Posts Tagged ‘1924’

Irving Zuelke Music Company

December 18, 2012

Irving Zuelke - Merry Christmas - Appleton Post Crescent WI 24 Dec 1921

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 24, 1921

From GenDisasters:

Business District of Appleton Threatened

(Special to The Northwestern)

Appleton, Wis. – In sub-zero weather, firemen from Appleton and five surrounding cities fought a fire at the corner of College avenue and Oneida street, which, for a time, threatened the entire business section of this city. While it was possible to prevent spread of the flames, the structure attacked was completely destroyed, with a loss estimated at a quarter of a million dollars.

The property involved was a brick building, directly at the corner with a frontage of sixty feet, on College avenue, and 100 feet deep along Oneida street. It was occupied by two stores and several offices. It was owned by Irving Zuelke and his loss on the building alone is placed at $65,000. All that remains standing is the front wall, and that will have to be razed…. [more at the link above.]

The Daily Northwestern, Oshkosh, WI 26 Jan 1928

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Before the fire:

Irving Zuelke - new store 1 - Appleton Post Crescent WI 18 Dec 1924

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Irving Zuelke - new store 2 - Appleton Post Crescent WI 18 Dec 1924

SEVERAL thousand people, many of whom came from cities as far as 100 miles away, visited Irving Zuelke’s new music store at the corner of Oneida -st and College-ave during his formal opening. The store is one of the finest of its kind in the middlewest, comparing very favorably with the best in the largest cities.

Enormous changes have been made in the interior of the building, as well as in the exterior. Every possible convenience for customers and for the business has been installed. All the rooms are beautifully appointed and arrangements were made for the fastest service for customers.

The main floor, used largely for general display purposes, is beautifully finished and well arranged. Highly decorative lighting fixtures have been installed and soft carpets add to the elegance of the room.

The display windows on two sides of the building are attracting a great deal of attention. They are spacious and so arranged that they can be decorated with the maximum effectiveness. Wax figures are used effectively in decorating the windows.

The piano room, radio room and phonograph room are on the third floor and a recital hall also has been fitted up on that floor.

The sales rooms are well equipped for demonstration and display purposes. Nothing that would add to attractiveness or to comfort has been omitted.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 18, 1924

Irving Zuelke - Special Christmas Offer - Appleton Post Crescent WI 13 Dec 1926

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 13, 1926

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PEP

November 24, 2012

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Apr 25, 1928

“PEP.”

This is the age of hustle, and there’s progress everywhere,
Why! We’re carrying “folks” and freight and mail
Away up in the air!
And the lad or lass with courage, initiative and pluck
Will put to rout, forever, that discouraging “tough luck.”
Achievement and expression; that’s the order every day,
Help yourselves, but others also “as we pass along this way.”
Hours fly when filled with worthwhile work, if tackled with a grin!
Just add it to your creed, my friend
You’ll be mighty sure to win!
Success and happiness you long for?
Really, truly want to “get?”
That elusive potent little word that’s labeled “pep?”
Well, here’s a tip, it’s old and new;
It’s that same little “up-to-you!
Don’t shirk, just work, and make our dream come true.”

— Beatrice Kramer, in Seattle Post Intelligencer.

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Dec 30, 1919

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Nebraksa State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) May 6, 1938

Peppy Fashion!

Nashua Reporter (Nashua, Iowa) May 26, 1937

Smart Suits Put Pep in Your Step!

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Jun 18, 1918

Peppy Feet!

Indiana Evening Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Feb 19, 1927

Prices to Pep You Up!

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Mar 8, 1929

Minty Pep!

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Aug 21, 1924

Up to the Voters

November 3, 2012

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The Great Game Of Politics
By Frank R. Kent

ONE SIDE HAS been more successful than the other in creating an impression of victory…

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Nov 2, 1936

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GIVE ME A RIDE OR I WILL VOTE FOR HIM AGAIN!

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Bone and Skin

October 31, 2012

Epigram on Two Monopolists

Bone and Skin, two Millers thin,
Would starve us all, or near it;
But be it known to Skin and Bone
That Flesh and Blood can’t bear it.

— John Byrom.

Iowa City Press Citizen (Iowa City, Iowa) Sep 1, 1924

*   *   *   About Bone and Skin (google book link)   *   *   *

Running Away

October 8, 2012

RUNNING AWAY

The snow fell slow, unhurried —
I had to watch and see
The way the great soft flakes of it
Caught in the balsam tree —

There was the baking yet to do,
The beds weren’t made, and still
It looked so pretty and so white
Along the Quarry Hill  .  .  .

I thought I’d run away a bit
And leave my work and then
I’d rush it through as best I could
When I came home again.

The snow was soft beneath my feet,
The wind was cold and wet;
It was such fun to tramp the hill,
To be so free — and yet

The work that I had left undone
Walked with me all the way;
It talked to me and scolded me,
It would not let me play.

So, what with this and what with that,
I couldn’t take my ease;
For thinking of those unmade beds
Made me forget the trees.

So, home I went discouraged;
I thought, “What use to shirk,
If Duty goes along with me
And makes me think of work?”

ABIGAIL CRESSON.

Iowa City Press (Iowa City, Iowa) Feb 14, 1924

The Clank of Breaking Manacles

September 22, 2012

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Sep 12, 1928

When you read republican platforms you see the faces of Lincoln and Grant, you hear the emancipation proclamation, the clank of breaking manacles falling from the limbs of slaves, the battle hymns of the republic, and the glory of the stars and stripes.

When you read the democratic platforms you see the faces of James Buchanan, Jefferson Davis, and Grover Cleveland; you hear of secession and rebellion, panic and disaster, repudiation of national obligations, starvation of American labor, and the hauling down of the American flag.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Sep 23, 1902

…Mr. STEVENS desired to say….As the Constitution could not be executed in the seceded States, the war must be carried as against an independent nation. The people would admit the measures he had advocated from the onset. To arm negro slaves was the only way on earth to exterminate the rebellion, they would find. We must treat those States as now outside of the Union, as conquered provinces, settle them with new men, and drive the rebels as exiles from the continent. They had the pluck and endurance which were not at first realised on this side of the House. They had determination and endurance, and nothing but exile, extermination or starvation could make them submit.

Mr. STEVENS here caused an article to be read, a special dispatch to the Chicago Times, to the effect that Gov. ROBINSON, of Kentucky, had issued a che???r letter to the members of the Legislature, asking for their views on the President’s Proclamation, and that fully two-thirds were in favor of taking the State out of the Union if the Proclamation is enforced. That the State militia would go with the South, and that HUMPHREY MARSHALL ad stationed himself at Mount Sterling to receive them.

Mr. MALLORY wished to know what part of this ominum gatherum the gentleman wished to direct their attention.

Mr. STEVENS — That two-thirds of the Legislature are in favor of taking the State out of the Union.

Mr. MALLORY denounced this newspaper statement as utterly false. That Gov. ROBINSON will do anything like advising Kentucky to engage in the rebellion, or arm against the Government, is equally false. There was no ground for such assertion.

Mr. STEVENS — I am happy to hear it, as the statement came from a Democratic newspaper, and I doubted its truth very much. [Laughter.]

Mr. WADSWORTH noticed another branch of the article, namely, about HUMPHREY MARSHALL being at Mount Sterling. The last he heard of HUMPHREY was, he was 170 miles off. He was drunk and cursing Kentucky, because she would not rise like “My Maryland.” The muskets in Kentucky are in the hands of the militia. employed in the defence of the Union. The malignant correspondent of the Chicago Times had not the slightest foundation for saying that the guns would ever be turned against the Union.

In reply to a question by Mr. STEVENS, whether the proclamation would take Kentucky out of the Union, he said Kentucky cannot be taken out of the Union either by secessionists or by abolitionists or both combined. (Applause and cried of “good.”) As for the emancipation proclamation, we despise and laugh at it. The latest mustering of Gen. BRAGG shows only 2,300 Kentuckians in his army, and some 1,200 Kentuckians had deserted from HUMPHREY MARSHALL. His opinion was there are not five thousand persons who were once citizens of Kentucky, who are in the rebel army, but the course pursued by the Radicals, like the gentleman from Pennsylvania, has worked more mischief to the Union than all the rebels have done since July, 1861. France and England might join the United States, but if the negroes are set free under the Proclamation, the Secessionists never can be conquered. The Proclamation cannot be enforced in Kentucky — not one man in ten thousand is in favor it….

The New York Times (New York, New York) Jan 9, 1863

New York Times (New York, New York) Jan 9, 1863

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[From the N.Y. Daily News]
THE PEACE CONFERENCE
[excerpt]

Mr. Lincoln offered no terms of compromise, and rejected, in advance, every proposition that did not accord with the extreme views of the faction he represents. He demanded unconditional submission to the Federal authority, and compliance with all the schemes of abolition set forth in the emancipation proclamation and the proposed amendment of the Constitution.

In brief, he gave the Southern people to understand that reconciliation was out of the question, unless they acquiesced in measures most repugnant to their feelings, and most antagonistical to their political convictions.

Galveston Daily News (Galvestion, Texas) Mar 4, 1865

The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Sep 22, 1924

Always for Some — The Last Day of School

September 5, 2012

The First Day of School is…

Always for Some…

The Last.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Sep 4, 1934

Public Humiliation

for

Endangering Children’s Lives

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Nov 17, 1924

College Presidents and Camput Cut-Ups

August 29, 2012

 

Song of the Young Idea.

“The world has never known the turning loose of such an army of hard-drinking, cigaret-puffing, licentious amazons as walk our streets and invade our campuses today.” — President of Roanoke College.

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They screech at us and preach at us and call us nasty names;
They flay us and they’d slay us, were they able;
For Jurgen they would substitute the writings of King James;
They’d have us banish gin and things from table!

Sing Hey!
Sing Whee!
Sing They!
Sing Me!

I’ll sing it as I want to, bless me;
Let any one who will suppress me;

Pajamas on an Amazon are pretty things to see;
It chances that the dance is rather sexy;
Admitting we like petting and put whisky in our tea —
Well — what is all of that to Prexy?

Sing Ho!
Sing Hum!
Sing Woe!
Sing Rum!

Let any one who wants to doubt it,
We’re having lots of fun about it!

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Jan 19, 1924

If I Know What I Mean
by Elsie Janis

COLLEGE PRESIDENTS AND CAMPUS CUT-UPS.

PRESIDENT SMITH, of Roanoke college, grabbed off a lot of front-page space for himself and his institution the other day by speaking his mind freely and fiercely about the modern girl. Of course, it pays to advertise and his obviously moral views will attract the attention of some puritanical parents.

“That’s exactly the college for dear daughter!” they exclaim.

It will also interest a number of daughters.

“Nothing stirring, mates! I don’t park my brain and brawn at any Roanoke — so long as that old bird roosts in the lookout nest.” That’s their verdict.

Of course, it would suggest that a man old enough to be president of a college might not know quite all there is to know about the modern girl, but  being just an uneducated female who never went to college, I feel free to say what I want to about college professors. Personally, I think it must be quite hard enough trying to pass exams without having the old dears counting how many cigarettes you smoke a day.

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PRESIDENT SMITH said “Never has there been such an army of hard drinking, cigarette puffing amazons as invade the college campus today.” Them was harsh words, Prexy. I don’t know yet whether he meant the Amazon river, on account of their wetness, or whether he means the kind that use to curry spears.

At least the modern girl doesn’t need a spear — she’s got a sense of humor. She needs it if she reads the newspapers. I wish they would stop giving her so much space. She naturally feels she has to make good by appearing bad. And how devout educators like the President must devour the dailies!

He says the girls have flasks on their hips. Now that shows how near he has been to the abandoned creatures! With these new straight up-and-down “cuss as you enter” dresses, that have a hole at the top for the head and one below for the dance-a-meters, you not alone can’t have a flask on the hip, but you can’t even have the hip, and look smart.

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JUST where these campus cut-ups carry their liquor I don’t know, but that most of them carry it well, I’m sure. Do they puff cigarettes? Well, if they do, he might give them medals, for that means that they do very little real smoking. If they inhale, that goes a bit further into the subject and a lot further into the lungs. If the girls take one last drag before entering the classroom and then exhale, the smoke at the end of a lecture on Eugenics, he might complain.

I really think that every girl has enough criticism in the home without paying tuition fees for more of it, and broadcasted at that. There is no doubt about modern young women being free thinkers and  spree drinkers — but at least they’re not lonely.

Honestly, I meant to avoid the subject of prohibition. Everything that can be said has been printed and a lot that can’t be printed has been said. I am not for it or against it. Spending half my time in Europe, I can afford to be neutral, though I must admit that while I’m in America I simply can’t afford to be wet.

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I’VE just finished a tour and saw a lot of girls and went to many parties. I was not so much impressed by how much these girls drink as I was petrified to see how much the can drink. Gone are the days when the villain hissed: “Curses! One drink and the girl is mine.” Today it’s “Curses! One drink and the girl wants mine.”

Perhaps their heads are so full of ideas that the liquor can’t get up there. Certainly their glass grabbers (right digits) are as tireless as an adding machine and almost as automatic.

Also I have observed that all the vices that the Professor considers disgraceful seem to be quite successful. The girls are certainly more idolized than criticized by the men who know more about loving than is????.

A halo is very satisfactory to the wearer, but the [illegible…..] tell it from Queen Mary’s spring bonnet. The modern young man doesn’t care what’s on her head or in it as long as she is a good dancer, a clean drinker and does not require a lot of rest.

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PERHAPS after all, President Smith has hit the nail on the head and driven it in. Perhaps it’s up to the men to save the women and he just started the movement. For years women have been saving men from other women — by which I mean even going to the lengths of marrying them to do it.

Now it’s obviously up to the men to follow the President’s lead if not his creed, and start soul saving on broad lines — not too broad, of course. Since the women insist on thrusting equal rights on the men (which goodness knows they never had before), there is surely nothing to stop the ardent young swain from reversing the tables (or upsetting them according to time, place and intentions), and pulling the time-worn phrase (1924 model), “Darling, I adore you. Do you care enough for me to give up your liquor?”

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FRANKLY, I’d love to be saved. But as I never went to college, I couldn’t hope to be classed with President Smith’s Modern Mesalinas. There was a time when actresses had a chance to get on the front page on account of the number of husbands they divorced, but now with public interest all centered around College Cut-ups and the number of cigarettes they consume, we actresses might as well bow low and admit that we are just a lot of tame tabbies trying to get along.

I resign, reluctantly. I am too far behind the modern flapper to catch up with her. Even so, I never could stick with her until 6 a.m. and then meet her in the park at 9:30 on a horse. If I stay up until 3, I don’t’ want to speak even to my mother before noon. And as for riding a horse, I wouldn’t even know how to start a conversation with one at 9:30 in the morning.

However, I am not too far behind the flapper to see and admire her. Yes, and defend her, anytime anybody of another generation starts tearing her to bits as if she were a treaty. I see her shortcomings, but I believe that they, like her short hair will grow out  in time.

In the meantime, I suggest that some college girl be given a front page to tell what she thinks of the modern college president who rushes into print about her.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Feb 10, 1924

You Can’t Forget a Garden, But Can You Forget a Poet?

July 1, 2012

Image from Alfredo Rodriguez

YOU CAN’T FORGET A GARDEN

You can’t forget a garden
When you have planted a seed —
When you have watched the weather
And know a rose’s need.
When you go away from it,
However long or far,
You leave your heart behind you
Where roots and tendrils are.

Louise Driscoll, in “Garden Grace.”

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jun 11, 1932

Louise Driscoll To Speak at Normandie

Garden lovers will have an opportunity to indulge themselves, in imagination, in the delights of their hobby, despite Winter’s barricade against outdoor participation, when Louise Driscoll speaks on Thursday, February 20, in the ballroom of the Normandie, No. 253 Alexander Street.

Miss Driscoll will have as her theme that evening “A Garden Thru the Year.” Author of “Garden Grace” and “Garden of the West,” she will bring the spirit of all gardens to her listeners, as in her poem, “Lost Garden,” from “Garden Grace.”

Guest of Mrs. Forbes

Miss Driscoll will be the guest of Mrs. George M. Forbes of Alexander Street, president of the Rochester Poetry Society, under whose auspices she will speak.

Rochester Journal (Rochester, New York) Feb 13, 1936

ON BEING A NEWSMAN IN PASADENA

I have long said one of the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena is that — no matter on what subject you write — you may rest assured that among the thousands of persons reading your stuff will be at least one of the world’s greatest authorities on that subject.

It never fails.

Some of the most valued acquaintances I have picked up over the years have developed this way. You do a “masterpiece.” Next day the phone rings, or there’s a letter on your desk. You were right, and you know it. Or you were wrong, and you’ve picked up a world of understanding.

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On my desk this morning was a letter of a different type — illustrating the point I am making in another way.

It was in response to a column I wrote way last spring, forgot, and then published late because I still thought it was a good column. I called it, IN WHICH I GROW SENTIMENTAL. It was built around re-discovery of this poem, which, half forgotten from my boyhood days, nonetheless had carried me through many tight places.

Here’s the letter I found on my desk.

L.M. — I was very much interested and pleased to see, in your column, a quotation from a poem by Louise Driscoll.

Louise — who died some years ago — way my cousin.

She was for many years, head of the library of Catskill, New York, and was a poet of quite considerable reputation. In the days when poetry, to be publishable, did not have to be (a) an imitation of the New Yorker, or (b) something just long enough to fill that annoying gap at the end of a magazine page.

Her poems were published in many magazines in the 1920s and thereabouts, and appear in several anthologies. She published one book of collected verse, so far as I know; a small book of very charming and rather haunting poems, under the title “Garden Grace.”

I am sure it would have made her very happy to know that one of her poems was remembered.

Very sincerely,

Marjorie C. Driscoll,

Altadena.

See what I mean about the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena?

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SENTIMENT HAS A PLACE IN OUR BEING

Star-News (Pasadena, California) Jun 9, 1959

 

Distinction for Local Women

New York, Sept. 26 (Special). —

Three Kingston women, seven residents of Woodstock, one Palenville and one Catskill woman are members of a group of outstanding women of the nation selected for inclusion in “American Women,” a who’s who of the feminine world just completed and published.

The honor was attained locally by Mary E.S. Fischer, illustrator, Melvina E. Moore-Parsons, and the late Mary Gage-Day, physicians of Kingston, Mrs. J. Courtenay Anderson, Agnes M. Daulton, Harriet Gaylord and Louise S. Hasbrouck, writers, Nancy Schoonmaker, lecturer, Lily Strickland, composer, and Mrs. Bruno L. Zimm of Woodstock, Jennie Brownscombe, artist, of Palenville, and Louise Driscoll, librarian, of Catskill.

New York state has contributed 1,096 of the 6,214 women chosen for the distinction of places on the list. Eighty-two per cent attended college and the majority are active in clubs and organizations. The possibility of success for a career and marriage combination receives strong endorsement from the fact that 41 per cent of the roster are married.

Approximately a third of the list, in true feminine fashion, declined to state their age. Writers formed the largest class, numbering 800, and professors the second with 355. Four each are engaged in aviation and astronomy, five in engineering and thirteen in the ministry. Gardening is the most popular hobby. Only sixty-four like to play bridge and one goes in for hunting mushrooms.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Sep 27, 1935

Louise won an award for this one:

Title: Poems of the Great War
Editor: John William Cunliffe
Publisher: The Macmillan Company, 1917
“The Metal Checks”
Pages 78-83

Her Father:

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Jan 3, 1941

Services Tonight For Mr. Driscoll, Dean of Masons
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Native of Rockland County, 103, Died Yesterday in Catskill
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CATSKILL — Masonic services will be held tonight for John Leonard Driscoll, a native of Piermont, Rockland County, and oldest Mason in the state, who died yesterday at his home. Mr. Driscoll, who had been in remarkable good health until two weeks ago, was 103 years old last October eleventh.

Mr. Driscoll was a descendant of Johannes ver Vailen, one of the holders of the Harlem Patent who had an inn and a ferry at Spuyten Duyvil in the early days of the state. His father was Isaac Driscoll and his mother Eliza Burgess Shaw. His great-grandfather came to the United States from Ireland about the middle of the Eighteenth Century.

Surviving Mr. Driscoll, who had lived under twenty-five of the nation’s thirty-two presidents, are the Misses Lizbeth, Caroline and Louise Driscoll, all at home.

As a boy Mr. Driscoll witnessed the digging of holes and the planting of rails for the Hudson River Railroad. Until the age of sixty he had never smoked. He first tried a cigar, without becoming sick, and then changed to a pipe which was his favorite and constant companion during the last few years of his life.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Sep 30, 1937

At the age of 100, referring to his job in the 1830’s when pine logs were used for fuel and he was chief engineer for the Catskill Mountain Railroad, he said, “A good fireman in those days would handle the wood only once. He pitched each chunk at such an angle that when it landed on the floor of the engine it would bounce through the fire door into the box.”

He explained his philosophy of life, take it as it comes, by saying:

“When you’ve lived as long as I have, and seen many things, you realize there are few things in the world worth worrying about. It’s a good world, too, as long as people keep their sense of humor.”

Middletown Times Herald (Middletown, New York) Jan 3, 1941

* Another obituary states his wife died in 1903. (See end of post for image.)

* I couldn’t find obituaries for Louise or her sisters. It is possible there were some in the Greene County Examiner-Recorder, but I don’t have access to the years they would have appeared. A shame, really; Louise was a very talented lady and I would like to know more about her.

Quilt square sewn by Louise Driscoll’s grandmother:

From Dutch Door Genealogy:

18. E.B. Driscoll, age 47
She was Eliza Burgess Shaw, mother of Carrie, above, and in 1862 was the widow of Isaac Blauvelt Driscoll (#6010) in 1836. Isaac died in 1851. Their children who lived were John Leonard Driscoll, born 1837, lived to be 103; Charles Francis, born 1841; and Caroline, born 1844. Eliza was a seamstress, per the 1860 census.

Read more about the quilt at the link.

This is the closest I could come to finding a biography, other than the short bit I linked at the top of the post:

Louise Driscoll, who had a story, “The Tug of War,” in Smith’s Magazine for May, and a novelette, “The Point of View,” in the June number of the same magazine, lives in Catskill, N.Y. She has written verse since she was a very little girl, and while still a schoolgirl used occasionally to send poems to the New York newspapers and different magazines, many of them being accepted. It is only within the last few months that she has tried to do much prose, and she says that she has found the editors of the American magazines so ready to receive and educate a new writer that she has no faith in the tales so often heard concerning the necessity of influence to gain attention. Her verses have appeared in Lippincott’s, the Critic — now Putnam’s Monthly — the Independent, the Metropolitan, and a number of other periodicals, and some of them have been widely copied. One poem, “The Highway,” which appeared in Lippincott’s about three years ago, brought her a good many letters from readers, including some editors of other magazines. Miss Driscoll in now at work on a longer and more serious book than “The Point of View,” which is her first long story. She is very ambitious and believes fully in hard work, but she says she writes because she must, and is sure she would write if she had never heard of type. Incidentally, she has a large regard for the English language, and a sincere desire to use it correctly.

The Writer, Volume 19
By William Henry Hills, Robert Luce, 1907

Another garden themed poem by Louise Driscoll:

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Nov 17, 1924

One of Louise Driscoll’s books can be accessed for free at Google Books:

Title: The Garden of the West
Author: Louise Driscoll
Publisher: The Macmillan company, 1922

From Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine – 1907

THE POOR HOUSE

by Louise Driscoll

There’s a white road lined with poplars
And the blue hills rise behind,
The fields lie green on either side
And the overseer’s kind.

This is a play/skit:

Title: The Drama Magazine – Volume 7
Author: Drama League of America
Editors: Charles Hubbard Sergel, William Norman Guthrie, Theodore Ballou Hinckley
Publisher: Drama League of America, 1917
Pages 448-460

This description from The Quarterly Journal of Speech Education – 1918:

One act tragedy for two men and two women. Realistic play of American rural life and the tragedy of weakness and lack of determination.

She also wrote and/or translated music lyrics. I ran across a Christmas carol she did as well:

Polska
Metsän puita tuuli tuudittaa,
ja joka lehti liikkuu,
oksat keinuu, kiikkuu,
karjan kellot kilvan kalkuttaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuor eli’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä
Näin iloiten vain ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Karjan kellot kilvan kaikottaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.

Sunnuntaina taasen kiikuttaa
pojat iloissansa
kukin neitojansa.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuorell’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä.
Näin iloiten vaan ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.

*****

Polka

In the woods the trees, the trees are gay.
See how the branches lightly swing and sway, swing and sway.
Sheep bells tinkle and sweet birds sing,
So sing the maidens, tra la, la,la, la,la.
Shaken like a leaf when winds are blowing,
Is a girl’s heart when the rose is showing.
Tra la, la tra la,la, when high flies the swing,
Tra la, la,la,la.la,la,la,la,la,la,la,la.
Her heart goes there like the swing in air,
And falls while she is singing_Tra la, la,la,la,la.

English version by
Louise Driscoll.

Title: Folk Songs of Many Peoples, Volume 1
Editor: Florence Hudson Botsford
Publisher: Womans Press, 1921
Page 26

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Greene County Examiner-Recorder (Catskill, New York) Jan 9, 1941

Deadly Cloudburst Hits Tennessee Mountains

June 12, 2012

Image from the Stoney CreekerThe Lewis Farm Historical Photos

12 DEAD IN FLOOD IN TENNESSEE HILLS

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Twenty Miles of Southern Railway Washed Out and Thousands of Acres of Farm Lands Are Ruined.

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Johnson City, Tenn., June 14. — Twelve known dead, four seriously injured, more than a dozen houses, barns and mills demolished. 20 miles of the Appalachian division of the Southern railway made impassable and thousands of acres of farm lands ruined, constitute the toll of the most disastrous cloudburst ever recalled in this section.

It appeared to have its center near Hunter, Siam and Carden’s Bluff, and on Little Stony creek and Blue Springs creek, where a house in which two families lived, went to pieces, taking nine lives.

The storm came without warning Friday night and early Saturday.

Aside from the impassable condition of roads the section is very mountainous, cut by precipitous bluffs, coves and many streams. Most of the houses and farms are in the valleys and lower lands, in the path of the rising streams, which feed the Watauga and the Doe rivers.

Unconfirmed reports from other sections told of persons missing and believed to be dead. Relief parties have started from Elizabethton and Hampton and from this city. Broken roads, however, prevented them penetrating further than the outer edge, except by primitive modes of travel. Telephone and telegraph lines are down.

No word has been received from Fish Springs and Butler, Tenn., good sized villages believed to be in the center of the devastated area. The cloudburst came as a climax to a day of heavy intermittent rains, swelling streams already raging torrents and sweeping everything before them.

The stricken area is partly traversed by two branch line railways, both of which are badly damaged and by highways which were not the best in dry weather and now no longer exist.

A telephone message from Elizabethton, the nearest point to the stricken area gave as known dead as follows:

Mrs. Pearl Lewis and her children, William, 14; Mary Lou, 4, and a 2-year old son, and an infant daughter; Lum Smith and wife and their son, Willard, 7, and a 6-year-old daughter of W.G. Ellis, a farmer.

The Lewis and Smith families lived in the same house. The Ellis family lived in the Stony creek section near Hunters.

Members of a second family named Smith and another named Norton also are reported missing.

Unconfirmed reports from Carden’s Bluff indicate eight known dead. Impassable roads and lack of telephone wires have prevented verification of this report.

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Image from Stoney Creeker

AGENT OF RED CROSS ON WAY TO REGION

Atlanta, Ga., June 14. — Upon receipt of a news dispatch that the towns of Hunter and Carden, Tenn., had been virtually wiped out by a cloudburst, southern division headquarters of the American Red Cross here announced they had dispatched a staff representative to the territory to take charge of relief measures.

Billings Gazette (Billings, Montana) Jun 15, 1924

And on the same page of the newspaper:

Down East.

Just got back from an eastern town,
Where mornings are dark, where rain comes down
And washes corn from the listed rows —
Down where the muddy Missouri flows.

Got out of bed at my usual hour,
In the chill and damp from the midnight shower,
Dressed in the gloom of the early light,
Wished for the warmth of sunshine bright.

Wanted to travel the open spaces,
Tramp along where the Yellowstone races
Down from the heights, from melting snow
Where clouds ride high and warm winds blow.

I saw no distant mountains where mighty rivers rise
From snows that fall in winter, or where the eagle cries;
I saw no rugged rock rims across the valley floor,
Nor heard the river dash and churn in restless midnight roar.

— H.S. Tool, Billings.

Billings Gazette (Billings, MOntana) Jun 15, 1924