Posts Tagged ‘1898’

Haunted?

October 30, 2011

Image from The Dead End Hayride website

A Hallowe’en party was fired into in a cornfield at Newark, New Jersey, by a farmer, and a seventeen-year-old boy was killed. The farmer gave himself up and is nearly crazy. The party frightened him.

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Nov 19, 1898

I heard of some musical mice the other day that had so “hoodooed” a cottage that the people living near moved away and told wondrous uncanny stories of the pretty little house. It was the country home of some wealthy San Francisco people. Soon after their return to their city home for the winter a couple of years ago, their sixteen-year-old daughter died.

Then the neighbors commenced hearing all sorts of mysterious sounds. They even declared the spirit of the girl wandered through the house and then finally sat down to the piano and played some of the tunes she had loved in life. They could hear them distinctly and recognized the old songs. After a time the music ceased, but the restless spirit still continued to wander through the cottage and the same terrifying and ghostly sounds were heard. So much for imagination.

The following summer the family returned and threw wide the doors of the haunted cottage and let the sunshine in. Then the piano cover was lifted and the mystery was solved. Out scampered a score of mice. The piano was ruined. They took from it a number of nests of whole families of baby mice and an even one hundred pounds, actual weight, of maccaroni, vermacelli, rice, wheat, corn, potatoes, and scores of other things. The piano was crammed full. No wonder it gave forth no sound. The only mystery to the family about their haunted cottage was how in the world the mice managed to squeeze into the piano their family larder, having been so excellently provided for.

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Nov 19, 1898

Spooks Take House; 8 Policemen Quail

Moans, Raps and Other Mysterious Noises Startle Bluecoats Who Stay in Haunted Cottage.

Gary, Ind., Jan. 18. Eight policemen of this place are convinced, after having made a personal investigation, that a certain small cottage a mile from Toliston, near here, is the abiding place of a genuine ghost. The squad of officers came to this decision this morning after having spent a night of terror in the haunted house.

Moans, raps and other sounds continued in a mysterious manner throughout the night, the officers say. Until two months ago the house was vacant. Then a family moved in. Wails and sounds of a struggle have nightly disturbed the new tenants and they called upon the police to investigate.

Several years ago a farm hand committed suicide in the cottage.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Jan 18, 1909

“GHOST” IS WOODPECKED

BROOKFIELD, Mo. — A new variety of “ghost” was revealed at the Country club here when some-one screwed up enough courage to go into an unoccupied “haunted” cottage. Investigation proved that a woodpecker had been the cause of all the alarm. The bird had died of starvation but the evidence indicated he had fallen into the chimney and then worked his way into the stove thru the stove-pipe. After days of pecking he had worked his way out of the stove.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Aug 15, 1928

Celebrating California: The 31st State

September 9, 2011

Image from the Museum of the City website

A Memorable Celebration.
[Excerpt]

Orator of the day, Hon. R.C. Rust, Superior Judge of Amador County:

“Forty-eight years ago to-day the Thirty-first State was added to our nation. Forty-eight years ago to-day the hopes, desires and ambitions of our pioneer fathers and mothers were in part realized, for on that day our beloved California was admitted to the Union, and without territorial childhood, without probation she appeared a new star in the firmament, with all the dignity, with all the privileges, and with all the responsibilities of a full fledged State.

“By that act on that day was fulfilled the prophecy of the pioneers of 1846 who raised the bear flag at old Sonoma of the freedom of California from Spanish rule, and was proven the wisdom of the act of Commodore Sloat in first raising on California’s soil the stars and stripes at Monterey.

“And to-day, we of the mother lode, from ‘Little Amador’ on the south and from Nevada and Placer on the north, with our friends from Sacramento, assemble beneath the shadow of the protecting folds of “old glory” and that other ensign of patriotism and bravery, the bear flag of California, to again sign the praises and honor the pioneer heroes of those days. To again recall to our minds their bravery and unselfish patriotism. To renew our solemn pledge to fulfill the duties of the sacred trust imposed upon us, and to again give evidence of our full appreciation of the blessings we enjoy as the recipients of their bounty.”

With the spell of the Past and all its sacred memories upon him, he paid loving homage to pioneers, dead and living, as follows:

“And in all we do to-day, my brothers, let us not be unmindful of the fact that we have, for the time, pitched our tent and staked our claim on sacred territory, hallowed by the memories of the pioneers of 1848 and 1849. They were

“The giants with hopes audacious, the giants of iron limb;
The giants who journeyed westward when the trails were new and dim;
The giants who felled the forests, made pathways o’er the snows,
And planted the vine and fig tree where the manzanita grows;
Who swept down the mountain gorges, and painted their endless night,
With their cabins rudely fashioned and their camp-fires ruddy light;
Who builded great towns and cities, who swung back the Golden Gate,
And hewed from a mighty ashlar the form of a sovereign State.”

Passing from the heroes to whom we are indebted for this “empire by the sea,” with its accomplished facts and possibilities, he paid a splendid tribute to the fighting commanders and forces on land and sea, in the war just closed. And commending all that is good and great to the love and emulation of his applauding hearers, he concluded:

“The emigrant trails are no more, but long shining rails of steel mark pathways that lead to the centers of trade. The pack train, the “prairie schooner” and the stage coach have given place to the railroad with its swiftly moving trains and luxurious Pullman coaches. On every hand we see peace, contentment, prosperity and progress. The past lives in history, the present is ours, the future what we will make it.

What a shame the Honorable R.C. Rust’s words have fallen on deaf ears:

“In your hands, oh children of the pioneer fathers and mothers of California, Native Sons and Daughters of the Golden West, rests the destiny of California. See to it that the mantel of our fathers falls on worthy shoulders. So mould your lives by their illustrious example that all the possibilities of the future may be realized, so that these two banners may float side by side for all time, the one the emblem of the grandest State in all our Union, the other the ensign of the greatest nation in all the world.”

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Sep 24, 1898

There is No Death

March 31, 2011

“THERE IS NO DEATH”

By J.L. McCREERY.

There is no death! the stars go down
To rise upon some other shore,
And bright in Heaven’s jeweled crown,
They shine forevermore.

There is no death! the dust we tread,
Shall change, beneath the summer showers,
To golden grain, or mellow fruit,
Or rainbow-tinted flowers.

The granite rocks disorganize
To feed the hungry moss they bear;
The forest leaves drink daily life
From out the viewless air.

There is no death! the leaves may fall,
The flowers may fade and pass away;
They only wait, through wintry hours,
The coming of the May.

There is no death! an angel form
Walks o’er the earth with silent tread;
He bears our best-loved things away,
And then we call them dead.

He leaves our hearts all desolate,
He plucks our fairest, sweetest flowers,
Transplanted into bliss, they now
Adorn immortal bowers.

The birdlike voice, whose joyous tones
Made glad the scene of sin and strife,
Sings now its everlasting song
Amid the trees of life.

Where’er he sees a smile too bright
Or soul too pure for taint or vice,
He bears it to that world of light
To dwell in Paradise.

Born into that undying life,
They leave us but to come again;
With joy we welcome them the same
Except in sin and pain.

And ever near us, though unseen,
The dear, immortal spirits tread —
For all the boundless universe
Is Life — there are no dead!

Colorado Springs Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colorado) Dec 11, 1910

“THERE IS NO DEATH.”

AUTHOR OF THE POEM IS FINALLY IDENTIFIED.

He Is J.L. McCreery, of Iowa — He Is a Clerk in the Office of the Assistant Attorney General — He Has Also Written a Book of Poems.

MEL R. COLQUITT writes to the Atlanta Constitution as follows: A few months ago I saw in the Constitution in answers to correspondents the reply as to who wrote the poem, “There Is No Death.” The answer attributed the poem to Bulwer, as usual — I say as usual, for it is surprising in view of the publicity given to the real authorship that the mistake still be made. As I am personally acquainted with the writer of those noble lines, I propose to set the matter at rest for all time. As grown people are as susceptible to the logic and object lessons of pictures as children are, I send with this a photograph of the author. Mr. J.L. McCreery, of Iowa, the poet, author of hte verses in question, and of a volume of poems entitled “Songs of Toil and Triumph,” has been for years a clerk in the office of the assistant attorney-general for the department of the interior.

His own story of the poem and the many controversies that have arisen concerning it is told in a delightfully clear and entertaining manner in “Annals of Iowa,” a historical quarterly, published by the historical department of Iowa in October, 1893. His story is extremely candid and told with winning frankness, as he goes most carefully into his own criticism of his poem and shows in verse after verse how revision and improvement finally let to its perfect thought and form. It was written in the early spring of 1863, when Mr. McCreery was living in Delaware county, Iowa. It was sent to Arthur’s Home Magazine, Philadelphia, and appeared in that monthly in the number for July, 1863 — Vol. 22, page 41.

The poem was shortly reprinted in The Delaware County Journal (Mr. McCreery’s own paper) and credited to Arthur Home Magazine. A writer for the Farmer’s Advocate, then published in Chicago, contributed to that paper an article on “Immorality,” concluding his prose article with Mr. McCreery’s lines. The name of the writer of the essay was Eugene Bulmer, and it was signed at the end, or after the quoted poem, with no credit given to the poet, no quotation marks used.

A friend of Mr. McCreery’s wrote at once to the editor of the Farmer’s Advocate, claiming the poem for the rightful owner, but it was too late. A Wisconsin paper had cut off the poetry from the article and printed it with the name of E. Bulmer attached, then another Wisconsin editor desired to reprint it, and supposing that he had discovered an error in the types, changed the “m” to a “w” and so the mischief was done, and to Lord Edward Bulwer Lytton, of England, who had never seen or heard of the matter, the fine poem was accredited. A few years ago Lippincott’s Magazine in its department of One Hundred Questions, asked the authorship of the much disputed verses and the magazine decided, June, 1889, page 918, that Mr. McCreery wrote them.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) May 14, 1898

[Excerpt – omitted parts repeating same information from above article]

…..
And thus it was that the world came into the possession of a poem by Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton through carelessness and unbeknown to the English Litterateur. The name of Bulwer attached gave to the poem an immediate notoriety, and in a very short time it was being copied all over the country, and from American journals was recopied in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Australia, and probably every other country where the English language is known.

Its merit was recognized, and it began to appear in school books and in various collections of poetry, and all this time the author stood silently by and saw his words credited to Lord Lytton. Whenever an opportunity offered, however, he asserted his title to the poem, and although the public received his statements incredulously, yet his claims called for an investigation.

In the year 1870 Harper  & Brothers included the poem in one of their school readers, accrediting it to Bulwer-Lytton. When the author discovered it, he called the attention of the publishers to the mistake, and in order to thoroughly satisfy themselves of the error, they addressed a letter to Owen Meredith, the son of Lord Lytton, asking whether or not his father had written the poem. In reply he stated that his father had not written it, and moreover neither he nor any of his family had ever heard of it.

Upon the receipt of this letter, Harper & Brothers wrote to Mr. McCreery as follows:

“An order was sent today to change the plates of our school reader by announcing you as the author of “There Is No Death.” I am glad that I have secured you your just dues.” This letter was dated October 10, 1874. From this time on the poem was properly credited in established publications, but it went wandering about for many years afterwards with the name of E. Bulwer attached.

As to the writing of the poem, Mr. McCreery says that one winter’s night, early in the year 1863, as he was riding home in the clear starlight, the theme of the poem suggested itself to him, and before he had finished his journey the first stanza had been evolved in his mind. With this as an inspiration, he worked on the poem at odd moments during the next succeeding weeks until it was completed. The lines printed above are those of the poem as originally written. In 1883, Mr. McCreery published a new volume of his poems, among which was “There Is No Death,” which he had revised in the meantime making so many changes that it might well be regarded as a different poem. In the revised poem there are 16 verses instead of 10, as in the original.

John L. McCreery was born in Monroe county, New York, on the last day of the year 1835. His father was a poor Methodist minister, whose meager income was barely sufficient for the support of his family, and the early life of the poet was consequently one of many hardships and privations. The greater part of his education was gained from borrowed books, which he would study by the light of a pine knot while lying on his back before the fireplace, or at intervals during the working hours of the day.

In his seventeenth year, McCreery removed to Illinois, where his continued feebleness of health and growing literary tastes impelled him before long to forsake the plow for the pen. He began at the foot of the ladder by learning the printer’s trade, but through his efforts and abilities he rapidly rose to more important callings, and was soon filling the position of assistant editor of a country newspaper. When he was 21 years of age he went to Iowa, and finally became local editor of the Dubuque Times. Here he remained for a number of years, and finally removed to Washington in 1878.

Colorado Spring Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colorado) Dec 11, 1910

Another article that accompanies the above picture can be read at the link below:

Title: National magazine …, Volume 36
Authors: Arthur Wellington Brayley, Arthur Wilson Tarbell, Joe Mitchell Chapple
Publisher: Chapple Publishing Company, Ltd., 1912 — [Pg 838 google book link]

Oh, the Paine’s!

March 13, 2011

Daily Northwestern (WI) Jun 27, 1898

In 1898, Paine’s Celery Compound was in  a vegetative state.

Daily Northwestern (WI) Sep 16, 1899

It then moves to human exhaustion before morphing into a sort of psycho/porn style:

Daily Northwestern (WI) Sep 23, 1899

Which quickly evolved into the Adonis – manly man advertising style:

Daily Northwestern (WI) Oct 21, 1899

Daily Northwestern (WI) Dec 2, 1899

Daily Northwestern (WI) Jan 6, 1900

And continues this  into the new century, but then  mutates into a darker, creepier style:

Daily Northwestern (WI) Jan 20, 1900

Daily Northwestern (WI) Jan 13, 1900

And finally, shifting its focus to those of the more feminine persuasion:

Daily Northwestern (WI) Apr 14, 1900

Daily Northwestern (WI) Dec 8, 1900

Evidently, Paine’s Celery Compound is (do they still make this stuff?) great if your nerves are over-strained, racked, exhausted, inflamed or just plain prostrated.

From the HubPages website article, Medicines in Gold Rush Times: A Dose of Deception and a Swig of Swamp Root 84:

This product was produced by Wells and Richardson Co. of Burlington Vermont. One sample contains the notation “pkg. adopted Jan 2, 1907”, so we know that this particular formula dates from after that time. “No 2002 guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act June 30, 1906”, also appears on the label therefore a disclosure of the ingredients is included on this product.

And what were those ingredients? As listed, they are: Celery seed, Calisia bark, Sagrada, Cascara, Senna leaves, Prickly Ash bark, Sarsaparilla root, Hops,Ginger root, Dandelion root, Mandrake root, Blackhaw,Chamomile flowers, Black Cohosh root, Yellow Dock root, Potassium nitrate (a strong oxidizing agent with diruretic effects), glycerin, sugar and water.

Read the rest HERE.

Actually, Paine’s Celery Compound was a herbal remedy of sorts, and probably was somewhat useful for a variety of conditions.

Left My Bed and Board

March 9, 2011

Perplexing Case.

Hon. James H. Knowlton, one of our most eminent Western advocates, met with the following perplexing adventure in his early practice in Wisconsin:

A stranger came into his office and abruptly informed his that his wife had deserted him, and wished to have her replevined at once. Knowlton told him that that remedy would not meet his case exactly, and went on to inform him that if he would be patient until the desertion had continued one year, he could obtain a divorce. —

The stranger said he did not know that he wanted a divorce. What he mostly feared was that his wife would run him in debt all over the country.

“In that case,” said Knowlton, “you had better post her.”

What his client understood him to mean by posting, remains a mystery to this day. He said, in a meditative way the he didn’t know where she had gone, and beside, that she was fully as strong as he was, and he didn’t believe he could post her, even if he knew where to find her.

Knowlton hastened to inform him that by posting his wife he meant puting a notice in a newspaper, saying:

“Whereas my wife Helen has left my bed and board without any just -”

“But that ain’t true,” interrupted the client — “that ain’t true. she didn’t leave my bed — she took it away with her.”

The Adams Sentinel (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 25, 1861

CAUTION.

WHEREAS my wife Anne, late widow of David Risher, had left my bed and board without just cause, on the 26th inst. — This is therefore to caution all persons, from trusting or harboring her on my account, as I am determined to pay no debts of her contracting after this date.

BALTZER KOONTZ, Son.
Bethlehem tp. July 27.

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) Aug 19, 1824

NOTICE. — WHEREAS MY WIFE, Anna Rolland, has left my bed and board I shall pay no more bills of her contracting from this date.

LEVI (his X mark) ROLLAND,
Fitchburg, Jan. 23, 1874.

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jan 29, 1874

Caution.

NOTICE is hereby given to all persons, that my wife Hannah Fosdick has left my bed and board, and has taken one of my children with her, John H. Fosdick. I hereby forbid all persons harboring or trusting her on my account, or in behalf of the child, as I will pay no debts of her contracting after this date; as I will support the child when returned to me at Norwalk.

JOHN M. FOSDICK.
Norwalk, Sept. 4, 1844

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) Sep 24, 1844

NOTICE.

I, the undersigned, caution the Public against trusting my Wife LYDIA M’WHIRTER — she having left my bed and board last October, without any provocation and against my consent. I will not pay any debts of her contracting from this date.

JOHN M’WHIRTER
Baltimore July 17, 1841.

The Adams Sentinel (Gettsyburg, Pennsylvania) Aug 2, 1841

CAUTION AND NOTICE.

WHEREAS my wife Elvira Bridges, without any good cause or reasonable excuse there for, has left my bed and board and absconded with my two children this is to caution all persons from harboring her or them and to give notice that I shall pay no debts of her contracting or pay any expense for their or either of their support having suitably provided for them at my house in Bucksport.

EPHRAIM BRIDGES, Jr.
Bucksport Oct 12 1841

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Oct 26, 1841


NOTICE.

MY wife, REBECCA, left my bed and board, and refuses to live with me under any consideration whatever, after intercessions and propositions of every kind, that an affectionate husband could make. I, therefore, hereby warn all persons not to harbor or trust her on my account, as I have arrangements made for her board, and by calling on me, or on Messrs. Wareing & Benson, or C. & J. Culp, she can have information, and be conducted to the house.

MATHEW M’KELVEY.
Plymouth, Huron County, Nov. 16, 1842.

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) Nov 29, 1842

Pass Him Round. — Mrs. Elizabeth Peterman, of Rochester, Fulton county, Indiana, thus notices her absconding husband: “Left my bed and board, last August, thereby making my expenses lighter, my dearly beloved companion, David Peterman, without any just cause or provocation. All the old maids and young girls are hereby forewarned against harboring or trusting him on my account, as I am determined not to be accountable for his debts, or, more especially, for his conduct. Papers will please copy, and oblige a female who is rejoicing at her happy riddance.” — Indiana Blade.

The Adams Sentinel (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Apr 13, 1846

Dennis O’Shanessy advertises as follows in the Columbus Republican: “I hereby give notice that my wife Bridget has left my bed and board and that I will not pay her debts, as we are not married.”

The Ohio Democrat (New Philadelphia, Ohio) Apr 12, 1872

Poetry Against Prose.

The following notices appear as advertisements in the Ticonderoga Sentinal of recent date:

NOTICE.

Whereas my wife Josephine has left my bed and board without just cause or provocation, all persons are hereby forbidden to trust or harbor her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting hereafter.

W.O. MEASECK.
_________
NOTICE.

No bed or board as yet we’ve had
From William O. or William’s dad.
Since last September, when we were wed,
Have furnished him both board and bed;
And for just cause and provocation
Have sent him home to his relation.

MRS. JOSIE MEASECK.

Josie has the best of it in wit if nothing else.

The Ohio Democrat (New Philadelphia, Ohio) Oct 5, 1893

NOTICE.

To whom it may concern: All persons are hereby notified that Joseph Leipert has left my bed and board without any cause or reason therefor, and that hereafter I will not be responsible for any board, lodging, clothing, food, expenses, or other article furnished him.

Dated at Corning, Iowa, February 26, 1898.

ANNA LEIPERT

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Mar 10, 1898

NOTICE.

My husband, John S. Sanders, having left my bed and board, notice is hereby given the public not to sell him anything in my name as I will not be responsible for debts or bills contracted by him.

MRS. ANNA M. SANDERS,
New Oxford, Pa.

New Oxford Item (New Oxford, Pennsylvania) Sep 5, 1918

To all Whom it may Concern.

My wife, Francis Catching, having separated from me, and having left my bed and board without any just cause or provocation, I hereby notify all persons not to trust or give her credit on my account, as I will pay no bills, debts, or obligations contracted by her from and after this date, of any nature or kind whatever.

JOEL P. CATCHING.
Missoula, M.T., Feb. 23, 1883.

The Daily Miner (Butte, Montana) Mar 4, 1883

MY WIFE, Mrs. I.H. Tupen, having left my bed and board, I will not be responsible for any debts contracted by her after this date, December 11, 1919. Irving H. Tupen.

P.S. — Her name formerly was Miss Avy Alice Cutlip.

Woodland Daily Democrat (Woodland, California) Dec 19, 1919

John Anderson, My Jo – My Jim – My John – My Tom and My, What a Lunatic!

February 1, 2011

Image of this Irish couple (Luke and Bridget Reilly) is from the Photopol blog.

The parodies continue:

ANSWER TO “JOHN ANDERSON MY JO.”

BY MRS. CRAWFORD.

Jean Anderson, my ain Jean!
Ye’ve been a leal gude wife;
Ye’ve mair than shared by pain, Jean,
Ye’ve been my joy through life;
I loved ye in your youth, Jean,
Wi’ bonny snooded brow;
But maun I tell the truth, Jean,
I love ye better now.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *
I’ve been a man ol toil, Jean,
And aye obliged to roam;
But still ye had the smile, Jean,
And canny “welcome home!”
Our hearth was aye a light, Jean,
The kail pot on the fire,
When I came back at night, Jean,
I found my hearts desire.

Our bairus hae bred some cares, Jean,
But thanks to thee my Jo,
They brought not our gray hairs, Jean,
Wi’ shame or sorrow low;
And when at last our bed, Jean,
Beside the kirk maun be,
They’ll honor us when dead, Jean,
And that’s enough for me.

Rock River Pilot (Watertown, Wisconsin) Mar 1, 1848

The original Robert Burns version (previously posted) for comparison.

Peddlin’ My Jo:

1886 Bicycle for Two – Image from the Copenhagen City Museum

John Anderson, My Jo.
John Anderson, my Jo, John,
When we were first acquent
You wouldn’t ride the bike, John,
But now your spine is bent.
I see you riding by, John,
And goodness how you go —
You’re the swiftest sco???er in the town,
John Anderson, my Jo.

John Anderson, my Jo, John,
We clamb the hill thegither —
I’ll ne’er forget the day, John,
Nor, ”aibelins, wil you ither!
We coasted on your tandem,
And, jinks, how we did go,
Till we struck that fence-rail at the foot,
John Anderson, my Jo.

— Chicago News.

The Daily Herald (Delphos, Ohio) Jun 17, 1899

Civil War Hero:

John Logan, O my Jo, John,
When we were first acquaint,
A soldier bold you were, John,
Bedecked with warlike paint;
And when your slogan sounded
It nerved your loyal clan,
For to the front they bounded —
You led them like a man.

Oshkosh Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Jun 24, 1884

Image from Wiki.

Now for politics and corruption, but I repeat myself:

This one is about John Kelly and Tammany Hall:

John Kellyus, my jo, John,
When we were first acquaint,
You were a dreaded chief, John,
When you put on your paint;
But now your goose is cooked, John,
Your head is lying low —
It lies beneath old Sammy’s feet,
John Kellyus, my jo!

Albany Journal.

The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana) Oct 30, 1881

Image from The Old Photo Album website – American Civil War Portraits

COLFAX’S FAREWELL.

(“John Anderson, My Jo, John.“)

OLD subsidy, my Pomeroy,
When first we were acquaint,
The gospel of Sharpe’s rifles
Declared you quite a saint.
But now the cause of freedom
Will surely quick succumb —
In spite of all your bonds and things,
They cast you out, my Pom!

Well subsidized, my Pomeroy,
We fought the fight together,
And many a little picking, Pom,
Laid by for stormy weather.
Now we must tumble down, Pom,
But cheek by jowl we’ll fall,
And sink together in the mud
Where we were meant to crawl.

The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) Mar 1, 1873

Image of Gov. J. Madison Wells from the Vangobot Pop Art Machine website.

“ADAPTED” FROM THE SCOTTISH.

Tom Anderson, my Jo, Tom,
When we were first acquaint,
For those electoral returns
In confidence you “went.”
You “fixed” ’em very bully, Tom,
With “Maddy” Wells and Co.,
And thought you had a certain thing,
Tom Anderson, my Jo!

But, Thomas A., my Jo, now
That matter “hasn’t went”
Entirely “serene,” and so
Your bonny brow is “brent,”
And your locks are prison locks, Tom,
And not at all like snow,
For they’ll not melt away with spring,
Tom Anderson, my Jo!

— Washington Post.

The Daily Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Feb 15, 1878

Image of John Sherman from Wiki.

ANOTHER CONFIDENTIAL LETTER.

FROM JOHN SHERMAN TO JAMES E. ANDERSON.

Jim Anderson, my jo, Jim,
When first we were acquaint,
You hadn’t kalsomined yourself
With pugilistic paint.
But now your jaw is oiled, Jim,
You’re telling what you know,
And I am shaking in my shoes —
Jim Anderson, my jo.

Jim Anderson, my jo, Jim,
We planned the fraud thegither,
And promised that we never would
Go back on one anither,
We juggled the returns, but James,
Jim James, how could you blow
And peach on me and Rutherford —
Jim Anderson, my jo?

Jim Anderson, my jo, Jim,
I promised we would pay,
But you despised a clerkship at
Three dollars every day,
Old Evarts should have sent you off
Consul to Cailao —
But hindsight isn’t foresight much
Jim Anderson, my jo!

Jim Anderson, my jo, Jim,
‘Twas not a fair divide,
You stole the mule for us and then
We wouldn’t let you ride.
And Stanley M. is sick, Jim,
And Hayes is lying low,
And I’m the deadest sort of duck,
Jim Anderson, my jo!

— N.Y. Sun.

The Daily Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jun 9, 1878

Read more:

Title: A Political Crime: The History of the Great Fraud
Author: Albert M. Gibson
Publisher: W.S. Gottsberger, 1885

pg 214 [Wells, Tom Anderson]

Chapter XV pg 283 [Sherman and John E. Anderson]

President John Tyler image from the We Love the Prairie Primer homeschool blog.

From the United States Gazette.

A New Song to an Old Tune.

John Tyler, sir, my Jo John, when first we were acquaint,
You did pretend to be a Whig, for Harry, sir, you went;
But now you’ve got in power, John, the cloven foot you show;
A shame unto all traitors, John, John Tyler, sir my Jo.

John Tyler, sir, my Jo John, the Whigs they fought thegither,
And many a canty day, John, they had with one anither;
But you have betrayed them, John, and why did you do so?
A shame unto all traitors, John, John Tyler, sir, my Jo.

John Tyler, sir, my Jo John, when nature first began,
To try her canny hand, John, her master work was man,
But when she turned you out, John, she said it was “no go,”
You proved to be but journey-work, John Tyler, sir my Jo.

John Tyler, sir, my Jo John, why will you be a fool,
And sneak around the Locos, John, who use you as a tool?
They’re laughing in their sleeves, John, to think that you’ll veto
The only bill can save you, John, John Tyler, sir my Jo.

John Tyler, sir, my Jo John, the higher monkies go,
The more they show their tails, John, you know it’s even so;
Then get you out the White House, John, and homeward do you go,
And make the people happy, John, John Tyler, sir, my jo.

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) Sep 27, 1842

Image from the Turn Back to God website.

Sweet, Long-lasting love:

IT’S MIGHTY COMFORTIN’.

Oh, it’s mighty comfortin’ when your hair is gettin’ thin,
And the wrinkles in your face have come to stay,
Just to feel her little hand smoothin’ out each silver strand,
While you meet her lovin’ look and hear her say:

“John, my dear, it seems as tho’ every day you live you grow
Handsomer than in olden day.”
And you smile back at your wife while you think, in all your life
You never heard a sweeter word of praise.

Then somehow, the teardrops rise to your dim, old fadin’ eyes,
While you kiss the tender hand still white and small,
And you try to tell her how you loved her then — you love her now,
But, bless me, if the words will come at all!

For just then it comes to you to think of trials she’s gone thro’,
And borne without a murmur for your sake;
You can only bow your head at the lovin’ things she’s said,
And your poor old heart can only ache and ache.

But she knows what ails you then, and she kisses you again,
While you hear her gently whisper, sweet and low;
“Life has bro’t more hopes than fears; we have known more smiles than tears;
You are the dearest dear of dears, John Anderson, my Jo!”

So it’s comfortin’, I say, when your hair is gettin’ gray,
And our slippin’ down life’s hill a mighty fast,
Just to feel her little hand strokin’ back each silver strand,
While she whispers that she loves you to the last.

— Farmer’s Voice.

The Daily Herald (Delphos, Ohio) Feb 26, 1898

Image of Lunatic Asylum, Columbus, Ohio from Wiki.

Kind of odd, dare I say crazy, for this Judge to out “riding” with this  “lunatic.” Maybe he was jilted:

A Poetic Fancy.

Judge Gilmore, of Columbus, has the original manuscript of the following verse, written by a young man who went to the lunatic asylum about a week later. The young poet asked the Judge out for a drive, and when they had gone some miles into the country said his object was to submit something to him. He then recited, “John Anderson, my jo,” and when he came to the sad ending: “We’ll sleep the gither at the fit, John Anderson, my jo,” he exclaimed, “That’s not the end of it. Burns never finished it. That’s not the end of such life-long love. There’s more to it. I have the closing verse here.” Then he read it:

John Anderson, my jo, John,
We wilna min’ that sleep;
The grave, so cauld an’ dark, John,
The spirit canna keep
For we will wake in heaven, John;
An’ hand in hand we’ll go
An live for aye in blissfu’ love
John Anderson, my jo.

Lima Daily News (Lima, Ohio) Jul 9, 1889

*****

Previous “John Anderson, My Jo” posts:

Robert Burns: “John Anderson, My Jo”

and

John Alcohol and the Poor Man’s Club

Pearline – Don’t Wear Yourself Out Over the Washtub

December 2, 2010

Sandusky Daily Register –  Jan 30, 1891

As stated in this 1891 Pearline advertisement, the produce came into being about 1877. They seemed to have kept their illustrator pretty busy producing a wide variety of advertisements.

Since I ran across some “Hints for Housekeepers,” while looking for the Pearline ads, I am including them. Some are entertaining, some might be useful, and some are rather dangerous, and come with a cautionary warning:

Galveston Daily News – Jul 13, 1888

***

Can you tell it was election season when this next one ran?

Daily Northwestern – Nov 27, 1888

***

These hints don’t appear to be serious:

Handy Hints for the Housekeeper.

A perplexed housekeeper wants to know what she shall do with the tin cans that from day to day accumulate about the house — fruit cans, meat cans — of all kinds cans, cans, and a thousand cans. Well, if you keep a boarding house, you might throw them into the street, right in front of the house as a bait for the homeless man seeking a boarding house, If you have a home, however, you might utilize the cans in many ways.

You might take the tomato cans, fill them with soft, rich earth, and plant them, and by and by a whole handful of all sorts of weeks would come up. Then you could take the can to the pottery and have the potter twist a nice terra cotta vase about it so as to completely hid the can, and thus at a trifling expense, not over a few dollars, you could utilize your old tomato can as a garden vase.

Or you could take a lobster can, and bore three holes at equal distances in the sides, close to the open end. Then cover the can as thickly as you need with fine plastic material used in the manufacture of cheap statuettes, and employ some good artist to fashion ?? in graceful shape and beautiful designs. Then fasten bright brass chains in the three holes and hang it in a hook in the porch roof, and you will have a handsome hanging basket that need not cost you more than $5.

If you should break a kerosene lamp, save the foot of it, and with a bit of red flannel and merino and some white crochet make a pin cushion of it, stuffing the flannel and merino out in a large, irregular shaped sphere and with the crochet cotton work “lOve thE giVEr” on it. Then set it in the spare room on the dresser, care being taken to have the cushion fastened on so loosely that it will cant a little to one side. Then, when the guest wakes up in the night and sees that awful apparition in the moonlight, he will confess all his sins, put on his clothes hindside foremost, and dropping himself out of the window will flee in terror into the wilderness and never come back to spoil your best pillow shams with his bear’s oily head again.

“It isn’t what you get,” they say down in West Virginia, “that makes you rich, it’s what you save.” A few cents here and there in household expenses are not noticed at the time, but at the end of a year they aggregate enough to pay the for a steam thresher.

Fort Wayne Daily Gazette (Fort Wayne, Indiana) May 7, 1881

Sandusky Daily Register – Aug 8, 1889

Sandusky Daily Register – Mar 3, 1890

***

This one even mentions Pearline in its hints:

Hints for the Housekeeper.

If you think the kitchen is a hot place be easy on the cook.

Lard applied at once will remove the discoloration after a bruise.

A rug under one’s feet is restful when long standing is necessary, as in ironing or washing dishes.

Whites of eggs may be beaten to a stiff froth by an open window when it would be impossible in a steamy kitchen.

Mrs. Emma Ewing avers that not book knowledge alone but cook knowledge is needed in this broad nation of dyspeptics.

Cistern water that has become foul may be purified with powdered borax or alum. A quarter of a pound of each will cleanse twenty-five or more barrels.

Put a little pearline in the greasy pots and roasting pans and it will greatly facilitate cleaning them, especially if you stand them on the range to heat the water.

Most vegetables are better cooked fast, excepting potatoes, beans, peas, cauliflower and others which contain starch. Cabbage should be boiled rapidly in plenty of water; so should onions, young beets and turnips.

William Galvani learned from experiments that by cooking most fruits and vegetables lose their natural flavor, which he says in “Food, Home and Garden,” is after all, more delicious than any that can be artificially supplied.

You can prevent your pretty new ginghams from fading if you let them lie for several hours in water in which has been dissolved a goodly quantity of salt. Put the dress in it while it is hot, and after several hours wring it out dry and wash and usual.

The pretty woman fades with the roses on her cheeks and the girlhood that lasts and hour; the beautiful woman finds her fullness of bloom only when a past has written itself on her, and her power is then most irresistible when it seems going.

When a warm bath is taken, if the whole body from the crown of the head to the soles of the feet is instantly sponged with cold water there will not be danger of taking cold. The cold water closed the pores naturally. They are left open unnaturally after a warm bath.

Commonplace but important is the suggestion, “Be careful of fire.” Never take risk of lighting fire in stove or furnace not known to be ready and safe. In building or repairing see that the pipe holes in the chimney are tight and well protected from lath and siding by use of clay pots made for the purpose.

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Jan 2, 1892

Sandusky Daily Register – Jul 21, 1890

Sandusky Daily Register – Dec 12, 1890

***

PLAIN TALK.

Every Day Hints for the Practical Housekeeper.

The oil of white birch bark, which gives to Russia leather its peculiar aromatic and lasting qualities, when dissolved in alcohol is said to be excellent for preserving and waterproofing various fabrics. It renders them both acid and insect proof, and in no way destroys their pliability.

Tea and coffee stains will usually come out of linen if put into water at once or if soon washed. IF the yare of long standing rub pure glycerine on them, and then after washing this out, wash the linen in the usual way.

Prick potatoes before baking so that the air can escape. This will prevent their bursting in the oven.

Bad breath or offensive breath may be removed by taking a teaspoonful of the following mixture after each meal. One ounce liquor of potash, one ounce chloride of soda, one and one-half ounces phosphate of soda, and three ounces of water.

A good formula for layer cakes is as follows: One cupful of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of sweet milk, the beaten whites of four eggs, two cupfuls of flour and a heaping teaspoonful of baking powder.

The Housekeeper gives the following hints: To take ink out of linen, dip the spotted parts immediately in pure melted tallow, the wash out the tallow and the ink will have disappeared.

Lima Daily Times (Lima, Ohio) Aug 16, 1892

Sandusky Daily Register – Jul 15, 1892

***

This next one is kind of creepy:

Sandusky Daily Register – Oct 11, 1892

***

Let the men wash!

Fort Wayne Gazette – Apr 30, 1895

***

Here are the household hints that come with the warning. The dangerous hints are mostly at the end of the list:

HINTS FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER.

The following directions for removing stains, spots, etc., must be used with exceeding caution, Chloroform, benzine, turpentine, kerosene and gasoline are all dangerous substances unless handled with extreme care.

Sponge a grease spot with four tablespoonsful of alcohol to one of salt.

Sprinkle salt over the spot on a carpet and sweep all up together.

Rub finger marks from furniture with a little sweet oil.

Put a lump of camphor in an air-tight case with silverware to keep it from discoloration.

Remove paint spots from a window by rubbing a copper cent over them.

Sprinkle salt over fresh claret stains.

Wash ink stains in strong brine and then sponge with lemon juice.

Hold a fruit stained article over a bowl and pour boiling water through the cloth.

Rub egg stains on silver with salt on a damp cloth.

Use wood ashes on discolored tableware.

Clean steel knives with raw potato dipped in fine brick dust.

Rub brass with hot vinegar and salt and scour with fine ashes.

Clean a carpet with a broom dipped in a very weak solution of turpentine in hot water.

Cleanse grained woodwork with cold tea.

Scour ironware with finely sifted coal ashes.

Soak mildewed clothes in buttermilk and spread on the grass in the sun.

Wash rusty gilt frames in spirits of wine.

Wash oilcloth with a flannel and warm water; dry thoroughly and rub with a little skimmed milk.

Purify jars by soaking hem in strong sodawater.

Wash blackened ceilings with sodawater.

Rub white spots on furniture with camphor.

Rub a stove zinc with kerosene.

Cleanse bottles with hot water and fine ????s.

Remove fruit stains from hands with weak oxalic acid.

Clean jewelry with prepared chalk.

Wash hair brushes in weak ammonia water.

Rub stained hands with salt and lemon juice.

Remove ink from wood with muriatic acid, after rinsing with water.

Wash japanned ware with a little warm soda.

Rub mirrors with spirits of wine.

Apply spirits of salt to ink stained mahogany.

Use sulphuric acid, wash off with suds, for medicine stains on silver.

Remove all stains from wall paper by powdered pipe clay moistened.

Use gasoline for removing paint.

Use jewelers’ rouge and lard for rubbing nickel plating.

Wash willow ware with salt water.

Clean hard finished walls with ammonia water.

Rub whitewash spots with strong vinegar.

Rub soft grease over tar and then wash in warm soda water.

Dip a soft cloth in vinegar and rub on smoky mica.

Sponge faded plush with chloroform.

Take paint out of clothing by equal parts of ammonia and turpentine.

To remove machine oil from satin use benzine. Be careful about having a light in the room as it is very explosive.

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) May 27, 1894

Fort Wayne Gazette – Dec 30, 1895

***

Pearline gets violent:

Fort Wayne Gazette – Jun 12, 1896

***

HINTS FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER

A PAN of borax and sugar, kept under the sink, will discourage roaches.

Plenty of hot water and washing soda put down the sink pipes will keep them clear, and lessen the plumber’s bill.

A piece of lime or charcoal in the new refrigerator will prevent the “new” odor and taste from clinging to eatables.

To successfully bake a piecrust without its filling, line it with paraffin paper and fill it with uncooked rice.

Enameled ware that has become burned or discolored may be cleaned by rubbing with coarse salt and vinegar.

A teaspoonful of lemon juice to a quart of water will make rice very white and keep the grains separate when boiled.

A tablespoonful of borax is an agreeable addition to the dishwasher, and helps to keep the hands soft instead of irritating them, as soda does.

The Anaconda Standard (Anaconda, Montana) Dec 1, 1907

***

Curse Monday, Wash Day:

Nebraska State Journal – Oct 25, 1897

***

The late 1890s must have been desperate times; this  woman is slashing with a dagger:

Eau Claire Leader – Jul 6, 1898

***

Hints for the Housekeeper.

A soft clean cloth dipped in melted paraffin will give the stove a smooth, attractive surface. Kerosene-oil on a soft lintless cloth may be used on the nickel afterward to effect a polish.

Put two worn blankets together, cover with silkolene and stitch with worsted. Thsi makes an attractive comforter, if you choose the silkolene and worsted to harmonize with the color scheme of the bedroom.

Brushes should be hung up. They should never be allowed to stand on their bristles as this mats them and tends to make the bristles fall out. In using a broom, sometimes use one side and sometimes the other; this will make it wear evenly and so last longer. An oil mop will wear longer if it is not hung too near the heat after washing it. The bristles of a carpet sweeper or a vacuum cleaner can be well cleaned of hairs with a buttonhook or a pair of scissors.

Fine china nicks particularly easily when it is warm. A towel in the bottom of the dish pan will save much danger of chipping. Use a mild soap in washing painted or gilt-edged china and wash one piece at a time. Avoid using water that is too hot, in washing dishes and put plates into it edgewise so that both sides will expand with the heat alike. Much fine china, especially that which is made in China, is rough on the bottom. When the dishes are stacked in the closet, soft paper, or flannel pads should be kept between them to prevent the decoration on the front from being scratched, worn or chipped.

— Delineator.

The Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) May 27, 1922

Nebraska State Journal – Aug 16, 1897

***

Hints For The Housekeeper

A Model Floor Waxer

I haven’t a floor waxer, so will tell how I wax my floors. I lay down a piece of cloth, put on the middle of it the amount of wax it will take, then place a warm flatiron on the wax, gather the cloth all up on the handle of the iron and proceed to iron the floor. As the iron cools change for a warmer iron. The wax goes go much faster this way and soaks in better, because it is warm. I wait about half an hour, then put a large piece of old woolen goods in the mop and then polish the floor. Try it on your Congoleum rugs and see how much brighter they are.

Save On Cleaning Candlesticks

Instead of scraping the wax from brass or silver candlesticks, plunge the metal part in hot water and thus melt the wax. Candlesticks are often scratched when the wax is scraped off. By melting off the wax much time is saved and you will not run the risk of marring the candlesticks.

Sheboygan Press (Shepoygan, Wisconsin) Jan 7, 1927

Thanksgiving Time

November 24, 2010

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 21, 1894

And from the same newspaper, different year:

THANKSGIVING TIME.

Thanksgiving time’s a-comin — 1 in hear the gobble-gobble
Of the turkeys in the barnyard on the farm where I was born.
I kin see the Shangai rooster walkin sort of wibble-wobble,
Makin b’lieve he’s feelin sick and off his feed of yaller corn.

An they’re fixin in the kitchen fer a good old fashioned dinner,
Choppin mince meat by the bushel thetis good fer hungry eyes.
Seedin raisins fer plum puddin fit to save the vilest sinner
If he ever had a mother an she made Thanksgivin pies.

Ah, the mother, she’s a smilin, standin in the doorway, lookin
Down toward the railroad station when she hears the engine toot.
Fer her by is a-comin, and the pies most burn a-cookin,
While her dear old heart’s a-thumpin fer this worthless ole galoot.

Doesn’t ‘pear to matter nohow thet I’m balk and gittin gouty,
Doesn’t seem to make no diff’rence thet I smoke and cuss a bit,
She’s the same ole lovin; mother, never cross and never grouty.
An they’ll be no more Thanksgivin’s boys, when mother hez to quit.

— New York Sun.

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 23, 1898

Where Dirt Gathers, Waste Rules

November 16, 2010

A GREAT HORROR DONE AWAY WITH.

House cleaning is a great horror to nine men out of every ten. When that time comes the “men folks,” as a rule, give the domestic hearth a wide birth. Oceans of suds — the product of tons of soap — fairly flood every part of the house. The women, from the mistress down, labor as they never worked before, and what with the discomfort, the smell of suds and the dampness, and not unfrequently sickness, the product of colds and overwork, matters are generally disagreeable. The simple use of Sapolio instead of soap does away with all this discomfort. It lightens the labor a hundred per cent, because it removes dirt, grease, stains and spots, with hardly any labor, with but little water, and in one-tenth the usual time.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Sep 1, 1873

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Mar 14, 1890

Carroll Sentinel (Carroll, Iowa) Feb 5, 1894

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Jan 24, 1890

*****

AN ACT OF CRUELTY.

Chapped hands and face are the most serious annoyances that farmers, and persons who labor much outdoors, experience from exposure. Exposed persons, especially children, repeatedly suffer intensely from great cracks upon the hands that often bleed. It is cruel to allow one’s self or others to suffer in this way, when the means of positive prevention are so easy to be had, and so cheap as to pay ten cents for a cake of Hand Sapolio. Hand Sapolio is not only better than the costliest soap for removing dirt, but it prevents chapping, and renders the skin soft and pliable. Sold everywhere.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Sep 10, 1873

Carroll Sentinel (Carroll, Iowa) Mar 16, 1894

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Feb 21, 1890

*****

A HINT TO HOUSEWIVES — HOW TO KEEP KITCHEN WARE CLEAN AND BRIGHT.

Every housewife of neat and tidy habits takes especial delight in keeping all the tin, copper and iron ware of her kitchen as clean and bright as painstaking labor can make them. A pride in this direction is commendable, and always meets the smiling approval of the “tyrant man” who pays the household bills. Remember that SAPOLIO is the only thing on earth that will make an old tarnished tin pan or rusty kettle shine as bright as new. And by the use of Sapolio it is the quickest and easiest thing in the world to keep every utensil in a high state of polish.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Sep 12, 1873

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Aug 1, 1894

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 1, 1890

*****

A WORD TO WORKING PEOPLE OF BOTH SEXES.

Mechanics, artisans, factory hands and people who labor for a living, find it very difficult if not impossible to keep the hands free from stain. Hand Sapolio will not only remove every particle of stain, ans what is called “grained in dirt,” but it will also keep the skin soft and pliable, rendering the muscular action as quick and easy as is the case with those who do not perform hard labor. It is only 10 and 15 cents a cake, according to size. Every mechanic should use it constantly in place of all other soaps.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Sep 22, 1873

Carroll Sentinel (Carroll, Iowa) Feb 25, 1896

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 8, 1890

*****

HOW TO REMOVE STAINS AND SPOTS FROM MARBLE FURNITURE, ETC.

The only stain which Sapolio will not remove is a “stain upon the character.” But from marble mantels, tables, china, table-ware, carpets, furniture of every description, or any article of household ornament or use, the deepest dyed stain can be instantly washed out forever by the use of Sapolio. It is as cheap as ordinary bar soap, and will always do exactly what is claimed for it, if the simple directions are followed.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Nov 13, 1873

Carroll Sentinel (Carroll, Iowa) Sep 6, 1897

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) May 2, 1890

*****

HOW TO LIVE ECONOMICALLY.

The problem of how to economize in living is one that engages the serious attention of a great many people. “Many a little makes a mickle,” was one of Benjamin Franklin’s “Poor Richard” truisms that summarizes the whole system of popular extravagance. If you wish to save money economize in little as well as in large items of expenditure. For all the household purposes for which polishing powders, bath brick and soap are usually used, excepting the one thing of washing clothes. Sapolio is by many times the cheapest article that can be employed. To say nothing about its great superiority to all other substances, it is, on the score of money alone, by far the cheapest. Remember this fact and save many dollars every year.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Nov 24, 1873

Carroll Sentinel (Carroll, Iowa) Dec 27, 1897

Carroll Sentinel (Carroll, Iowa) Mar 28, 1898

Carroll Sentinel (Carroll, Iowa) Jun 1, 1899

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 14, 1890

SISSY JANE.

Allays — mornin’, noon an’ night,
Rose o’dawn or candlelight,
She was toilin’ in the house,
Creepin’ round’, jes like a mouse;
Washin’ kittles, pots an’ pans,
Runnin’ erran’s in the rain,
Lots o’ work fer her small han’s —
sissy Jane.

Had to work er’ she’d get spiled,
Bein’ jes a char’ty child;
Them’s the kind that folks despise —
Kind o scary like brown eyes,
Hair that  fell without a comb,
Like a yearlin’ colt’s rough mane,
‘Cause she hadn’t any home —
Sissy Jane.

Finerly she sort o’ failed,
Cheeks got sunken like an’ paled,
Eyes kep gettin’ bigger, too,
Elbow jints come crowdin’ through.
So she up and died about
Time the men was cuttin’ grain.
Reckon she got tired out —
Sissy Jane.

— Chicago Herald.

Sandusky Daily Register (Sandusky, Ohio) Apr 14, 1890

The Unhung Rascals of Today

November 1, 2010

AFTER ELECTION

(Denver Post.)

Election judgment day is near,
The candidates are at the bar,
And upon every side we hear
What hell-bound renegades they are.
Soon will the conflict die away,
And these vile, rope-deserving men,
These unhung rascals of today,
Will be good citizens again.

The Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Nov 6, 1898