mar 5, 1875

Receiver’s Office.

The business of the Helena Land Office has been retarded for some time, owing to the resignation of Mr. Sol Star, and the non-appearance of his successor, Mr. Sheridan. But the office runs smoothly again. Commissioner Burdett has modified the acceptance of Mr. Star’s resignation, and Mr. Star, as ordered, will resume the duties of the office until the arrival and qualification of his successor. We understand it will not interfere with his duties as Auditor. The following is the dispatch:

WASHINGTON, March 25, 1875.

To Sol Star, Esq., Helena, M.T.:

“The acceptance of your resignation has been modified so far as to take effect upon the appointment and qualification of your successor. You will, therefore, continue to act as Receiver until that event.”

S.S. BURDETT, Commissioner

The Daily Independent (Helena, Montana) Mar 27, 1875

Short Stops.

Mr. Sol Star has ordered from the East a large stock of queensware, glassware, wire and willoware, lamps and chandeliers, which he expects to open to the trade about the 1st of June.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Apr 4, 1876

Sol Star and Seth Bullock, on their way to Benton, narrowly escaped drowning in the Little Prickly Pear.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Jun 24, 1876

Sol Star & Seth Bullock (Image from http://picasaweb.google.com/John.Auw)

THE TERRITORY.

Mr. Sol. Star, who had shipped a large invoice of queensware to Helena and designed opening a store, has taken the Black Hills fever, shipped his goods back from Benton to Bismarck, and designed starting to-day for Deadwood City. Sorry you are going, Sol., but good luck to you.
North-West.

Butte Miner (Butte, Montana) Jul 8, 1876

Personal.

Sol Star has gone East by way of the river.

Seth Bullock left yesterday for Dakota Territory. He will be absent several weeks.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Jul 8, 1876

You can read about Sol and Seth’s arrival at Deadwood (Google book link)  in the 1899  book,  The Black Hills, by Annie D. Tallent.

Lincoln Territory.

Delegates representing all the interests and localities in the Black Hills, assembled in convention at Deadwood on the 21st ult. and adopted a memorial to Congress setting forth the wants and necessities of the people. We notice that our former townsman, Sol Star, was appointed one of the Committee on Organization, and W.H. Claggett, late of Deer Lodge, one of the Committee on Resolution.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) May 8, 1877

Implicated in Star Route Frauds.

WASHINGTON, September 28. — President Arthur to-day directed the removal of Sol Star, postmaster at Deadwood, D.T., for confessed complicity with the Star route contractors in defrauding the Postoffice Department.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Sep 30, 1881

Sol. Star.

Sol. Star denounces through the columns of the Black Hills Pioneer, the statement emanating, as he supposed, from one Pursy, to the effect that he had confessed complicity in the Star route frauds. He says that such statements are unqualifiedly false in every particulas and are malicious slanders and fabrications; that no such confessions were ever made, and that no facts existed on which the alleged confession could be made. Mr. Star was for many years a resident of Helena, and has many friends here who would be glad to learn of his complete vindication.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Oct 11, 1881

Sol Star and the Star Routes.

Mr. Sol Star has been removed from the postmastership at Deadwood on the charge of being complicated in some of the Star Route frauds in Dakota. As Mr. Star is well-known in this territory, being at one time Territorial Auditor, the following, which we clip from the Black Hills Times, concerning his removal, and his letter of explanation, may be fo some interest to our readers. We therefore produce them:

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1. — Star, postmaster at Deadwood, removed yesterday, has confessed that for several years past he has made false certificates of star route service between Sidney and Deadwood. His confession exposes the rascality of the star route ring in the northwest.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1. — The action of the president in removing Postmaster Star, of Deadwood, was caused by his revelations concerning the star route in the northwest. For some months past one of the most efficient inspectors of the postoffice department has been secretly investigating the management of the Deadwood postoffice, and when he confronted the postmaster with his proofs the latter confessed.

The telegraph lines have been weighted with reports concerning star-route frauds, in which postmaster Sol Star of this city is proclaimed as being implicated, and as having made a confession to that effect. To those who know the facts it is scarcely necessary to state the report is an unmitigated lie from first to last. He has made no confession of fraud for the best of all reasons — there is no fraud to confess on his part. The confession, so called, we here publish. As will be seen, nothing short of entire malice could constitute this report of facts as a confession of crooked dealing. It is about as much of a confession as an almanac is a confession of the state of the weather:

DEADWOOD, D.T. Sept. 1, 1881.

John B. Furay, Special Agent Postoffice Department:

In reply to your verbal request in relation to the arrival of mails on route 34,156, I beg to state that the record of arrivals as reported by my mail bills was based upon the schedule time given by the contractor, and not the actual time of arrival. The report thus made was not made with any expectation or promise to receive a reward from the contractor, but was done and reported, first, because I believed that if the public was satisfied the government would also be with the arrival of the mails; and second, having so reported for two years last past without hearing any complaint from the department I took it for granted that my view of it was correct. I am now informed that such a report was detrimental to the interest of the government, and that the actual time of arrival, and not the schedule time or near the schedule time, is what was wanted. I desire to state that in my belief arrivals of mails will vary from two to four hours later than as reported, as follows: From July, 1879, to September, 1881, for ten months in the time mentioned, the time of actual arrival will vary from two to four hours per day, and for two months in each year named, say for March and April, 1880, and March and April, 1881, the time from that reported will vary from one to three days too early.

Yours truly,

SOL STAR, Postmaster.

The Daily Miner (Butte, Montana) Oct 11, 1881

The elation of the star route people over a verdict of acquittal from Judge Dundy’s court in Omaha will, it is stated, not avail them in other cases. These cases originated in the confession of the postmaster at Deadwood that he had been giving false certificates of the arrival and departure of mails in order to enable the contractors to draw their full pay, though they had not fulfilled their contract. This confession was obtained by Postoffice Inspector Furay, in an investigation set on foot by himself. There were strong local influences of mail contractors in that region. Monroe Saulsbury, one of the largest mail contractors who lives at Deadwood, prevented an indictment of guilty persons once, but it was finally had. On the trial, however, the Deadwood postmaster refused to testify on the ground that he would criminate himself. The confession in these cases was made last summer by Sol Star, a former resident of this Territory, and led to his removal from the position of postmaster of Deadwood.

The Daily Minor (Butte, Montana) Feb 25, 1882

JUSTICE TO AN OLD MONTANIAN.

The Inter Mountain professes to be indignant because the Black Hills Plains says some kind words about Mr. Sol. Star, one of the newly elected aldermen of Deadwood City, and thinks that “such perversity in press and people cannot help the application of Dakota for Statehood.” It is quite likely the thought never entered the head of the Times writer that he was jeopardizing the interests of his Territory when he penned the favorable notice of his townsman, the genial, clever Sol. He may take it all back after seeing the Inter Mountain of the 16th inst., but we don’t believe he will. Now we propose to say a few kind words about Mr. Star even if by so doing we imperil Montana’s prospects of Statehood. But we will state in the outset our firm belief that Mr. Sol. Star is no more a star route thief than the Inter Mountain editor is an angel.

Mr. Star lived many years in Montana and while here he occupied responsible positions both public and private and earned a reputation for intelligence, capability and integrity of character which we are yet to learn he has lost. He served a term as auditor of this Territory and faithfully performed its duties and when he retired from the office he carried with him the confidence and respect of a host of friends. It will be news to those friends and to Mr. Star, himself to learn that he confessed “to the commission of a felony.”

Mr. Star did nothing of the kind. He simply certified as postmaster to the arrival and departure of the mails. Sometimes the mail did not arrive or leave exactly on schedule time, but as is generally usual among nearly all postmasters, where there was not too long a continuance of diversion from schedule time, he made no exceptions in his certification. These, as we understand them, are the simple facts of the case, but the officious, and as the sequel has proved, not over scrupulous Furay preferred charges against him in the interest, it is said, of one of his (Furay) friends. Mr. Star resigned, stood his trial and was acquitted.

If Mr. Star is as guilty as the Inter Mountain would have its readers believe the citizens of Deadwood are certainly a bad lot, for in the face of all this Star route business they have elected him as an Alderman of the city. Our word for it he will make a good one. If he is not the Sol Star of old it is because he has too closely followed the precepts and practices of the Republican party of which, while here, he was an honored and leading member.

The Daily Miner (Butte, Montana) May 18, 1882

If the Inter Mountain has not completely exhausted itself in its endeavor to injure the reputation of an old, well-known and much-esteemed ex-resident of Montana and now a respected citizen of Deadwood, could it not dispose of a portion of its time and space in noticing the Dorseys, Bradys, Howgates and a score of other worthies of the party to which it seems to owe allegiance? It appears to ignore the fact that two of these distinguished Republican luminaries are on trial for swindling the government and that the other is a fugitive from justice. Just for a change from diatribes against Governor Potts, slanderous accusations against Mr. Sol Star and stale editorials from the New York Herald, give us a live article about something else its knows nothing about — for instance the effect which a “dishonest coinage law” and “fraudlent dollars” have upon the business of the country.

The Daily Minor (Butte, Montana) May 19, 1882

DAKOTA CONVENTIONS.

Republicans and Democrats Hold Powwows In Their Respective Burgs.

HUDSON, S.D., August 29. — The republican state convention reassembled at 10 o’clock this morning and heard reports of the committee on credentials and organization. Permanent organization was effected by the election of Sol Star as permanent chairman and E.W. Caldwell as secretary with two assistants. Mr. Star made a brief address, and Judge Moody took the platform amid deafening cheers. On behalf of the delegation of Lawrence county he presented the chairman with a tin gavel made from tin taken from the Etta mine in that county. Judge Moody’s speech was very eloquent and was frequently applauded. The convention then adjourned till 2 o’clock this afternoon.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Aug 30, 1889

The Convention Meets.

MITCHELL, Aug. 27. — Convention called to order by C.T. McCoy, chairman, at 2:15….

Sage of Faulk nominated Sol. Star of Deadwood for temporary chairman. He was unanimously elected.

Mr. Star was introduced by the committee and addressed the convention as follows:

Gentlemen of the Convention: On behalf of the Black Hills country, and particularly those residents of Deadwood here, I can but return to you my thanks personally for your grateful acknowledgment of services I have rendered you at a convention of a similar nature and character at the city of Huron a year ago, and to the pledges I have made and services I have rendered. I can only add in addition, that I will endeavor to discharge these duties which devolve upon me as temporary chairman of this orginization without fear or favor…

Daily Huronite (Huron, South Dakota) Aug 28, 1890

A bill has been introduced at Pierre by Sol Star of the Black Hills, providing for the resubmission of the question of prohibition. It is safe to say it will not pass.

Mitchell Daily Republican (Mitchell, South Dakota) Jan 17, 1890

Mitchell Daily Republican - Jan 28, 1890

The Black Hills Journal website has some interesting tidbits in regards to the history of prohibition in South Dakota,  and mentions Deadwood, specifically.

THE NEWS.
Miscellaneous.

Sol Star is elected mayor of Deadwood for the eight time.

Daily Huronite (Huron, South Dakota) May 6, 1891

Gossip among the Republican delegates in town this afternoon en route to the Aberdeen convention was to the effect that Sol Star of Deadwood was to be pushed to the front on the anti-prohibition issue, and that Judge Moody would be at the head of the Lawrence county delegation. Minnehaha county was claimed for Star, while French of Yankton was thought to be the second choice of the Star men.

Mitchell Daily Republican (Mitchell, South Dakota) Sep 28, 1891

The Hills on Jolley.

Sol Star in the Sioux City Journal: We saw that there was no show, ans so we went for the best man, and that man is Col. Jolley, of Vermillion. He is the very best man that the party could have nominated. He is a worker, thoroughly posted in the needs of the state, an able man and one who will do the state credit at Washington. I think, too, that he will be broad enough to look out for our interests as well as those of his own part of the state. We are satisfied with the nomination and Jolley will get the support of the Hills Republicans.

Mitchell Daily Republican ( Mitchell, South Dakota) Oct 4, 1891

Sol Star was re-elected for the ninth time mayor of Deadwood, by 37 majority. Another republican victory.

Daily Huronite (Huron, South Dakota) May 9, 1892

Dec 16, 1892

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Mar 6, 1896

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Gravestone image posted by afraydknot,  on Find-A-Grave, along with a biography.

PICTURESQUE PIONEER WHO FOUGHT INDIANS ON BISMARCK — BLACK HILLS TRAIL IN ’76 DIES AT DEADWOOD

Deadwood, S.D., Oct. 19 — Sol Star, picturesque pioneer of the Black Hills, and who, with his partner, Seth Bullock, was among the first to take the Old Black Hills trail from Bismarck to Deadwood, has left on his last, lone, prospecting tour. “If the streets up there are paved with gold, Sol will be right at home,” said one of his old pals.

Sol Star, several times mayor of Deadwood, and one of the best liked of all the old timers, was born in Bavaria in 1840, coming to America at the age of 10, and to Helena, Mont., in 1865. He remained at Helena and Virginia City until 1876, serving as register of the United States land office from 1872 to 1874, and for one year as territorial auditor of Montana. He arrived in Deadwood on Aug. 1, 1876, with Capt. Seth Bullock, who years ago gained fame as a personal friend of Theodore Roosevelt. The Partners picked Deadwood as a good camp. They had a large consignment of goods en route to Helena for them, and upon Bullock’s suggestion this shipment was headed off at Bismarck and brought to Deadwood over the old Black Hills trail.

The trail from Bismarck to the Black Hills was beset with hostile Sioux, angry with the whites because of ignored treaties, and when Bullock and Star reached old Crook City they were compelled to fight a pitched battle with the redskins. Again they encountered the enemy on Big Bottom, but they finally reached Deadwood with their skins and their goods intact. Upon their arrival here they opened a general store, and their partnership in this business continued until 1894. Star was mayor of Deadwood from 1884 to 1893 and from 1895 to 1899. For 19 years he served as clerk of court, and in 1889 he attended the first state convention at Huron, where the enabling act was ratified, and he nominated the first set of officers for the new state of South Dakota. Later he served in both branches of the state legislature.

The Bismarck Tribune (Bismarck, North Dakota) Oct 19, 1917

Zebulon Baird Vance

July 14, 2010

{From the Fayetteville Observer.}

COL. ZEBULON BAIRD VANCE.

MESSRS. EDITORS. — I very much approve your determination to support for the office of Governor and Commander-in Chief of the forces of North Carolina, Col. Zeb. B. Vance, of Buncombe. From intimate acquaintance I know he possesses uncommon gifts and has had abundant opportunities for improving them.

His natural gifts are great quickness of perception, mother-wit and common sense to a remarkable degree, a fine mind, great energy and readiness of resources, and above all a genial disposition and an honest and kind heart. He is a self-made man. He inherited little more than a good library, but that library he used to great advantage. I first knew him a boy of sixteen, and was astonished at his accurate knowledge of the English Classics. He finished his education at the University of North-Carolina, where he attained the first distinction in his studies, being especially eminent in the department of Constitutional Law.

After leaving College he obtained license to practice law, and soon had a fine practice at the bar. He served as member of the General Assembly from Buncombe, and afterwards a vacancy occurring in the Mountain district by the elevation of Gen. Clingman to the U.S. Senate, Col. Vance was induced to offer himself as a candidate for a seat in the House of Representatives, being opposed by the Hon. W.W. Avery. As Gen. Clingman had carried the district by about two thousand majority, and his influence was in Colonel Avery’s favor, many thought it the merest folly for Colonel Vance to oppose the manifest sentiment of the people. The result showed the accuracy of Vance’s  judgement and his hold on the affections of the mountaineers, for he defeated Avery by over two thousand majority. And the following year Col. David Coleman was vanquished by a similar majority. The ability, mental resource, eloquence, humor and presence of mind exhibited by Col. Vance in these contests with powerful champions, have given him high reputation as an orator.

The course of Col. Vance in Congress was eminently conservative. He labored hard to stay the tide of Northern fanaticism, and he carefully refrained from language calculated to stir up sectional feeling. But when the Northern President overstepped the bounds of the Constitution, refused all efforts by our wisest and best men for conciliation, and called for troops from North Carolina to make war on the rights of the South, Vance’s voice was for prompt and earnest resistance in arms. If Andy Johnston and Horace Maynard had taken counsel of Vance, their names would not now be infamous, and East Tennessee would not be a thorn in the side of the Confederacy.

 

Not content with raising his voice for war, whilst most of the prominent politicians were cringing around Gov. Ellis and Col. Winslow of the Military Board, begging for office, Col. Vance volunteered as a private in the Rough and Ready Guards. That company made him its Captain, and long before the aforesaid hungry patriots had wormed themselves into the public crib, he was serving his country in the hot and unhealthy country near Norfolk. But his merits were not forgotten. He was soon, though absent at the time, elected Colonel of the 26th regiment of volunteers, easily defeating, I am told, L.O’B. Branch, then Colonel of the Commissary department; but it was not many days before Col. Branch of the Commissary department was appointed Colonel of a regiment by Gov. Clark, and then by the President Brigadier General, and Vance placed under him!! The duties of these various stations Col. Vance fulfilled to the satisfaction of all except one or two partizan editors — to their satisfaction until it was discovered he would oppose their schemes of making Johnston Governor. Few better combine the three qualities laid down by Jefferson as necessary to a faithful public servant, industry, capacity, integrity, than Colonel Vance. Few men have had finer opportunities of learning the duties of a Governor in these trying times. He is a statesman and can conduct the affairs of the Camp.

Some men, Messrs. Editors, believe in the stock of men as in the stock of horses. I will therefore mention that no one in the State can boast of a prouder lineage than Col. Vance. His grand father by his mother’s side was Zebulon Baird, from whom he inherits his name. Col. Baird was one of the best citizens of Buncombe, honored and respected all his days — served for many years as a member of the General Assembly from Buncombe. His grandfather by his father’s side was Col. David Vance, a Revolutionary hero, who fought at King’s Mountain.

Z.B. VANCE.

A few weeks since, we expressed our determination, to support Col. Z.B. Vance, for Governor, if he would accept the nomination. He has accepted, and to-day, we place his name at the head of our paper, to be kept there until he is elected, which we doubt not will be his fate, as soon as the polls are open and the people vote. We do not think that any reasonable objection can be urged against such a consummation. He is “honest, faithful and capable.” He is devoted to the cause of his country.

He did not want, wait for, or ask for, an office, before he would gird on his sword and fight for the independence of the South — not he — he is not one of that sort. He knew that the great boon of liberty and independence could only be achieved by hard fighting, and, no sooner did Lincoln issue his proclamation for seventy-five thousand men to deprive the South of her rights and liberty, than, shouldering his musket, he stepped into the ranks, a private, (and a very good looking one at that — that is a recommendation sometimes, particularly in the ranks.)

The old saying, “handsome is, that handsome does,” is very true, and in the case of private Vance, has been for the hundredth thousandth time verified. He performed the duties of a private soldier so handsomely, that he was promoted — not by appointment — but by the willing votes of those who knew him best, who, when they had elected him Colonel — pronounced the work handsomely done.

“We can die boys, but we cannot surrender!” We want a man for Governor, who will died before he will consent to surrender a single interest of the State. We want a man who will inform himself of the actual condition of the defences of the State, who is able to judge when her defences are adequate to her means. We want a man who will surrender nothing — who, when a demand is made, by an enemy for surrender will say — “Come and take us!” Vance, we believe to be that man, and thus believing — we intend to show our faith by our works.

Wadesboro Argus.

Weekly Standard (Raleigh, North Carolina) Jul 9, 1862

SENATOR VANCE’S SPEECH.

We have read with much are the speech delivered in the United States Senate on the 14th inst. by Hon. Z.B. Vance, on the bill to provide the appointment of a commission to investigate the question of the tariff and internal revenue laws. The telegraphic synopsis of this speech, which we published last week, gave the Senator’s figures showing how the North has for years absorbed the emoluments of the government, leaving the South to bear the burdens, but his denunciation of the partiality which has obtained in the distribution of the public domain for the purposes of building railroads, digging canals and educating the children of the people formed but a small part of his speech. It was devoted almost entirely to an exposure of the enormities of the existing tariff.

He held it up, in all of its hideousness, for the gaze and the execration of mankind. He laid down the proposition that the protectionists were such for protection’s own sake, and he maintained it. He exposed the fallacy and ridiculousness of the cry that the government should foster our “infant manufactures,” and intimated very clearly that men who, in their chosen calling, cannot make their bread without the special intervention of the government in their behalf, had better quit the business. As to the specious claim that the country had prospered under a protective tariff, he said that with precisely the same logic such results might be affirmed of the small-pox or our Indian wars, “under which” we have undoubtedly prospered. He denounced protection as legalized robbery, and quoted from a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States which declared that a tax levied to build up private fortunes for favored individuals, and not for any public purpose, was none the less robbery because perpetrated under the forms of law.

We wish it were possible for us to lay this entire speech before our readers. It is a masterly argument, compact, symmetrical, thoroughly knitted together. There is just enough of jest in it to give it spice, but it is essentially an argument, and, we may be permitted to say, an irresistible one to any mind not already wedded to the heresy of protection. As proofs of the impression which is created, it may be remarked that Senator Vance had a larger audience at his conclusion than at his opening, and that several Republican Senators left their seats and went over on the Democratic side of the chamber to listen to the speaker.

How, with that speech upon his tongue, Senator Vance could fire the people! Our agricultural population, who are robbed year by year without knowing it, for the benefit of the few men who own cotton mills and iron mills, only need to have this iniquity placed before their eyes to cause them to rebel against it. When they fully learn, as learn they must, that they are daily paying $1.00 for articles of prime necessity which they should get for 50 cents, and 50 cents for hundreds of other articles of prime necessity which they should get for 25 and 30 cents — all this not to afford revenue to the government, because these duties are so high that these articles cannot come in at all and hence afford no revenue, but simply for the purpose of keeping up a monopoly in the hands of a few men that they may grow rich at the expense of the toiling millions — we say when the people come to realize fully the infamy of this protective tariff which robs them in the interest of a favored class, they will rise in their might against it, and woe be unto him who seeks to withstand them.

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Recently, in the United States Senate, when Mr. Vance, of North Carolina, asked leave to call up his resolution asking for certain facts with regard to the affairs of the sixth internal revenue district of this State, Mr. Hoar, of Massachusetts, objected, on the ground that the resolution was disrespectful to the Secretary of the Treasury! This means that the Secretary of the Treasury is an officer above the law, and that no act of any of his subordinates must be called into question because it is a reflection upon him! Verily, the pampered office-holders of this country have become greater than their masters, the people.

The Landmark ( Statesville, North Carolina) Feb 24, 1882

The keg of whiskey that Mr. Thos. N. Cooper sent to Senator Vance just before Christmas doesn’t appear to have had the desired effect. It always had been said that spirits never seemed  to take much effect on Vance.

The Landmark ( Statesville, North Carolina) Mar 24, 1882

There is a story somewhere of a Dutchman who had obtained a cheese by surreptitious means, and was just proceeding to masticate it when a violent storm came up, accompanied by terrific thunder and blinding lightning. “Mein Got!” exclaimed the Dutchman, letting fall the supposed cause of the atmospheric disturbance.

“Whoefer know so much fuss apout a leetle old cheese!” so may we exclaim, Whoever knew so much ado over a little five-gallon keg of whiskey! The item from this paper of week before last about Mr. T.N. Cooper’s present to Senator Vance, just before Christmas, had gone all over the State. A Democratic contemporary exclaims, “My, God, Abernethy!” and one of our esteemed Republican contemporaries argues from it that Senator Vance, in accepting the whiskey, accepted a bribe. Without stopping to argue who is the guiltier, the man who offers or the man who accepts a bribe, we observe that Senator Vance’s course in the Cooper matter has not been very suggestive of bribery; and we add to this that in three or four weeks after the keg of whiskey went forward to him, a keg was received at the depot here, from Washington, consigned to Mr. Cooper. We are not prepared to say that Senator Vance sent Mr. Cooper’s whiskey back to him but it looks a good deal that way.

The Landmark ( Statesville, North Carolina) Apr 14, 1882

Senator Vance had a good old-fashioned log-rolling at his mountain home, “Gombroon,” near Black Mountain, Buncombe county. He asked in hands from all the adjacent country, as is learned from the Asheville Advance, and two extra cooks were provided for the occasion, with no lack of good things for them to cook.

The Landmark (Statesville, North Carolina) Aug 7, 1885

A gentleman who met Senator Vance as he passed down the road one night last week on his way to Washington, was asking him all about his recent log rolling at his home, “Gombroon,” at the foot of Black Mountain, and inquired of him what sort of refreshments he had for the neighbors. The Senator replied that he had a barrel of cider and a barrel of beer and a jug hid out in the woods.

The Landmark (Statesville, North Caroling) Sep 18, 1885

Tremont Temple - Boston (Image from Wiki)

Senator Vance’s Lecture in Boston.

Baltimore Sun.

The lecture delivered last evening by Senator Vance, at Tremont Temple, in Boston, for the benefit of the J.A. Andrew Post of the Grand Army of the Republic on “Political Feeling and Sentiment During the Civil War” was devoted in a large measure to a discussion of the errors and delusions under the influence of which the masses of the Northern people were brought to enter upon and continue the war upon the South. Gen. McClellan, in a recently published posthumous work, expresses the opinion that the war was prosecuted by Stanton and other leaders at Washington in the interests of a particular political party.

The war itself, with the reconstruction policy that followed, was directed particularly, if not openly, to the establishment of Republican supremacy. Its history has been written, Mr. Vance complains, on the assumption that the exigencies of a party were those of the Union itself, and that party tricks must be accepted as honest representations inspired by the purest patriotism. He gives special attention to the attempt on the part of Northern writers in dealing with the civil war to forestall history, and to impress upon all who took part in it on the Southern side the stigma of treason. The term “rebellion,” still used by some persons to designate the war between the States, shows what confusion of ideas has thus been produced.

“All crime,” says Senator Vance, “is to be found in criminal intent, and no Southern man believed he was engaged in rebellion or treason.” On the contrary, the Southern people, in common with the leaders of opinion North and South, believed that secession was constitutional and right. “It was the universal understanding,” says Mr. Vance, “when the constitution was adopted, that when a State deemed herself injured she had the right to withdraw.”

The Madison resolution of 1798 asserted this right, and it was reasserted by Massachusetts in 1803, when upon the annexation of Louisiana that State threatened to act upon it. Massachusetts again, several years later, asserted the right of secession at the Hartford convention. But the doctrine became well-nigh universal when the resolutions of 1798 were incorporated in the political platform of the Democratic party, and were again and again enumerated among its principles by national conventions and by candidates who were elevated to the presidency by the votes of a majority of the American people. The Southern people considered the doctrine established and no court has ever decided that secession was treason.

“There could have been no criminal intention,” said the lecturer, “because there was no criminal knowledge.” It is therefore unfair and untruthful, Mr. Vance contends, to continue to speak of secession as treason; “the question was never decided until it was decided by the war.” A like error is involved, it was held, in the common assertion that slavery was the cause of the war, of which it was only the occasion, the real cause being the attempt of the Federal government to control the internal affairs of the States. Failure to resist interference with slavery would have precluded resistance to anything else whatever, thus making an end of State sovereignty. As for the sin of slavery itself, it is divided equally, Mr. Vance maintains, between the North and South. Rhode Island and Massachusetts sent ships to Africa to exchange New England rum for slaves, and disposed of their purchases at home in the South.

“When the Northern States,” said the lecturer, “found their climate unsuited to slaves, they sold them to the Southern States, quit the business and turned philanthropists.” The Southern States were not less forward than the North in bringing about the suspension of the slave trade, “so that on both subjects, secession and slavery, New England is not in a condition to throw stones at anybody else.” The devotion of the great mass of Southern people to their cause during the war, the immense development of Southern manufactures at the time, and the fidelity of slaves to their masters in the time of trial, were other topics treated by the Senator. Upon the question of the Confederate constitution he expressed the strong opinion that, “in view of the great odds against the Confederacy, the Southern people should have stripped themselves naked of all laws and constitutions and bowed to one will.

” Pugnacious to the last, the Senator, however, concluded his remarks to his Boston audience with the mollifying statement, that old as he was he would now fight eight years, if need be, to maintain the Union.

The Landmark (Statesville, North Carolina) Dec 16, 1886

His Protective Pastoral About the Girl with One Stocking.

Senator Vance once set colleagues and spectators in a roar by reading in splendid style the following pastoral, which he said was entitled, “The Girl with One Stocking; a protective pastoral composed and arranged for the spinning wheel, and respectfully dedicated to that devoted friend of protected machinery and high taxes, the senator from Rhode Island, Mr. Aldrich:”

Our Mary had a little lamb,
And her heart was most intent
To make its wool beyond its worth,
Bring 56 per cent.

But a pauper girl across the sea
Had one small lamb also,
Whose wool for less than half that sum
She’d willingly let go.

Another girl who had no sheep,
No stocking — wool nor flax —
But money enough just to buy
A pair without the tax.

Went to the pauper girl to get
Some wood to shield her feet,
And make her stockings not of flax,
But of wool complete.

When Mary saw the girl’s design
She straight began to swear
That she’d make her buy both wool and tax
Or let one leg go bare.

So she cried out: “Protect reform!
Let pauper sheep wool free!
If it will keep both of her legs warm
What will encourage me?”

So it was done, and people said
Where’er that poor girl went,
One leg was warmed with wool and one
With 56 per cent.

Now praise to Mary and her lamb,
Who did the scheme invent,
To clothe one-half a girl in wool
and one-half in per cent.

All honor, too, to Mary’s friend,
And all protective acts,
That clothe the rich in wool
And wrap the poor in tax.

The reading of this piece of doggerel was received with shouts of laughter, even republican senators leaning back in their seats and giving unrestrained way to their mirth. As for the people in the galleries they screamed and yelled frantically, and when Senator Vance sat down they kept up their uproarious applause until the North Carolina orator gravely inclined his head in acknowledgment.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jun 3, 1894

Southern Wit in War.

“As we are reminded by the author of “Four Years in Rebel Capitals,” the south, as well as the north, needed to exercise its sense of humor, whenever that was possible, to carry it through the terrible strain of the war. Some of the puns, burlesques, and repartee of that dreadful time have become locally historic. Colonel Tom August, of the First Virginia, was the Charles Lamb of Confederate war wits, genial and ever gay.

Early in secession days a bombastic friend approached him with the question, “Well, sir, I presume your voice is still for war?”

“Oh, yes,” replied the wit, “perfectly still!”

Always to be remembered is General Zebulon Vance’s apostrophe to the rabbit, flying by him from a heavy rifle fire: “Go it cottontail! If I hadn’t a repurtation I’d be with you!”

Lima Daily Times (Lima, Ohio) Sep 17, 1891

Senator Vance Favors the Income Tax.

Richmond Dispatch, 1st.

Senator Vance, of North Carolina, has been in town here for two days, and speaking of revenue and tariff legislation to-day said:

“There is throughout the South an almost unanimous sentiment in favor of an income tax, and this question will be brought up when the tariff bill is under discussion. My own opinion is that an income tax of some character will be engrafted upon the tariff measure before it passes Congress. What form it will take it is now impossible to say, but some of the best minds in both branches of Congress are directed to the subject, and it is safe to say they will evolve a satisfactory basis which will receive a hearty Southern support.

“It will be necessary to adopt some means of raising the enormous revenue required to support the government when tariff reform is effected. Some say this should be done by raising the tax on whiskey and tobacco. Experience, however, has shown that this is not always practicable. Statistics prove that less revenue is derived from a high tax on spirits and tobacco than from a moderate tax. The reason for this is that consumption falls off as the tax becomes prohibitory. There is no fairer way to raise revenue than by taxing incomes, notwithstanding the objection that has been urged that it will be class legislation. Such arguments are based on sophistry, as it can be easily shown that an income tax is the most equitable and just of all methods of raising public revenue.”

In an interview in Baltimore the Senator expressed himself as pleased with the Wilson tariff bill, and said the Southern Representatives would favor it. He also expressed himself very strongly in favor of the repeal of the tax on State bank notes, and gave it as his opinion that a bill looking to this end will be introduced at this session of Congress and advocated by most of the Southern Representatives.

The Landmark ( Statesville, North Carolina) Dec 7, 1893

Most of the images in this post are from the following book, which can be read online:

Title: Life of Zebulon B. Vance
Author: Clement Dowd
Publisher: Observer Printing and Publishing House, 1897

(Google book –  LINK)

Brutal Blute Kicks His Wife to Death

June 7, 2010

Portsmouth, N.H. (Image from http://en.wikipedia.org)

KICKED TO DEATH.

The Brutal Act of a Brewer in New Hampshire.

PORTSMOUTH, N.H., Dec. 27 — The police were notified that a murder had been committed in this city yesterday in a residence. When the officers entered the kitchen on the floor a most horrible sight met their eyes. Lying dead on the floor was Margaret Blute, the wife of John Blute. The body was perfectly naked. The head, throat and body were terribly bruised and discolored, and from all appearances the woman had been kicked and beaten to death. The woman’s husband was sitting unconcernedly beside the body, fully dressed, and his four little children were in the corner crying.

The man looked up at the officers and saying: “This is a bad piece of business,” struck a match and lighted his pipe.

When he went to leave the room a few minutes later he was arrested.

He said that after he had beaten and kicked his wife in their bedroom he had thrown her down into the cellar and then went to sleep. When he woke up, about midnight, he found her dead on the floor, and had called in some neighbors. He thought it was about 5:30 p.m. when he had beaten his wife, but wasn’t sure.

He said he was 45 years of age, and had been married seven years. His wife was 33.

The authorities took charge of the house, and neighbors cared for the children. The prisoner will be arraigned on the charge of murder in the first degree. He was employed in a brewery, and is said to be of a peaceful disposition.

Trenton Times, The (Trenton, New Jersey) Dec 27, 1886

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Brutality of Blute the Wife Murderer

PLYMOUTH, Dec. 28 — New and important facts in relation to the Blute murder were elicited at the coroner’s inquest today. Persons who saw a part of the tragedy tell a terrible story and say that Blute, while murdering the woman, told her that he meant to kill her. The coroner’s jury will return a verdict of murder in the first degree tomorrow.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Dec 29, 1886

Patrick Blute, the Brute.

PORTSMOUTH, N.H., Dec. 8 — The coroner’s jury rendered a verdict that Mrs. Blute was murdered by her husband, Patrick.

Saturday Herald (Decatur, Illinois) Jan 1, 1887

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Matters in the Legislature

CONCORD, Jan. 21. The Governor and Council this forenoon gave a hearing upon the petition for the pardon of Patrick Blute, who was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment in April, 1877, (typo) for manslaughter in killing his wife in Portsmouth on Christmas day, 1886. The ground upon which the application is based is that Blute is incurably ill of consumption. Hon. Calvin Page, of Portsmouth, appeared for the petitioners and Attorney General Bainard and County Solicitor Emery in opposition.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Jan 22, 1891

Patrick Blute, the Portsmouth wife murderer, died in prison at Concord, N.H.

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jan 31, 1891

Title: Reports, Volume 1
Author: New Hampshire
Published: 1892
(Google book, pg 175 – LINK)

One of Patrick Blute’s daughters:

The marriage of Artis F. Schurman and Miss Margaret E. Blute, two well known young people, is announced to take place on Wednesday, Feb. 8.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Jan 31, 1899

Mrs. Margaret E. Bray

Mrs. Margaret E. Bray of 589 Dennett street, wife of Mark W. Bray, died early this morning after a long illness. She was born in Portsmouth, the daughter of the late John and Margaret (Quinn) Blute.

Mrs. Bray is survived by her husband, one son, Charles A. Schurman of Warwick, R.I.; two daughters, Mrs. Helen M. Cooper and Hazel F. Schurman, both of Philadelphia, Pa., and two sisters, Mrs. Mary O’Gilvie and Mrs. Julia Remick, both of Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Dec 12, 1944

Patrick Blute’s father:

John Blute.

John Blute, one of the oldest Irish residents in the city, died at the home of his granddaughter on Dennett street, on Wednesday evening, the 20th inst., aged eighty-six years. He had been a citizen of Portsmouth for over fifty years.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Nov 21, 1901

Wills proved. — John Blute. Portsmouth, Margaret E. Schurman, executrix;…

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Jan 3, 1902

Image from cardcow.com

Another daughter:

Wedding of Miss Blute And Mr. Remick

CEREMONY PERFORMED BY REV. FR. CAVANAUGH

A pretty wedding of two popular young people took place at six o’clock on Thursday evening at the rectory of the Church of the Immaculate Conception, when Miss Julia G. Blute of this city and Austin Remick of Rye were married.

The ceremony was performed by Rev. Fr. William J. Cavanaugh.

The bride was tastefully gowned in a dress of Alice blue with a pink hat. She was attended by her sister, Miss Mary Blute, who wore a handsome dress of pale lavender.

Walter Varrell of Dover, a life-long friend of the groom, acted as best man.

After the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Remick repaired to the home of the bride, 10 Langdon street, where the immediate friends and relatives enjoyed a collation and a reception was held.

Mr. and Mrs. Remick received many costly and useful gifts and the congratulations of a legion of acquaintances, who wish them much joy in their new life.

The bride has for the past six years been an employe of the Morley Button Company and a young lady held in high esteem by her shopmates. The groom is one of the best known young men of his native town and has many warm friends at home and in this city.

Mr. and Mrs. Remick will resdie at 10 Langdon street.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) May 25, 1906

Mrs. Julia G. Remick

RYE — Mrs. Julia Genevieve Remmick, 69, of Brackett Road, widow of Austin F. Remick, died this morning.

Born in Portsmouth Jan. 31, 1883, the daughter of the late Patrick and Margaret (Quinn) Blute, she had resided in Rey for the past 47 years.

Survivors include four sons, Sgt. Stanton G. Remick of the Portsmouth police department, Melvin S., Artis F. and Sherman A. Remick, all of Rey; two daughters, Mrs. Lawrence Harmon of Machias, Me., and Mrs. Lawrence Seavey of Rye; one sister, Mrs. Mary Ogilvie of Portsmouth; 15 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Jan 12, 1953

Blute family - 1880 Census

*****

The elder John Blute and granddaughters - 1900 Census