Posts Tagged ‘1896’

Not the “Johnny Appleseed” You Were Looking For

September 25, 2012

Image from Cask

Fort Wayne Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Aug 10, 1894

FRIDAY.

William Coughlin, familiarly known as “Johnny Appleseed,” was sentenced to two years in the penitentiary. A few weeks ago, he stole $50 from Frank Pulver, of Huntertown, and it was on this charge that he was convicted.

Fort Wayne Weekly Gazette (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Nov 12, 1896

William Coughlin, alias, “Johnny Appleseed,” was arrested for drunkenness. He was in a belligerent mood last evening and smashed Officer Romy in the face. Squire France sent him to jail for nineteen days.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Jul 14, 1899

Judge Louttit had easy picking at police court this morning, having only two victims of the night force to spose. “Johnny Appleseed” protested vigorously against being called nicknames in court and insisted that his name is William Coughlin. When asked under that name to enter a plea to a charge of drunkenness, he pleaded guilty.

He says he is no appleseed, nor hayseed either, but is a retired gentleman who drinks at leisure and drinks as often as opportunity affords. The judge told him to take a leisure spell of eleven days and think the matter over.

Jack Case was the other easy mark. Jack was sent over two weeks ago to serve a term for drunkenness. There was another affidavit against him at the time of his first trial for assault and battery on his sister-in-law. On the latter charge he was brought from the jail to police court, and on his plea of guilty was given another eleven days.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Aug 21, 1901

There was a large grist at police court this morning. The venerable Johnny Appleseed, the survivor of more hard fought battles with the booze king than any man in Fort Wayne, made his semi-occasional appearance. Johnny’s return engagement this time was after a shorter interval than usual and he rather hesitatingly admitted to the judge that it had been only ten days since he had faced his honor before.

“But,” said Johnny, in his most persuasive tone, “ef you’ll let me off this time I’ll git right out of town and I’ll niver come back.”

“What do you mean by never?” asked the court. “Niver so long as you’re in office an’ a sittin’ up there.”

Johnny evidently does not know that the judge will be a candidate for re-election in four years, but his story and his promise went with the court.

“I’ll just fine you ten dollars,” said the judge, “and have a mittimus made out for you and the next time the officers catch you in town they’ll take you right over for twenty days, without going to the trouble of bringing you up here. Meantime I will suspend sentence; now do you understand what I mean?”

“I doos, I doos, tank you, tank you!” and Johnny slid out.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Sep 10, 1901

*     *     *     *     *

Police News.

Officer Elliott last night found Johnny Appleseed lying in front of the fire engine house on East Main street. Johnny was in a badly intoxicated condition and the officer took him to headquarters.

The Fort Wayne Journal and Gazette (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Nov 21, 1903

A sure sign of spring showed up yesterday when Johnny Coughlin, familiarly known as “Johnny Appleseed,” blew into the city. It is his wont to remain in the country during the winter and to migrate to the city in the spring. He was given shelter at the police station and, if he follows his usual custom, he will be the occupant of a cell before many days. Johnny is a queer character, of the Sunny Jim type, but his love for drink usually lands him in jail at stated intervals.

The Fort Wayne Journal Gazette (Fort, Wayne, Indiana) Apr 6, 1906

Police headquarters last night got a call that an old soldier was lying drunk in a yard on East Lewis street. Patrolman Elliott responded to the call and found that the supposed soldier was Johnny Coughlin, a police character, who is known as “Johnny Appleseed.”

The officer started Johnny towards his home at the county infirmary and returned to headquarters just in time to investigate a call from Clinton street that an old soldier was lying drunk in a yard.

Going to the place, the officer again found Johnny and decided to take him to the station in order to preserve  the reputation of the veterans.

The Fort Wayne Journal Gazette (Fort Wayne, Indiana) May 22, 1907

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Paste This in Your Hat

June 11, 2012

A Silver Song.

It’s silver, silver, silver
On every ringing side;
On every hand throughout the land
Swift sweeps the silver tide.
There’s a jingle in the cities
And a jingle on the plains,
And all the skies of springtime
Pour down their silver rains!

— Atlanta Constitution.

Freeborn County Standard (Albert Lea, Minnesota) Jun 10, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

“Free silver” is a phrase that appeals to the shiftless man who is always out of money. The expression seems to him to imply that under a free-silver regime money would be as readily obtainable as the air we breathe. The word “free” always fascinates men who do not go beneath the surface of great problems. “Free lunch.” “free silver,” “free trade,” “free country,” “free rides,” “free speech” — all these variegated expressions come to mean the same thing to many individuals who are not able to get past the adjective to the noun it qualifies.

— New York World.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Paste This In Your Hat.
As a republican I am proud of many things, but I can sum up as the highest satisfaction I ever had in the party and its career, that the prospect of republican success never did disturb business. — From Harrison’s Speech.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 3, 1896

The Rape of Democracy.

Poor Democracy’s slate
Is — God save her! — completed.
She has now but to wait
Till the same is defeated.

All their rivals o??-vyin’
In the Jacobine duel,
Mr. Congressman Bryan
And ex-Alderman Sewall

Have been put in command
Of the buccaneer crew,
Who have thoughtfully planned
To make one equal two.

Well may Grover decline,
As the fish spins his reels,
To give out any sign
Of the pity he feels.

Well may men who uphold
Honest methods of trade
Join the standard of gold
Where it flies unafraid.

Well may veterans flee
With a bitter disgust
When their banner they see
Labeled: “Silver or Bust!”

Since the party is cursed
With dishonest intention,
Let the fates do their worst
They can’t beat the convention.

FRANK PUTTNAM.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Jul 18, 1896

A fine ounce of gold is worth $20.67.

Sixteen ounces of silver are worth $11.20.

Congress can legislate until it is black in the face without making the ounce of gold worth less or the sixteen ounces of silver worth more.

— New York Press.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Aug 20, 1896

An ounce of gold is worth $20.67 in the open market; an ounce of silver just 70 cents. Only the law of supply and demand can change their relative values.

Congress is powerless to effect it even if it were clothed with the authority to attempt it.

Cambridge Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Aug 27, 1896

I do not know what you think about it but I believe it is a Good deal better to open the mills of the United States to the labor of America than to open the mints of the United States to the silver of the world. — Major McKinley, at Canton, August 12, 1896.

Bessemer Herald – Oct 17, 1896

The Financial Calendar.

The following financial calendar of the past quarter of a century shows what the leading nations of the world have done with silver during that period:

1871. Germany adopted a gold standard.

1873. Belgium suspended standard silver coinage.

1873. Holland suspended silver coinage.

1873. Denmark adopted a gold standard.

1873. Germany demonetized silver coins.

1873. Norway adopted a gold standard.

1873. Sweden adopted a gold standard.

1873. United States suspended free coinage of silver dollars.

1874. The Latin Union limited their silver coinage.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage in Italy.

1875. Switzerland declined to coin her quota of silver under Latin Union.

1875. Suspension of silver coinage on account of Dutch colonies.

1876. France suspended the coinage of silver.

1877. Finland adopted the gold standard.

1878. Spain suspended the free coinage of silver.

1878. Latin Union suspended coinage of silver except subsidiary coins.

1878. United States resumed coinage of the silver dollar, but on government account.

1879. Austria-Hungary suspended the free coinage of silver.

1885. Egypt adopted a gold standard.

1890. Romania adopted the single gold standard.

1890. United States suspended the coinage of silver dollars and began purchase of bullion.

1891. Gold standard adopted in Tunis.

1892. Austria-Hungary adopted the gold standard.

1893. Mints of India closed to the free coinage of silver.

1893. United States suspended purchase of silver bullion.

1895. Russia decided to coin 100,000,000 gold rubles.

1895. Chile adopted the gold standard.

1895. Costa Rica adopted the gold standard.

1878 1881-1892 — Three international conferences held to try to reestablish the use of silver.

Meantime the United States increased her full legal tender silver 50 fold in the face of a 50 per cent fall in its value, until her credit and financial standing could endure the strain no longer, and she was obliged also, reluctantly, to suspend silver coinage.

What would happen if she were to resume, and open wide the doors of her mints to the discarded silver of the world? It does not require much of a financier to answer that.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Oct 3, 1896

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Related Posts:

Girding Their Loins for William Jennings Bryan

William McKinley – Our Martyred President

Cashing in on Political Gold:

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 7, 1896

Nightfall on the Farm

June 9, 2012

Image from MoMA

NIGHTFALL ON THE FARM.

Upon the porch at even
We two together stood,
And listened to the tinkle
Of sheep-bells in the wood.
The locust trees bent o’er us,
White blossoms dropping down,
And, fringed with flowers, before us
The path lay bare and brown.

We heard the sheep-bells music
Far off and dreamy grow;
We saw the white flowers sprinkle
The lawn like flecks of snow;
The roses drew back shyly
Into the silent dark,
But though their haunts were shaded
Their perfume we could mark.

Up in a locust’s branches
A little bird said “cheep” —
‘Twas all that broke the silence
The whole world seemed asleep.
“Good night,” she said. “I love you!”
I said. She did not speak,
But swift she leaned toward me
With tears upon her cheek.

— Philip L. Barker, in Chicago Record.

Freeborn County Standard (Albert Lea, Minnesota) Jun 10, 1896

Blackberrying

May 20, 2012

Image from the National Archives

BLACKBERRYING.

When I was but a wee, shy boy,
My mother’s pride, my father’s joy,
My hands and mouth had full employ
When blackberries were ripe.
And oft my mammy she would squeeze
The thorns from out my arms and knees,
And my good dad, to give me ease,
Laid by his favorite pipe.
And even since I’ve become a man,
And dressed on quite a different plan,
I’ve still gone carrying the can,
When blackberries grew sweet.
Yes, trampling through the bramble brakes,
I’d court the keenest pains and aches
For two or three fair colleens’ sakes —
Whose names I’ll not repeat —
Till Norah of the amber hair,
Who’d been my partner here and there,
Around, about and everywhere,
As blackberries came in —
When I just tried, with too much haste,
The richer, rarer fruit to taste
That on her lips was going to waste,
She tosses up her chin,
And marches by me night and morn,
Her gray eyes only glancing scorn,
Regardless of the rankling thorn
She’s rooted in my heart.
Yet maybe — though I much misdoubt —
Her eyes that flash, her lips that flout,
Will yet turn kind, and conjure out
That thorn of cruel smart.

— London Sketch.

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) May 23, 1896

God Bless the Mothers

May 13, 2012

Written for the DAILY LIGHT.
GOD BLESS THE MOTHERS.

“Personal abuse is not argument, and any reference, or vile allusion to the noblest and grandest creation of God, ‘THE MOTHER’ of man, will not be permitted in the LIGHT.

MANAGER DAILY LIGHT.
April 17,, 1896.

I read those lines and like them well,
They have an honest ring,
That’s worthy to be writ in gold,
And forms a theme to sing.
If there is on the earth a name,
That’s dearer than another,
And wakes my soul, with fire intense,
It is the name of MOTHER.

I know the hand that penned those lines,
And know his loving heart,
And well i know that as a son,
He plays a faithful part.
A man that well his mother loves,
I’ll take to heart as brother,
For he’s not bad who truly loves
And nurtures well his MOTHER.

I have a mother far away,
And, Oh! I lover her well,
Far dearer than I e’er can say,
For words, they fail to tell.
Thus I respect all women true,
But more than any other,
Is she that lives a stainless life,
And bears the name of MOTHER.

Curse on the man who would defile,
That dearer, sweeter name;
Or who by thought, or word, or deed,
Would seek to it defame.
When mother is assailed I can’t
My indignation smother,
And I say, with you, God bless the name —
That deal old name of MOTHER.

HENRY RYDER-TAYLOR.

CITY OF MEXICO, April 23, 1896.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 26, 1896

Jack Frost

February 21, 2012

Image from Power of Babel

JACK FROST

The door was shut, as doors should be,
Before you went to bed last night;
Yet Jack Frost had got in, you see,
And left your window silver white.

He must have waited till you slept;
And not a single word he spoke.
But penciled o’er the panes and crept
Away again before you woke.

And now you cannot see the hills
Nor fields that stretch beyond the lane;
But there are fairer things than these
His fingers traced on every pane.

Rocks and castles towering high;
Hills and dales, and streams and fields;
And knights in armor riding by,
With nodding plumes and shining shields.

And here are little boats, and there
Big ships with sails spread to the breeze;
And yonder, palm tress waving fair,
On islands set in silver seas.

And butterflies with gauzy wings;
And herds of cows and flocks of sheep;
And fruit and flowers and all the things
You see when your are sound asleep.

For creeping softly underneath
The door when all the lights are out,
Jack Frost takes every breath you breathe,
And knows the things you think about.

He paints them on the window pane
In fairy lines with frozen steam;
And when you wake you see again
The lovely things you saw in dream.

–Gabriel Setoun

The Oshkosh Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 25, 1936

Title: The Child World
Author: Gabriel Setoun
Illustrated by: Charles Robinson
Published: 1896
Jack Frost – Page 86

Hiawatha Up To Date

October 22, 2011

HIAWATHA UP TO DATE.
—–
BY GEORGE V. HOBART.

“Wed a maiden of your people,”
Warning said the old Nokomis;
“Go not eastward, go not westward
For a stranger whom we know not.”
Thus dissuading spoke Nokomis,
And young Hiawatha answered
Only this, “Dear old Nokomis,
Sure our people have no maidens,
Not one worth a bit of wampum,
For across the Gitchee Gumee,
Far across the Big Sea Water,
Dukes have come and nabbed these maidens.”
Gravely then said old Nokomis
“Surely you can find a maiden
Here among our own dear people,
Even tho’ they haven’t wampum,
Haven’t beads and shells to burn, sir!”
Smiling answered Hiawatha
“Yes, but they are all new women,
All are wearing dizzy bloomers,
Riding bikes and clad in bloomers.
I don’t want to wed a maiden
Clad in bloomers, loud old bloomers.
In the land of the Dakotahs
Lives the Arrow maker’s daughter,
Minnehaha, Laughing Water,
Handsomest of all the women;
She is not one of these new women,
Never saw a pair of bloomers.”
Still dissuading said Nokomis
“Bring not to my lodge a stranger
From the land of the Dakotahs,
That is where they make divorces.”
Laughing answered Hiawatha
“For that reason if no other
Would I wed in far Dakotah,
For if I don’t like the maiden
I can easy get divorced, see?”
“Very well, then,” said Nokomis,
“You know best, my Hiawatha,
Go and wed this Minnehaha,
Give the laugh to old Nokomis,
Yes, the laugh — the Minnehaha!”
Straightway Hiawatha did so,
Wed the maiden, Laughing Water;
And to make divorce more certain,
If divorce should e’re be needed,
Lived they after in Sioux City
In the land of the Dakotahs.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Jul 29, 1896

*****

To read the original (Google books):

Title: THE SONG OF HIAWATHA.
Author: HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW
Published: 1856
Page 128 [Hiawatha’s Wooing]

Sea Song of the Landlubber

August 29, 2011

SEA SONG OF THE LANDLUBBER.

If you really want a song of the sea,
Let no sailor that song sing,
But some lubbery clown from an inland town,
His song will have the ring.

There never was a man who went to sea,
Abaft the mast or before,
Who could sing you a rollicking song of the sea
With a man who stays on shore.

Then pass the steaming punch around
When the nights grow merry and long;
When the black tides swirl at the harbor’s mouth
We’ll raise the lubbersong.

Oh, the starboard watch was well wound up,
Likewise the port watch too,
When the binnacle fell from the mizzentop
And the chaplain piped to the crow.

‘Twas a close hauled reach to nearest beach,
And the spanker floated free,
As we stood by our guns of some thousand tons
With a gale upon our lee.

Then blow, ye breezes, blow,
And the guns they go bang! bang!
A sailor’s joy is the harbor buoy;
Hurrah for Li Hung Chang!

Our capstan sail was hoisted up,
The garboard strake gave room,
And we sailed away from New York bay
By the light of the spinnaker boom.

The captain found the anchor a-trip
In the salt of the sparkling brine,
And the ho’sun said that the anchor tripped
When the good ship crossed the line.

Then brail away on the topsail sheet,
Belay on keep downhaul;
It’s our cowsprit yard that is safe and hard,
And we’ll reef in the sounding pawl.

— New York Press.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Nov 12, 1896

The Whistling Buoy.

The accompanying little illustration shows a device which, had it been in position on the Manacles, would have saved the Paris and the Mohegan from running ashore on that dangerous bit of English coast. This machine is what is known as the whistling buoy. It is capable of giving out a much more effective signal than the old-fashioned bell buoy, which is has just replaced off the Manacles. This new buoy works automatically, and every short while emits a most doleful but far-reaching whistling scream.

Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa) Sep 22, 1899

BOXING THE COMPASS.

The Test Between a Sailor and a Landlubber.

Boys who live in seaport towns are sometimes asked to “box the compass.” If they can do it quickly and accurately, they are fine sailors and may grow up to be the captain of a four master. If they miss a point or can only do it slowly, they are landlubbers and will never see blue water.

To box the compass means to name all the points in order just as fast as you can speak. This is the way an old down east skipper will rattle it off:

North, nor’ by east, nor’-nor’east, nor’ east by north, northeast, nor’east by east, east-nor’east, east by north, east, east by south, east-sou’east, sou’east by east, sou’east, sou’east by south, sou’-sou’east, sou’ by east, south, sou’ by west, sou’-sou’west, sou’west by south, sou’west, sou’west by west, west-sou’west, west by south, west, west by north, west-nor’west,, nor’west by west, nor’west, nor’west by north, nor’-nor’west, nor’ by west, north.

Can you do it?

If a needle is drawn a few times over the ends of a horseshoe magnet, it becomes magnetized. Push such a magnetized needle throng a small cork. Place the cork in a bowl of water, taking pains to see that the cork when it floats on the water will carry the needle in a horizontal position or “on an even keel.”

Another way is to cut about three inches from a hollow straw (such as is used to suck lemonade) and to push the needle inside the straw. The straw will float and carry the needle.

Now observe what happens. The floating needle will slowly swing round till it points north and south. The straw will behave in the same way. Push it in any other direction, and the moment it is free it swings back again.

We do not know who first observed the fact that a floating magnetized needle will point to the north. Nor do we know precisely when or where some unknown inventor used this idea to make a compass. All we know is that the Chinese made and used compasses more than 2,000 years ago.

When men began, perhaps 10,000 years ago, to sail upon the water, they used marks upon the shore to guide them on their way. Long years after they observed that a certain star kept at all times the same place in the sky, and they used this pole star as a guide in steering their ships. Today a steamship starting down the Hudson river for Europe is guided by the pilot, and he uses the buoys, beacons and other guide marks to steer the ship down the bay. Off Sandy Hook he gives up the ship to the captain, who instructs the helmsman to steer northeast by east, east by north or whatever course he selects, and the helmsman, watching the compass, keeps the ship headed in that direction.

— Dallas News.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Dec 10, 1902

Another Tradition of Seas Gone.

One of the latest inventions to improve the efficiency of travel at sea is the invention of an automatic ship-steering device which is said to be more accurate in holding a vessel to its course than the best helmsman who ever manned the wheel. The contrivance, known already in the parlance of the briny as “Metal Mike,” not only releases the helmsman for other services, but checks the weaving of a ship to either side of a predetermined course and thus permits a saving of time and fuel. Tests have been made on several ships and the apparatus has proved highly satisfactory.

“Metal Mike” is said to resemble a street care motorman’s box rigged alongside the ship’s steering wheel and attached to its hub by a chain operated by an electric motor. The motor in turn is connected with a gyroscopic compass in such a way that any variation registered by the compass is immediately transmitted to the steering device which automatically turns the wheel so as to keep the ship on its course. The advantage lies in the fact that the time required for a variation in the course to be transmitted electrically to the rudder is almost infinitesimal compared to that needed by a human helmsman to perform the same operation.

Science has thus robbed the sea of one of its cherished traditions. The landlubber’s conception of the helmsman at the wheel is that of a bearded, wrinkled, weather-beaten veteran of many storms, defying the pelting rain and wind as he peers through the inky blackness. That day, of course, has long passed on the larger sea-going vessel and the modern helmsman is comfortably ensconced in the glass-inclosed room. Now “Metal Mike” comes along to supplant the human touch altogether after the vessel has reached the high seas and is speeding along under favorable weather conditions. Once the ship’s course has been determined, “Metal Mike” takes charge, and until relieved of the task will hold the vessel straight across the pathless deep. Rather a far cry from the days of the “Flying Dutchman” or the hardy adventurers who were guided by the North Star.

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) Nov 10, 1922

Learn the Lingo:

Title: The Sailor’s Word-Book
(An alphabetical digest of nautical terms, including some more especially military and scientific, but useful to seamen; as well as archaisms of early voyagers, etc.)
Author: Admiral William Henry Smyth
Editor: Vice-Admiral Sir Edward Belcher
Publisher: Blackie and Son, 1867 (google book link)

Or:

Title: The Sailor’s Sea-Book
(Volume 55 of Weale’s rudimentary series)
Author: James Greenwood
Editor:William Henry Rosser
Published    1879
Dictionary of Sea TermsPage 163

Where No Irish Need Apply

March 17, 2011

Image from the Food @ Hunters Hill website.

Hurray for the Irish!

The other day we tossed a scallion to an Irish-owned Employment Agency on 6th Avenue because it posted a sign reading: “No Irish Need Apply.”

Now comes a reminder from William Kenny of East Haven, Conn., who says that this is taken from an old Dean Swift quotation. Swift saw the same sign on a factory — No Irish Need Apply!

So he took out his pencil and under that sign be swiftied: “Who ever wrote this wrote it well, For the same is written on the Gates of Hell!”

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Mar 23, 1932

Image from the Lehman College website.

The New York Sun supplies the following ingenious explanation of the origin of the expression, “No Irish need apply.” “The words for a time were common in advertisements of servants wanted. The story is that Dean Swift and his Irish servant were travelling near Cork and reached that city, then governed by some Englishman. He had fastened a sign on the gates to the effect that Irishmen would not be admitted. The dean passed in, Patrick was left outside. He saw this sign, and presently added this couplet:

“”‘Whoever wrote this, wrote it well,
For the same is written on the gates of hell.'”

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Feb 23, 1896

A girl, presenting herself for a situations, at a house “where no Irish need apply,” in answer to the question where she came from, said: “Shure, couldn’t you persave by me accint that it’s Frinch I am?”

Decatur Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Feb 25, 1869

DURING a recent engagement of Mr. and Mrs. Barney Williams in Philadelphia, a woman, with an infant, attended one of the performances. The baby kept up an incessant cry. At the end of the play, Mr. Williams was called before the curtain. The baby was bawling lustily. Mr. Williams looked around for a moment then said:

“Shure there’s a nurse wanted.”

A roar of laughter followed. When the mirth had subsided, the woman with the infant arose and replied:

“No Irish need apply.”

There was a tremendous burst of applause, amid which the woman, with the musical baby, triumphantly retired.

Decatur Review (Decatur, Illinois) May 25, 1871

New York Daily Times – Mar 25, 1854

The New York Times – May 10, 1859

The Daily Republican -(Illinois) – May 7, 1873

The Ohio Democrat – May 10, 1883

“No Irish Need Apply.”

Editors Morning Herald.

In running my eye over your list of local news items April 1st, my attention was particularly attracted by an advertisement for the respectable and responsible position of “maid of all work” with the qualifying (but not obsolete) phrase “no Irish need apply.” The advertiser did well to add this last phrase, lest all the Irish in the city might apply together, as the position was too good to miss it there would be a rush sure of the “wild Irish.”

I fear the advertisers have outlived their time, as Irish-phobia and Knownothingism are dead and buried so deep as to be past resurrection. I am told the same phrase, “no Irish need apply,” is posted on the doors and gates of the nether world, as well as on some of their facsimiles on terra firma. The occupants of the house referred to must be sleeping, or out of the country, for the last ten or eleven years, as during that time their fell of bigotry toward the Irish was crushed out and Irish have held positions of trust and danger from the time the first gun was fired on Fort Sumpter down to the present date. In conclusion my Irish friends are better off without such anglicised bigots for employers.

Yours, &c,
“IRISH”

Titusville Morning Herald (Titusville, Pennsylvania) Apr 2, 1872

“Dennis, my boy,” said a schoolmaster to his Hibernian pupil, “I fear I shall make nothing of you — you’ve no application.”

“An’ sure enough, sir,” said the quick-witted lad, “Isn’t myself that’s always been tould there is no occasion for it? Don’t I seen every day in the newspapers that ‘No Irish need apply,’ at all at all?”

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Aug 18, 1883

IT will be noticed that our city government is a regular knownothing concern. The first year of the present administration the Irish and Germans were recognized, in a small way, and even Johnny Bull got a small slice, but the second year every foreign born citizen was bounced. Not only has the promise to “take care” of the men who like a glass of beer been violated, but the men who were largely instrumental in the election of the republican city ticket aer not now recognized in the appointments. No Dutch or Irish need apply, except to shovel on the streets.

Decatur Morning Review (Decatur, Illinois) Jul 15, 1884

“No Irish Need Apply.”

TO THE EXPRESS: — An unknown poetic friend sends me the following stirring poem. It deserves circulation, and will be read with pride by all lovers of distressed Erin — the laurel-twined isle, so ignobly oppressed that station comes not till at treason’s behest:

J.N. GALLAGHER.

Shame on the lips that utter it, shame on the hands that write;
Shame on the page that publishes such slander to the light.
I feel my blood with lightning speed through all my being fly
At the old taunt, forever new —
No Irish need apply!

Are not our hands as stout and strong, our hearts as warm and true
As theirs who fling this mock at us to cheat us of our due?
While ‘neath our feet God’s earth stands firm and ‘bove us hangs his sky,
Where there is honor to be won —
The Irish need apply!

Oh! have not glorious things been done by Irish hearts and hands?
Are not her deeds emplazoned over many seas and lands?
There may be tears on Ireland’s cheek, but still her heart beats high,
And where there’s valor to be shown —
The Irish need apply!

Wherever noble thoughts are nurs’d and noble words are said,
Wherever patient faith endures, where hope itself seems dead,
Wherever wit and genius reign, and heroes tower high,
Wherever manly toil prevails —
The Irish will apply!

Wherever woman’s love is pure as soft, unsullied snow,
Wherever woman’s cheek at tales of injury will glow,
Wherever pitying tears are shed, and breathed is feeling’s sigh,
Wherever kindliness is sought —
The Irish need apply!

If there is aught of tenderness, If there is aught of worth,
If there’s a trace of heaven left upon our sinful earth;
If there are noble, steadfast hearts that uncomplaining die
To tread like them life’s thorny road —
The Irish will apply!

Till on Killarney’s waters blue the soft stars cease to shine,
Till round the parent oak no more the ivy loves to twine.
Till Nephin topples from his place and Shannon’s stream runs dry,
For all that’s great and good and pure —
The Irish will apply!

F.R.H.

San Antonio Daily Express (San Antonio, Texas) Aug 26, 1886

The defeat of John W. Corcoran for lieutenant governor, and the putting aside of Owen A. Galvin as a mayoralty candidate, may be regarded by the Irish-American voters as a notification from the mugwumps that when it comes to offices “no Irish need apply.” — {Boston Traveller.

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Nov 14, 1890

Mrs. Noshape — There, you careless creature, you have dropped that beautiful statue of Venus and Broken it all to pieces.

Bridget — Well, mum, you ought to be glad av it. Sized up alongside of Vaynus your figure was at considerable disadvantage.

And no Mrs. Noshape has advertised for a new servant that is respectful and well-behaved. No Irish need apply.

— Texas Siftings.

The Stevens Point Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) Jun 12, 1895

Image from the Parlor Songs website, and includes an interesting article about the Irish Immigrants and the song.

FAIR ENOUGH By Westbrook Pegler

[excerpt]
Hated Like Present Jew Refugees

The Irish refugees of those days, men and women of the same faith and stock from which Father Coughlin himself has sprung, were hated like the Jewish refugees of the present. Election frauds and immigration frauds were bitterly resented by the native Americans as politicians exploited the greenhorns to thwart native proposals and defeat their tickets at the polls.

The immigrants were untidy, disorderly and troublesome, speaking in general terms. So, even as late as the turn of the century, a music hall song, possibly one of Harrigan and Hart’s, sounded the refrain, “And they were Irish, and they were Irish, and yet they say ‘no Irish need apply’.”

This referred to the virtues of Irish heroes and to the open prejudice against the Irish expressed in the employment ads in American cities.

The bill against the Irish and, of course, the Catholics — for they were almost all Catholic — also accused them of carrying into their new life here their active hatred of a foreign nation with which this country was on friendly terms. It was argued that immigrants who took citizenship here had no right to imperil the life of their new country by activities which might involve the United States in a war with Great Britain.

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Feb 25, 1939

Why Catsup? It’s Ketchup

January 28, 2011

Image from Grow & Resist.

When I first ran across this article for Ohio Ketchup, I had no idea that “ketchup” was ever anything except the red stuff that comes in a bottle.

Seasonable Recipes.

OHIO KETCHUP. — The Buckeyes are in the habit of making a certain kind of ketchup which I have found no where else, and have, therefore, taken the liberty to call it “The Ohio Ketchup.” Is is an article that should be found in every household. You may pardon me for not attempting to give you an idea of its deliciousness, because my pen cannot do justice to the subject. The season will soon be here when this “happy combination of vegetables” can very easily be made. I will therefore transcribe the receipt for the benefit of your readers: Take about three dozen full grown cucumbers, and eight white onions. Peel the cucumbers and onions; then chop them as finely as possible; then sprinkle upon them three-quarters of a pint of fine table salt, then put the whole into a sieve and let it drain for eight hours; then take a tea cup-full of mustard seed, half a cup of ground black pepper, and mix these well with the cucumbers and onions; then put the whole into a stone jar and fill up with the strongest vinegar and close tightly. In three days it will be fit for use, and will keep for years.

Let all your readers give the Ohio Ketchup a fair trial, and you and I will receive sixty thousand thanks for letting them into the secret of making it.

TO PRESERVE TOMATOS. — The following has been handed to us as the receipt of a good housewife for preserving or “curing” tomatoes so effectually that they may be brought out at any time between the seasons “good as new,” with precisely the same flavor of the original article; Get sound tomatoes, peal them, and prepare just the same as for cooking, squeeze them as fine as possible, put them into a kettle, bring them to a boil, season with pepper and salt; then put them in stone jugs, taken directly from water in which they (the jugs) have been boiled. — Seal the jugs immediately, and keep them in a cool place.

Watertown Chronicle (Watertown, Wisconsin) Sep 4, 1850

NOTE: The Republic Compiler (Gettysburg, PA) Jul 29, 1850,  also carried this article and  included its author as E.B.R. Springfield, Clarke co., Ohio, 1850.

TOMATO KETCHUP. — The following, from long experience, we know to be the best receipt extant for making tomato ketchup.
Take one bushel of tomatoes, and boil them until they are soft. Squeeze them through a fine wire sive, and add —

Half a gallon of vinegar,
One pint and a half of salt,
Two ounces of cloves,
Quarter of a pound of allspice,
Three ounces of cayenne pepper,
Three table-spoonful of black pepper,
Five heads of garlic, skinned and seperated.

Mix together and boil about three hours, or until reduced to about one-half. Then bottle without straining.

Daily Commercial Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Sep 9, 1852

** Bushel: In dry measurements, equals 8 gallons or 32 quarts of a commodity. Associated Content from Yahoo

Tomato Catsup — Tomato Sauce.

As the season is drawing near for all good housekeepers to commence putting up different kinds of preserves, pickles, &c., we copy the following recipe from the August number of the [American Agriculturist] for making tomato catsup and sauce: “The basis of tomato catsup, or ketchup, is the pulp of ripe tomatoes. Many defer making catsup until late in the season, when the cool nights cause the fruit to ripen slowly, and it may be t is gathered hurriedly for fear of a frost. The late fruit does not yield so rich a pulp as that gathered in its prime.

The fruit should have all green portions cut out, and be stewed gently until thoroughly cooked. The pulp is then to be separated from the skins, by rubbing through a wire sieve so fine as to retain the seeds. The liquor thus obtained is to be evaporated to a thick pulp, over a slow fire, and should be stirred to prevent scorching. The degree of evaporation will depend upon how thick it is desired to have the catsup. We prefer to make it so that it will just poor freely from the bottle. We observe no regular rule in flavoring. Use sufficient salt. Season with cloves, allspice, and mace, bruised and tied in a cloth, and boiled in the pulp; add a small quantity of powdered cayenne.

Some add the spices ground fine, directly to the pulp. A clove of garlic, bruised and tied in a cloth, to be boiled with the spices, imparts a delicious flavor. Some evaporate the pulp to a greater thickness than is needed, and then thin with vinegar or with wine. An excellent and useful tomato sauce may be made by preparing the pulp, but adding no spices, and putting it in small bottles while hot, corking securely and sealing. If desired, the sauce may be salted before bottling, but this is not essential. To add to soups, stews, sauces and made dishes, a sauce thus prepared is an excellent substitute for the fresh fruit. It should be put in small bottles containing as much as will be wanted at once, as it will not keep long after opening.

The Heral and Torch Light (Hagerstown, Maryland) Aug 2, 1882

— Old Virginia Ketchup. — Take one peck of green tomatoes, half a peck of white onions, three ounces of white mustard seed, one ounce each of allspice and cloves, half a pint of mixed mustard, an ounce of black pepper and celery seed each, and one pound of brown sugar. Chop the tomatoes and onions, sprinkle with salt and let stand three hours; drain the water off; put in a preserve kettle with the other ingredients. Cover with vinegar, and set on the fire to boil slowly for one hour.

— Ladies’ Home Journal.

The Wellsboro Gazette (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania Sep 5, 1895

** Peck: Equivalent of 2 gallons of dry weight, or 10 to 14 pounds.  Associated Content from Yahoo

Image from the Local Food Local Farms Local Sustainability website.

Ketchup.

Why catsup? Nearly every bottle which comes from a public manufacturer is emblazened with that spelling. Wrong Ketchup is the word. It is a corruption of the Japanese word kitjap, which is a condiment somewhat similar to soy. It is a pick me up, a stirrer of the digestive organs, a katch me up, and hence its application to the mingling of tomatoes and spices, whose name it should bear.

— Philadelphia Times.

North Adams Transcript (North Adams, Massachusetts) Jan 15, 1896

NOTE: At the link for the mushroom ketchup (scroll down,) it says that Ketchup came from a Chinese word, rather than Japanese.

Image from the Simple Bites website – Real Food for the Family TableCanning 101 Home Canned Tomatoes

TO MAKE KETCHUP.

When you cut up the tomatoes remove that part of pulp which holds the seeds, as that produced only some of the watery fluid which afterward must be got rid of. Then cook the tomatoes until perfectly soft and strain like this: Take a pan sieve; place over a two gallon crock, the top of which is a little smaller than the sieve. Set the crock in a dishpan. When you pour the hot tomatoes in the sieve, the thinnest liquid will run through the edge which extends over the crock, into the pan, and you can throw all that liquid away, which otherwise would have to be boiled away. Then with a spoon, and afterward with your hands, rub the tomatoes through the sieve. In half the time the ketchup is better and thicker than ever. When it doesn’t cook too long, the ketchup also is lighter in color. This fact, and because I tie the spices in a bag, makes it as bright as that you buy.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jul 1, 1907

Sauce for Chops.

Pound fine an ounce of black pepper and half an ounce of allspice, with an ounce of salt, and a half ounce of scraped horseradish and the same of shalots peeled and quartered; put these ingredients into a pint of mushroom ketchup or walnut pickle; let them steep for a fortnight and then strain it. A teaspoonful or two of this is generally an acceptable addition, mixed with the gravy usually sent up for chops and steaks; or added to thick melted butter.

Another delightful sauce for chops is made by taking two wineglasses of port and two of walnut pickle; four of mushroom ketchup; half a dozen anchovies pounded, and a like number of shalots sliced and pounded; a tablespoonful of soy and half a drachm of Cayenne pepper; let them simmer gently for ten minutes; then strain, and when cold put into bottles, well corked and sealed over. It will keep for a considerable time.

Suburbanite Economist (Chicago, Illinois) Jan 23, 1914

American Pickles for Queen Victoria.

Lusden & Gibson, grocers, of Aberdeen, Scotland, regularly supply Balmoral Castle, the Queen’s residence, with Heinz’s sweet pickles, tomato soup, pickled onions, ketchup and chutney. The goods are supplied through H.J. Heinz Company’s London Branch.

— New York Sun.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Mar 1, 1899

T.M. Shallenberger comes to the defense of labor as an institution. The subject is one that admits of endless discussion, without arriving anywhere. If a man like to work, it is entirely proper that he should be given the privilege; but it not fair that people who detest work are compelled to work if they would be considered respectable. It  would be just as reasonable to compel a man to play ball, although he abhors the game.

There is something wrong with the man who really enjoys working: he is not balanced right; the busy bee is a sample worker; it sweats around all day, going three or four miles to get raw material that could be obtained just as well a few yards from the hive.

Ketchup is another worker; when it is bottled, instead of taking things easy, it begins to work and gets sour and spoiled. That is the way with most people who work; they get sour and spoiled.

We are arranging to organize a new political party, composed of non-workers. The only toll permitted will be the working of candidates for cigars, which is a pleasing and profitable employment.

The Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Aug 13, 1899

I wonder if this works:

Household Hints

WHEN cooking ketchup, etc., try putting a few marbles into the kettle to prevent burning. The heat will keep the marbles rolling and prevent the stuff from sticking to the kettle.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jun 9, 1922

When the slow eater calls for ketchup, he means business.

–[N.O. Picayune.

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California Jun 19, 1880

When Casey’s small son was asked by the teacher to give the plural of tomato, he promptly answered: “Ketchup, mem.”

Suburbanite Economist (Chicago, Illinois) Jul 4, 1913

The following poems aren’t  ABOUT ketchup, but the do mention it. I have bolded ketchup:

Image from the USDA National Agricultural Library

A Sunnit to the Big Ox

Composed while standin within 2 feet of Him, and a Tuchin’ of Him now and then.

All hale! thou mighty annimil–all hale!
You are 4 thousand pounds, and am purty wel
Perporshund, thou tremenjos boveen nuggit!
I wonder how big you was wen you
Wos little, and if yure muther wud no you now
That you’ve grone so long, and thick, and phat;
Or if yure father would rekognize his ofspring
And his kaff, thou elefanteen quodrupid!
I wonder if it hurts you mutch to be so big,
And if you grode it in a month or so.
I spose wen you wos young tha didn’t gin
You skim milk but all the kreme you kud stuff
Into your little stummick, jest to see
How big yude gro; and afterward tha no doubt
Fed you on otes and ha and sich like,
With perhaps an occasional punkin or squosh!
In all probability yu don’t no yure enny
Bigger than a small kaff; for if you did,

Yude brake down fences and switch your tail,
And rush around, and hook, and beller,
And run over fowkes, thou orful beast
O, what a lot of mince pize yude maik,
And sassengers, and your tale,
Whitch kan’t wa fur from phorty pounds,
Wud maik nigh unto a barrel of ox-tail soop,
And cudn’t a heep of stakes be cut oph yu,
Whitch, with salt and pepper and termater
Ketchup, wouldn’t be bad to taik.
Thou grate and glorious inseckt!
But I must klose, O most prodijus reptile!
And for mi admirashun of yu, when yu di,
I’le rite a node unto yore peddy and remanes,
Pernouncin’ yu the largest of yure race;
And as I don’t expect to have a half a dollar
Agin to spare for to pa to look at yu, and as
I ain’t a ded head, I will sa, farewell.

LeRoy Gazette (LeRoy, New York) Apr 20, 1859

CINTHY ANN’S NEW HOUSE.

I built a house for Cinty Ann — an made it red and rich,
An rigged it up with cuperlows an lightnin rods and sich,
An built a wide piazzer roun ware she could set and sew,
An take her knittin work an gab with ole Kerturah Snow.

An Cinthy Ann was happy fer about a week or so,
And then she foun the chimbley draft wus workin ruther slow;
For the smoke came in her kitchen an she couldn’t bake her pies,
An her pudd’n only sizzled, an her johnny cake wouldn’t rise.

An soon she foun her buttry wuz too small to hol her stuff,
For apple sass and blackb’ry jell it wasn’t large enough,
An all her things were scrooched right in ez tight ez she could cram,
Her pickles, an her ketchup, an her elderberry jam.

An then a dog day storm came on an drizzled for a week,
An the roof around the chimney had to go an spring a leak,
An mildewed four er my white shirts thet she hed made an biled,
An her winter muff was rooined and her weddin dress was spiled.

An then sez I to Cinthy, w’en she sut down to cry,
“Ther ain’t no home upon this side the mansions in the sky
But what has some leak in the roof, some trouble in the flue,
Some mis’ble cluttered buttry” — an poor Cinthy said “Boo hoo!”

We build our pooty houses that are ternal fine to see,
An we stick’em up with cuperlows and sich like filigree,
An in our dreams they’re fair ez heaven, but let us wait a week,
This pooty palace of our dreams is sure to spring a leak.

— S.W. Foss in Yankee Blade.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Sep 14, 1892