Posts Tagged ‘1918’

The Warmth of Perfection

December 11, 2012

Vintage Perfection Oil Heater

Image from Etsy

Oil Heater - Perfection - The News - Frederick MD 24 Dec 1907

Glowing Heat From Every Ounce of Fuel

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 24, 1907

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Gettysburg Times PA 09 Dec 1911

Clean Dry Heat

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 9, 1911

Oil Heater - Perfection - Olean Evening Times NY 24 Dec 1912

Houses Without Chimneys

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Dec 24, 1912

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 12 Dec 1914

Baby’s Morning Dip

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 12, 1914

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 18 Dec 1915

A Touch of a Match Brings a Touch of Spring

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 18, 1915

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Frederick Post MD 18 Dec 1918

Emergency Heating

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Dec 18, 1918

Oil Heater - Perfection - The Gettysburg Times PA 18 Dec 1918

Don’t Waste Coal

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Dec 18, 1918

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Kitchen Police

December 10, 2012

kp duty - potato peeler

KITCHEN POLICE.
(K.P.)

(This poem presumably written by a soldier is valuable as indicating the saving sense of humor possessed by our men and which carries them through the difficult days of the training period and sustains them in the sterner and more trying days that follow.)

_______

Sitting here in the kitchen, peeling a bucket of spuds,
Wearing a dirty apron to cover my blue serge duds,
A hundred thousand in the bank, “Society man” — that’s me;
Just because I was late at roll call, they gave me a week’s K.P.

Sitting here in the kitchen, with slops all over my jeans;
Picking rocks and splinters out of a barrel of beans,
My thoughts have gone a-wandering to what I used to be
Before I missed that last post car and they gave me a week’s K.P.

I think of the nights I squandered, doing the barroom stunt;
Gee! what a sissy I was — what a hopeless, hopeless runt!
Oh, I was there with the girls, boys, and they called me a “lady’s man.”
What would they say if they saw me now, scraping a greasy pan.

The mess sergeant’s a slaver; he gives a man no rest.
The first cook is a villain, but I have the second best.
Oh, sure, boys, I enlisted to march away to war,
But they’ve got me here in the kitchen, doing the company chores.

A week policing the kitchen, watching the biscuits browned —
Me, who used to order two thousand men around.
I wonder what those two thousand would say if they saw me now
Washing a hundred dishes, ready for 6 o’clock chow?

Two months ago, in a greenhouse, I held Anita’s hand,
Told her that I had enlisted to fight for my native land.
She leaned her head on my shoulder, said she’d be proud of me;
She’d be proud, all right, if she saw me now, doing a week’s K.P.

Dumping the slush in the hogpan, scrubbing the kitchen floor,
Swabbing a slimy mush-pan until my hands are sore,
Fixing the hash for supper, putting ice in the tea —
Archibald Percival Knutty, “society man” — that’s me!

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Jul 25, 1918

Tin Soldiers, Toy Soldiers, Wartime Toys

December 8, 2012

Tin Soldier Cut-Outs - Edwardsville Intelligencer IL 06 Dec 1941

He was only a little tine soldier then,
To be used as a battering ram;
Today he’s the pride of a nation wide —
He’s the nephew of Uncle Sam.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 6, 1941

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

THE Toyville army, marching
Into billets ‘neath a chair,
Discovered two tin soldier spies
Beneath the carpet there.

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

The captain sternly marched them out,
Their case and fate to settle.
They stood at ease with steady knees,
For they were men of mettle!

Toyville Army 3 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

I’m glad Ted chanced to pass just then
And took a hand. He thrust
The two spies in his pocket,
To the captain’s great disgust!

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 12, 1918

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

THE Toyville army bravely marched
Across high table land,
Upon the table edge, some one
Forgot the right command!

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

No welcome “Halt!” to bid them stay,
So like the gallant host of yore,
Theirs not to question, but obey,
They fell in companies to the floor.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 19, 1918

Wartime Christmas - Reno Evening Gazette NV - 16 Nov 1942

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 16, 1942

LITTLE TIN SOLDIER.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright should your captain say,
“Fall out, dismissed, well done — let’s play!”

Or would the Something that comes with drill
O’ershadow you, follow you, hinder you still —
And you hear like the beat of a distant tattoo,
“Count off, front and rear, one two .  .  .  one two?”

Time was, I am sure, though you look so grim
There’s a gleam in your eye, though ’tis often dim,
When your memory quickens and troubles you
As you quick-step, march — one two, one two.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright if I said what is true,
“I love you, my darling — I do, I do?”

— Ann Drew.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jul 4, 1926

Be a Tin Soldier - Billings Gazette MT 08 Jul 1945

Billigns Gazette (Billings, Montana) Jul 8, 1945

Pumpkin Pie Time

November 13, 2012

THE OLD-STYLE PUMPKIN PIE.

Some like a fancy custard pie.
Or apple, mince or game.
Or some new-fangled article,
I ‘low, just for the name,
I ain’t so p’tic’lar’s some I know,
And different from the rest.
But the good old-fashioned pumpkin pies
Are what I love the best.

I’m hankerin’ for a piece, right now.
Of the pie that mother made,
When I came home from school I,d get
A hunk and in I’d wade.
And, (p’r’aps my mouth is somewhat large)
Though I’d resort to tears.
She wouldn’t give me another piece
Because it mussed my ears.

I’ve lingered here a lifetime since,
Put up with what I got,
But oft in dreams I’m back again
To that old familiar spot.
And then, at such times, I can find,
On the butt’ry shelf arrayed,
A row of good old pumpkin pies,
The kind that mother made.

— Philadelphia Times.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Nov 3, 1898

Times Record (New York) Nov 4, 1943

FOR THE IDEAL PUMPKIN PIE
_____
Why Wait Until Thanksgiving to Enjoy This Exclusively American Delicacy? — Make It Now.
_____

Our neighbor came to call early this morning with lips stained a dark purple from a saunter through the arbor; on his arm he carried a basket of grapes and in each hand a big red apple, and in his buttonhole a spray of goldenrod, and the first red autumn leaf made him quite gorgeous. Under his arm he carried a pumpkin, so we invited him to breakfast.

One should not wait until Thanksgiving for the first pumpkin pie, but begin putting their appetite in training for the feast by some preliminary work on the American pastry.

Steam the pumpkin instead of boiling it, and when cool press it through a fine sieve or vegetable press.

For each pie allow a pint of this strained pumpkin, one cup of rich milk, one egg, one-half cup of sugar, one teaspoon of ginger, one-half teaspoon of allspice, one-half teaspoon of cinnamon and a little salt.

If the milk is brought to the boiling point before the other ingredients are added the pie will bake more smoothly.

The crust should be baked before the filling is put in, as this prevents it becoming soggy. Unlike most custard pies, pumpkin requires to be baked quickly. When the top is brown, firm to the touch and glossy it is done.

— Henrietta D. Grauel, in the Cleveland Leader.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 11, 1912

The Frederick Post (Frederick, Maryland) Nov 20, 1923

CRADLE SONG

For the frost-rime now approaches,
And the price of eggs is high,
While the grapes hang blue and purple
On the vines.
From their store the wild bee poaches
Knowing winter time is nigh,
And the pickle snuggles deeper
In the brine.

Winter’s coming, coming, coming,
And the vittles that it brings
Fetch a trembling tear of gladness
To the eye.
You can hear the turkeys drumming
While the first fall sausage sings,
And the whipped cream lights upon
A pumpkin pie.

Love, the scoffing of the summer
That they talk of leaves us cold
All these ices and these salads
Give no thrill.
Each day’s rations leave one glummer
Yeh, but pumpkin pies are gold,
Welcome, then the blizzard coming
O’er the hill.

Kokomo Tribune (Kokomo, Indiana) Nov 21, 1929

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 26, 1912

The Frost Is on the Pumpkin, So of Course We’ll Have Pie

Open Season For Dessert Popular Since Pilgrim Days

By LOUISE BENNETT WEAVER
AP Feature Service Writer

ITS OPEN SEASON for pumpkin pie, a dessert treasured in America since Pilgrim days.

In preparing this famous fall pastry, there are three important things to consider. First, the crust’ it should be short and well fitted into a deep pie dish. Second, the filling; it must be subtley pungent — not too spicy or too flat — and it should be very creamy and a rich brown color. Most important is the baking.

Cook the pie ten minutes in a moderately hot over — about 450 degrees. That helps prevent a soggy under crust. Then reduce the heat to moderately slow — about 325 degrees — for forty-five minutes to give the filling its desired velvety texture. Always cool the pie on a rack.

DRY PUMPKINS ARE BEST

You can use any of the excellent canned varieties of pumpkin for the filling or cook up your own golden fruit. If you cook your own, cut the pumpkin into medium-sized pieces, discard peel, seeds and fibrous portions. Steam until the pulp is soft and press it through a fine sieve.

Dry mealy pumpkins make the best pies. So, if your pumpkin is moist, cook it over a low heat or in a double boiler until the moisture has evaporated.

If your recipe calls for three eggs and you are a little short, you can substitute two tablespoons of flour for one egg. Add it with the sugar.

TOP DRESSING

Pumpkin pie fillings sometimes have a flecked appearance, but you can easily prevent it by thoroughly blending together the sugar, salt, spices and pumpkin before adding liquids.

The favored pie steps right out when it’s dressed up with a new topping. For instance, then minutes before time to take the pie from the oven, sprinkle it generously with grated cheese or carefully cover it wit ha slightly sweetened meringue flavored with a few gratings of orange peel.

Cocoanut, marshmallows, chopped candied ginger (just a dash), candied fruit peels, dates, raisins or nuts also introduce variety. Use them for topping or add them to the filling before it is baked.

A sponge or chiffon pumpkin pie is of the lighter, fluffier kind. Add the egg yolks with main part of the ingredients and then lightly fold in the beaten whites just before the mixture is poured into the crust. A whipped cream coating gives this pie a real party air.

A two-crust pumpkin pie is a novelty. Bake a one-crust pie, as usual and at the same time bake a lid of pricked crust that will just fit on top of the pumpkin. Just before serving the pie, slip the lid into place.

PUMPKIN PIE

Two cups steamed and strained pumpkin (canned pumpkin may be used), 1 cup pure New Orleans molasses, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1-2 teaspoon salt, 1 egg, 1 cup rich milk.

Mix ingredients in order given and bake in one crust. Top of pie should be sprinkled with sugar, cinnamon and dots of butter before it is put into the oven. Canned pumpkin is excellent. Crackers, rolled fine, can be added to mixture in place of the egg in pumpkin pie. Serve warm and topped with whipped cream.

Abilene Reporter News (Abilene, Texas) Oct 28, 1938

The Daily Herald (Chicago, Illinois) Jan 25, 1918

Positively Insulting.

“I know the pumpkin pie was rather thin as to filling,” said the landlady, almost crying, “but I don’t think he had any right to say what he did.”

“What did he say?” asked the second table boarder.

“He asked me if I didn’t think that the pie crust would be improved if it had another coat of paint.”

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Feb 7, 1899

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Oct 21, 1928

WASHINGTON, Nov. 26. — The art of camouflage has now reached the good old pumpkin pie. Mrs. G.M. King, of 241 William street, East Orange, N.J., today sent to the National Emergency Food Garden Commission a recipe for making pumpkin pie without the pumpkin.

Here it is:

Scald one quart of milk; add scant cup of Indian meal; little salt. When cool add two eggs, cinnamon and ginger to taste. Sweeten with brown sugar. Put a little cream or milk on top and bake.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 26, 1917

Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin Pie is almost as old in the American history of feasting as those hungry Redskins who attended the first Thanksgiving get-together on the Massachusetts coast. Here are two recipes — one more or less in the homey tradition, the other based on a newer process.

Mix 1 tablespoon old-fashioned molasses with 1/4 cup brown sugar, then mix this with 1 1/2 cups cooked, mashed and strained pumpkin, or canned pumpkin. To this mixture add a pinch of salt, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg and 2 cups milk. Beat 2 eggs until fluffy, then add. Line your pie plates with your most perfect pastry, pour in this mixture and bake in hot oven 10 minutes, then in moderate oven about 35 minutes more.

Modern recipe: Mix these: 1 cup steamed, strained, canned pumpkin, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1/2 teaspoon cloves, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 3 well-beaten eggs, 1 1/3 cups sweetened condensed milk, 1 cup water. Pour into unbaked pie shell. Bake in hot oven for 10 minutes and reduce heat to moderate and bake another 35 minutes, or until crust has set.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 22, 1936

Variations on the familiar Thanksgiving dessert theme is the rule in the Maltby household in northwestern New York state. Lucy Maltby, noted American interpreter of what the average American family likes best to eat, says, “Let’s have both a mince meat dessert and a pumpkin pie this Thanksgiving, and add a surprise element to the dinner.”

Mrs. Maltby, an old friend of readers of this column, has worked out this mouth-watering “old wine in new bottles” recipe exclusively for us.

BUTTERSCOTCH PUMPKIN PIE
(8 Servings)

Pastry — 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1-2 teaspoon salt, 2-3 cup lard or other fat, 6 to 8 tablespoons ice water.

Filling — 3 eggs, 1-2 cup dark-brown sugar, 1-2 cup granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, 1-4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1-2 teaspoon ginger, 1-4 teaspoon cloves, 1 3-4 cups cooked pumpkin, 1 3-4 cups milk.

Sift flour, baking powder and salt together. Cut in shortening until the size of lima beans with a pastry blender or two knives. Add ice water a little at a time, mixing it in with a fork. Pat dough together and chill if possible.

For the filling, separate eggs; beat yolks until foamy. Mix with yolks the brown sugar, granulated sugar, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cloves and pumpkin. Scald milk and add to pumpkin mixture.

Roll out about three quarters of dough on floured board. Line 10-inch pie plate, leaving about an inch overlapping the edges. Make double upright fold and pinch between thumb and forefinger to make fluted rim.

Beat egg whites until stiff and fold into pumpkin mixture. Pour filling into pastry lined pan. Roll out remainder of dough and cut pastry turkeys with turkey cutter. Place on top of filling. Bake in a hot oven (450 degrees F) for 10 minutes. Then reduce heat of oven to 350 degrees F and continue baking for 30 minutes or until knife comes out clean when inserted into pumpkin custard.

Abilene Reporter News (Abilene, Texas) 14 Nov 1941

Christopher Columbus Day

October 8, 2012

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 15, 1965

Christopher Columbus discovered America 426 years ago. The kaiser discovered it just about 425 years later, and to show his contempt for Spain he sinks an occasional ship of King Alfonso’s fleet.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Oct 28, 1918

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Oct 12, 1921

Siriusly – Hot “Dog Days” Weather

August 19, 2012

DOG DAYS.

I’ll sing a curious little song,
Perhaps you’ll find it dull and dreary;
In truth, I drive the Muse along,
And often notice she is weary.
To sing of dog days I’ll confess
Requires a lot of nerve and notion,
Still, if you’ll bear with me, I guess,
You’ll save lost motion.

When Sirius upon the scene
Climbs upward with his constellation,
The other stars feel real mean,
And drive the world to consternation;
Poor mortals must, perforce, throw fits,
Or seek the heart-destroying places;
Freak baths allure, the mud and sitz
Preserve our graces.

The angry stars get jealous now
Of Sirius, who roars and blusters —
He stirs all heaven to a row
With hypochondriac-like flusters.
Throughout this time when flies abaft
Our beam refuse to let us swat them,
This heavenly bully drives us daft —
We know we’ve “got them.”

Our cows — they give us buttermilk;
Our pigs break through our beds of tulips;
Our silk worms all refuse to silk,
We keep alive by mock mint juleps;
Just how we strive through heat and wet
Proves that our life’s no bed of clover —
Well — let us sweat and swear and get
These dog days over!

Fort Wayne Weekly Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Jul 23, 1917

Never Go.

Misfortune ne’er leaves us,
A fact which is plain —
The dog days have left us,
But cat nights remain.

— Detroit Tribune.

Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois) Aug 29, 1905

FOR HOT WEATHER.

Dog Days and Cat Nights.

“Making any progress toward getting acquainted with those fashionable people next door?”

“Just a little. Their cat invited our cat over to a musicale last night.”

Fitchburg Daily Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Aug 31, 1918

Let Us Play the Game to Win

June 6, 2012

LET US PLAY THE GAME TO WIN

BY LUCIUS WINCHESTER.

(This poem was written last spring when young Winchester was only fourteen years old. He is the son of Lucius W. Winchester, 170 Oakdale avenue.)

Dire war has come upon us, with its struggling and its strife,
And the weeping of the widows, and the loss of human life;
But above the roar of battle, o’er the tumult and the din
I can hear a voice entreating,
“Let us play the game to win!”

Yes, I know we did not want it, but now that it is here,
Let us welcome it with shouting, let us greet it with a cheer,
And through the heat of battle, ‘midst the suffering and the sin,
Let us fight for all we’re worth —
Let us play the game to win!

And in the awful struggle, with the slaughter at its height,
We will show the German kaiser that Americans can fight!
We will rush to help our country, and we’ll die ere we give in;
We’ll show them we’re not quitters —
For we play the game to win!

Yes, war is now upon us, with its suffering and its pain,
And the weeping of the loved ones o’er the bodies of the slain.
Though we know well that War is Hell, since now that we are in,
Let’s fight for right with all our might —
Let’s play the game to win!

And when the struggle’s over, and when the fight is won,
And with carnage, pain and strife, all the nations shall be done,
Let us say it with a fervor, let us say it with a grin,
“Why, we couldn’t help but win it —
For we played the game to win!”

The Daily Review (Decatur, Illinois) Aug 29, 1918

Today in History: Woolworth Opens First Store

June 21, 2011

Image from the City of WATERTOWN New York website

June 21, 1879, F.W. Woolworth opened his first store. Although it failed almost immediately, he didn’t give up, and  eventually, Woolworth became a household name. Here is a collection of items mentioning Woolworth’s, from company business, to jokes, a movie and chewing tobacco; together they show the influence of the Woolworth “brand.”

FIVE AND TEN CENT STORES IN BIG TRUST

NEW YORK, Nov. 3. — A $65,000,000 corporation to merge the greatest string of 5 and 10 cent stores in America is announced today by F.W. Woolworth. Six hundred concerns will enter the new corporation, which will be known as F.W. Woolworth and Co.

The new corporation will take over the business of F.W. Woolworth of New York; S.H. Knox & Co. of Buffalo; F.M. Kirby & Co. of Wilkes-barre, Pa.; the E.P. Charleston & Co. of Fall River, Mass.; C.S. Woolworth of Scranton, Pa.; W.H. Moore of Watertown, N.Y., and W.H. Moors & Son of Schenectady, N.Y.
The corporation also will assume a controlling interest in the English business of F.W. Woolworth & Co. limited.

All the concerns involved in the merger own a chain of 5 and 10 cent stores, 600 in number, in all sections of the United States, Canada and England.

It is understood the new corporation will have 7 per cent preferred stock to the value of $15,000,000 and common stock to the value of %50,000,000. It is said that Goldman, Sachs and Co. and Lehman Bros. of New York and Kleinwortsen & Co. of Cleveland will acquire an interest in the new company.

Woolworth one of the founders of the scheme, was one of the originators of the 5 and 10 cent store business and has piled up  millions of dollars on his chain of establishments in which 10 cents will buy anything in the store. His fortune is so great that practically unaided he financed the building of the great building in course of construction in lower Broadway, which will tour 50 stories about the street.

The life of F.W. Woolworth head of the big merger announced today, is the romance of an idea. It is the story of how a tremendous store was built up from nickels and dimes.

Woolworth is the head himself of 286 stores besides supplementary warehouses in Lewistown, Maine, and Denver, Colorado. He has twenty stores in England.

A recent census showed that 1,500,000 persons entered his stores in a day.

The man who mastered such a business is less than 50 years of age. He started without wages as a farmer’s boy in a dry goods store in Watertown, N.Y., set up his first store in 1879 and has been in business for 30 years. He was born in Jefferson county, New York.

When he worked in a store as a boy he evolved the idea that brought him great wealth. Woolworth fixed a uniform price — five and ten cents. He opened his first store in Utica, but the proposition did not go. He tried again in Lancaster, Pa., and there laid the foundation for his fortune. Now Lancaster is an important Woolworth center with a new warehouse that is one of the sights of the town.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Nov 8, 1911

After deliberating nearly 11 hours a Des Moines, Ia., jury last night decided that bay rum sold in a Woolworth five and ten cent store there is “an intoxicating liquor fit for beverage purposes and should be condemned as such.”

Of course the decision applies only to bay rum in the Des Moines store. It will not affect the sale of similar “lotion” in the Edwardsville Woolworth store, or in stores elsewhere in the country.

As a matter of fact it seems that Edwardsville residents who are brave enough to tackle the liquid will be better off than the folks in Des Moines. Testimony in court there was to the effect that a dime would buy three ounces of the liquid.

Image from The California Perfume Company website

Here it was possible this morning to purchase for a dime a bottle of bay rum, which, according to the label, contained four ounces. The label also said that the liquid contains “60 per cent of alcohol, by volume.” There is nothing to indicate the character of the remaining 10 per cent.

The Iowa case resulted from the seizure, some months ago, by state officers of 3,000 bottles of bay rum. The state charged that the liquid was intoxicating and fit for beverage purposes, which view was upheld by the jury. There was no charges against Woolworth officials, the state merely seeking to confiscate the bottles. Counsel for the company objected.

It was announced today that an appeal would be taken.

At the same time prosecuting authorities at Des Moines announced that a drive would be instituted against sale of bay rum anywhere with their jurisdiction.

So far as is known, this is the first time a jury has passed upon the question of whether bay rum is intoxicating and fit for beverage purposes.

Edwardsville, Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Sep 13, 1929

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) May 10, 1919

HE WAS THIRSTY TOO

I spied a smart dog quench his thirst in Woolworths 10c store yesterday. Watching the people take a drink at the bubbler, he raised up and helped himself also, to the amusement of all who saw it. G.L.C.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Apr 14, 1923

Customer to girl pounding a piano in Woolworth’s: “Would you mind playing Some Time?”

Girl: “Wadda ya think I’m doin’ big boy? Sleepin’?”

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Aug 12, 1926

He — “I’ll take the first two dances.”

She (who worked in Woolworth’s) — “Twenty cents, please.”

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 20, 1926

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Oct 18, 1923

STABS AND JABS AND COUNTERS
By JOE WILLIAMS

Yes, we call those tricky little golf holes “Woolworths.” We make ’em in five or ten.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Aug 24, 1927

Bob: “If you stand over a dime what would you resemble?”

Rob: “I don’t know.”

Bob: “Woolworth’s. Nothing over ten cents.”

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Apr 11, 1922

ALICE WHITE LEADS CAST

Pulchritude and New Plot Ideas Mark Liberty Film.

Dialogue as she is spoke. A whiff of fresh plot ideas: Legs, Curves. Pulchritude with a pull. Good music, good singing, clever lines. That describes “The Girl From Woolworth’s,” which heads a good bill at the Liberty for three days beginning today.

But it doesn’t halfway describe the genuine enjoyment you’re going to get from this First National and Vitaphone offering, because we haven’t mentioned Alice White, the dynamic little star of the piece, and the rest of a really great cast.

Charles Delaney, that engaging young Irish ace of the World war and stunt flyer of the movies, who played opposite Miss White in “Broadway Babies,” is again her leading man. Wheeler Oakman, Ben Hall, Gladden James, Bert Moorehouse, Rita Flynn, Patricia Caron, William Orlamond and Milla Davenport appear in support.

These are not all familiar names on a film offering, because some of them are stage celebrities. Every member of the cast does excellent work And it wouldn’t be fair to pass up a mention of that delectable, pulchritudinous and clever night club chorus of 24 girls. They’re the regular First National — Vitaphone chorus, imported from Broadway, New York, and every inch, curve and kick is class. And William Beaudine‘s direction is splendid.

Still it seems that there is something more that should be said about “The Girl From Woolworth’s” as a charming, heart-touching little love story. The five-and-ten atmosphere, the big town background, the sophistication of the night club — and yet it’s human. That’s it. Human and direct and simple, so that it almost seems old-fashioned. Why, you can tell the story in one short sentence: The love of a boy and girl for each other in the wrong sort of Eden proves strong enough to make the Eden the right sort of garden after all.

By all means, take in “The Girl From Woolworth’s.”

Billings Gazette (Billings, Montana) Dec 29, 1929

*****

NOTE THE BARGAINS:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Oct 18, 1918

Left My Bed and Board

March 9, 2011

Perplexing Case.

Hon. James H. Knowlton, one of our most eminent Western advocates, met with the following perplexing adventure in his early practice in Wisconsin:

A stranger came into his office and abruptly informed his that his wife had deserted him, and wished to have her replevined at once. Knowlton told him that that remedy would not meet his case exactly, and went on to inform him that if he would be patient until the desertion had continued one year, he could obtain a divorce. —

The stranger said he did not know that he wanted a divorce. What he mostly feared was that his wife would run him in debt all over the country.

“In that case,” said Knowlton, “you had better post her.”

What his client understood him to mean by posting, remains a mystery to this day. He said, in a meditative way the he didn’t know where she had gone, and beside, that she was fully as strong as he was, and he didn’t believe he could post her, even if he knew where to find her.

Knowlton hastened to inform him that by posting his wife he meant puting a notice in a newspaper, saying:

“Whereas my wife Helen has left my bed and board without any just -”

“But that ain’t true,” interrupted the client — “that ain’t true. she didn’t leave my bed — she took it away with her.”

The Adams Sentinel (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 25, 1861

CAUTION.

WHEREAS my wife Anne, late widow of David Risher, had left my bed and board without just cause, on the 26th inst. — This is therefore to caution all persons, from trusting or harboring her on my account, as I am determined to pay no debts of her contracting after this date.

BALTZER KOONTZ, Son.
Bethlehem tp. July 27.

The Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) Aug 19, 1824

NOTICE. — WHEREAS MY WIFE, Anna Rolland, has left my bed and board I shall pay no more bills of her contracting from this date.

LEVI (his X mark) ROLLAND,
Fitchburg, Jan. 23, 1874.

The Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jan 29, 1874

Caution.

NOTICE is hereby given to all persons, that my wife Hannah Fosdick has left my bed and board, and has taken one of my children with her, John H. Fosdick. I hereby forbid all persons harboring or trusting her on my account, or in behalf of the child, as I will pay no debts of her contracting after this date; as I will support the child when returned to me at Norwalk.

JOHN M. FOSDICK.
Norwalk, Sept. 4, 1844

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) Sep 24, 1844

NOTICE.

I, the undersigned, caution the Public against trusting my Wife LYDIA M’WHIRTER — she having left my bed and board last October, without any provocation and against my consent. I will not pay any debts of her contracting from this date.

JOHN M’WHIRTER
Baltimore July 17, 1841.

The Adams Sentinel (Gettsyburg, Pennsylvania) Aug 2, 1841

CAUTION AND NOTICE.

WHEREAS my wife Elvira Bridges, without any good cause or reasonable excuse there for, has left my bed and board and absconded with my two children this is to caution all persons from harboring her or them and to give notice that I shall pay no debts of her contracting or pay any expense for their or either of their support having suitably provided for them at my house in Bucksport.

EPHRAIM BRIDGES, Jr.
Bucksport Oct 12 1841

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) Oct 26, 1841


NOTICE.

MY wife, REBECCA, left my bed and board, and refuses to live with me under any consideration whatever, after intercessions and propositions of every kind, that an affectionate husband could make. I, therefore, hereby warn all persons not to harbor or trust her on my account, as I have arrangements made for her board, and by calling on me, or on Messrs. Wareing & Benson, or C. & J. Culp, she can have information, and be conducted to the house.

MATHEW M’KELVEY.
Plymouth, Huron County, Nov. 16, 1842.

Huron Reflector (Norwalk, Ohio) Nov 29, 1842

Pass Him Round. — Mrs. Elizabeth Peterman, of Rochester, Fulton county, Indiana, thus notices her absconding husband: “Left my bed and board, last August, thereby making my expenses lighter, my dearly beloved companion, David Peterman, without any just cause or provocation. All the old maids and young girls are hereby forewarned against harboring or trusting him on my account, as I am determined not to be accountable for his debts, or, more especially, for his conduct. Papers will please copy, and oblige a female who is rejoicing at her happy riddance.” — Indiana Blade.

The Adams Sentinel (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Apr 13, 1846

Dennis O’Shanessy advertises as follows in the Columbus Republican: “I hereby give notice that my wife Bridget has left my bed and board and that I will not pay her debts, as we are not married.”

The Ohio Democrat (New Philadelphia, Ohio) Apr 12, 1872

Poetry Against Prose.

The following notices appear as advertisements in the Ticonderoga Sentinal of recent date:

NOTICE.

Whereas my wife Josephine has left my bed and board without just cause or provocation, all persons are hereby forbidden to trust or harbor her on my account, as I shall pay no debts of her contracting hereafter.

W.O. MEASECK.
_________
NOTICE.

No bed or board as yet we’ve had
From William O. or William’s dad.
Since last September, when we were wed,
Have furnished him both board and bed;
And for just cause and provocation
Have sent him home to his relation.

MRS. JOSIE MEASECK.

Josie has the best of it in wit if nothing else.

The Ohio Democrat (New Philadelphia, Ohio) Oct 5, 1893

NOTICE.

To whom it may concern: All persons are hereby notified that Joseph Leipert has left my bed and board without any cause or reason therefor, and that hereafter I will not be responsible for any board, lodging, clothing, food, expenses, or other article furnished him.

Dated at Corning, Iowa, February 26, 1898.

ANNA LEIPERT

Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa) Mar 10, 1898

NOTICE.

My husband, John S. Sanders, having left my bed and board, notice is hereby given the public not to sell him anything in my name as I will not be responsible for debts or bills contracted by him.

MRS. ANNA M. SANDERS,
New Oxford, Pa.

New Oxford Item (New Oxford, Pennsylvania) Sep 5, 1918

To all Whom it may Concern.

My wife, Francis Catching, having separated from me, and having left my bed and board without any just cause or provocation, I hereby notify all persons not to trust or give her credit on my account, as I will pay no bills, debts, or obligations contracted by her from and after this date, of any nature or kind whatever.

JOEL P. CATCHING.
Missoula, M.T., Feb. 23, 1883.

The Daily Miner (Butte, Montana) Mar 4, 1883

MY WIFE, Mrs. I.H. Tupen, having left my bed and board, I will not be responsible for any debts contracted by her after this date, December 11, 1919. Irving H. Tupen.

P.S. — Her name formerly was Miss Avy Alice Cutlip.

Woodland Daily Democrat (Woodland, California) Dec 19, 1919

NOW – 100 Years Ago

December 31, 2010

Now.

“Unto the day, the day,”
Tomorrow ne’er appears.
Live NOW, and put aside
Your dreams, your foolish fears.

“Unto the day, the day,”
NOW is the time to give
Of faith, and hope, and charity —
NOW is the time to live.

— Ethelind Lord in the Nautilus

Milford Mail (Milford, Iowa) Jan 5, 1911

Title: Unity, Volume 49
Authors: Unity Tract Society, Unity School of Christianity, Harry Houdini Collection (Library of Congress)
Publisher: Unity Tract Society, 1918
Page 525