Posts Tagged ‘1920’

What Christmas Morning Means

December 22, 2011

CHRISTMAS TIME.

Oh, I am glad to know,
Those Christmas days of long ago,
To see the candle-lighted tree
With all the pomp of mystery,
To stand before it open-eyed
As some new tinseled toy I spied.
To wake before the dawn had come
And find beside my bed a drum,
And then to rouse the house with joy
As now does many a little boy.

Those glorious Christmas days, it seems,
Have vanished in the mist of dreams,
Yet other little boys must know
The self-same charms of long ago;
But there’s no table long drawn out
For all the folks to sit about.
No shouts of glee, no welcoming smile
To those who’d driven miles and miles
To be with us and share the day —
Those good old friends were called away.

The mother smiling at the door,
Her eyes with tears just brimming o’er,
Glad tears that seemed so strange to me,
I wondered oft how they could be.
Because, till I’d grown old, I thought
That Christmas day with joy was fraught,
And didn’t understand or know
That it is touched with grief and woe,
And howsoever large the list,
There always is a loved one missed.

The gifts were simple then, but oh,
With love they set all eyes aglow!
For ivory pen or picture framed
“Just what I wanted!” each exclaimed,
“How did you guess, Aunt Jane, that I
This very thing had longed to buy?”
Love’s altar candles were aflame
As we produced our big surprise
Which brought the tears into her eyes.

But we who were the children then
Are now the women and the men;
The girls are mothers and they cry
As mothers did in days gone by,
And I have learned through changing scenes,
Just what the Christmas morning means;
I feel their kisses on my cheek,
And find it difficult to speak —
I’ve come to understand, and know
Just how they felt so long ago.

By Edgar A. Guest

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 22, 1920

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 22, 1921

Snow’s a Bleak and Ghostly Thing

December 5, 2011

SNOW.

When I was young, long, long ago,
I loved to see the falling snow;
but now that I am old and bent,
I do not like it worth a cent.
The land looks ghastly, stark and dead,
when over it the snow is spread;
the land where late the roses bloomed
is in its shroud in snow entombed.
I like this good old pleasant globe
when shining verdure forms its robe,
when grass is growing on the hills,
and codfish sport along the rills;
then everything seems full of vim;
I dance and shake a buoyant limb;
and if some common village scold
come up to tell me I am old,
I turn a handspring on the green,
to show that I am sweet sixteen.
It takes the sunshine and the breeze
to limber up a dotard’s knees,
and make him feel he’s still on earth,
a creature of some use and worth.
But when he from the window looks
on naked woods and frozen brooks,
on snow wreaths whirling in a rage,
he feels the burden of his age.
It seems to him his age must be
a thousand years, plus two or three.
And all the boys he used to know
are sleeping somewhere ‘neath the snow;
and colder than a miser’s soul
the snow comes down, while church bells toll
a requiem for Tom or Jim —
when will the blamed bells toll for him?
Such thoughts the drifting snowflakes bring;
and snow’s a bleak and ghostly thing.

Walt Mason

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 21, 1920

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 5, 1921

Aw, Beans!

December 3, 2011

AW BEANS!

(A play in 4 acks.)

Ack 1.

Boy: Hay ma, would you mind please taking me down town so I can see Santa Claws and tell him wat I wunt for Chrissmas?

Boys mother: Wy certeny, the plezzure will be all mine.

Ack 2.

Skinny Salivation Army Santa Claws: How do you do, boys? Wats you wunt for Chrissmas if youre a good boy?

Boy: Ice skates, a sled, a drum and gum boots, thanks.

Ack 3.

Fat Salivation Army Santa Claws: Hello there, boy. Wat can I do for you this Chrissmas in case youre a good boy?

Boy: Holey smoaks, are you Santa Claws?

Fat Salivation Army Santa Claws: Certeny.

Boy: Well then who was that other guy?

Fat Salivation Army Santa Claws: Are you going to tell me wat you wunt or are you going to pass on and give somebody elts a chance, wich?

Boy: Ice skate, a sled, a drum and gum boots, thanks.

Ack 4.

Reel Santa Claws: Ah there, boy enything speshil you wunt for Chrissmus and if so wat?

Boy: Aw beans!

Reel Santa Claws: Beans for Chrissmas? Haw haw wat a unusual child.

Boy: Youre the 3rd guy told me they was Santa Claus.

Reel Santa Claws: But I reely am.

Boy: Aw beans!

Reel Santa Claus: You can ask your mother if I aint.

Boys mother: How can I tell?

Boy: Aw beans, lets go home, ma.

(Wich they do.)

Reel Santa Claws: Darn the luck.

The end.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 11, 1920

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 3, 1921

Trotzky and Lenine

December 1, 2011

Image from Life magazine website

More Truth Than Poetry
By James J. Montague.

Trotzky and Lenine.

From Azov’s frozen border
To Poland’s boundary line,
They’re bringing law and order,
Are Trotzky and Lenine.
The high ideals that fill ’em,
No turbulence can stem,
If people kick they kill ’em,
And that’s the last of them.

Well may the people heed ’em,
When fervently they cry,
“You need the brand of freedom
That only we supply.
In still enclaved dominions
The luckless subject cowers
To other men’s opinions,
But you can cringe to ours!

“You buy the goods we sell you
Without a growl or kick:
You do just what we tell you
And do it mighty quick.
And while we reign resplendent
You sh???? your ??????  fates
That you are not dependent
On haughty potentates!”

Within all Russia’s border,
There soon would be once more
A state of law and order,
Excepting for the war.
And thus the propagation
Of freedom will be spread,
Till all the population
Is either free or dead.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Sep 25, 1920

The Boy Stood on the Burning Deck

November 30, 2011

Image from The Battle of the Nile

CASA BY ANCHOR.

BY SLOWCUS.

The boy stood on the burning deck,
There isn’t any doubt;
And yet who saw him on the wreck?
Who really heard him shout?

Would he have stood and roasted there
With jolly-boats so near,
And bragged about his fierce despair
Nor walked off on his ear?

Why not give one good roar for oars
Assail his pa for sail
To wait him toward the fishing shores?
Why stay aboard and wail?

What wonder standing there he seemed
So beautiful and bright?
Who couldn’t while around him beamed
That lovely Titian light?

His pow-wow with his father I
Regard as tempting fate;
If he declined to early die,
Why stay there and dilate?

“Pa, can’t you speak — a little please?
Just try a sneeze or cough,
My nearest kin, kin you release,
Or are you, father, off?”

And while his father slept below
The boy, he never stirred;
One of a “race” who never “go”
Unless they “get the word.”

He called aloud, “Am I allowed
Your leave to leave? Your son
Stands fire, you now, but don’t you crowd
The thing; I’m toasted done.

“Of course I’ll do what you desire,
If you’re laid on the shelf;
I burn with ardor — but, this fire!
You know how ’tis yourself.

“Speak father, I would be released?
I list your loving tones,”
He knew not that he pa, deceased,
Had gone to Davy Jones.

Upon his brow he felt the heat,
Yet stood serene and calm.
With only now and then a bleat,
Like Mary’s little lamb.

The yards and spars did burn and snap
All in the wildest way;
Not e’en a shroud was left the chap,
And he the only stay.

There came a bursting thunder peal —
Good gracious! Pretty soon
Boy, ship, and anchor, flag and keel,
Went up in a balloon.

And when this sound burst o’er the tide,
The boy! oh, where was he?
Ask of the winds, or none beside
Stayed long enough to see.

With mast and helm and pennon fair,
That acted well enough,
The sickest thing that perished there
Was that young sailor muff.

Now, boys, don’t take a cent of stock
In Cas-a-bi-an-ca;
The spots from such a son they’d knock,
Our Young A-mer-i-ca.

Cambridge City Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Oct 26, 1871

Image from 80 Plus – an octogenarian’s blog

*****

The original poem, from the All Poetry website:

Casabianca

The boy stood on the burning deck
Whence all but he had fled;
The flame that lit the battle’s wreck
Shone round him o’er the dead.

Yet beautiful and bright he stood,
As born to rule the storm;
A creature of heroic blood,
A proud, though childlike form.

The flames roll’d on…he would not go
Without his father’s word;
That father, faint in death below,
His voice no longer heard.

He call’d aloud…”Say, father,say
If yet my task is done!”
He knew not that the chieftain lay
Unconscious of his son.

“Speak, father!” once again he cried
“If I may yet be gone!”
And but the booming shots replied,
And fast the flames roll’d on.

Upon his brow he felt their breath,
And in his waving hair,
And looked from that lone post of death,
In still yet brave despair;

And shouted but one more aloud,
“My father, must I stay?”
While o’er him fast, through sail and shroud
The wreathing fires made way,

They wrapt the ship in splendour wild,
They caught the flag on high,
And stream’d above the gallant child,
Like banners in the sky.

There came a burst of thunder sound…
The boy-oh! where was he?
Ask of the winds that far around
With fragments strewed the sea.

With mast, and helm, and pennon fair,
That well had borne their part;
But the noblest thing which perished there
Was that young faithful heart.

By Felicia Dorothea Hemans, © 1809, All rights reserved.

Editor notes

Casabianca, It tells the story of Giocante Casabianca, a 12-year old boy, who was the son of Luce Julien Joseph Casabianca. Casabianca was the commander of Admiral de Brueys’ flagship, l’Orient , Giocante Casabianca stayed at his post aboard the flagship L’Orient during the Battle of the Nile. Giocante Casabianca and his father both died in an explosion when the fire reached the gunpowder store.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jul 21, 1894

*****

Evidently, this was a popular poem to parody – From The Guardian

“Casabianca” was soon taken up by the parodists. As we’ve recently discussed on this forum, a good parody demands such close reading it might almost be thought an ironical act of love. But most of the anonymous parodists of “Casabianca” didn’t get beyond the first verse. “The boy stood on the burning deck./ His feet were covered in blisters./ He’d burnt the socks right off his feet/ And had to wear his sister’s” was the version I heard as a child.

A few more:

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jun 24, 1895

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Feb 2, 1913

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Sep 25, 1920

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jul 7, 1912

CASABIANCA.

THE BOY stood on the burning deck — an orator was he,
and in that scene of fire and wreck he spoke quite fluently,
“The men who hold the public scaps should all be fired,” he cried;
“they should make room for worthy chaps who wait their turn outside.
True virtue always stands without, and vainly yearns and tolls,
while wickedness in office shouts, and passes round the spoils.
One rule should govern our fair land — a rule that’s bound to win
all office holders should be canned, to let some new ones in.
All people usefully employed at forge, in mill or shop,
should know that labor’s null and void — man’s duty is to yawp.
The farmer should forsake his play, the harness man his straps;
the blacksmith should get busy now, and look around for snaps.
Why should the carpenter perform, when we have homes enough;
why should producers round us swarm, when statesmen are the stuff?
Why should we put up ice or hay, or deal in clothes or meat,
when politicians point the way that leads to Easy street?”
There came a burst of thunder sound; the boy — O where was he?
Ask of the winds that all around with lungs bestrewed the sea.

Walt Mason

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jun 14, 1911

THE SPENDING SPREE

The boy stood on the burning deck and soaked his aching head;
he wrote a million dollar check, then cheerily he said:
“My friends, I’ve never made a move one honest cent to earn,
but here’s where I start out to prove that I have wealth to burn.”
They called aloud, he would not go; heroic were his words:
“I’ve still got money left to throw at insects and at birds.”
And calmly midst the awful wreck while billows played wild games
he wrote another million check and fed it to the flames.
You say if you had such a boy you’d bend him o’er your knee,
and many shingles you’d deploy to curb his spending spree;
and yet you’re strutting ’round the deck as lordly as a jay
and spending money by the peck and throwing it away.
It seems that men cannot withstand the siren lure of debt;
the things their appetites demand they buy, already yet.
When times of stress and panic come they’ll utter naughty words
and wish they had the goodly sum they pelted at the birds.

CLEM BRADSHAW.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) May 31, 1920

Dry Bill – Bye, Bye, Booze

October 28, 2011

Miami News: Two were shot in the first raid on a New York saloon under the Volstead act. The other patrons were half shot.

Ada Weekly News (Ada, Oklahoma) Nov 20, 1919

***

Posing as prohibition agents, six men forced their way into the home of Joseph Wolff, former wholesale liquor dealer at Chicago, blew open a vault in the basement and carried away 100 cases of 20-year-old whisky.

***

In defiance of the laws against combinations  in restraint of trade, to say nothing of the Volstead act, bootleggers of Spokane, Wash., have organized to boost the price of liquor.

***

Overpowering three guards and smashing down the doors, a gang of liquor robbers, believed to have numbered 30, escaped with 2,100 gallons of whisky from a warehouse at Burkittsville, Md.

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) Mar 16, 1922

Old Ben.

(From Cincinnati Enquirer.)

Each night, for more than 40 years,
He drank a couple of good beers.
He never would exceed that number,
He said that beer promoted slumber;
It was a tonic, so he said,
And to him it was liquid bread.
He said that whisky poisoned men,
He was against it, was Old Ben.
So he went out and voted dry,
To kill the bourbon and the rye.
He killed the whisky, but, oh, dear!
He also found he’d killed his beer.
He needed beer, and he was sad,
For there was no beer to be had.
*     *     *     *     *
Now in a cell we hear him groan —
For Old Ben tried to make his own.
_________
Man’s first trouble was an apple in the garden.
Now its peaches on the roof garden. R.R.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jun 28, 1920

More Truth Than Poetry

By James J. Montague.
(Copyright, 1920, by the Bell Syndicate, Inc.)

The Disaster.
(Apologies to the Late James T. Fields.)

We were crowded in the cabin,
Not a soul was at the bar,
For the splendid floating palace
Hadn’t traveled very far.

‘Tis a fearful thing on shipboard
To be preyed upon by thirst,
and to hear the Captain’s warning,
“Pass the three mile limit first.”

Strong men twitched, with nervous fingers
At the buttons on their coats,
Women, gulped to ease the yearning
Of their parched and panting throats.

So we watched the idle steward
With one eye upon the clock,
When we heard below the grinding
And a sudden, dreadful shock.

And so slowly on the billows
We began to dip and lift,
“All is off,” the Captain shouted.
The propeller’s broke adrift.

But the Captain’s little daughter,
Who’d been looking at the log,
Cried: “We’ve passed the three mile limit,
We’ve been drifting through the fog.”

Then we kissed the little maiden,
Life again became worth while,
And we all were nicely jingled,
‘Ere we’d logged another mile.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jun 28, 1920

Rain-Makers: Wizards, Kings…and Uncle Sam

June 14, 2011

EFFECTS OF RAIN-MAKING

Uncle Sam’s Rain: Prosperity
Politician’s Rain: Office
Miser’s Rain: Money
Merchant’s Rain: Orders
Farmer’s Rain: Crops
Spinster’s Rain: Angels? Babies?

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Sep 5, 1891

Image of men attempting to make rain — from the Nebraska State Historical Society website.

RAIN TO ORDER.

An Interview With Frank Melbourne, the Rain King.

CINCINNATI, July 3. — An evening paper publishes the following interview held with Frank Melbourne, the rain wizard, at Canton, O., Monday evening:

Late this evening, during a drizzling rain, your correspondent called on Frank Melbourne, the storm wizard, at his quarters in the Hotel Yohe. Melbourne, who is the busiest man in Ohio just at the present, could not be seen at the noon hour, being then engaged in the undertaking of bringing a storm, he said, and too busy to spare time for an interview. To the patter of the rain upon the roof, the wizard bid the correspondent be seated.

As a prelude to the conversation, and no doubt indicative of his powers, Melbourne pointed his finger upward, where the rain was playing a tattoo upon the roof, and said: “This is the rain I was advertized to bring. It was booked for Tuesday, but, owing to the condition of the atmosphere it came a day sooner than expected. It takes from a day to two days to bring a storm. I began on Sunday to start this one, expecting it to be here on Tuesday, but you see it got around a little in advance.”

“How do you produce these rains?”

“That is a secret I hardly dare divulge beyond saying it is the infusion of certain chemicals in the air through a machine of my invention.”

“How long have you been engaged in this occupation?”

“I began to work on my machine twelve years ago last September and soon after brought the first rain. I was then in Australia. I made twelve experiments in Queensland and New South Wales, all of which were successful. A rain can be brought there more rapidly than here, being closer to the sea and not so hilly.”

“The formation of the land there has something to do with the bringing of a rain?”

“Oh, yes, considerable. The nearer to the sea and the more level the land the sooner a rain can be started. One day was all the time needed there.”

“What are your charges for bringing a real good shower?”

“Three hundred dollars is all I ask, and that not to be paid until the rain is produced. This is much cheaper than most experiments of the kind are made.”

“How large a territory can you cover?”

“About two hundred and fifty thousand square miles.”

“Are your storms all electrical and accompanied by thunder and lightning?”

“Not at all. That depends upon the condition of the atmosphere at the time it is produced.”

Mr. Melbourne at this time felt that his presence was required at his office, where the rain machine was then at work, and begged to be excused, handing the correspondent the accompanying circular, which, he said, would throw some light upon his invention.

Mr. Melbourne is a rather tall and slender man, decidedly nervous and thoroughly in earnest regarding his experiment as an actual fact as he regards it now. Whether there is any truth in his assertions or not, he is the biggest Roman of them all at present, and managers of picnics and outdoor sports consult this modern oracle before determining upon the date.

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Jul 3, 1891

Newark Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Jul 2, 1891

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Nov 18, 1891

The Evening News (Lincoln, Nebraska) Jul 27, 1892

The Last of the Rainmakers.

George Matthews of Wichita is the only one left of all the Kansas rainmakers who has nerve enough to get into public notice and talk about his system. Scoffs and jeers have no terrors for Mr. Matthews. On Friday night he commenced operations at a point near Wichita under an agreement to bring rain by Monday night or ever after hold his peace. In a talk to a reporter the rain wizard said:

“I use thirty-six electric batteries, two jars of hydrogen gas, and two jars of compound hydrogen gas in making rain. In order to produce a storm center we mix the hydrogen gas so that it explodes in the upper air. This forms a vortex. Then the clouds hover around and concentrate, forming a storm center.”

The New Era (Humeston, Iowa) Jul 31, 1895

Millions of dollars have been spent in the last few years on the perfection of irrigation, which, up until the present time, was the only solution to crop production in arid sections.

But science is always solving these problems in other ways, as in the case of Chas. M. Hatfield, the “Rain Wizard,” who claims to have perfected a chemical apparatus whereby rain clouds are attracted and caused to drop their wealth of rain drops. Mr. Hatfield has practiced his secret system for 22 years with much success, charging from $1000 to $3000 an inch for rain. Only recently he was credited with a cloudburst in the northwest. Press reports did not state whether or not he was paid at the above rate.

Adams County Press (Corning, Iowa) Aug 18, 1920


THE RAIN.

Hear the tapping of the rain
Tripping on the window pane
Like gay, nimble footed fairies
Dancing in a field of grain.
How the new drops dart and pass
Till they press against the glass
Lightly as the fragile fingers
Of a dainty, crippled lass.

Oh, these pixies of the mist,
Jeweled, all, from heel to wrist,
How they glitter as they gather
To some nature nurtured tryst!
How they romp across the dim
Spaces of the day or swim
In a vapor surf with Zephyr,
Playing hide and seek with him!

Oh, the rain of field and town,
Darting, drifting, dawdling down,
Careless of its brief existence
And creation’s smile or frown!
Wasn’t it but yesterday
That we heard the shower say:
“Cheer up. Time is but a moment.
Make the most of work or play?”

— Chicago Record.

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Feb 17, 1899

May Day Moving

May 1, 2011

With May Day comes the annual moving proposition. It carries with it the usual annoyance of shifting your abode, for what would the first day of May come to if we didn’t continue the practice of moving? Beautiful May, all except the inconvenience of moving – a custom that won’t live down.

Portsmouth Daily Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) May 1, 1912

May Day Moving Sets New Chicago Record
(International News Service)

CHICAGO, May 24. — May Day moving here set a new record for the period of the housing shortage, according to the requests for changes to telephone and gas companies. More than 3,000 changes daily were asked of a gaslight and coke company before the yearly exodus to new homes. This is 50 per cent higher than 1921.

J.S. Waterfield, Chicago Real Estate board said the “own your own home” idea is responsible for hundreds of the movings.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) May 24, 1922

CHICAGO, May 1. — Thousands of families in Chicago went on a “rent strike” today and refused to vacate their apartments in accordance with May Day moving orders, H.S. Standish, president of the Chicago Tennants’ Protective League, asserted.

Mr. Standish predicted that 10,000 tenants would defy efforts of landlords to evict them.

Some of the disputes would be settled by arbitration, Mr. Standish said, but others would be carried into court for jury trials.

Battle Landlords
By JAMES HENLE,
N.E.A. Staff Correspondent.

NEW YORK, May 1. Two men are largely responsible for starting in this state the anti-rent profiteering crusade which, unless the laws are finally thrown out by the courts, has limited landlords to 25 per cent increases.

One of them is not even a New Yorker. His name is James F. Gannon, Jr., and he is city commissioner of Jersey City.

The other no longer hold any official post. His name is Nathan Hirsch and he was formerly chairman of the Mayor’s Committee on Rent Profiteering.

Victims Aided

It was Hirsch’s committee — and largely Hirsch himself — who first came to the aid of the victims or rent profiteers. Before this persons who objected to extortionate rent increases were called “Bolsheviki.” Hirsch had little real authority, but he used what he had with good effect.

The result was that any number of cases were compromised last year by the landlords, and tenants were enable to stay on by paying only moderate increases in rent. A strong public sentiment was built up to oppose rent hogs.

Hirsch was serving without pay and when the appropriation he asked to continue the committee’s work was refused he resigned.

Hug[e] Rent Strike

Then came Gannon. Early this year he engineered the biggest rent strike ever conducted and won it. Thousands of tenants with the city’s backing, refused to pay unreasonable rent increases and won in the courts.

This woke New York up. If Jersey City can do it, why can’t we? was the comment. The result was a wave of popular sentiment that swept everything before it and resulted in the enactment by the Legislature of a dozen laws to protect the tenant, the most important of which is the measure limiting rent increases to 25 per cent.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) May 1, 1920

NOTES AND GOSSIP

The month of May, when poets sing of roses and meadows decked with green, is, in the vicinity of New York, the flitting time for half the world — or has been. Fortunes are changing and even the May moving day, so long sacred to New Yorkers, is giving way before the iconoclastic spirit of the age. Enough, and more than enough of it, is left however. The removals of the great annual flitting time, often useless, often undertaken without clear reason than that restlessness so peculiar to American life, must cost the people of New York, Brooklyn and Jersey City, directly and indirectly, not less than $3,000,000 in actual money outlay, to say nothing of personal discomfort. Moving time entails an endless train f discomforts and disorders. It means a clear month’s comfort gone out of the year in preparing for the move and getting over it; is the direct cause of broken furniture not a little, of wrecked tempers by the thousands and of much actual suffering.

But moving day is not what it used to be. People who move in spring are beginning to discount it by removing at any time during the latter part of April, so that the first of May no longer resembles the fag end of a furniture dealer’s nightmare so much as it did. The real estate agents, too, have conspired against moving day. Not that the agents want people to stay where they are and forswear change. By no means. The more removals the more commissions for the agents. It is to increase their own profits and those of the owners that such strenuous efforts have been made, and with much success, to substitute October for May as the moving time. Many landlords now let  houses from October to October, and more are anxious to do so. The reason is that a good many people of moderate means, whose only hope of getting wives and babies into the country for the summer is to stop paying rent, and have been in the habit of giving up their houses on May 1, storing the furniture, packing off the family and seeking board until October, when the city residence could be safely resumed in another quarter. This arrangement was fine for the tenants, but it was bad for the owners and agents, consequently it had to be stopped. And it is being stopped.

Morning Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) May 1, 1887

MAN’S INHUMANITY TO MAN. —

The following unjustifiable case of landlord oppression is one of the many cases which May day moving has developed in Jersey City: — A widow named Jane Meara, with her five children, occupied a small store in Prospect street, near Morgan. The property changed hands, and as a consequence the widow was doomed; but her lease had not expired and she held a receipt for the rent of the premises, paid in advance, for the month of May. Under these circumstances the poor woman felt secure, at least for the present; but on May day, during her absence, her furniture and goods were thrown out of doors, and when she returned to her house she found the premises so locked and fastened that ingress was impossible, while every article of her household goods was drenched with rain on the sidewalk. She at once proceeded to Justice McAnally, who very humanely allowed her the use of a house for herself and her children till she can procure other quarters, as this was the only relief he could afford in the case. The woman has commenced a suit against the new proprietor, laying damages at $10,000.

New York Herald (New York, New York) May 3, 1869

NEW – YORK CITY.
First of May — Moving Day.

There was not as much moving yesterday as is common upon the last of April — pretty good evidence that landlords generally were wise enough to fall somewhat from their old rates of rent, and so far accommodate tenants that they could afford to keep their old premises another year. Whoever is abroad to day, however, will be disposed to think there never was so much moving before. It will begin early — before some of us are up, no doubt, and it will continue late. The sidewalks will be worse obstructed in every street than Wall-street is where the Brokers are in full blast. Old beds and ricketty bedstands, handsome pianos and kitchen furniture, will be chaotically huddled together. Everything will be in a muddle. Everybody in a hurry, smashing mirrors in his haste, and carefully guarding boot boxes from harm. Sofas that go out sound will go in maimed, tables that enjoyed castors will scratch along and “tip” on one less than its complement. Bed-screws will be lost in the confusion, and many a good piece of furniture badly bruised in consequence. Family pictures will be sadly marred, and the china will be a broken set before night, in many a house. All houses will be dirty — never so dirty — into which people move, and the dirt of the old will seem enviable beside the cleanliness of the new. The old people will in their hearts murmur at these moving dispensations. the younger people, though aching in every bone, and “tired to death,” will relish the change, and think the new closets more roomy and more nice, and delight themselves fancying how this piece of furniture will look here and that piece in the other corner. The still “younger ones” will still more enjoy it. Into the cellar and upon the roof, into the rat-holes and on  the yard fence, into each room and prying into every cupboard, they will make reprisals of many things “worth saving,” and mark the day white in their calendar, as little less to be longed for in the return than Fourth of July itself.

Keep your tempers, good people. Don’t growl at the carmen nor haggle over the price charged. When the scratched furniture comes in don’t believe it is utterly ruined, — a few nails, a little glue, a piece of putty, and a pint of varnish will rejuvenate many articles that will grow very old ‘twixt morning and night, and undo much of the mischief that comes of moving, and which at first sight seems irreparable.

At night, after you have kindled a fire in the grate, — don’t, because you have cleaned house, make your house a tomb for dampness, nor let the children shiver through the evening, — after the tea things have been set aside, be sure to take one peep of the moon in her eclipse. Nor stay too long to look at her, for her exhibition begins rather late, and you should be up early next day to tack down the carpets, set the furniture to rights and make a home of your new house. Moreover, if it rains or is very cloudy, take our advice and don’t look at the eclipse — it’s no great affair after all.

New York Daily Times (New York, New York) May 1, 1855

In Lighter Vein
_____

The May Queen

“You must wake and call me early,”
The prospective May Queen said.
But when called, the foxy girlie
Stayed in bed.

And her plan was far from silly
Though another served as Queen,
For the winds were raw and chilly
On the green.

To the first my hat I’m doffing,
She who dodged the breezes bleak,
For the other will be coughing
All the week.
_____
Bolting The Ticket.

“The young men have chosen her to be Queen of May.”

“And how do the other girls like that?”

“Don’t seem to like it. They’re all insurgents.”
_____
May 1 In History.

May 1, 1589 — Queen Elizabeth is Queen of May, catches cold, and has the snuffles all day.

May 1, 1755 — Moving day, Dr. Johnson evicted for non-payment of rent.
_____

“Going Maying today?”

“Nix.”

“Why not?”

“I went Maying once.”
_____
Everything Upset.

A book of verses underneath the stove,

A lump of coal upon a silver tray;

Such are the things that make a terror of

The first of May.
_____
Moving Day.

“The May migration is very ancient.”

“So?”

“Yes; Shakespeare speaks of moving accidents by flood and field.”
_____
Nothing Romantic.

“Got your wife out for a May day stroll I see. Going to hunt for arbutus?”

“Quit your kidding. We’re going to hunt for a flat.”
_____
May Moving.

“You ought to read this book. It will move you deeply.”

“Do you know any concern that will move me cheaply? That is what I’m interested in just now.”

— Washington Herald.

Evening Post (Frederick, Maryland) May 1, 1912

True Realism.

Dramatic Author — I understand that you are looking for a new play.

Manager — Yes, but I am very hard to suit. I want a play which shall combine all the elements of tragedy, comedy, farce, pantomime and spectacle.

“That’s it. That’s what I’ve got. Chock full of tragedy and human suffering, tears and smiles, joy and woe, startling surprises, unheard of mishaps, wreck and ruin, lamentations and laughter.”

“What’s the title?”

“‘A May Day Moving.'”

“What’s the plot?”

“Hasn’t any plot. Just and ordinary May day moving.”

— New York Weekly.

The Marion Star (Marion, Ohio) Nov 9, 1895

The Bradford Era (Bradford, Pennsylvania) Apr 12, 1946

I thought the May Day moving had petered out in the 1920s, but evidently it was still going strong in Pennsylvania as late as the 1940s!

Images from the Newman Library – Baruch College

Play Ball!

April 1, 2011

THE SPRING MENU.

“I must diet,” said the player, “I am training for the season;
The more I work and the less I eat, the slimmer I will get.
The way those drummers gorge themselves is simply out of reason;
I swore to eat small luncheons, and I mean it, to, you bet!”
The player tucked his napkin in the crevice o’er his collar
And picking up a bill of fare he scanned it for a while,
Then, reaching in his pocket, slipped the “dinge” a silver dollar
And gave the following order in a loud and lordly style:

“Tomato Soup, some bluefish, please —
Be sure and fill the platter;
About six lamb chops served with peas —
Go heavy on the latter.
About a dozen bullfrogs’ legs,
With Tartar sauce around ’em;
A good big plate of scrambled eggs,
And give the date you found em!
Then some dessert, ice cream and cake,
A dish of charlotte russe,
And coffee. Now, old stocking, take
That score card and vamoose!”
The treasurer of the ball club heard and joy was in his heart,
Because the meal was table d’hote instead of a la carte.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California Apr 5, 1906

Billings Gazette (Billings, Montana) Apr 11, 1920

BASEBALL SEASON OPENS IN LIMA

By BERTON BRALEY

“Play — ” no, we won’t start it that way!
And there is an excellent reason
For since men first started to play
“The opening game of the season,”
Each bard and scribe of the newspaper tribe
Has wrinkled his hard-working brow
Then started “Play –” — Nix on those old-fashioned tricks,
WE’RE gonna be different now!

“Play –” — Antediluvian stuff!
WE’LL use some ORIGINAL dope.
WE’RE cleaver and snappy enough
To pull some new phrases, we hope;
We’ve always averred that a scrivening bird
Should certainly know how to do
The opening day without starting it, “Play –,”
WE’RE gonna do something that’s new.

“Play –” there’s the darn phrase once again.
We’ll prove to all manner of men
That we’re an original cuss;
“The season has started, the fans are light hearted,
The game has the crowd in its thrall,
“Play –” (ain’t it the deuce) “Play –” (oh what’s the use?)
“Play –” (gosh, I can’t help it)
“PLAY BALL!”

(Copyright 1923, NEA Service, Inc.)

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Apr 9, 1923

Baseball just wouldn’t be baseball — without the umpires!

HIZZONER, “THE UMPS,” READY FOR OPENER

By JAY VESSELS
Sports Editor
(Associated Press Feature Service)

New York, (AP.) — Those mobile-faced umpires, the real war horses of baseball, are going back to the firing line for another season of calling them “like they see ’em.”

That is just what 1930 means for those keen-eyed warriors to whom Babe Ruth, Rogers Hornsby, Lefty Grove and other glittering diamond stars are just so many more ball-players.

Out there on opening day will be such baseball disciplinarians as Tom Connolly, Bill Dinneen, Clarence “Brick” Owens and George Hildebrand of the American league, and Bill “Catfish” Klem, Ernie Quigley, Cy Rigler, and Charley Moran of the National.

Some of these men have been clicking an indicator in the big leagues for 25 years and what they know about the great American pastime would fill more bookshelves than all of the volumes written about the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Take Tom Connolly who, at 60, has been running major league ball games for 32 years. He has been with the American league alone since 1901 and there are few in this land as conversant with the playing code as “The Duke of Natick.” Connolly probably knows more firemen than any other American. You see, Tom used to look for congenial company at the local fire halls in the days when the umpires kept themselves more aloof from the ballplayers. He still pursues this custom.

There is Brick Owens, younger in years, but a big league umpire at intervals for 22 years. He has been with the American league since 1916. Naturally “Brick” acquired his odd sobriquet because of being hit with a brick. That occurred when the big arbiter was officiating in an independent game out at Pittsburg, Kans.

High among the picturesque characters who enforce the laws of baseball is Bill “Catfish” Klem, himself. Probably the greatest ball and strike expert in the business, Klem has been a National leaguer since 1905. A scribe once angrily referred to Klem as “looking like a catfish.” That was way back in those days when such uncouth things even appeared in the newspapers, but all along Klem has stuck to the nickname, laughing with the baseball world at what some would consider plain slander.

Bill Dinneen is one of the older umpires. He is 54 and has been in the American league since 1910. Dinneen pitched baseball for  15 years and says he still finds himself pitching every game he works. “I know what the batters can hit and what they cannot hit,” said the veteran. “Consequently, I say to myself, ‘If I were pitching I would hand this bird a curve, low and on the outside, etc., etc.'”

A brother “umps” of Dinneen’s is George Hildebrand, an American leaguer of 17 years’ experience. He took up the indicator after an injured knee spoiled a career in the Pacific Coast league where he was noted for his speed.

Three of the better known National league arbiters are Charley Moran, Ernie Quigley and Cy Rigler. Quigley, who has been in the senior loop since 1913, is widely known as a football and basketball official. Rigler has been in and out of the umpiring ranks since 1906 and Moran who has been calling them since 1918. “Uncle Charley” Moran is the man who coached the “Praying Colonels” of Centre college to a brief but high position in the football world.

A dignified and colorful lot are these old masters of the diamond. They certainly can’t be judged by what the pop-eyed fans will be hollering after April 15.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Apr 12, 1930

The Grand Review in ’65 and ’92

November 10, 2010

G.A.R. AT WASHINGTON,

Largest Demonstration ever made by the Organization.

Grand Army week at Washington opened fair and the weather generally was pleasant during the national Encampment. All day and night of Monday the streets were alive with marching men, G.A.R. posts and their friends, on their way from railroad stations to quarters. Despite all the exertions that the railroad companies made to handle the crowds promptly, the visitors were from two to twelve hours late in reaching the city; but as rapidly as possible the trains were rolling into the city and unloading their human freight. The passengers accepted the situation with the best possible grace, and whatever the measure of their discontent it was all dissipated upon arriving at the Capitol, as they looked upon the generous and artistic manifestations of welcome and found themselves surrounded with reminiscences of the war and in the society of those whose friendship was knit in the blood and smoke of battle.

Tuesday was the great day of the reunion, with its grand parade, intended to be in commemoration of the grand review of 1865. Fifty thousand Union survivors of the great struggle marched over the identical route taken on that memorable occasion. Thirty thousand other wearers of the Grand Army badge or button, withholding themselves from the procession for various reasons, stood along the curbs or sat upon the stands, cheering their comrades as division by division, platoon by platoon, passed by for nearly seven unbroken hours. Along the two-mile route fully 350,000 persons were gathered to watch the procession. The parade was, with few exceptions, composed of men who were young 30 years ago, but who are now advanced in years. They wore the blue uniforms of the Grand Army, which is neat, but not gaudy, and they marched as old men march. With many it was an effort to cover that long stretch of road-way after waiting several hours to fall into line. Many were suffering from wounds which had never healed; many were broken and bent with rheumatism and other diseased incident to camp life. But what they lacked in grace and movement they made up in spirit and determination, and at every step they were cheered with heartiness which they would have been less than human not to appreciate.

The posts marched in two parallel columns, each of 12 files front, to Fifthteenth street and then the columns united and formed one sold column of 24 files front. At the Treasury Department Vice President Morton reviewed the procession and at the War Department the veterans marched in review before their commander-in-chief, Gen. Palmer.

Illinois had the place of honor in the parade, the State being the parent of the Grand Army of the Republic. Wisconsin came next, followed by Ohio. New York had 10 brigades in line. Massachusetts had 211 posts. New Jersey 70, Maine 15, California 14, Rhode Island 16, New Hampshire 17, Vermont 21, Maryland 49, Iowa 50, Oklahoma 1. The Department of Virginia and North Carolina marched 700 men in line. Nebraska, Texas, Alabama, North and South Dakota and Connecticut made a fine showing. The Pennsylvania department mustered 15,000 strong and was the largest in the long and splendid parade.

Wednesday opened with business sessions of the Grand Army, the Union Veterans’ Union, the Woman’s Relief Corps, the Ladies’ Aid to the S.of V., the Daughters of Veterans, Ladies of the Grand Army and Women’s Relief Union. In the afternoon a consolidated band of 1,500 pieces gave a patriotic concert in the Capitol grounds.

The post with the largest membership in the country naturally attracted much attention, and this was intensified by a mammoth model of the typical industry of the city in which it is located. It is General Lander post of Lynn, Mass., which numbers over 1,200 men. They carried with them an immense shoe, twelve feet long.

Preliminary to the festivities of the week was the dedication of Grand Army Place, located on the famous White Lot just south of the White House grounds.

A striking display was the surprise offered by the Iowa department. They carried in the air 3,000 cornstalks, some of them nearly six inches in diameter, and each man had an ear of corn strapped to his back.

Among the notable arrivals was that of the famous Sixth Massachusetts, the first to respond to President Lincoln’s call for troops. En route to Washington they were fired upon in Baltimore, April 19, and spilled the first blood after the assault upon Fort Sumter. Several hundred men were present with the command.

Col. A.G. Weissert, of Wisconsin, was elected National Commander and Indianapolis selected as the place of next year’s reunion.

Gettysburg Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 27, 1892

NOTE: Both Images above are from Wikipedia

*****

The following obituaries all have a common thread. All men were Civil War veterans and all marched in the Grand Review of 1865 in Washington, D.C. Most of them also have some connection to the State of Pennsylvania, with one or two exceptions.

At the bottom of the post, there are two articles about Civil War animal mascots — a dog and a rooster.

Carson Lutz.

Carson Lutz, familiarly known to most people in the Glen Campbell and Burnside sections as “Kit Carson,” passed away in the home of a daughter in Hobart, Ind., Sunday, April 6. Following the services there his body was brought to Glen Campbell, his former home, where funeral services were conducted at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon in the Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Marks. Interment was made in Burnside Cemetery, alongside of his wife and daughter, who preceded him to the grave several years ago. It was a military funeral, conducted by members of the American Legion of Glen Campbell, assisted by a firing squad from the American Legion Post of Clearfield.

Carson Lutz was born in Lancaster county, September 5, 1848 and enlisted in Company B, Forty-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers in January, 1864, being honorably discharged July 17, 1865. He was engaged in several battles and was present at Lee’s surrender. He was also proud of having marched with the million soldiers in the grand review at Washington, D.C.

He was one of the pioneers of the northern part of Indiana county and helped to cut and raft a great deal of timber that grew in that section. He sometimes worked as one of the woods crew, but mostly as the camp cook. His reputation as a cook was known to all old woodsmen and in later years he cooked for hunting camps, many of the deer hunters recalling “Kit” and his wonderful meals.

For the past 17 years he had made his home with his two daughters. He leaves the daughters, Mrs. James Judge of Hobart, Ind., and Mrs. C. Fred Brands of Gary, Ind.; two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. At the time of his death he was a member of William Ketcham Post, Grand Army of the Republic of Gary, Ind.

Indiana Evening Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Apr 14, 1930

Image from Find-A-Grave (NOTE: previous image has been replaced due to copyright)

PROFESSOR WERT, LONG ILL, DIES

Former Head of County Schools Was Well Known Writer.

WROTE SEVERAL NOVELS

Took Part in Civil War Playing a Part in the Battle of Gettysburg. Wrote History of Conflict.

Professor J. Howard Wert, well known writer and educator, with many friends in Adams county where he was the superintendent of schools for several years, died Thursday night at his home in Harrisburg after a long illness at an advanced age. He had been seriously ill for some weeks and his death was not unexpected. For years he had been living retired.

Professor J. Howard Wert was born on a farm near Gettysburg, the only child of Adam and Catharine (Houghtelin) Wert. His father, a man of exceptional ability, was a leader among Pennsylvania Abolitionists. His mother, also very gifted, was very conspicuous in the annals of early Methodism in Southern Pennsylvania.

After a preliminary course in the rural public schools and the Gettysburg High School, in all of which he evinced a precocity which made him the marvel of the community, the deceased spent six years at Gettysburg College, graduating in 1861.

While in college, he acquired considerable reputation as a writer; becoming a contributor to nearly all the Boston and New York literary periodicals of that day.

His first serial, “The Mystic League of Three,” a novel in twenty chapters, written while in the Sophomore year, won a prize and was published in Frank Queen’s “New York Clipper.” Having been dramatized, it was produced soon after at one of the Bowery theaters, wit ha run of 4 consecutive nights. It was a story of sporting life in the large cities written at a time that the young author had never seen a larger town than Gettysburg.

In various capacities, Professor Wert saw many of the stirring scenes of the Civil War, including the battle of Gettysburg, where he had exceptional opportunities for observation both during and after the conflict. During the Gettysburg campaign he did considerable service as a scout for which he was well fitted by his intimate knowledge of the whole surrounding country. On the afternoon of the first day of the battle, he was the guide who conducted the head of General Slocum’s 12th corps to the position it subsequently held in Culp’s Hill, after having informed the officers leading the column of the positions which Early’s Confederate corps had gained on the other side of Rock Creek.

Concerning the decisive battle he had written many valuable articles and pamphlets, as well as an extended history, first published in 1886, which had sold extensively on trains and on the field for several years. A second Gettysburg battle history written for a New York syndicate as a souvenir gift to G.A.R. posts in connection with the Semi-Centennial celebration of 1913, and published from the plant of the Harrisburg Telegraph was characterized by a competent reviewer as “The most vivid pen-portraiture of the great battle ever written, and on of the finest specimens of historic word painting in the English language.”

The close of the war found Professor Wert a lieutenant in Company G, 209th Pennsylvania Volunteers. This regiment served first in Butler’s Army of the James, and then became a part of Hartranft’s celebrated Pennsylvania command, — the Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. With it the deceased participated in some of the severest engagements around Richmond and Petersburg including the storming of the latter city; and followed up Lee’s retreating army to the surrender at Appomattox.

He also participated in the Grand Review of the Army of the Potomac, May 23, 1865, when, for seven continuous hours, 80,000 veterans, solidly massed from curb to curb, swept down Pennsylvania Avenue, at the nation’s capital, passing before President of the United States and General Grant.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Mar 13, 1920

161st Indiana Infantry Band

Not the same Indiana Infantry Band – Read more about this one from the Spanish American War HERE

OBITUARY

Abram Rummel, one of the oldest and highly esteemed citizens of this place, was found dead Sunday morning in his chair at his home on the east side. He was found by his daughter, Margaret, who having heard him arrange the fire earlier in the day, thought he was sleeping and did not disturb him until the breakfast hour. Evidently he attended the fire and then sat down in his accustomed chair as was his wont to often sleep there rather than lie down owing to heart trouble, and of which he evidently died.

Mr. Rummel was born March 16, 1840, at Creswell, Lancaster county, Pa., the son of Adam and Anna Rummel, and was brought by his parents to this state in 1847. When a young man he joined his brothers Felix and Adam in the wagon making and smith trade at Germantown. While here he joined a local cornet band, which afterward tendered its services to Governor Morton and was assigned to the Twelfth Indiana Infantry as the regimental band and later the brigade band. Of this band Amos Bear of Richmond is the surviving member. After three years service the band was mustered out in 1865 after participating in the “grand review” at Washington. Returning to Germantown, Mr. Rummel was married to the love of his youth, Miss Mary Jane Ocker, who died July 19, 1913. The children are J. Willard Rummel of New Castle, and Mrs. Ida Martin and Miss Margeret Rummel of this city. Oscar Valentine died in 1875. The grandchildren are Miss Lula Martin of this city and Miss Thelma Rummel of New Castle.

In 1865 Mr. Rummel joined Walnut Level lodge of Odd Fellows, which membership he transferred to Wayne lodge when he and his brothers came to this city and engaged in business the same as in Germantown. Two years ago Wayne lodge gave him a veteran’s jewel, having been a member 50 years and financial secretary 20 years. He was also a member of the G.A.R. and M.E. church.

In 1881 Mr. Rummel was elected a town trustee and served five years. For a quarter of a century he was connected with the township assessor’s office, first as deputy and later assessor. In all those offices of honor and trust Mr. Rummel fitted his duty as he saw it. Whether as a soldier, a public servant, a lodge member, or a husband and father, he discharged his duties in that exalted manner that marks the exemplary citizen.

Funeral services were held at the M.E. church Tuesday afternoon by Rev. Jones, the W.R.C. and Odd Fellows. The attendance was large and the floral tributes many and very pretty. Burial in Riverside.

Cambridge City Tribune (Cambridge City, Indiana) Feb 8, 1917

Wisconsin Memorial at Vicksburg

Image from the book, Wisconsin at Vicksburg on Google

A SOLDIER’S RECORD

Interesting Account of Army Service During Civil War By the Late A.N. Maltby.

A.N. Maltby, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J.N. Welsbey, last Wednesday afternoon, was a Civil war veteran and took part in Sherman’s “March to the Sea” and the Grand Review at Washington. Among the Possessions he left was a brief account of his army record, which is published below and will undoubtedly prove interesting to Gazette readers:

“I enlisted August 7, 1862, at Tomah, Wis. The company was quartered in Sparta and joined the regiment at La Crosse. Was mustered into United States service September 14, 1862, with Co. D, 25th Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.

“The regiment was ordered to Minnesota on October 1 and D company was stationed at Mankato to protect the city from the Indians. In December of that year the regiment was ordered back to Wisconsin and we marched from Mankato to La Crocce. Arrived at Madison Dec. 20, when we all got a ten day furlough.

“In the February following we went south via Chicago and Cairo, Ill., and went int camp at Columbus, Ky., where we stayed until Jun 1, when we went down the Mississippi river to Vicksburg, then up the Yazoo river to Yazoo City, then back to Haynes Bluff, in the rear of Vicksburg, where we were in the siege until the surrender on July 4, 1863. On July 7, I got sick furlough home for 30 days, and rejoined my company and regiment at Helena, Ark., September 1. At this time the 25th had only 57 men fit for duty and 800 men on the company rolls. In February we left Helena and went again to Vicksburg and from that place on the ‘Meridian March’ with Sherman. We were back in Vicksburg at the end of 30 days and then went by steamboat up the Mississippi to Cairo, then up the Ohio and the Tennessee rivers to Mussels Sholes,, then by rail to Decatur, Ala. From there we marched to Chatanooga, Tenn., and on the first of May, 1864, started with General Sherman on the Atlanta campaign.

“At this time the 25th was in the Second Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee. This division was in the flanking corps and was all the time marching or fighting. Our first battle was at Resaca, May 14, 1864. The company and regiment took part in all the fighting, including the battle of Atlanta, and the chase after General Hood’s Confederates back toward Chattanooga. At Atlanta Co. D lost just one-half of the company in killed, wounded and prisoners. Of the four captured, three were wounded and died in the Andersonville prison, while the fourth was exchanged.

“Before beginning the March to the Sea we were reorganized and our brigade, the 43rd and 63rd Ohio, the 17th New York and the 35th New Jersey was the 2nd Brigade, 7th Division, 17th Army Corps, General Mower Division Commander.

“The March to the Sea began in Nov. 1864, and before Christmas we had taken the city of Savannah, Ga. In January, 1865, we went by transport to Beaufort, S.C., and captured Fort Pokatolligo. On February 1 we began the march for Richmond, Va. Our last battle was at Bentonville, N.C. Was at Raleigh,  N.C., when General Johnson and army surrendered to Sherman. From Raleigh we marched through Richmond and Petersburg to Washington; took part in the Grand Review and was mustered out the 7th day of June, 1865, by reason of the end of the war.

“I was appointed corporal August 27, 1862, at La Crosse, and sergeant October 1, 1863, by M. Montgomery, colonel commanding the regiment. I was in every march, skirmish and battle in which the regiment took part and was in command of the company in its last battle at Bentonville,  N.C. At the time we were mustered out at Washington, D.C., I was offered a brevet captaincy and refused it.”

The Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) Feb 16, 1916

Image from Find-A-Grave for Barney B. Bartow

GEORGE WASHINGTON WEIGHT.

A Respected Citizen And An Old Soldier Entered Into Rest.

On Tuesday morning about ten o’clock, the life of George Washington Weight, one of Snyder township’s respected citizens, passed into the eternal world. As he was born and raised in this community he was known as an upright, honest man, who always did unto others as he would have them do unto him. He had always been a strong, robust man and used to hard work. Last Friday he caught a heavy cold which developed into pneumonia and on account of his advanced age he was not able to withstand the disease and death ended his sufferings at the above mentioned time.

When the was clouds of the Rebellion hung heavy over our country, he was among the brave boys that went to the front to fight for the flag and country that he loved. He placed his life as a sacrifice on the country’s altar, but was among the fortunate that escaped the ravages of bullets and shell, although the many hardships that he and many of the old veterans experienced was enough to kill any man. He was a member of Company D, 208th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. This regiment was in the Third brigade, Third division and Ninth army corps of the Potomac. He fought at Hatchers Run, in February, 1865, and was in the attack on Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865. He was also in the fight Petersburg and was present when that city surrendered to the Union army. His regiment pursued Lee along South Side railroad to Notaway court house and only halted in their march when the news reached them that the brave southern General had surrendered at Appomotox court house. Comrade Weight participated in all these engagements and was honorably discharged June 1, 1865, at the close of the war, after which he took part in the grand review in Washington. He returned to his home at Ironsville after the war and followed his occupation, that of a knobler, at the Tyrone Forge.

In August, 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Woomer, who preceded him to the grave December 25, 1894. When only a young man Mr. Weight united with the Methodist Epsicopal church, at Ironsville and he always endeavored to live according to its teachings. He was an active member of Colonel D.M. Jones post No. 172, G.A.R., and always delighted to participate in any meetings held by this organization.

George Washington Weight was born near Ironsville, December 11, 1833 and was aged 74 years, 11 months and 13 days at the time of his death. He leave to mourn his demise the following children: Thomas Weight, of Tyrone; Harry Weight, Mrs. Viola Gillman, Mrs. Grove Cox, Sylvester Calvin and Walter, of Ironsville; General Grant, of East Altoona, and Mrs. Katharine Mingle, of Birmingham. Also one brother, Thomas Weight, of Ironsville.

The funeral services will be held in the Methodist Episcopal church at Ironsville, on Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Gordon Gray, the pastor. The funeral cortege will leave the house promptly at fifteen minutes of two o’clock and proceed to the church. Interment will be made in Grand View cemetery. The services at the grave will be in charge of Col. D.M. Jones post No. 172, G.A.R., of which he was a charter member.

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Nov 25, 1908

Image from the website: Wisconsin Civil War Battle Flags

ARUNAH B. DWINELL DEAD

Well Known Citizen and Supervisor of the Sixth Ward Passes Away Very Suddenly This Morning.

For nearly four months A.B. Dwinell of this city had been in failing health, and had been confined to his home under the care of a physician for just eight weeks. The first three or four weeks of this time he suffered greatly, but since then had been apparently much improved and was able to rest comfortably most of the time, both day and night, something that he had not been able to do at first. On one or two occasions during the past couple of weeks his condition was considered critical at brief intervals, however, but he soon revived from these spells and was apparently on the road to enjoy better health. While fully realizing that his condition was most serious, and having expressed the opinion that he could not survive, making this remark for the last time yesterday, he was ever cheerful and did not complain, seeming to be ever solicitous for his faithful wife and daughters, who rarely left his side, even for a moment, during the past eight weeks. Last night he retired at about 9:30 o’clock and slept soundly throughout the night. Soon after 6 o’clock this morning Mrs. Dwinell heard her husband cough in a ajoining room, but as this was not unusual, she did not at once arise, getting up a few minutes later, however, and when she approached his bedside, she was horrified to find that her husband had passed away. He was lying peacefully as though in sweet sleep, having his hands folded over his breast and had undoubtedly died without a struggle. His illness and death was due to a compilation of dropsy and heart trouble.

Arunah B. Dwinell was born at Erie, Pa., May 13, 1838, and was therefore in the 70th year of his age. When about 12 years of age his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther H. Dwinell, moved to Michigan and after a short stay in that state, came to Fond du Lac and thence to Portage county in 1850, this having been the home of the now deceased ever since. His father died in Stockton in 1870 and is mother in 1878. The son remained on the homestead in the town of Stockton until he enrolled as a soldier in the civil war in September, 1861.

He enlisted at Plover in Co. B., 14th Wis. Infantry. The regiment organized at Fond du Lac, where it remained until March 6, 1862, when it proceeded to Benton Barracks, St. Louis, and after a stay of two weeks went to Savannah, Tenn. Orders were received to join the forces of Grant at Pittsburg Landing, and the regiment in which Mr. Dwinell was serving moved to embark on the transport, but did not arrive on the field until nearly midnight of April 6th, they forming in line of battle at once, notwithstanding heavy rain was falling. They went into action and fought on the second day of the battle, where they acquitted themselves with conspicuous bravery. Mr. Dwinell performed provost duty at Pittsburg Landing until he was taken sick and sent to the hospital at St. Louis, where after two weeks he received a furlough for fifteen days, which was extended, and he reported to Gen. Gaylord at Madison and remained in the hospital there until the fall of 1862, when he received an honorable discharge and returned to Plover. Aug. 21, 1864, he again enlisted, this time in Co. F, 5th Wis. Infantry, in the reorganized command. On the formation of his company he was made orderly sergeant and proceeded with his command to the Army of the Potomac, where he was connected with duty on the Orange & Alexandria R.R., for a brief time. Thereafter he went to the Shenandoah Valley, where the regiment joined the “Independent Battalion,” the remainder of the old 5th, at Winchester. They then went to Cedar Creek, the command being engaged in skirmishing on the right. At the latter place the soldiers were given the privilege of voting, and Mr. Dwinell’s second vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln. December 1st they went to Petersburg, going into winter quarters in front of that city, Mr. Dwinell performing picket duty until Feb. 5, 1865. He was in the fight at Hatcher’s Run and afterwards at Ft. Fisher, and in April in the charge of Petersburg, his knapsack being shot from his back on the morning of the second day of that month and he was slightly wounded in the shoulder in the afternoon. The next day he was in pursuit of Lee and fought on the 7th at Sailor’s Creek, where the entire force of rebels were killed or captured. He also took part in the surrender at Appomatox, after which he went to Danville to the assistance of Sherman, but went back to Wilson Station and thence to Washington, where he was in the Grand Review and was discharged at Madison, June 20, 1865, returning to the village of Plover. December 15, 1861, he was married to Ida E. Morrill, who survives him. They were the parents of nine children, two of whom, Edith died at the age of two years, and Fred J. passed away at Rugby, N.D., four years ago the 16th of June. Those who survive are George L., sheriff of Waukesha county, Arthur J. of Rugby, N.D., Ada B., now Mrs. C.W. Rhodes of Madison, Allie, now Mrs. G.S. Putney of Waukesha. Miss Ethel, who is employed as stenographer for the Wilbor Lumber Co. at Waukesha, Bernice, now Mrs. John C. Miller of Madison, but who is ill in a Chicago hospital, and the Misses Beatrice and Ida E., who are at home, the latter being employed as stenographer in the law offices of McFarland & Murat. He also leaves one brother, C.H. Dwinell of this city, and two sisters, Mrs. Amasa Ball of Idaho and Mrs. Clara Perkins, who resides somewhere in the west.

Mr. Dwinell had resided in this city since 1878 and had served as alderman and supervisor, being elected as supervisor again at the April election. He was a man of far more than ordinary ability, shrewd, sharp and progressive, and he always took an active interest in home, state and national affairs. In politics he was a Democrat for a number of years, but for the past several years had been affiliated with the Republican party. The only organization that he belonged to was the Grand Army Post, being a charter member of the local society.

The time of the funeral has not been fully decided, and will not be until the arrival of his sons and daughters, but will probably not take place until Sunday afternoon. Rev. James Blake of the Baptist church will officiate and the officers of the local Post will not doubt conduct the services at the grave.

The Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin) Jul 24, 1907

Jack Brutus belonged to the Connecticut military troops during the Spanish-American War.  I couldn’t find a picture of  “Jack,” the Civil War bulldog. More Civil War mascots can be found at the Fort Ward Museum website.

Dog Had Prominent Part in the Civil War

Twice wounded, three time taken prisoner and having fought in a score of battles during the civil war, was part of the interesting career of “Jack,” a bulldog, which accompanied members of the old Niagara fire department when they enlisted and became a part of the One Hundred and Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. Through the entire war he wore a collar that cost $75, and before he died, several years later, this collar was adorned with several medals, worth several hundred dollars. When he died, this ornament was left around his neck and the body was wrapped in a small American flag before being buried.

Jack accompanied the regiment through the following battles: Yorktown, the battle of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Marv’s Heights, Mine Run, the Seven Days’ Battle, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, the defense of Washington, July 11, 1864, Winchester, Flint Hill, Fisher’s Hill and Middletown.

At the battle of Malvern Hill he was shot through the shoulder and back. At Salem Heights he was captured, held a prisoner and exchanged for a Confederate soldier. During the engagement at Savage Station he was again taken prisoner, but detained only six hours. During the entire war he followed the regiment, and when the army assembled in Washington for the grand review Jack was one of the conspicuous features of the parade. He was taken to one of the northern counties of the state by one of the officers of the regimental association, who kept him until he died.

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 21, 1911

A TRAVELED ROOSTER.

When the 16th regiment marched through town, a little white bantam rooster was observed perched on the knapsack of one of the men. We learn that it has an interesting history. It was carried from Madison in 1863 and taken into the ranks of the 32d regiment, which it accompanied through the Mississippi march to Meridian and back to Vicksburg, thence to Decatur, Alabama, and on the march to Atlanta, at whose capture it was present on the grand march through Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, to Raleigh. With the 32d it went north to Washington and with it passed in the grand review.

Subsequently it was transferred to the 16th veterans and in now mustered out and on its way home. The little fellow had been carried on the knapsack the entire rounds, and has been in all the battles and skirmishes in which the 32d has participated. — Madison Journal.

Cedar Falls Gazette (Cedar Falls, Iowa) Aug 4, 1865