Posts Tagged ‘1899’

Such as…

April 18, 2012

QUITS.

Said a young and tactless husband
To his inexperienced wife,
“If you would but give up leading
Such a fashionable life,
And devote more time to cooking —
How to mix and when to bake —
Then perhaps you might make pastry
Such as mother used to make.”

And the wife, resenting, answered
(For the worm will turn, you know),
“If you would but give up horses
And a score of clubs or so
To devote more time to business —
When to buy and what to stake —
Then perhaps you might make money
Such as father used to make.”

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Apr 25, 1899

Girls Just Wanna Have Fun

April 18, 2012

Image from The Fin de Siecle

She can swing a six-pound dumbbell,
She can fence and she can box,
She can row upon the river,
She can clamber ‘mong the rocks.

She can do some heavy bowling,
And play tennis all day long;
But she cannot help her mother,
‘Cause she isn’t very strong!

— Life.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Apr 20, 1899

The Wants of Man

March 1, 2012

“The Wants of Man.”

Editor Constitution — Will you publish the poem entitled “The Wants of Men,” written by President John Quincy Adams”
R.M.B.
Chattanooga, Tenn.

“Man wants but little here below,
Nor wants that little long.”
‘Tis not with me exactly so;
But ’tis so in the song.
My wants are many and, if told,
Would muster many a score;
And were each wish a mint of gold,
I still should long for more.

What first I want is daily bread –
And canvas-backs – and wine –
And all the realms of nature spread
Before me, where I dine.
Four courses scarcely can provide
My appetite to quell;
With four choice cooks from France, beside,
To dress my dinner well.

I want (who does not want?) a wife –
Affectionate and fair;
To solace all the woes of life,
And all its joys to share;
Of temper sweet, of yielding will,
Of firm, yet placid mind –
With all my faults to love me still
With sentiments refined.

And as Time’s car incessant runs,
And Fortune fills my store,
I want of daughters and of sons
From eight to half a score.
I want (alas! can mortal dare
Such bliss on earth to crave?)
That all the girls be chaste and fair –
The boys all wise and brave.

I want a warm and faithful friend,
To cheer the adverse hour;
Who ne’er to flatter will descend,
Nor bend the knee to power –
A friend to chide me when I’m wrong,
My inmost soul to see;
And that my friendship prove as strong
To him as his to me.

I want the seals of power and place,
The ensigns of command;
Charged by the people’s unbought grace
To rule my native land.
Nor crown nor sceptre would I ask,
But from my country’s will,
By day, by night, to ply the task
Her cup of bliss to fill.

I want the voice of honest praise
To follow me behind,
And to be thought in future days
The friend of human kind,
That after ages, as they rise,
Exulting, may proclaim,
In choral union to the skies,
Their blessings on my name.

These are the wants of mortal man –
I cannot want them long,
For life itself is but a span,
And earthly bliss a song.
My last great want, absorbing all –
Is, when beneath the sod,
And summoned to my final call,
The Mercy of my God.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Aug 8, 1899

Andrew Breitbart (1969-2012)

Rest in Peace

February, I Thank Thee in Advance

February 1, 2012

FEBRUARY.

February — fortnights two —
Briefest of the months are you,
Of the winter’s children last.
what do you go by so fast?
Is it not a little strange
Once in four years you should change
That the sun should shine and give
You another day to live?
Maybe this is only done
Since you are the smallest one,
So I make the shortest rhyme,
For you, as befits your time;
You’re the baby of the year,
And to me you’re very dear,
Just because you bring the line,
“Will you be my Valentine?”

– Frank Dempster Sherman in Exchange.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 4, 1899

FEBRUARY.

Month of the valentine,
Month of the frosted pain;
Month of the groundhog and
Of snow on hill and plain;
Month of the lengthening days —
Thrice welcome and thrice dear —
Come sit before the blaze
And help us make good cheer.

Month of the chilling winds
That howl across the waste;
Oh, sharp and soulless month,
When Jack Frost must be faced —
Month of the frozen pipes,
Thrice welcome and thrice dear —
For the simple reason that
You’re the shortest of the year.

— Exchange.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 6, 1899

FEBRUARY.

Not many love thee, February,
By few thy praise is sung;
While thousand cherish Maytime merry,
And June’s on every tongue.

Half like thy brother stern before thee,
And half like March, so rude,
Soon sped withal, bards quite ignore thee,
Or chant with listless mood.

And yet, my February, dearly
I prize thy four brief weeks;
Thy many an early sign that clearly
Of days still distant speaks.

I love thee for each certain token
That gleams ‘mid melting snow;
Each sure hint of the summer spoken
In kindlier winds that blow.

I scent e’en now the roses’ savor,
I see yon green expanse;
And, as men own some future favor,
“I thank thee in advance.”

— Ladies’ World.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 18, 1899

Pirates, Opium and the Plague

January 23, 2012

Three Hundred Criminals Beheaded.

SAN FRANCISCO, March 12. — The steamer City of Pekin has arrived from Hong Kong and Yokahama, bringing advices that 300 pirates, robbers and other criminals were beheaded in Kwantung province during the last few days of the old Chinese new year.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Mar 18, 1891

Things theatrical for the past two weeks have been rather of routine. The near approach of the holidays is having a depressing effect on the attendance at the Faurot. With tonight’s performance the Holden repertoire company will have closed their engagement of one week. Only two shows are booked for the coming week, the first being that startling success, “King of the Opium Ring,” this is booked for Tuesday night.

KING OF THE OPIUM RING

No doubt that enthusiasm is already being manifested concerning the engagement of the Chinese-American play, “King of the Opium Ring,” which will be the attraction at Opera House Tuesday, December 19.

The play comes with a repute for great success at the Academy of Music, New York, where it played to the capacity of that great theatre for 150 nights. It is a sensational melodrama which is said to contain more different kinds of villiany and Chinamen than anything that has been seen for a long time.

The scenes are laid in San Francisco’s famous Chinatown. The first act represents Deadman’s Dock, showing the escape of the smuggling yacht, “Halcyon” with a revenue cutter firing a fusillade from a rapid fire gun.

The second act is an opium joint, which from the outside is an innocent looking laundry, but the interior shows side rooms with upper sections fitted with bunks in which men and women lay with little lamps at their side inhaling “happy thought,” through realistic looking opium pipes. Opium smoking is a form of a vice which most theater-goers are familiar with only through the newspaper reports of a raid, and the realistic layouts offered in this act are a decided novelty.

In the third act is pictured the heart of Chinatown on the occasion of the Chinese New Year; the great mart, the Chinese theater and Joss house, together with the many illuminations are shown, and the thrilling climax of the rescue of the Queen from an upper balcony by the wonderful Chinese acrobats.

The last set is the assembly room of the swell Chink club of ‘Frisco, the Fong Quay Society, and is an exact reproduction of the original. This scene is said to be one of Oriental magnificence; in fact, it may be said that all of the scenes are the same, true to the originals.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Dec 16, 1899

Image from GeocachingPlague!

BLACK PLAGUE IN HAWAII.

Breaks Out In Two Islands — Situation In Honolulu Improves.

Honolulu, Feb. 15, via San Francisco, Feb. 23. — The black plague has broken out at both Kahului, on the island of Maui, and Hilo, on the island of Hawaii. The latest advices report seven deaths at Kahului, all Chinese, and one at Hilo, a Portuguese woman, the wife of A.G. Seneo. The news was received here Feb. 10 in a letter from Sheriff Baldwin.

Chinatown in Kahului, which had about 300 inhabitants, has been destroyed by fire. The sanitary conditions were worse than in Honolulu. The towns of Lahaine and Hauhua have established quarantine against other portions of Maui. An unfortunate feature of the case is the proximity to Kahului of several large plantations with their thousands of laborers. It is thought that the plague reached Kahului through the shipment of Chinese new year goods.

In Honolulu the health situations is better than at any time since the outbreak of the plague. Not a case has developed in the last ten days. Although the board of health is confident that the trouble is over, vigilance will not be relaxed. Up to Feb. 6, the date of the last case, there had been 50 deaths from the plague in this city. The board of health has passed a resolution prohibiting the landing of all merchandise from countries where the bubonic plague exists.

Saturday, Feb. 17, has been set apart as “rat killing” day, and a great slaughter of the rodents is expected.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Feb 24, 1900

Sea Song of the Landlubber

August 29, 2011

SEA SONG OF THE LANDLUBBER.

If you really want a song of the sea,
Let no sailor that song sing,
But some lubbery clown from an inland town,
His song will have the ring.

There never was a man who went to sea,
Abaft the mast or before,
Who could sing you a rollicking song of the sea
With a man who stays on shore.

Then pass the steaming punch around
When the nights grow merry and long;
When the black tides swirl at the harbor’s mouth
We’ll raise the lubbersong.

Oh, the starboard watch was well wound up,
Likewise the port watch too,
When the binnacle fell from the mizzentop
And the chaplain piped to the crow.

‘Twas a close hauled reach to nearest beach,
And the spanker floated free,
As we stood by our guns of some thousand tons
With a gale upon our lee.

Then blow, ye breezes, blow,
And the guns they go bang! bang!
A sailor’s joy is the harbor buoy;
Hurrah for Li Hung Chang!

Our capstan sail was hoisted up,
The garboard strake gave room,
And we sailed away from New York bay
By the light of the spinnaker boom.

The captain found the anchor a-trip
In the salt of the sparkling brine,
And the ho’sun said that the anchor tripped
When the good ship crossed the line.

Then brail away on the topsail sheet,
Belay on keep downhaul;
It’s our cowsprit yard that is safe and hard,
And we’ll reef in the sounding pawl.

— New York Press.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Nov 12, 1896

The Whistling Buoy.

The accompanying little illustration shows a device which, had it been in position on the Manacles, would have saved the Paris and the Mohegan from running ashore on that dangerous bit of English coast. This machine is what is known as the whistling buoy. It is capable of giving out a much more effective signal than the old-fashioned bell buoy, which is has just replaced off the Manacles. This new buoy works automatically, and every short while emits a most doleful but far-reaching whistling scream.

Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa) Sep 22, 1899

BOXING THE COMPASS.

The Test Between a Sailor and a Landlubber.

Boys who live in seaport towns are sometimes asked to “box the compass.” If they can do it quickly and accurately, they are fine sailors and may grow up to be the captain of a four master. If they miss a point or can only do it slowly, they are landlubbers and will never see blue water.

To box the compass means to name all the points in order just as fast as you can speak. This is the way an old down east skipper will rattle it off:

North, nor’ by east, nor’-nor’east, nor’ east by north, northeast, nor’east by east, east-nor’east, east by north, east, east by south, east-sou’east, sou’east by east, sou’east, sou’east by south, sou’-sou’east, sou’ by east, south, sou’ by west, sou’-sou’west, sou’west by south, sou’west, sou’west by west, west-sou’west, west by south, west, west by north, west-nor’west,, nor’west by west, nor’west, nor’west by north, nor’-nor’west, nor’ by west, north.

Can you do it?

If a needle is drawn a few times over the ends of a horseshoe magnet, it becomes magnetized. Push such a magnetized needle throng a small cork. Place the cork in a bowl of water, taking pains to see that the cork when it floats on the water will carry the needle in a horizontal position or “on an even keel.”

Another way is to cut about three inches from a hollow straw (such as is used to suck lemonade) and to push the needle inside the straw. The straw will float and carry the needle.

Now observe what happens. The floating needle will slowly swing round till it points north and south. The straw will behave in the same way. Push it in any other direction, and the moment it is free it swings back again.

We do not know who first observed the fact that a floating magnetized needle will point to the north. Nor do we know precisely when or where some unknown inventor used this idea to make a compass. All we know is that the Chinese made and used compasses more than 2,000 years ago.

When men began, perhaps 10,000 years ago, to sail upon the water, they used marks upon the shore to guide them on their way. Long years after they observed that a certain star kept at all times the same place in the sky, and they used this pole star as a guide in steering their ships. Today a steamship starting down the Hudson river for Europe is guided by the pilot, and he uses the buoys, beacons and other guide marks to steer the ship down the bay. Off Sandy Hook he gives up the ship to the captain, who instructs the helmsman to steer northeast by east, east by north or whatever course he selects, and the helmsman, watching the compass, keeps the ship headed in that direction.

— Dallas News.

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Dec 10, 1902

Another Tradition of Seas Gone.

One of the latest inventions to improve the efficiency of travel at sea is the invention of an automatic ship-steering device which is said to be more accurate in holding a vessel to its course than the best helmsman who ever manned the wheel. The contrivance, known already in the parlance of the briny as “Metal Mike,” not only releases the helmsman for other services, but checks the weaving of a ship to either side of a predetermined course and thus permits a saving of time and fuel. Tests have been made on several ships and the apparatus has proved highly satisfactory.

“Metal Mike” is said to resemble a street care motorman’s box rigged alongside the ship’s steering wheel and attached to its hub by a chain operated by an electric motor. The motor in turn is connected with a gyroscopic compass in such a way that any variation registered by the compass is immediately transmitted to the steering device which automatically turns the wheel so as to keep the ship on its course. The advantage lies in the fact that the time required for a variation in the course to be transmitted electrically to the rudder is almost infinitesimal compared to that needed by a human helmsman to perform the same operation.

Science has thus robbed the sea of one of its cherished traditions. The landlubber’s conception of the helmsman at the wheel is that of a bearded, wrinkled, weather-beaten veteran of many storms, defying the pelting rain and wind as he peers through the inky blackness. That day, of course, has long passed on the larger sea-going vessel and the modern helmsman is comfortably ensconced in the glass-inclosed room. Now “Metal Mike” comes along to supplant the human touch altogether after the vessel has reached the high seas and is speeding along under favorable weather conditions. Once the ship’s course has been determined, “Metal Mike” takes charge, and until relieved of the task will hold the vessel straight across the pathless deep. Rather a far cry from the days of the “Flying Dutchman” or the hardy adventurers who were guided by the North Star.

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) Nov 10, 1922

Learn the Lingo:

Title: The Sailor’s Word-Book
(An alphabetical digest of nautical terms, including some more especially military and scientific, but useful to seamen; as well as archaisms of early voyagers, etc.)
Author: Admiral William Henry Smyth
Editor: Vice-Admiral Sir Edward Belcher
Publisher: Blackie and Son, 1867 (google book link)

Or:

Title: The Sailor’s Sea-Book
(Volume 55 of Weale’s rudimentary series)
Author: James Greenwood
Editor:William Henry Rosser
Published    1879
Dictionary of Sea TermsPage 163

Hobo Cooking

August 28, 2011

Image from the Hobo Soul blog

“HOBO” COOKING.

The Valuable Culinary Lesson Which a Professional Tramp Gave to Runaway Boys.

“The first time I ran away from home I learned a trick or two that was worth while,” said a well-known business man. “I started out on several unauthorized tours of adventure before I reached years of discretion, but the first is most vividly impressed upon my memory. Three of us kids caught a freight train and got some 60 or 70 miles away from home before the first nightfall. Then we didn’t know where to spend the night. Several attempts to quarter ourselves in empty box cars on the side track of a little village only resulted in our being chased away and threatened with arrest, so we went to the outskirts of the place, and built a fire on the bank of a little creek. Here we made ourselves as comfortable as possible, and one or two of us had actually dozed off for short naps when a regular hobo, a good specimen of the real article, happened along and wanted to know if we had anything to eat. Of course we hadn’t.

“‘Well,’ he said, ‘if you fellers’ll ketch a chicken, I’ll show you a trick that’ll be useful to you.’

“It didn’t take us long to catch the chicken and bring it back. The veteran member of the nomadic fraternity wrung its neck, jerked off its head, cleaned it and going down to the creek added it up, feathers, feet and all in a big ball of yellow clay. This he rolled into the fire and scraped the burning embers up around it. The clay soon hardened, and we could see it among the wood coals gradually becoming a bright cherry red. When it did so the cook rolled it out again, let it cool a little and then broke it open with a stone. The feathers had stuck to the baked clay and a clean, inviting chicken was ready to be served. All the moisture that in ordinary baking is lost had been kept in by the brick-like inclosure and the morsel that fell to my lot was the juiciest and sweetest I have ever eaten.”

— Cincinnati Enquirer

Daily Republican (Decatur, Illinois) Apr 6, 1899

Kentucky Feuds – State of War Continues

August 25, 2011

One more article about the Baker-Howard-White feuds:

BEV. WHITE’S TOUGH DEPUTIES FALL OUT AT MANCHESTER, KY.
———
State of War Still Continues — Town in a State of Intense Excitement — Howard Faction Keeps the Baker’s and Their Friends Out of the Place — Sheriff White Purchasing Ammunition.

London, Ky., June 19. — News of a fight at Manchester between Sheriff Beverly P. White’s numerous deputy sheriffs has just reached this place. Prior to the convening of court at Manchester, Sheriff White swore in 25 desperate characters as deputy sheriffs. Saturday night after they had received their pay several of them got drunk. They met at the upper side of the town and fired off their pistols almost continually until a late hour.

This morning “Bill” Holland, the negro deputy, was missing and it developed that he had been so badly beaten during a fight in which several shots were fired that he is confined to his bed. Holland says Dave Chadwell undertook to get a bottle of whiskey away from him and he struck Chadwell, knocking him down. This angered Chadwell’s friends and he was beaten over the head with the butts of pistols until he was almost dead.

The town is still in a state of intense excitement and the Howards and Whites a hundred and fifty strong keep the Bakers and their friends out of the place. A courier arriving here says he heard after leaving Manchester that Andy Baker and Jason Bowling with a number of friends had come into Clay county and were at Bowling’s house at Begtown. This is where Chris Johnson was attacked by members of the Howard-White faction Friday night and it is feared that Bowling’s house will be the next scene of a battle between the warring factions.

Sheriff White has just returned to Manchester and it is reported that he has secured a large amount of ammunition and a number of guns with which to equip more men in case Governor Bradley attempts to send court there to try him and others on the charge of murdering Tom Baker. John Whitmore, whose horse’s throat was cut at Manchester has arrived here. He says the Whites deny most emphatically that Tom Baker was killed by any of them. Sid Baker and Hiram Bolin, the body guard of John G. White, accompanied him home to Winchester to-day and returned here this afternoon, leaving for Manchester later. It develops that Judge Eversole is related to James Bowling, who is now in the feud and this further complicates matters, allying the judge with the Baker faction. Judge Eversole has gone to Lesile county to hold court. Instead of going via Manchester, which is the usual route, he went via Richmond several miles out of the way. Court is to begin to-day but he cannot reach there before Tuesday. Cale, Robert and Dee Baker are still at the home of Chris Jackson, who will recover from the wound received Friday afternoon at Begtown.

Naugatuck Daily News (Naugatuck, Connecticut) Jun 19, 1899

UPDATE: The Feudin’ Never Seems to Stop:

KENTUCKY OUTLAWRY.

Five Men Killed in the Philpot-Griffin Feud.

Louisville. July 18. — A special from London, Ky., tells of a report reaching there of the outbreak of another feud in Clay county, by which five men lost their lives yesterday. The dead are said to be: Robert Philpot, Ed Fisher, Aaron Morris, Jim Griffin and Hugh Griffin. These fatalities resulted from a pitched battle fought near Little Goose creek, three miles from Manchester.

The feud dates back nearly two years. On Christmas, 1897, James Philpot was killed by Aaron Morris, but before he died he shot and killed William Bundy, a friend of Morris. The Morrises and Griffins were closely affiliated. Since then the feeling between the two factions has been very bitter, and it has been aroused recently by the White-Baker hostilities. The Philpots, which are the strongest faction in the mountains, numbering about 750 voters, openly espoused the cause of the Bakers, while the Griffins took sides with the Whites.

The story that reaches here from Manchester is to the effect that Rob Philpot was arrested yesterday by Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker. It is said that while Thacker was taking Philpot’s bond the latter was shot from behind by a member of a crowd that had gathered. This precipitated a general fight with Winchesters and revolvers, which was participated in by George, Granville, Robert and Peter Philpot and Ed Fisher on one side, and Aaron Morris, Hugh, Jim and Green Griffin on the other. The battle raged fiercely for ten or fifteen minutes. When it was over it was found that the five men mentioned above had been killed outright, three of the belligerents were seriously wounded, while Pete Philpot was the only one on either side to escape injury. Granville Philpot is said to be one of the most seriously wounded. He is a Union veteran, having lost a leg at Stone River; is an ex-member of the Kentucky legislature, and is said to have killed three or four men. Ed. Fisher was about 23 years old, but was said to have killed three men.

The situation in Manchester is deplorable. The place is in a state of terror, scarcely any one daring to venture out of doors. Business is suspended and the residents are momentarily expecting a renewal of hostilities.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Jul 18, 1899

Five Men Are Slain in a Pitched Battle
——-
FEUDISTS AGAIN AROUSED
——-
Philpot Griffin Broil is Revived by the White Baker Hostilities
Their Respective Followers Engaging in a Mortal Combat.
——

[Excerpt]

The story of this battle caused consternation here, notwithstanding the fact that serious trouble has been expected to break out among the mountaineers of Clay county ever since the assassination of Tom Baker several weeks ago. An effort was at once begun to secure deputies to go to the seat of the trouble and attempt to restore quiet, but there had not been enough responses to make up a force that would command respect.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Jul 18, 1899

FEUD SPREADING

Kentucky Factionists Gathering and Another Outbreak Feared.

London, Ky., July 19. — The Clay county feud is growing to gigantic proportions. Monday’s battle in which three persons were killed outright and several were mortally wounded is believed to be the beginning of a series of battles.

Armed Philpots have gathered from all sections, 100 strong. The opposing clans, the Morris, Griffin and Chadwell families, are said to be only two miles away fifty strong.

Ed Fisher, who was mortally wounded Monday, died yesterday. Robert Philpot was reported dying last night, but this morning he was not yet dead.

——-

Frankfort, Ky., July 19. — Governor Bradley has taken no action in the Clay County matter. He favors calling an extra session of the legislature as well as sending troops.

——-

London, Ky., July 19. — Details of the ferocious fight between the Philpot and Griffin factions show that Aaron Morris, William and Green Griffin were instantly killed, and Hugh Griffin, Ed Fisher and Robert Philpot were mortally wounded. The dead men were buried at Island Branch graveyard and the wounded conveyed to the homes of their friends.

Messengers from Manchester report the situation more threatening than ever, because of the spread of the feud to families not heretofore directly concerned. The Chadwells and Barnetts are said to be joining the Griffins and Morrises, while the Philpots, in themselves the strongest faction, are gathering their followers from neighboring districts in expectation that their antagonists who were worsted in Monday’s battle, will seek an early opportunity for revenge.

——-

Clay County Officers Criticized.

Frankfort, Ky., July 19. — Governor Bradley received full official particulars concerning the Clay county battle. The governor is more than every worried over Clay county affairs, but has not decided on any plans with reference to the latest outbreak. There is very severe criticism of the Clay county civil authorities in state official circles, and it is hinted that some of the judicial authorities in that district will be made the subject of rigid investigation by the legislature.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) July 19, 1899

Both Factions Have Quit Work to Prepare for the Tremendous Struggle About to Take Place

———

Arms Said to Have Been Received From Louden — Victims of the Fight the Other Day Escorted to Their Graves by a Heavily Armed Guard.

—–

LONDON, Ky., July 21. — Clay county appears to be alive with armed men; both sides to the feud have suspended all labor and are assembled in their respective neighborhoods. Preparations for war go on. Arms are said to have been received from this point and taken to Clay county. It is believed they were for both sides.

Judge W.L. Brown, London, who has tried many mountain feud fighters, says that he regards this as the most serious trouble Clay county has ever had, and he expects to hear of a desperate fight.

Hugh Griffin and Aaron Morris were laid in the same grave. Harvey Griffin was placed beside them. The funeral procession escorted the corpses to the burial grounds under a heavy guard, armed with Winchesters.

The Philpot-Morris feud can be traced back over eight years. It began in the Pigeon Roost fight, in which the Philpots and Fishers were engaged with a number of alleged followers of Morris. On election day I.B. Philpot was killed, and a young man named Nicholson, a clerk in the pension department at Washington, who had come home to vote, had a leg shot off. George Cole, who last year killed Marshal Roach at Barboursville, and is now a fugitive from justice, was riddled with bullets. Several others were wounded. Sam Philpot, who figured prominently in that fight, was wounded at the battle of San Juan hill.

The next fight was about six years ago. One of the Stuarts and Maj. Jack Downey, of the Chadwell-Stuart forces, were killed. The Stuarts are alleged allies of the Chadwells and Griffins in the present feud. Joe Nance and John Bowling were sent to the penitentiary on account of their participation in this battle, but were afterward pardoned.

The next engagement was four or fives years ago, when Tim Philpot, Ed Fisher and others on one side were engaged by the Chadwells and George Thompson on the other. Thompson was killed, and both Tim Philpot and Ed Fisher were indicted and tried, but they were acquitted.

One other fierce but short battle occurred at Dripping Springs, Clay county, in which Dave, Hugh and Joe Bowling lost their lives at the hands of the Hamptons, who are now in the Morris-Griffin ranks. Others were wounded.

The next battle was fought on Horse Creek, at a saloon, a year ago. In this fight James Crow Philpot shot and killed William Bundy, and was in turn killed by Aaron Morris, Bundy’s son-in-law. Morris was sentenced for 21 years, but on a new trial he was acquitted.

It is charged that the Whites, of the Howard-White-Baker feud, assisted him.

As a result of last Monday’s battle four men, Hugh Griffin, Aaron Morris, Harvey Griffin, of the Morris side, and Ed Fisher of the Philpot faction, have been buried. Two others will probably die.

Lima Daily News (Lima, Ohio) Jul 21, 1899

LONDON, Ky., Sept. 5.

Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker was found dead on the roadside on the road to Manchester where it is supposed he was shot from ambush. He had recently testified against the Griffins.

Butler County Democrat (Hamilton, Ohio) Sep 7, 1899

KILLING DUE TO KENTUCKY FEUD.

Deputy Sheriff, of Clay County, is Slain From Ambush.

BARBOURSVILLE, Ky., Sept. 6. — [Excerpt]

…Later details of the killing of Deputy Sheriff Thacker, of Clay county, give the surmised reason for his assassination. Thacker had served as deputy sheriff of Clay county for fifteen years, and it was believed he was a favorite. No threats against his life had come to his ears and he felt perfectly secure in the discharge of his official duty. Since his murder it is recalled that he was a witness of the Morris Philpot fight and that his testimony in court was favorable to the Philpots. Sheriff Beverly White’s zeal in pursuit of the murderers with an armed posse of fifty men would seem to indicate that the White faction has no sympathy with the criminal.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Sep 6, 1899

FEUD ON IN EARNEST AGAIN.

One Faction in Kentucky Making War on Women.

LONDON, Ky., Sept. 11. — The opening of war between the Griffin and Philpot factions in Clay county began last night. The house of Widow Chadwell, wife of Evan Chadwell, brother of Deputy Sheriff Dave Chadwell, the leader of the Griffin faction, was fired into from all sides. She escaped by throwing herself on the floor. All the cattle, hogs and dogs were killed and a notice was posted on her door giving her twenty-four hours to leave or be killed. It was done by a body of horse-men whom the Griffins say were Philpots. The jail here, which has two Griffins in it, is heavily guarded by men with Winchesters.

A rumor is also current here that a battle was fought yesterday in Clay county resulting in killing four men and wounding seven. The rumor locates the battle on Red Bird creek, eighteen miles from Manchester. There have been several killings there of late and the battle may have been either between the Markums and Roberts or the Sizemores and Ashers, which four factions are at war with each other.

The Nebraska State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Sep 12, 1899


Slain from Ambush in Kentucky.

Wash Thacker, a deputy sheriff of Clay County, Ky., has been shot from ambush and killed. A mule on which Bob Smith, who accompanied Thacker, was riding, was slain, but Smith lay motionless on the ground for a couple of hours, feigning death, and thus escaped assassination.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Sep 16, 1899

Fear Serious Trouble.

Pittsburg, Ky., Sept. 27. — The situation in Clay county is very serious. The trial of the Griffins, Chadwells and Barnetts for the killing of Wash Thacker was again postponed. Two bands of 40 men each of the Philpots went to Manchester, all heavily armed. An unexpectedly large force of Griffins are near that town well equipped with Winchester rifles. The jail is being guarded by a large force, as the Griffins claim that the jail will be attacked and an effort made to lynch the eight inmates, members of their faction. Law-abiding citizens of Clay county are clamoring for troops.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Sep 27, 1899

Kentucky Feudists Tried.

Manchester, Ky., Oct. 2. — The trial of seven Griffin feudists for ambushing Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker and Jim Smith of the Philpot faction has been held. Eddy and Floy Chadwell, Sol, Jim and Tom Griffin were held without bail, and Charles Burnett, Dan Hampton and Anderson Griffin were discharged.

The Wellsboro Agitator (Wellsboro, Pennsylvania) Oct 4, 1899

KENTUCKY FEUD TRIAL TO-DAY.

LONDON, Ky., Oct. 22. — The Clay County Circuit Court opens to-morrow at Manchester. Five feudists, Eddie and Floyd Chadwell, and Sol. Jim, and Tom Griffin, will be tried for the killing of Deputy Wash Thacker of the Philpot faction.

Gov. Bradley has troops in readiness to go to the protection of the court immediately upon the request of the Judge.

Since the last term of court twenty men and one woman have been shot and there are only five indictments.

The New York Times (New York, New York) Oct 23, 1899

The Clay County Trouble.

Manchester, Ky., Oct. 26. The grand jury impaneled here at the term of court with began Monday has a big task before it. There are 12 murders besides the assassination of Tom Baker to be investigated. The jury has returned true bills against Sol, Jim and Tom Griffin, charging them with the murder of Sheriff Wash Thacker, and Eddy and Floyd Chadwell, charging them with complicity in the crime. Eddy Chadwell confessed that the plot was made and executed by the Griffins to revenge the advantage Thacker had given the Philpots by his testimony against the Griffins after the battle of July 17, in which four Griffins and one Philpot were killed. The town is full of witnesses and feudists. Judge Eversole did not arrive, and C.B. Little is holding the court.

The Trenton Times (Trenton, New Jersey) Oct 26, 1899

INDICT KENTUCKY MURDERERS.

——-

The Regular Judge, However, Fails to Appear in Court — Armed Feudists Await Further Developments.

Special to The New York Times.
MANCHESTER, Ky., Oct. 25. — True bills of indictment, charging Solomon and Jim and Tom Griffin with the murder of Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker in Clay County on Sept. 4, and against Eddy and Floyd Chadwell with complicity in the crime, were returned by the Grand Jury here to-day. The regular Judge, H.C. Eversole, for some reason has not arrived as yet, but he sent word to two members of the bar to elect a special Judge and go ahead with the court. Judge C.B. Little was chosen, and a Grand Jury empaneled.

The Grand Jury has its hands full, there being about 10 killings and assassinations to investigate, all of which have taken place since the last term of court, in June, and this in addition to the killing of Tom Baker, which Judge Eversole has promised Gov. Bradley to investigate. Troops are being held in readiness at Lexington, and it is believed by members of the bar that Judge Eversole will not come until the Governor agrees to furnish him with military protection. In view of this fact, Judge Eversole’s instructions to try unimportant matters until he arrives is being disregarded, and Judge Little will take up the cases as they are reported by the Grand Jury.

It is now believed that the assassin who killed Tom Baker while he was a prisoner will never be found. Sheriff White, from whose house the fatal shot was fired, is seriously ill and has left the business of his office with his deputies. Commonwealth’s Attorney Isaacs has also failed to appear. He sent word that he would be compelled to be absent during the term because of sickness in his family. In Perry County, County Attorney Turner and B.B. Golden of Barbourville will represent the Commonwealth.

The Griffins and the Philpots are on hand in force, all heavily armed. Every one appears in the best of humor, and they mingle together telling jokes. Valentine G. Philpot came near causing a riot yesterday by stating that he told the farmer who came up with his two-horse wagon and offered to haul off the dead after the Philpot-Griffin fight on July 17, that he only wished they could finish out a load for him.

The Griffins heard of this remark and there was a rush to arms, but through some agreement the matter was settled and no blood spilled. The report that Pete Philpot, the boy who shot three Griffins in the big fight, had been shot yesterday, is untrue. “Tom” Whittamore, a Philpot sympathizer, is dead, the reports to this effect having been confirmed.

Gov. Bradley will be requested to place the whole county under martial law by the citizens who hope to have an end put to the feud at once, but this plan is not considered practicable by the Chief Executive.

The following is a list of the people killed in the Philpot-Griffin feud since the last term of the Circuit Court:

July 6 — James Stubblefield, Deputy Sheriff, killed while attempting to arrest Mart Smith. Smith escaped.

July 17 — Aaron Morris, Harvey Griffin, Green Griffin of the Griffin faction, and Ed Fisher of the Philpot faction, killed in pitched battle. Several other men wounded. Philpot tried and cleared.

Sept. 2 — Bill Lewis, Deputy Sheriff, killed while trying to arrest Mart Smith. Smith again escaped.

Sept. 4 — Wash Thacker, Deputy Sheriff, killed while riding along the road with Jim Smith, a friend. Jim, Tom, and Sol Griffin and Eddy and Floyd Chadwell arrested, and are to be tried for the crime.

Sept. 5 — James Robertson, Philpot sympathizer, assassinated. No arrests.

Sept. 28 — Eli Taylor, a juryman in Philpot cases, assassinated. No arrests.

Sept. 6 — [maybe meant to be Oct 6?] Henry Marcum, a Griffin feudist, assassinated. No arrests.

Oct. 23 — Tom Whittamore, friend of Philpot’s, assassinated. No arrests. Simon Philpot assassinated at Pigeon Roost. No arrests.

One woman was shot and seriously wounded, having been mistaken for a Philpot, and the homes of a number of the factionists riddled with bullets at night.

The New York Times (New York, New York) Oct 26, 1899

Banished From Clay County.

London, Ky., Nov. 7 — Dave Chadwell, father of Eddie and Floyd Chadwell, who are accused of complicity in the murder of Deputy Sheriff Wash Thacker, has been run out of Clay county. He was shot from ambush and almost killed two weeks ago and afterward notified to leave the county. He did this, going to Corbin, but on Sunday he was warned that he was still too close to Clay county to please the Philpots and advised to go farther. Consequently he has removed with his family to Winchester.

The Trenton Times (Trenton, New Jersey) Nov 7, 1899

TROOPS ORDERED OUT

Corbin, Ky., Dec 11. — Governor Bradley ordered the company of state guards just organized here, into service to protect Floyd and Eddie Chadwell, who killed Town Marshal Hartford Saturday night. The town is crowded and an attempt to lynch them may be made.

The two Chadwells are feudists from Clay county, sons of Dave Chadwell, one of the leaders of the Griffin faction in the Philpot-Griffin feud. They said, “We just wanted to show how we have fun back in Clay.”

An attempt at rescue may be made by Clay countians.

The Daily Review (Decatur, Illinois) Dec 11, 1899

 

The Summer Solstice

June 21, 2011

The Summer Solstice.

We have entered the summer solstice, and the astronomical summer has commenced. The sun has reached its farthest point from the equator north and shines vertical over the Tropic of Cancer. The literal meaning of the word sol – stice is turning of the sun, as that orb will apparently retrograde and the days become shorter.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Jun 28, 1887

Image from the Richard the Lionheart page on Rootsweb.

An Old Custom.

A quaint old custom still prevails in the beautiful country on both sides of the Danube, some hundred miles above Vienna, commonly called the Wachnau. At the summer solstice fires are lit on all the more prominent heights of the mountains that give the Wachnau its peculiar charm.

The picturesque towns and villages on both shores are beautifully illuminated and the bridges across the great river are ablaze with a million lights. The most charming sight of all this year was the illumination of the ruins of Castle Durenstein, above Krems, the legendary castle where Richard Coeur de Lion heard Blndel sing outside his prison walls. This festival is now called Jahannisfier, or St. John’s fete, by a devout population, but the old people call it by its real Papan name, Sonnenwendfeuer — Solstice Fires. — London News.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Nov 16, 1899

Rain-Makers: Wizards, Kings…and Uncle Sam

June 14, 2011

EFFECTS OF RAIN-MAKING

Uncle Sam’s Rain: Prosperity
Politician’s Rain: Office
Miser’s Rain: Money
Merchant’s Rain: Orders
Farmer’s Rain: Crops
Spinster’s Rain: Angels? Babies?

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Sep 5, 1891

Image of men attempting to make rain — from the Nebraska State Historical Society website.

RAIN TO ORDER.

An Interview With Frank Melbourne, the Rain King.

CINCINNATI, July 3. — An evening paper publishes the following interview held with Frank Melbourne, the rain wizard, at Canton, O., Monday evening:

Late this evening, during a drizzling rain, your correspondent called on Frank Melbourne, the storm wizard, at his quarters in the Hotel Yohe. Melbourne, who is the busiest man in Ohio just at the present, could not be seen at the noon hour, being then engaged in the undertaking of bringing a storm, he said, and too busy to spare time for an interview. To the patter of the rain upon the roof, the wizard bid the correspondent be seated.

As a prelude to the conversation, and no doubt indicative of his powers, Melbourne pointed his finger upward, where the rain was playing a tattoo upon the roof, and said: “This is the rain I was advertized to bring. It was booked for Tuesday, but, owing to the condition of the atmosphere it came a day sooner than expected. It takes from a day to two days to bring a storm. I began on Sunday to start this one, expecting it to be here on Tuesday, but you see it got around a little in advance.”

“How do you produce these rains?”

“That is a secret I hardly dare divulge beyond saying it is the infusion of certain chemicals in the air through a machine of my invention.”

“How long have you been engaged in this occupation?”

“I began to work on my machine twelve years ago last September and soon after brought the first rain. I was then in Australia. I made twelve experiments in Queensland and New South Wales, all of which were successful. A rain can be brought there more rapidly than here, being closer to the sea and not so hilly.”

“The formation of the land there has something to do with the bringing of a rain?”

“Oh, yes, considerable. The nearer to the sea and the more level the land the sooner a rain can be started. One day was all the time needed there.”

“What are your charges for bringing a real good shower?”

“Three hundred dollars is all I ask, and that not to be paid until the rain is produced. This is much cheaper than most experiments of the kind are made.”

“How large a territory can you cover?”

“About two hundred and fifty thousand square miles.”

“Are your storms all electrical and accompanied by thunder and lightning?”

“Not at all. That depends upon the condition of the atmosphere at the time it is produced.”

Mr. Melbourne at this time felt that his presence was required at his office, where the rain machine was then at work, and begged to be excused, handing the correspondent the accompanying circular, which, he said, would throw some light upon his invention.

Mr. Melbourne is a rather tall and slender man, decidedly nervous and thoroughly in earnest regarding his experiment as an actual fact as he regards it now. Whether there is any truth in his assertions or not, he is the biggest Roman of them all at present, and managers of picnics and outdoor sports consult this modern oracle before determining upon the date.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Jul 3, 1891

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Jul 2, 1891

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 18, 1891

The Evening News (Lincoln, Nebraska) Jul 27, 1892

The Last of the Rainmakers.

George Matthews of Wichita is the only one left of all the Kansas rainmakers who has nerve enough to get into public notice and talk about his system. Scoffs and jeers have no terrors for Mr. Matthews. On Friday night he commenced operations at a point near Wichita under an agreement to bring rain by Monday night or ever after hold his peace. In a talk to a reporter the rain wizard said:

“I use thirty-six electric batteries, two jars of hydrogen gas, and two jars of compound hydrogen gas in making rain. In order to produce a storm center we mix the hydrogen gas so that it explodes in the upper air. This forms a vortex. Then the clouds hover around and concentrate, forming a storm center.”

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Jul 31, 1895

Millions of dollars have been spent in the last few years on the perfection of irrigation, which, up until the present time, was the only solution to crop production in arid sections.

But science is always solving these problems in other ways, as in the case of Chas. M. Hatfield, the “Rain Wizard,” who claims to have perfected a chemical apparatus whereby rain clouds are attracted and caused to drop their wealth of rain drops. Mr. Hatfield has practiced his secret system for 22 years with much success, charging from $1000 to $3000 an inch for rain. Only recently he was credited with a cloudburst in the northwest. Press reports did not state whether or not he was paid at the above rate.

Adams County Press (Corning, Iowa) Aug 18, 1920


THE RAIN.

Hear the tapping of the rain
Tripping on the window pane
Like gay, nimble footed fairies
Dancing in a field of grain.
How the new drops dart and pass
Till they press against the glass
Lightly as the fragile fingers
Of a dainty, crippled lass.

Oh, these pixies of the mist,
Jeweled, all, from heel to wrist,
How they glitter as they gather
To some nature nurtured tryst!
How they romp across the dim
Spaces of the day or swim
In a vapor surf with Zephyr,
Playing hide and seek with him!

Oh, the rain of field and town,
Darting, drifting, dawdling down,
Careless of its brief existence
And creation’s smile or frown!
Wasn’t it but yesterday
That we heard the shower say:
“Cheer up. Time is but a moment.
Make the most of work or play?”

— Chicago Record.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 17, 1899