Posts Tagged ‘1915’

The Warmth of Perfection

December 11, 2012

Vintage Perfection Oil Heater

Image from Etsy

Oil Heater - Perfection - The News - Frederick MD 24 Dec 1907

Glowing Heat From Every Ounce of Fuel

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 24, 1907

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Gettysburg Times PA 09 Dec 1911

Clean Dry Heat

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 9, 1911

Oil Heater - Perfection - Olean Evening Times NY 24 Dec 1912

Houses Without Chimneys

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Dec 24, 1912

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 12 Dec 1914

Baby’s Morning Dip

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 12, 1914

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 18 Dec 1915

A Touch of a Match Brings a Touch of Spring

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 18, 1915

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 18 Dec 1918

Emergency Heating

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 18, 1918

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Gettysburg Times PA 18 Dec 1918

Don’t Waste Coal

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 18, 1918

Gareth to Lynette

December 6, 2012

arthur hughes - inspired by Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette

Image from ARTMAGICK

Poem in College Magazine.

The following poem which appeared in the University of Virginia Magazine, published by the students, was written by L. Travis White, of Frederick, who is studying law at the institution:

Gareth to Lynette.

Then Gareth: “Here be rules. I know but one —
To dash against mine enemy and to win.” — Tennyson.

More soft than silken strands the hair
That tumbles round thy temples fair,
Tossed by the summer air;
Like roses bloom thy cheeks;
The droning bee they near deceive,
When proffered sweetness to receive
Some brim-full flower he seeks.

Thine eyes, like twin stars on the deep,
Soft-mirrored when the billows sleeps
And moaning winds their silence keep,
Shine tenderly; yet seem
They like the dewdrops when the lawn
Gem-strewn, doth greet the Sun of dawn —
And mockingly they gleam.

Near thee the lark on tireless wing
Hovers his sweetest song to sing;
To thee the zephyrs tribute bring,
With violent-laden breath.
The buds whose fragrance is most sweet
Are gladly crushed beneath thy feet —
Thrice blest in such a death.

But thy heart is as hard to lover’s pain
Like the rocks beside the storm-swept main —
Against them dash, in vain, in vain,
The waves of a passionate sea;
Yet slow to ocean yields the land,
The proud rocks crumble into sand —
So will I conquer thee!

— L. Travis White.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 4, 1912

L Travis White - Class of 1911 - Frederick MD - The Frederick Post MD 15 Dec 1971

L. Travis White is number 4 in the picture above.

Frederick High School’s Class of 1911 is once again part of the scene at the local school, at least in the form of the official class photograph presented to the school recently by Robert J. DiDomenico, executive director of Goodwill Industries of Monocacy Valley Inc.

The full story of where the old fashioned studio picture spent the last 60 years will probably never be known, although it can easily be visualized gracing the living room of some proud graduate’s home.

Whatever its history, the picture complete with handsome frame and glass, turned up as part of an anonymous donation to Goodwill and was spotted by Mrs. Barbara Coulter, secretary to DiDomenico, who recognized it as an interesting bit of memorabilia for the school.

DiDomenico agreed that this was a fitting disposition for the photograph and it was presented to George Seaton, principal of Frederick High School.

The picture, taken in the era of the old Boys High School, now Elm Street Elementary School, reveals several points of contrast with more recent high school class photos. Most obvious, of course, is the fact that the class is composed of only 19 members, all boys.

It is also interesting to note that the students are pictured in a West Point type military uniform, an indication of the schools’ past presently reflected only in the nickname “Cadets,” used by Frederick High athletic teams.

The students’ haircuts, on the other hand, are a bit on the full side with moderate sideburns not too different from today’s more conservative styles.

Most familiar, however, are the surnames, most of which are still prominently represented in Frederick County today. No effort has been made to tell how many members of the class survived, but Principal Seaton would be pleased to hear from any who might still live in the area.

Names of those identified in the Smith Studio (of Frederick) photograph include: Clyde E. Burgee, Allen G. Quynn, Earl E. Zeigler, L. Ray Burgee, Louis A. Rice, James R. Keller, J. Ernest Haifleigh, R. Dorsey Sappington, Willis D. Witter, George L. Rothenhoefer, Dean W. Hendrickson, David L. Johnson, William H. Solt, Marvin L. Shirley, Prof. Amon Burgee, Edgar J. Eyler, J. Roger Fisher, L. Travis White, John L. Shaw and J.F. Minor Simpson.

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 15, 1971

L Travis White - Scholarship - The News - Frederick MD 06 Jun 1912

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Jun 6, 1912

L Travis White - Scholarship - The News - Frederick MD 20 Jun 1914

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Jun 20, 1914

Travis White El Paso - Caribel and Roxanna visit - The Frederick Post MD 11 Apr 1931

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Apr 11, 1931

L Travis White - Odd Tricks - Bridge book cover

Image from Gamblers Book Club

From Bridge Guys – Bridge Books:

White, Littleton Travis – (July 3, 1894 – December 1973) – Littleton Travis White

Odd Tricks, c1934, Edited by Albert H. Morehead and Clifford A. Bender, Publisher: The Bridge World, Inc., New York City, United States; also Odd Tricks, 1978, Edited by Albert H. Morehead and Clifford A. Bender, Publisher: GBC Press, Las Vegas, United States, ISBN-10: 0896508102; also Odd Tricks, 1983, Edited by Albert H. Morehead and Clifford A. Bender, Publisher: Casino Press, ISBN-10: 0870190334 / ISBN-13: 9780870190339, LC: 34041970

Note: Mr. Paul Ryan has contributed this information in addition to a scanned version of the newspaper article in the El Paso Herald Post upon the publication of the bridge book. This information is included in a .pdf file for the interest of the bridge visitor and, in addition, a visually more acceptable version, also in a .pdf file format. Mr. Paul Ryan has also included the scanned version of the World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, of Littleton Travis White and also the scanned information collected during the 1930 United States Federal Census. Also include is the Social Security

*     *     *     *     *

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Work Done By The Just Government League:

[excerpt – L. Travis White’s mother was involved in women’s suffrage movement]

L Travis White - Mrs John Kearnes White - Suffragette - The News - Frederick MD 15 Dec 1915

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 15, 1915

Littleton Travis White - Roxanna's Party - The News - Frederick MD 17 Dec 1901

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 17, 1901

*     *     *

Evidently, his sister was a bit of an artist:

Roxanna White - Charcoal Drawing - The Frederick Post MD 15 Oct 1917

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Oct 15, 1917

Campus map, St. John's College (MD)

Image from HCAP

L. Travis White’s sister, Roxanna, married the president of St. John’s College. What I found interesting were his comments to the Rotary Club about the educational revolution, and St. John’s “counter-revolution”:

COLLEGE HEAD TALKS TO CLUB

St. John’s System Explained To Rotarians By President

Educational counter-revolution by St. John’s College, Annapolis, shared discussion with the shortage of Maryland oysters as topics of discussion before the Wednesday luncheon meeting of the Frederick Rotary Club.

Dr. John Spangler Kieffer, president of St. John’s College and also of Annapolis’ Rotary, described the 100-book foundation of knowledge system inaugurated by the school in 1937.

W.R. Slemmer, chairman of the local Rotarians’ committee for an oyster-roast to be held later this month, changed the after-dinner talk of members from the day’s topic of  “Education in Revolution”, to “will we be able to get oysters to roast?”, when he refused to continue sale of tickets for the proposed affair, until weather conditions and the bivalve market assures delivery of the food.

Introduced by his uncle, Rev. Henri L.G. Kieffer, the speaker of the meeting explained St. John’s College new system as anomalous, in that it is designed to maintain the “aura of college aristocracy, with democratic ideals.”

The highly honored Harvard graduate was made president of the Annapolis college last year, succeeding Stringfellow Barr in continuing the “nationally observed new-trend for education, started in 1937.” President Kieffer’s wife, the former Miss Roxanna White, is a native of Frederick.

Called Revolutionary

Dr. Kieffer explained that the St. John’s program is actually a revolution against the nineteenth-century revolution in education. That classical education of the past hundred years was not the complete fundamental knowledge necessary to developments of laboratory sciences and that elective courses were a compromise which undergraduates are not capable of choosing.

He deplored over-specialization in teaching undergraduates and summed up the program of his college system, as one intended to complete adolescence of students by training the mind to think generally and adultly; thereby being acquainted with the “principles” of the civilization in which he will live.

“We are living through a revolutionary period, as evidenced by the present loss of standards, faith and belief in things,” Dr. Kieffer said, “There is skepticism, dogmatism, on every hand. There is a general lack of knowledge and faith in fundamentals. We have lost the stability of the nineteenth century minds, because the atomic bomb disproved Maxwell’s system of physics,” the speaker concluded.

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Feb 12, 1948

*     *     *     *     *

Interesting “men vs. women” note in this article excerpt:

PARTY FOLLOWS FINAL SEMINAR

Mr. And Mrs. Kieffer Are Honored By Group At Library

Women may control the wealth of the country as statistics indicate, but it was the men who defended its economic system as opposed to the Communist theory in a lively final session of the Great Books Seminar in the C. Burr Arts Library, May 2 during the discussion of the Communist Manifesto. John S. Kieffer, director of adult education at St. John’s College, Annapolis, who has been conducting the Seminar, presented. The session concluded with a party given by Between-the Book-Ends Club in honor of Mr and Mrs. Kieffer….

Kieffer - Book Seminar - The Frederick Post MD 12 May 1952

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) May 12, 1952

*     * Census Records *     *

John Kearnes White, the father, doesn’t every appear to be with the family:

Littleton Travis White - 1900 census - Frederick MD

1900 Federal Census – Frederick, MD

Travis White - 1910 census - Frederick MD

1910 Federal Census – Frederick, MD

In 1920, Mrs. White and Roxanna are still living in Frederick, MD, sans father, and Littleton Travis White is a roomer in Virginia, practicing law.

*     *     *

By 1940, Littleton Travis White was finally married, and to quite the YOUNG lady:

Travis White - 1940 census - El Paso TX

Living in El Paso, Texas, with his mother-in-law, young wife, and baby daughter.

*     *     *     *     *

According to his mother’s obituary, she was a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy:

Caribel Travis White - Obituary - The Frederick Post MD 30 Apr 1954

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Apr 30, 1954

John Kearnes White - The White Rose

Travis’s father appears to have authored a book of poetry. The interesting part is the dedication:

John Kearnes White - to my mother

To My Mother, not My Wife.

HATHI TRUST Digital Library has the book online: THE WHITE ROSE

*     *     *     *     *

Littleton Travis White died in Annapolis, Maryland, while visiting his sister:

Travis White - Obituary - El Paso Herald-Post TX 08 Dec 1973

His death was front page news in the El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Dec 8, 1973

The End

All this for a poem!

Out of a Frederick Window

December 4, 2012

TP Fall Snow SA 1

Image from FrederickNewsPost.com

Out Of A Frederick Window.

Out of a Frederick window — a glimpse of a far off hill
Out of a Frederick window — a vale and a rippling rill;
Out of a Frederick window — a mountain with crown of snow,
And a long, white road through the valley that sweeps like a bowl below;
Out of a Frederick window — the fields of the winter wheat,
And over it all Catcoctin, with the town at its green-girt feet!

Out of a Frederick window — a window that looks to the west,
The beautiful blue hills dreaming the dream of the wintry rest;
Snow-crowned gleaming and splendid, somber when dusk drifts down
And the bells of the twilight echo from the spires of the beautiful town;
Out of a Frederick window — the old pike winding far,
The vales and the bending river, the peaks and the evening star!

Out of a Frederick window — a glimpse of the naked trees,
Braddock upon the summit, and the echo of melodies
When the bees in the summer orchards and the hillside birds set fire
To the heart of the listening dreamers as they sang in a sweetheart choir;
Out of a Frederick window — the meadows of furzo and bloom,
And love in a faded garden with her foot on a silver loom!

Out of a Frederick window — a car climbs over the hill,
The steel wires sing in the valley and cows come down to the rill;
The phantoms of old, sweet faces, the shadows of old friends, glide,
And a great dream breaks into morning with a young heart by my side;
Out of a Frederick window — the valleys, and there they lie,
The peaks of the loved Catoctin in the blue of a wintry sky!

— The Bentztown Bard in The Baltimore Sun.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 15, 1915

Pork Falls

December 3, 2012

hanging hogs

Image from A Family Farm Album — Frank Sadorus

Pork Falls.

While assisting his son Alfred to butcher a few days ago, George W. Gaver, a well known farmer residing east of Middletown, met a narrow escape from serious injury. Eight hogs which were butchered were hung on a long pole, and after the last one had been placed the pole broke. Mr. Gaver who was standing beneath it was almost caught under the heavy mass as it fell to the ground.

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 18, 1915

The Most Beautiful Suffragette

August 27, 2012

Miss Inez Milholland, whose picture is here shown is the daughter of J.E. Milholland, the millionaire pneumatic tube system man. She is now in the Junior class in Vassar and announces her intention of becoming a truant officer so that she may pursue the work of reforming bad boys. Miss Milholland is an athlete of note in the college games, and has had great success in reclaiming bad boys.

Coshocton Daily Times (Coshocton, Ohio) Feb 25, 1908

AWAKENED BY YANKEE GIRL

Miss Inez Milholland, Who Wants to Vote, Roused Oxford and Cambridge.

After trying with vigor, but in vain, to  convince the authorities of Oxford and Cambridge universities in England that she should be permitted to study law at one of the two venerable institutions Miss Inez Milholland of New York sailed for America to try her persuasive powers at Harvard.

Miss Milholland has won fame as a young leader of the suffragists. She was recently graduated from Vassar, where she conducted a vigorous campaign in favor of women’s votes.

She is the daughter of John E. Milholland of New York and London, and a background of wealth has not lessened her charm. Her bronze hair, large blue eyes and well modeled features make her a classic type.

At Vassar Miss Milholland kept President Taylor on the rack, inciting miniature equal rights resolutions among the students. When the suffragists of the state journeyed to the capitol at Albany for their annual hearing on woman and the vote the president peremptorily forbade Miss Milholland to accompany them, fearing her presence would accentuate the rumor that the college was a center of the woman’s rights campaign.

Aside from her political tendencies, Miss Milholland made no mean record at Vassar. Her scholarship put her well in the fore, and her athletic prowess was the boast of her associates. As captain of the hockey team she led her players to a victory that captured the interclass championship. She was conspicuous on field day and champion in putting the eight pound shot.

Coshocton Daily Times (Coshocton, Ohio) Oct 9, 1909

There was as much excitement in suffragette headquarters Thursday as if the New York legislature were about to grant women the right to vote. It was not joyful excitement, however, because the rumor spread that Inez Milholland, vivacious, bronze-haired, and clever suffragette, was engaged to be married to Sydney Smith. In other words, the rumor had it that Miss Milholland and Mr. Smith, both warm friends of Mrs. O.H.P. Belmont, had formed a friendship under the guiding influence of Mrs. Belmont, and that perhaps the energy and enthusiasm of the most picturesque suffragette would be lost.

There was a jingle of telephone bells as suffragettes hunted for Miss Milholland. There was suppressed grief and an occasional sob over the thought the young woman might give up law, forsake the cause of woman suffrage, and become an ordinary housewife or a society matron. Miss Milholland was not in the Hotel Manhattan. She was in the New York University Law School, digging out cases and hunting for points that would prove the right of women to vote. At least her mother thought so.

Mrs. John E. Milholland was likewise frantic over the rumor of the reported engagement.

“No, it was not true. It could not be true,” she said.

But the fearful mother quickly put in a hurry telephone call for the university. Miss Milholland was found finally in the law library poring over a musty tome and racing to get our her lesson, as she was planning a suffragette meeting for the young men of the law school in the evening. When the young woman was reached she listened calmly as her mother recited the details of the alleged engagement.

“What does all this mean?” asked the excited mother.

“Nothing, mama,” answered the modern Portia. “Mother, don’t you know I am too busy to think of such things? I have my law, the cause, and, what’s more, I have a woman’s suffrage meeting right here in the university tonight and I haven’t time to discuss such things.”

Miss Milholland, who is a daughter of John E. Milholland, one time politician and now a millionaire promoter, with headquarters in London, is an alumna of Vassar. She stood near the head of her class, was a star debater in college, and always an advocate of woman suffrage. She kept things lively in college with her organizations and her fights for her rights. She passes much of her time in England, where she is regarded as the most beautiful suffragette. Her advocacy of woman suffrage, her skill and eloquence as a speaker, won her the admiration of Mrs. Belmont, and the two have become almost inseparable.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Dec 10, 1910

Image from Everyday Dutch Oven

SUFFRAGETTES AND THE HENS

The suffragettes who have been marching on Washington already had their troubles. I understand that when they left one place the hens quit the coops and started to follow them. And a rooster flew in front of a speckled hen and asked her for heaven’s sake to go back, and she crowed in his face.

I recollect hearing about a suffragette who was making a speech. She said: “I pant for the right to vote. I pant for the right to exercise my political rights.” And some one in the audience spoke up and said: “Lady, you pant for a pair of pants.” — Representative Heflin, on the floor of the House.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Mar 2, 1913

Miss Inez Milholland.

NEW YORK, March 21. — Miss Inez Milholland, known as the most beautiful suffragette in New York, who has just been admitted to the New York bar, is working on her first case as associate counsel to James W. Osborne, defending Gee Doy Young, a Chinatown gunman, who is charged with having started the last Tong war that resulted in five killings.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Mar 21, 1913

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) Mar 15, 1913

Miss Inez Milholland, the handsome New York suffragette, was married in the Kensington registry office, London, to Eugene Boissevain, a wealthy Dutchman of Amsterdam. The bridegroom, who is 33 years old, is engaged in the wireless business and was introduced to Miss Milholland in New York a few weeks ago by Signor Meroni. His father, Charles Boissevain, of Amsterdam, is the owner of rich plantations in Java. He is also the principal owner of the foremost newspaper in Amsterdam. The couple will spend their honeymoon in a cruise on the North sea and will sail for New York in August. Miss Milholland was graduated from Vassar in 1909, and while there she kept the faculty on pins and needles with her advanced views on feminism and socialism. It was she who started the suffrage movement in Vassar, enrolling two-thirds of the students in the cause and then proceeding to teach them the meaning of socialism. She held a record for throwing the basketball. The bride will continue her law practice when she returns to New York.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jul 21, 1913

Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Apr 05, 1914

Inez Milholland Admits Proposing

NEW YORK, Nov. 27. — Inez Milholland Boissevain, lawyer and suffragist, advocated yesterday that women should have the right to propose. She said:

“Certainly women should have the right to propose — I did it myself.”

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 27, 1915

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 27. — Mrs. Inez Milholland Boissevain, widely-known suffragist and welfare worker, died in a hospital here shortly before midnight Saturday night after an illness of 10 weeks. She was 30 years old.

Mrs. Boissevain was stricken suddenly while addressing the recent political campaign and fainted on the platform at the meeting. She was removed to a hospital and her husband and parents rushed from New York to join her here. Miss Vida Milholland, her sister, was with her when she was stricken and has been in constant attendance since that time.

Inez Milholland Boissevain had been for many years well known for her activity as a woman suffragist, a social welfare worker, an advocate of socialism and as a practising lawyer.

During the 1908 Presidential campaign she won new fame as “the girl who broke up the Taft parade.”

Following her graduation from Vassar College, she attempted to enter Harvard Law School, but this permission was denied her on the ground that it was not a co-educational institution. Miss Milholland finally received her degree in law at the New York University Law School in 1912, and during this time she was active as a suffrage worker and speaker and organizer of woman’s parades, being featured in them both in New York, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere as “the most beautiful suffragette.”

In July, 1913, she married by a civil ceremony in London, Eugene Boissevain, a wealthy Hollander. In 1916 she went as a delegate on the Ford Pence Ship, but left the party at Stockholm, because, as she said in a statement, “the undemocratic methods employed by the managers are repugnant to my principles.” Mrs. Boissevain was born in New York, August 6, 1886, receiving her early education in New York, London and Berlin.

The Daily Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) Nov 27, 1916

Strain of Campaign … Caused Her Death.
[Excerpts]

Mrs. Boissevain’s illness was diagnosed as aplastic anemia and blood transfusion was resorted to in attempts to improve her condition. Miss Vida Milholland twice gave blood for this purpose and on four other occasions friends submitted to the ordeal in hope that benefit would result. After each transfusion temporary improvement was followed by relapse….

It was stated that Mrs. Boissevain’s trouble originated in her tonsils, which became inflamed as the result of too constant speaking during the campaign. She had been weakened by overexertion and when she became ill her system failed to resist the advance of the disease….

As a student at Vassar college, 1905-9, although known as the college beauty and possessed of wealth and position, she shunned society as such and shocked the more conservative college opinion by her radical social views….

Later the same year [1915] she went to Italy as a war correspondent and was forced to leave Italy by the authorities there because of her pacifist writings….

She was a member of the Political Equality League, Women’s Political Union, national child labor committee, Woman’s Social and Political Union of England and the Fabian Society, England.

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Nov 27, 1916

BEAUTIFUL SUFFRAGIST LEADER TO BE BURIED IN ADIRONDACKS
[Excerpts]

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 27. — Preparations were being made today to take the body of Mrs. Inez Milholland Boissevain, who died here Saturday night, to New York City for funeral services and thence to Meadowmount, in the Adirondacks, the old family home of the Milhollands, where the burial will take place….

Aside from her college activities, she worked among the poor children in the city of Poughkeepsie, and had herself appointed probation officer. During her first college vacation she visited London and there joined the Pankhurst suffragettes, making several speeches and being once arrested….

Following her graduation from Vassar College, she attempted to enter Harvard Law School, but his permission was denied her on the ground that it was not a coeducational institution.  The incident gave rise to a heated newspaper controversy in which Inez Milholland and other prominent feminists took part. She also became active about this time in the working girls’ cause, taking part in the shirt waist makers’ strike. In the clash of the strikers with the police she was arrested and locked up, but after a controversy of several weeks the charge against her of leading an unlawful assembly was finally dropped….

She began the practice of law in 1912 as a clerk in the offices of James W. Osborne, her first case being the defense of “Red Phil” Davidson, charged with murder of “Big Jack” Zelig. Her next case was the defense of Gee Doy Yung, accused of murder in a Chinatown tong war, and she was successful in obtaining his acquittal….

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 27, 1916

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Dec 30, 1916

Her mother was Jean (Torrey) Milholland: Talks About Women

Her father, John E. Milholland: Racist Issue Hits Feminist Party

Strawberry Insanity

August 3, 2012

INSANITY FROM STRAWBERRIES.

Fruit Causes Irritating Rash, Which Has Resulted in Mental Derangement.

Waterbury (Conn) Dispatch New York Herald

Thousands of persons in this city, Naugatuck, Beacon Falls, Seymour, Torrington and Thomaston are suffering from a rash or from rheumatism, which, physicians say, is caused by eating strawberries.

The rash resembles eczema in some cases and psoriasis in others. It causes intense itching, and some persons, unable to sleep or to obtain relief, have become temporarily insane.

Those afflicted with rheumatism say that a few hours after eating the berries they began to have sharp pains in the muscles of the back and limbs. Several persons thought they had suffered a paralytic stroke.

Dr. Frank J. Tuttle, medical examiner of Naugatuck, is one of the victims, and a dozen other physicians are afflicted. They attribute the epidemic to the eating of strawberries from the South that were green when shipped and ripened after arrival here. They say that such berries contain an uncommonly large quantity of acid, which causes rheumatism in persons susceptible thereto and a rash in others.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Jun 8, 1915

THE BALEFUL STRAWBERRY.

Sulkiness, Rash and Headache Caused by It — Safety Limit Twelve.

Hygenists who delight in raising alarms against popular foods are now tilting against strawberries, says a London special cable dispatch to the New York Sun. These are accused of having a bad effect upon the tempers of their eaters, who, it is alleged, become sulky and irritable after eating them.

A hygenist is quoted as saying that ladies are particularly susceptible in this respect. Some of them will eat a pound or more of strawberries at a time and then become so morose that people are glad to avoid them.

The fact is, they are physically ill without knowing it. They are suffering from the strawberry disease, the symptoms of which are slight dizziness, a desire to be alone and intolerance of being questioned.

The strawberries which have the worst effect are large mashy ones. The small kinds, with seeds on the surface, are usually harmless. The trouble is ascribed to the strawberry acids, which cream does not mollify. Indeed, the fruit is more wholesome without cream or sugar, and nobody should eat more than a dozen at a time.

Eustace Miles, the tennis player, as a vegetarian dietist confirms the danger to some persons from strawberries. He says they contain three acids, phosphoric, sulphuric and silicic. He believes that the last named causes the trouble. In addition to irritability, sufferers have strawberry rash and strawberry headache.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Jun 11, 1907

Hermit Digs Own Grave

June 22, 2012

Image from RED TAIL TRAILS – Pacoima Canyon via Dillon Divide

HERMIT DIGS OWN GRAVE.

Then Goes Home to Die, Leaving Pathetic Note to Coroner.

Los Angeles Dispatch to New York Sun.

“Dutch Louie,” known throughout the Southwest as the hermit of the Pacoima, a few days ago walked slowly from his hut, which is 5 miles from Pacoima, and selecting a spot on the hillside, dug himself a narrow grave.

Then he returned to his home, dressed himself in his best clothing and lay down to die. All that he told in a letter he wrote to the coroner just before he lay down for the last time.

The note, a pitiful chronicle of hope that never died, asked the coroner to bury him without ceremony in the grave he had dug and to mark it only with a scant inscription, “Dutch Louie.”

“I don’t fear death,” wrote the hermit. “It is the inevitable wages of life — and I have lived. For scores of years I have lived in the hope of finding the bonanza I had dreamed of and prayed for. I never found it, but I was cheered to the end by the star of hope.”

The body was found by hunters.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Jun 8, 1915

Nothin’ Doin’

June 19, 2012

Images from Vanished Americana

NOTHIN’ DOIN’.

J.M. Lewis, in Houston Post.

Gee whiz! School has been out a week,
And here I am till yet!
It does not matter how I seek
There ain’t no job to get!
There don’t nobody want a kid
Like me in no one’s store,
But, ding it all! I wish they did!
I’m gittin’ good and sore!

I’ve tackled every store on Main,
But they don’t need no one;
This huntin’ jobs gives me a pain,
I’m very nearly done!
I’ll try just one more ice cream store,
And just one candy shop,
Then not try any more no more —
Just try these two and stop!

When I get big I’ll start a place,
The biggest place in town,
Where boys like me can feed their face
Whenever they come down;
And little girls can come there, too,
And eat just all they can!
That is the way that I will do
When I become a man.

And when they’ve et their cream and start
To pay for it I
Will say: “Why, bless your little heart,”
You didn’t come to buy!
You only come to visit me,
And I am glad you did!
And my friends get their ice cream free;
I used to be a kid.”

I cannot find no man like what
I’m meanin’ for to be,
And not a one in town has got
A job of work for me.
Nobody pays me any mind,
As far as I can tell,
I guess I’ll have to try to find
Some rags and bones to sell.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Jun 8, 1915

Columbus and the Egg

October 10, 2011

You doubtless have all heard the many references to the story of Columbus and the egg, so here is the true story as handed down the ages from Columbus’ own time.

After Columbus returned from his perilous voyage many of the couriers, who were jealous of him, taunted him with the words, “Anybody could have done what you did just by sailing steadily westward.”

“To be sure,” said the navigator, “but I’ll show you something you can’t do.” Calling for an egg, he asked them to make it stand steady on its smallest end.

They all tried, but all in vain. Then Columbus took a knife, and with a stroke flattened the end so that the egg stood firmly on the table.

“Oh,” cried the courtiers, “we did not know you meant us to di it that way. That’s easy.”

“Anything is easy if you know how,” answered Columbus; “so it is with the discovery of the new world.”

Children, think of Columbus and his men, with discouragement of the public, a poorly equipped fleet, and only a question-mark way off on the horizon to respond to the anxious “wither?”

October 12, 1492, should be emblazoned on every American mind, and the name COLUMBUS should be synonymous with courage, valor, daring and greatness.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Nov 10, 1915

 

SEASONABLE PUZZLERS.

My first is the World Columbus reached
When he sailed out West from the old;
My second is what Columbus did
At the end of his voyage bold,
My third is something Columbus saw
‘Twixt the sea and the sky so blue
On October the 12th, that wonderful year
Of fourteen and ninety and two,
My whole’s an animal shaggy and big,
Ever ready a life to save —
The animal’s known as the Children’s friend
And he’s gentle as he is brave.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Nov 10, 1915


Columbus Day Thought

In fourteen hundred and ninety-two, they say, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. He was forty-six years old and had met discouragements which would have deterred most men. But he stuck to his belief that the earth was round and if you started sailing towards the sun eventually you’d find a short cut to the east; if you kept going long enough you’d come around full circle to your home.

Because he did not let sneers or hardships get him down, he finally got his three ships started. Because he would not let a mutiny turn him back he finally was able to give us our lovely land. Canada got hers, too, more of it than ours. The South American states got theirs. Beauty and fertility and strength were in that earth and we have all shared in their power.

When boys and girls get tired of school, and play hookey in spirit if not in person on enticing outdoor days, they might remember old Christopher and stick it out. For the lad and lass who do their school work well will run their lives well. They learn concentration and self-control, which stand them in good stead all their lives.

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Oct 12, 1953

She Gets a Pension

July 9, 2010

After nearly forty years of continual service as a teacher in the employ of the public schools of Oakland, Miss Rebecca A. Bills of 961 Jackson street, of this city will have for her faithful work, the distinction of being the first woman in Alameda county to be pensioned from the teacher’s pension bill which goes into effect August 10 of this year.

During the lengthy period of service with the Oakland schools, Miss Bills has been most actively identified with activities of the primary grades, being especially devoted to the younger grammar school children. Miss Bill first became identified with the local educational branch in 1872 when she was appointed to one of the graded classes of the Lafayette Grammar school.

Later she was given a class in the old Irving school serving until 1875 under J.B. McChesney. In that year, she was transferred to Mills Seminary in East Oakland, where she taught for two years.

This was followed by a short six-month leave of absence and after a short term in the San Leandro school she was elected to a position in July, 1878, to the Lincoln Grammar school with which institution she has been connected until Friday, which concluded her career of teaching.

TAKES  TRIP ABROAD.

According to present plans, Miss Bill will leave for a trip through the various cities and places of interest in Europe, returning by way of the Panama Canal and arriving here on time to witness the Panama Pacific Exposition in 1915 in San Francisco. At the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. Cotton at 961 Jackson street, with whom she has resided for the past fifteen years, Miss Bills recalled several reminiscences of her career.

“I graduated from Mt. Holyoke University Mass. in 1867,” she said, “and after several weeks of traveling arrived in Oakland early in the year 1868. My first experience as a teacher was at the Pacific Young Ladies’ Seminary which was located where the Merritt hospital now stands. It was in this year that the great earthquake similar to that of 1906 occurred. I was the last to leave the building, taking two small Spanish girls with me. They were both badly frightened and cried out in terror. It was one of the most dreadful experiences I have ever gone through.”

Miss Bills also taught at the same institution for some time after its removal to Eddy and Taylor streets in San Francisco.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jun 29, 1913

MRS. SYMONS ENDS 33 YEARS SERVICE AS SCHOOL TEACHER

Seated comfortably in her cozy home on Fifth street, Mrs. Eleanor Symons, Elyria’s veteran school teacher, entertainingly discussed her long service of thirty-three years in the public schools and let her mind run back over the years that she has been engaged in training the youth of this community.

“I hardly know how to express myself,” said Mrs. Symons, “but I feel as if I had earned a vacation and a needed rest. My years of teaching have been pleasant ones, and I presume I will be lost when I retire in June.”

Eleanor M. Baker Symons was born in Spring Creek, Pa., in 1851 and attended the district school summer and winter. At the age of fifteen she obtained her first county certificate, and that winter began her first school. She was then but sixteen and taught 66 days for $24 in cash with her board thrown in, boarding around in the old-fashioned way. This was not considered a hardship as it had many pleasant sides to it.

“Some of the most delightful and lasting friends came into recognition in this way,” said she. “The school ma’am had the best of everything and was always invited to all the festivities of the district. I taught six years in the county schools and then went into the Corry public schools and taught the spring term as assistant eighth grade teacher and principal. The following summer the president and secretary drove to my home to see if I would take the position of the principal, as she had resigned.

Reluctantly, and after much urging, I consented to try it, with the result that I taught there until the Christmas of 1876 when I resigned and was married. I came to Elyria in 1877 and for one year was home sick as I did not know a child on the street.

Mr. Symons was working in the Democrat office. George G. Washburn was the editor of this paper and in February of 1878 he invited me to visit the schools with him on a certain Tuesday. I gladly went, not knowing then that Superintendent Parker was anxious to find a teacher for his one A grammar school. This fact, however, was known to Mr. Washburn, who had been asked by the superintendent to bring about this visit so he could size me up. Mr. Parker walked home with me at noon and asked if I had certificates, recommendations etc., I had, and he took them with him, after explaining his desire to find a teacher so he could release Miss Josie Staub, who soon became Mrs. D.C. Baldwin.

On Thursday evening of this same week, Mr. Parker called and said I had been hired by the board to teach and was to begin the following Monday. He advised me to visit Miss Staub and get somewhat acquainted with this work for the next week, which I did. I taught this grade for seven years and resigned, never intending to teach again, and I did not teach a day for six years. Then Mr. Parker sent for me to help out for a day, a week or maybe a fortnight.

The fall of 1894, he came for me to take the A grammar school taught by Miss Whitbeck, who was obliged to stop on account of illness. He put aside all my excuses for not taking up the work and I went into the school again on the following Monday. On the following Friday Miss Whitbeck passed away and of course, I remained until the end of the school year, and as you know I have been there ever since. I want to thank everybody connected in any way with the Elyria public schools, the different board members, superintendents, teachers, children and parents, for making my long years of teaching such years of joy and happiness.”

Well does the writer remember Mrs. Symons’ first year in school for he was a member of her class. It was a tough school to take charge of and was full of smart Aleck boys and a few frivolous girls, who did not have much idea of what they went to school for. However, the majority of the school were good students, and being a strict disciplinarian, Mrs. Symons soon brought order out of chaos. All will agree that Mrs. Symons has been able to discipline her schools in the right way. She knows when to be lenient, and when to be stern, with absolute justice at all times to her pupils. Some of her pupils with whom she had to be severe, have since written and thanked her for the advice she had given them, and these letters from all over the world are among her prized possessions. Little did the boy back in ’78 dream that in 1921 he would be telling the story of Mrs. Symons’ long years of service in the public print. But it is a genuine pleasure to give tribute to this splendid character whose life has been devoted to the youth of Elyria.

When she retires in June, she will be one of the first to receive the benefit of the teacher’s pension fund that a thoughtful legislature has provided for that splendid body of men and women, who mould the minds of men and women of tomorrow to become useful, orderly, patriotic, educated citizens.

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Jun 5, 1921

Miss Kate Stanton, teacher in Wayne township school No. 9, who has taught school for 43 years, retired under the teacher’s pension law at the close of her school term last Friday. She will receive $700 a year the remainder of her life. Miss Stanton is the first teacher in Wayne county to receive a pension.

Cambridge City Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Apr 5, 1917

TEACHER 53 YEARS

SACRAMENTO, July 9. — Fifty-three years of teaching is the record submitted by Mrs. Fannie L. Walsh, of Salinas, who has applied to the California State Board of Education for a teacher’s pension. This is the longest term of teaching ever submitted by any applicant.

Trenton Evening Times ( Trenton, New Jersey) Jul 9, 1915