Posts Tagged ‘1920’

Just The Same

December 9, 2012

Buying Power - Old Sock Hung With Care - Fresno Bee Republican CA 23 Dec 1947

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California)  Dec 23 1947

LIGHT SIDE OF LIFE.
By Roy K. Moulton.

JUST THE SAME.

The can threaten.
They can bellow.
They can go investigate,
But the cost of living rises just the same.
They can fume and
They can holler.
They can go and legislate,
But the cost of living rises just the same.
They can talk of deportation for the hardy profiteers.
They can bunk the patient public with a lot of phony steers.
They can wave their fists and orate for a half million years,
But the cost of living rises just the same.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 28, 1920

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Suppose Nobody Cared

November 4, 2012

SUPPOSE NOBODY CARED.

(BY RUSTY)

Suppose that you should die tonight
And leave a little one;
Suppose your call came suddenly,
With many things undone!
Suppose that one so dear to you
Were left all unprepared —
Suppose it happened wretchedly —
Suppose nobody cared!

Suppose it was a little girl
Who bore her mother’s eyes
And in whose laugh another’s voice
You’d sometimes recognize,
A voice that’s silent in the grave,
A voice that loved — and shared —
Suppose it was her babe and yours —
Suppose nobody cared!

For their dear sakes a little bit
Of God’s sweet charity!
For tho today it’s not your own,
Tomorrow it may be
Misfortune will have fallen on
The home that has been spared —
And you’ll thank God, beyond the grave,
Because somebody’s cared!

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Dec 24, 1920

Wine Woman and Song

November 2, 2012

Image from KCET

The State Department of Agriculture
Notes the fact
That apples and peaches
Are plentiful this year.
Let us, therefore,
Give a toast
To Cider, Flappers and Free Verse;
Which is as near as we can come
In these days of near-beer
To Wine, Woman and Song.

— Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Aug 13, 1920

Women Will Celebrate

August 26, 2012

WASHINGTON — A great jubilation to celebrate the successful culmination of woman’s long battle for suffrage will be held in the rotunda of the Capitol in October in event that Tennessee or Vermont adds the final chapter to ratification within the next month.

Women thruout the world will join the women’s organization of the United States in making it an historic event. The celebration will be the occasion of presenting the nation with marble busts of Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the three women who began the struggle for political freedom for their sex and died in it.

The busts have an interesting history. Collections of funds for them began thirty-four years ago. John Greenleaf Whittier, Longfellow and other noted men of the day were among the contributors. Finally enough was obtained to commission Adelaide Johnson, one of the best-known women sculptors, to make the busts. Miss Anthony herself raised $1,000 toward the fund.

After her death, and when most of the members of  the original committee organized to take charge of the fund had passed away, plans for completing the busts progressed but slowly. When the last member of the committee died, Ida Husted Harper, well known suffrage leader, was bequeathed possession of the funds with power of attorney.

Recently Dr. Harper gave the National Woman’s Party permission to take charge of the busts and present them to the government. The party is paying for their completion. The sculptor in her studio at Rome, Italy, is now adding the finishing touches to the busts, which were made from methods begun during the lifetime of the three suffrage pioneers.

They are to be placed in the Capitol. At present only one among the countless bronze and marble statues there is in memory of a woman. Frances E. Willard, alone among her sex, is honored by a marble bust in Statuary Hall.

When the suffragists hold their jubilee it will not be the first time the rotunda of the Capitol has been the scene of impressive suffrage ceremonies.

Once the gold and purple colors of the militants bedecked its great marble posts and without protest. It was when Alice  Paul’s band chose the rotunda for their memorial tribute to beautiful young Inez Milholland, who gave her life for the “cause.” They took possession of it and made it ready for the ceremonies without permission. Senators who came to protect remained as silent and touched spectators.

It will be the militants who will have charge of the jubilee ceremonies. They will go to the Capitol this time as honored guests of the government.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Jul 28, 1920

Golf Teas the Latest Fad

August 20, 2012

Golf, tennis or croquet teas are popular. Outdoor exercise such as these games afford is somewhat exhausting, and hostesses are now serving refreshments under the trees to those who gather either informally or on invitation to play on their grounds. The idea is a delightful one, and it is a pity some one did not think of it long ago. Tea made in the 5 o’clock tea apparatus and served with tea cakes or tiny sandwiches between games keeps the enthusiasm of the guests away up for an afternoon, instead of gradually dwindling away after an hour or so. Tea, chocolate or cocoa is more refreshing than iced drinks.

Men and women both enjoy the informality of the outdoor luncheon, and the men are never seen to better advantage than when displaying a little extra thoughtfulness over the tea of some favored fair friends. It takes a heroism a little short of martyrdom for a hot, tired and thirsty man to stalk about distributing tea and sandwiches and seeing the last cupful disappear with the knowledge that he will have to wait until a second pot is brewed. A man who can patiently and politely endure such an ordeal is a good person for the average young woman to cultivate if he is still unattached and fancy free.

North Adams Transcript( North Adams, Massachusetts) Aug 29, 1899

HOW TO MAKE TEA CAKES.

Put three-quarters of a pound of dry flour into a basin, and rub one ounce of butter into it. Mix half an ounce of compressed yeast until it is quite smooth with rather less than half a pint of milk which is just warm, then add one ounce of castor sugar and a well beaten egg. Make a hollow in the middle of the flour and pour in the milk, etc., gradually, and mix the flour until a very soft dough is formed. Then turn it from the basin on to a floured board, and knead it for a few minutes. Butter some round cake tins of medium size. Divide the dough into two or four pieces, according to the size of the tins, and place a piece in each tin.

Stand the tins on a baking sheet, cover them with a cloth and put the baking sheet on the kitchen fender for about an hour. At the end of this time the cakes will have risen well, and they should be baked at once in a quick over for about half an hour. When nearly done, brush them over quickly with milk, and scatter some powdered sugar over them to give the tops a glazed appearance. The cakes can be served as soon as they are cooked, after being cut through and buttered, or they may be allowed to get cold and can then be toasted and buttered.

A small quantity of mixed spice or chopped candied peel added to the dough may be considered an improvement. In the event of no round tins of a suitable size being at hand, the dough may be shaped into the form of buns, which should be placed on a buttered baking tin, allowed to rise, and then baked according to the directions given above. IF the dough is to be sued in this way, rather less milk should be mixed with the yeast; otherwise the dough would be too soft to mold satisfactorily.

North Adams Transcript (North Adams, Massachusetts) Apr 14, 1899

BLUEBERRY TEA CAKE.

Four cups of blueberries, three cups of flour, half cup butter, one cup of sugar, three eggs, one cup milk, two full teaspoons of baking powder. Cream the butter and sugar, stir in the eggs, beaten very light, the milk, the flour, into which had been sifted the baking powder, and last, the berries, well dredged with flour. Bake in a thoroughly greased biscuit tin, split, butter and eat while warm.

North Adams Transcript (North Adams, Massachusetts) Aug 26, 1899

Dainty Tea Cakes.

Here are directions for making some dainty cakes for a home tea which are inexpensive and will be found delicious.

Beat two eggs to a froth in a cake bowl, add two cups of granulated sugar, one teaspoonful of vanilla extract, half a nutmeg grated, half a teaspoonful of salt, beat these to a cream, then ad a cupful of butter which is quite soft. Beat this well together with the other ingredients, then add a cupful of sweet milk, stir it well through the mixture, and last add two and a half cupfuls of flour sifted twice with three teaspoonfuls of baking powder and stir the whole to a smooth batter. Slightly butter the inside of your patty pans and put one generous tablespoonful of the cake batter in each patty and bake in a slow oven. This mixture will make over thirty little tea cakes. Cover the top of each with a frosting and put one blanched almond on the center.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 27, 1912

INEXPENSIVE TEA CAKES

These can be baked while the potatoes bake.

One and one-half cups flour, 2 level teaspoons baking powder, 2-3 teaspoon soda, 1-4 teaspoon nutmeg or mace.

Sift together the flour, baking powder and soda and add three-fourths cup of granulated sugar. Put in a mixing dish and with a spoon make a hole in the center. In a bowl break a egg and put in three-fourths cup of sour milk; beat together and still this liquid into the flour mixture, quickly. Have melting in the small cake pans a piece of butter the size of an egg. When melted pour into the cake mixture and blend thoroughly. Pour into well greased small tins and bake. This cake requires no creaming of butter or beating of egg whites. Butter when warm.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Oct 4, 1912

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Oct 13, 1920

Sierran Pan

August 12, 2012

Newpaper image from San Jose State University

Henry Meade Bland – Poet Laureate

Sierran Pan

I am fire and dew and sunshine,
I am mist on the foamy wave,
I’m the rippling note from the field-lark’s throat,
I’m the jewel hid in the cave.

I’m the lightning flash on the mountain,
And the cold rose-red of the dawn,
I’m the odor of pine and purple vine
And the willowy leap of the fawn.

I’m the sigh of the south wind of autumn,
I’m the scent of the earth at first rain,
I’m the wild honker call of the earliest fall,
I’m the yellow of ripening grain.

I’m the music no singer has dreamed of,
I’m joy in the heart of man;
I’m the lyric time of no poet’s rhyme,
I’m the glad, the immortal Pan.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Aug 29, 1920

Wets and Drys

April 27, 2012

Image from Vintage Vault

The Drys all like
A game of bridge,
And Wets are strong
For Beveridge.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jun 8, 1920

What Will You Be Wearing Easter Sunday?

April 4, 2012

1920 — Neiman’s Easter Dress Selection

An Easter coat offered by Gordon’s in 1922

Wow! In 1924, Clark W. Thompson Co. was selling these pretty numbers.

Easter time in New Castle, PA must have been rather chilly in 1925. These outfits/coats were being sold by New Castle Dry Goods Co. — I bet the Dry Goods was THE place to shop for everything fashionable in those days!

For 1926, the “all-important” Easter Hat, take your pick!

Straw hats were all the rage in 1932 —  Or just a good bargain?

Stripes were trendy in 1934, at least at Johnson Hill’s.

Gotta have shoes to go with the Easter stripes. I bet the fashionistas rushed over to the Davis Shoe Co. to get themselves a pair of these.

A little something for the men in 1938.  After buying their wives’ outfits, they probably only had enough to spring for straw hats for themselves.

Fast forward to 1967. Hats (bonnets) — still an Easter must-have!

And flashback to 1907, when Silk and Mixture Walking  and Dress Skirts were on sale for Easter.

Woman Prospector Nurses Husband

March 27, 2012

Image from PopArtMachine

WOMAN PROSPECTOR NURSES HUSBAND

Mrs. Patrick O’Hara arrived in town yesterday from Witherspoon canyon in the Tule Canyon district, with the news that her husband, Pat O’Hara, a mining man well known in Southern Nevada, had on July 23 accidentally shot himself in the thigh. He was hunting rabbits and on stopping to adjust the hobbles on a horse his revolver was discharged, the bullet entering a point high up in the thigh. The nearest habitation to the O’Hara camp is at Lida, eight or nine miles distant and owing to the excessive heat on the desert his wife was afraid to risk the long drive over the desert to Goldfield for medical aid and has herself been treating the injured man, assisted only by the few Indians in the section.

Image from University of Texas LibrariesNevada Historical Topographical Maps

There is no doctor nearer than Goldfield and Mrs. O’Hara was unable to leave the wounded man until yesterday, when she drove over the scorching Ralston desert for supplies. She says that the patient is now getting on very well and there are no signs of blood poisoning. O’Hara is a member of the Knights of Pythias and has been in the section for some time engaged in mining. His wife says that they have a good prospect with some excellent ore exposed in a large vein. She was formerly Mrs. Casey, and was known as the “woman prospector,” having traveled far and wide over the desert and prospected alone in many parts of the southern part of the state.

— Goldfield Tribune.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Aug 8, 1910

CENSUS RECORDS showing Patrick O’Hara and wife, Syliva:

***

In 1920, they were listed as living in Lida, Patrick’s occupation listed as miner (gold and silver.) In 1910, they show up in the town of Goldfield, Patrick also listed as a (gold) miner, second marriage for both, Sylvia having had 2 children, but none living.

***

According to the 1930 census, Patrick was no longer working, but Sylvia was a tailoress, in her own shop.

By 1938, old Sylvia was back to propecting!

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Dec 17, 1938

History of the Nivloc Mine – The Beginning

Sage Counsel – It’s What’s for Christmas

December 23, 2011

SAGE COUNSEL.

The Christmas season comes apace,
when smiles will hang from every face.
The Christmas spirit for a time,
will make our lives a thing sublime.
Alas, beshrew me, and dodgast!
The Christmas spirit does not last!
A day or two it warms our hearts,
then straightway shrivels and departs;
why does it chase itself so soon,
and leave our lives all out of tune?
It is because we eat too much
of turkey, pudding, pies and such;
the Christmas spirit cannot dwell
where people with dyspepsia yell.
The Christmas morning finds us calm;
the season, like a soothing balm,
has healed the broubles and the cares
that man through weary workdays bears.
We look with kind and loving eyes
upon our smiling fellowguys;
we send some peanuts to the poor,
and think the Spirit will endure.
And then we eat a gorgeous meal,
including turkeys, ducks and veal,
and pies — the kinds that mother made —
and doughnuts, cakes and marmalade.
At night our burdened innards balk,
and through long hours the floor we walk;
and in the morning, cold and gray —
the morning after Christmas day —
we groaning leave the sleepless berth,
and care no hoot, for peace on earth.
And now I spring some good advice,
which followed up, will cut much ice.
Eat humble grub on Christmas Day,
and give the gorgeous things away.

Walt Mason

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 22, 1920

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Dec 23, 1911