Posts Tagged ‘1927’

The Supreme Court’s Inconspicuous Start

December 20, 2011

Image from Architect of the Capitol

Supreme Court Of The United States Had An Inconspicuous Start

Washington — In a small and undignified chamber on the first floor of the unfinished Capitol of the United States, there assembled in 1801 a body of nine men who probably in the next few years did as much as anyone to mold the still malleable forms of the American Government.

The recent reconvening of the Supreme Court for its 1927-28 term, from October to June here, recalls the inauspicious beginnings of the body in the days of John Marshall. No branch of the Government and no institution under the Constitution, it has been said, has sustained more continuous attack or reached its present position after more vigorous opposition. Today, in black-robed dignity, under the benign smile of Chief Justice William H. Taft, the court sits in assured national respect, in the room in the Capitol which was the Senate Chamber 50 years ago. In 10 or 15 years more the court will sit in its own million-dollar building authorized by the last Congress, to be located on the hill near the Library of Congress.

Quarters Were Inconspicuous

But in 1801, and in the year of the famous Marbury vs. Madison decision, which decided once and for all the court’s power to review, and, if need be, declare unconstitutional acts of Congress, the Supreme Court sat in a chamber only 24 feet wide, 30 feet long, 21 feet high, and rounded at the south end. This was the room casually set aside for it only two weeks before the court came for the first time, in 1800, to the “Federal City,” known now as Washington, D.C.

After 12 years of control by the Federalists, John Adams had been defeated. Jeffersonian Democracy was to have its opportunity. Feeling ran high. Along the unpaved streets of the little capital-town that is now the center of America’s co-ordinated Government, new and old office-holders came almost to blows. Riding into power came the “Anti-Federalists” or Republicans, not to be confused with the present party of that name. Eventually they were to become the Democratic party. Tammany Hall still inscribes its campaign inscription with “Democratic-Republican candidates.”

The Anti-Federalists, with Jefferson, had won the executive and the legislative fields in 1800, but it was the Federal strategy to hold control of the judiciary. A short time before retiring, President Adams almost doubled the number of inferior federal courts and filled them with supporters. Then on Jan. 20, 1801, a little while before leaving office, he sent the name of his Secretary of State to the Senate for confirmation as the _______ Justice. It is recorded that John Marshall, under the stress of the times, nearly failed confirmation at the outset of his 34 years in office.

Image from awesomestoriesMARBURY VS. MADISON

Mingled With the People

John Marshall, the man who upheld the right of judicial review and thereby definitely confirmed that the American Government should ride three-wheeled instead of tandem, with equal powers divided between executive, legislative and judiciary, was regarded as a tower of strength by the Federals. He as a man who felt he could mingle with the people without losing dignity, for he pitched quoits, dressed carelessly, read novels ceaselessly, it is said, and went to market — basket on arm.

He was reared in Fauquier county, Va., served in the Revolution, and was the oldest of a family of 15. From the same state came his arch-opponent in constitutional theory, Thomas Jefferson, the new President. At one end of the unpaved Pennsylvania avenue, in the White House, sat the man who believed in states’ rights; in the stuffy room over the basement, east entrance hall, of the unfinished Capitol sat John Marshall, the very embodiment of the theory of a strong central government.

Decision Delayed Two Years

The incident that made the Supreme Court what it is today came almost at once. Under the act rushed through by the Federalists establishing additional judicial offices a certain William Marbury and three others were named justices of the peace in the District of Columbia. Jefferson coming into office instructed James Madison, as Secretary of State, to refuse to issue their commissions. Marbury and his associates moved by their counsel in December, 1801, in the Supreme Court for a mandamus — a writ requiring a person to do a specified act. A delay of two years ensued. Justice Marshall did not have congested dockets to excuse his delay, but weightier political reasons for withholding judgment.

Then from the small room in the Capitol in 1803 was first enunciated from the Supreme Bench in unmistakable language the doctrine that judicial control over legislation is implied in the provisions of the Federal Constitution. In fact, Chief Justice Marshall was the first man who declared an act of Congress unconstitutional.

Image from Free North Carolina

Comment Still Continues

The Marbury vs. Madison decision declared Marbury was entitled to office and that a mandamus was the rightful remedy. However, the application for the latter from the Supreme Court was denied, on the ground that the authority given the Supreme Court by a recent Judiciary Act of Congress was not warranted by the Constitution. Comment has continued on the decision from that day to this.

The right of judicial review is still challenged. Chief Justice Walter Clark of North Carolina, for example, declared the authority of the court is a “doctrine never held before, nor in any country since,” and attacked it as giving sovereignty in the Nation to a majority of the court — “to five lawyers, holding office for life, and not elected by the people.” On the whole, however, the Nation has supported the Marshall view. The whole course of American democratic development since then has been founded upon it.

Today as the nine Supreme Court justices file into their decorous chamber, led by Chief Justice Taft, smiling broadly, and greeted with old-time pomp of prim, deferential bows from clerk and court attaches, they probably have to thank John Marshall not only for their expanded quarters but for the dignity and power which, under him, the great judicial body has obtained.

— Christian Science Monitor.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Oct 13, 1927

Asking Too Much

December 4, 2011

“I’m afraid, child, you are asking old Santa for too much this year.”
“Well, it is a good bit, mother, but with all the toys he’s got he’ll never miss ’em.”

The Deming Headlight (Deming, New Mexico) Dec 16, 1927

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Dec 4, 1931

NOTE: Number of shopping days were different back then. I couldn’t find a “Days till Christmas” for Dec 4th.

Mistletoe Kisses

December 2, 2011

Sent a Box of Mistletoe to Recall a First Kiss

“SIGN on the dotted line, lady.”

“But are you sure this is for me?”

“It says, ‘Miss Martha Brent, 220 Cassland;’ ain’t that you? There’s no mistake; its yours all right.”

Miss Brent drew the box into the house and opened it with trembling hands. And there stood a box filled with mistletoe, lovely white berries like pearls.

“What in the world!” ejaculated Miss Brent. “Mistletoe for an old maid! It must be a joke!”

But she took it out and decorated her tiny home.

That night her door bell rang. When she went to the door there stood a prosperous, middle-aged man.

His hair was beginning to turn gray and he had a vaguely familiar look.

“Miss Martha,” he said, “thirty years ago tonight we were attending a party at Mary Holland’s. I kissed you under the mistletoe and you boxed my ears soundly. I said, ‘I thought girls liked to be kissed.’ You replied, ‘Not by a good-for-nothing Fitzgerald.’

“I’m no longer good-for-nothing. May I try again, Martha?”

— Jane Roth.
(c. 1927. Western Newspaper Union.)

The Deming Headlight (Deming, New Mexico) Dec 16, 1927

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 2, 1921

Armistice Day

November 11, 2011

On November 11th, 1918 when the Armistice was declared ending the first World War, America was once again the Victor. She proved to the world that the right way of life triumphs against evil. She proved that her sons were ready and able to stand up against those who believed in world domination and oppression.

Let us, then, on this Armistice Day pray that their deeds may always be remembered. Let us pray and give thanks for their God given courage that helped to make our great America the guardian of the world.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 11, 1948

Image from LIFE magazine – Caption:

Shirtless American sailor relax on and around several torpedos on the deck of an unidentified ship during the Pacific Conflict, 1943. On one torpedo is written ‘Armistice Day – Hell!’

*****

ARMISTICE DAY

To save from the ash can a burning Old World
And keep flying sparks from the roof of the New,
Our brave Uncle Sam with his colors unfurled
Just smothered it out with live red, white and blue.

Warm RED flowed the blood of his sturdy young sons,
Whose WHITE bled-out faces were lost in the grime,
While tested BLUE steel in projectiles and guns
Completed the job in new world-record time!

In rev’rence we bow on this ARMISTICE DAY,
Before the same altar their sacrifice blessed,
With a priceless return of Hope’s peaceful array
In which the whole earth joins their own hallowed rest.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 11, 1927

Bayard News (Bayard, Iowa) Nov 12, 1942

More of the “White Man’s Burden”

November 7, 2011

Another collection of the “White Man’s Burden” from various papers and time periods.

Image from the book cover of A Prairie Populist on the Iowa Research Online website

CARRIES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

Populist Delegate Holds Their Baby While His Wife Lobbies.

CINCINNATI, May 8. — Mrs. Luna E. Kelli is one of the most active among the delegates and lobbyists gathering here for the anit-fusion populist national convention. In the near vicinity can usually be seen her husband carrying “the white man’s burden” — in this case their infant.

Mrs. Kelli, who is the editor of the Prairie Home at Hartwell, Neb., is here as a delegate both to the Reform Press association and the populist convention. Her husband is also a delegate to the latter body. At home he is a tiller of the soil.

Mrs. Kelli is particularly active in urging the adoption of a universal suffrage plank, and her husband gives hourly proof that he is assisting her in attaining her desire.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) May 8, 1900

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

Practically every western state is facing for this year the greatest tax bill on record. In many instances, the tax has been doubled and trebled in the past six years.

Industry will be called upon to pay this burden and there is no way to get out of it, for the bill has been contracted.

The people are largely to blame for the present state of affairs and they will get no relief until by their voice expressed at elections they have the courage to demand tax reduction and to hold public officials to campaign pledges for economy.

Further, the citizen must get out and vote for men and measures which guarantee economy. If this is not done our tax burdens will grow until it will take special deputies to hunt down individuals and confiscate their property, if they have any, to meet the tax bills. This is not an exaggerated picture.

That the power to tax is the power to destroy has been already well illustrated and taxation today is the greatest single item which prevents and will prevent a return to pre-war conditions. Inasmuch as we have an enormous war tax bill to pay in addition to our other taxes, it is all the more necessary that a reduction in local taxrolls be demanded and secured.

Ada Weekly News (Ada, Oklahoma) Jul 28, 1921

*********

MacNIDER ENLARGES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN
(By Associated Press)

NEW YORK, April 16. — Responsibility for righting the wrongs of the world rests with the people of the United States and Canada, Hanford MacNider, United States Minister to Canada, declared tonight, addressing the annual banquet of the Prudential Insurance Company of America.

“Whether we want the responsibility or not,” he said, “or whether the older countries have any desire to turn their eyes in our direction, it is from the North American Continent that the first move will be expected to right world affairs when they become complicated or confuses.”

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 17, 1931

CARRY THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

France has taken possession of seven islands off the Philippines, with the secret approval of the United States.

This country has lost interest in that part of the world, inasmuch as the Philippines are to be given their freedom, if they so desire.

The United States preferred to have French occupy the islands rather than the Japanese.

From now on the French will be called upon to carry the white man’s burden in that region.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Jul 30, 1933

NEW LANDS ON FRENCH MAPS
[Excerpt]

The despatch boats Astrolabe and Alerte that planted the French flag on Tempest, Loaita, Itu Aba, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands and Amboyne coral reef found inhabitants on only two, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Aug 4, 1933

WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

The mystery of Italy’s African policy seems to be at least partly explained in the latest statement from the government’s colonial department at Rome.

Under-secretary Allesandro Lessona says:

The Ethiopian situation is a problem of vast importance, embracing the whole European civilizing mission, not merely security for our own lands.”

Americans have not been able to see, from any facts provided by the Italian government, that lawful Italian interests were really threatened in Africa.

The Ethiopian government has seemed eager to settle on any fair basis the trivial boundary dispute that Italy makes so much fuss about. But now the situation begins to clear up. Europe has a “civilizing mission” in Africa, and must make life in that dark continent as “secure” as it is in Europe.

If the Ethiopians have a sense of humor, they must laugh as they read that.

Kokomo Tribune (Kokomo, Indiana) May 11, 1935

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

The Indians of California are on the war path again.

It’s not scalps they’re after, this time, nor are they mobilizing to repulse a new invasion of “pale faces.” They are aroused because a law they pushed through Congress at the recent session was vetoed.

The law was an amendment to an act approved in 1928, which authorized the Indians to sue the U.S. for pay for lands, goods, and other benefits promised in the “Eighteen Lost Treaties” negotiated in 1851 and 1852. It would have made possible suits totalling $35,000,000 instead of just ten or twelve millions, as in now the case.

Of course the Indians are not trying to get back the land itself. But, in view of the hazards of land-owning these days, it might be a break for white men if they did. There is the continual struggle against droughts, insects, weeds and taxes. And now there is this new threat in California to try to support the whole State treasury by a tax on land alone — the Single Tax.

Although such was what Kipling meant by the phrase, nevertheless land seems to be qualifying as the real “White Man’s Burden.” And if this latest tax blow falls on land, we might just as well give it back to the Indians to let it become the Red Man’s Burden.

Arcadia Tribune (Arcadia, California) Jul 20, 1936

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

President Truman has announced that he is considering asking congress for legislation to permit the entry of European refugees — including Jews — to the United States.

How congress will react to this is a matter for speculation, but it is to be hoped that it will be rejected.

From a humanitarian standpoint we will admit that the victims of the World War should be assisted, but it should be in a way of repatriation rather than absorption.

Not so long ago we had an acute unemployment problem in this country, and it is not impossible that it should recur. What it would be if millions of Europeans were received into this country, no one can foretell. It would certainly require more than a glorified WPA, for most of the refugees would be penniless, and would have to  be provided with housing and maintenance until they could become established.

In view of the disturbance which is now in progress in Palestine, it would seem that the admission of Jews would be taking on a problem with which Great Britain has been unable to cope. We might be inviting an explosive situation such as is now besetting the Holy Land.

Somehow Uncle Sam has fallen heir to a large proportion of the white man’s burden of the entire world. We not only financed and furnished munitions and material for our allies in the late war, but have since made them loans, and now the President proposes to adopt all the unfortunates of war-torn Europe.

If the people of the United States are not to be brought to the economic level of Chinese collies, they will have to demand that Uncle Sam quit playing the role of Santa Claus.

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Aug 17, 1946

J.A. Livingston
Three Major Crises For John Kennedy
[Excerpt]

RECOVERY OR RECESSION

Next week, Secretary of the Treasury Anderson will personally ask Chancellor Adenauer, of West Germany to assume more of the “white man’s” burden and, thus, relieve the drain on U.S. gold. The central bank of West Germany has reduced its discount rate from 5 per cent to 4 per cent in order to discourage the flow of investment funds from the U.S.

2. The new president will have to decide whether the nation is in a recession or recovery is just around the corner. More than 5,000,000 persons will be out of jobs when Kennedy assumes office. Then outdoor work on farms, construction, and the railroads will be at a seasonal low. As many as seven persons out of every hundred may be seeking work.

Mr. Kennedy, therefore, will have to decide whether to cut taxes to stimulate retail sales (see chart), or initiate hurried public works to provide jobs, or both. Such expansionary efforts will unbalance the budget and aggravate international worry about:

3. The soundness of the dollar. Even the richest nation in the world can bite off more economics than it can handle. In recent post-war years, high defense outlays, aid to under-developed nations, and federal social undertakings have overreached taxes. Collectively, as well as individually, Americans have been living on the installment plan.

Big Spring Daily Herald (Big Spring, Texas) Nov 13, 1960

*********

Previous White Man’s Burden post.

Influence of Texas on Election of 1844

October 26, 2011

In 1837, Texas asked to be annexed to the United States.

Texas wanted to enter as a slave state.

The Texas Question became an important presidential campaign issue.

Pro-annexation, James K. Polk beats Henry Clay.

*****

HIGH LIGHTS OF HISTORY — Influence of Texas on Election of 1844
By J. CARROLL MANSFIELD

The Davenport Democrat and Leader (Davenport, Iowa) Jun 24, 1927

In The Attic with Wilbur D. Nesbit

June 27, 2011

Image by Janet Kruskanp.

I had originally planned to post this with the other “dolls in the attic” poem (see previous post) but after doing some  research on Wilbur D, Nesbit, I decided to separate the poems so I could include more about him and his work.

IN THE ATTIC.

Up in the attic where mother goes
is a trunk in a shadowed nook —
A trunk — and its lid she will oft unclose
As it were a precious book.
She kneels at its side on the attic boards
And tenderly, soft and slow,
She counts all the treasures she fondly hoards —
The things of the long ago.

A yellow dress, once the sheerest white
That shimmered in joyous pride —
She looks at it now with the girl’s delight,
That was hers when she stood a bride.
There is a ribbon of faded blue —
She keeps with the satin gown;
Buckles and lace — and a little shoe;
Sadly she lays that down.

One lock of hair that is golden still
With the gold of the morning sun;
Yes, and a dollie with frock and frill —
She lifts them all one by one.
She lifts them all to her gentle lips
Up there in the afternoon;
Sometimes the rain from the eave trough drips
Tears with her quavered croon.

Up in the attic where mother goes
is a trunk in a shadowed place —
A trunk — with the scent of a withered rose
On the satin and shoe and lace.
None of us touches its battered lid,
But safe in its niche it stays
Scared to all that her heart had his —
Gold of the other days.

— W.D. Nebsit in Chicago Tribune.

New Castle News ( New Castle, Pennsylvania) Oct 28, 1904

Wilbur D. Nebsit was also the author of An Alphabet of History, the FRANKLIN image above taken from the book, which can be viewed/read on the Open Library website. I linked the Google book version of this book in my The Unknown Blue and Gray post, which also includes his poem by the same name.

*  *  *  *  *

A very brief Masonic Bio can be found HERE. Some of his Freemason poetry can be found HERE.

Below are  some articles that give a little more insight:

Image from The Indianapolis Star – Apr 4, 1914

RACE DRAWS LARGE GROUP OF WRITERS

Scribes From Afar Arrive to Describe Speed Battle for Papers and Journals.

The 500-mile Motor Speedway race has drawn men from two continents, whose names are known to the world of letters. These men will relate the human interest tale of the struggle of men and steel machines against time and danger in the columns of publications throughout the world. Gellett Burgess is one of the many who will pen the history of the race.

Wilbur D. Nesbit, author of poems, comic operas and books, is another. He will write the story of the race for Harper’s Weekly….

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 30, 1912

CHICAGO HOOSIERS ELECT.

Wilbur D. Nesbit Made President of Indiana Society.

Wilbur D. Nesbit, the well-known bard, was elected president during his absence in New York….

The Indianapolis Star – Jan 17, 1912

*  *  *  *  *

I clipped this particle biographical sketch from a book on Ancestry.com:

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. Indiana and Indianans : a history of aboriginal and territorial Indiana and the century of statehood [database on-line]. Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: Dunn, Jacob Piatt,. Indiana and Indianans : a history of aboriginal and territorial Indiana and the century of statehood. Chicago: American Historical Society, 1919.
Image from the Culver-Union Township Public Library websiteCulver Through the Years
*  *  *  *  *
The following poem by Wilbur D. Nesbit appeared in The Indianapolis Star as part of:
the remarkable sermon delivered by Wilbur D. Nesbit, the famous Hoosier writer, in the Mt. Vernon Methodist Episcopal pulpit at Baltimore last Sunday…
A handful of dust, that is blown by the wind
That is sporting with whatever thing it may find.
It goes swirling and whirling and scattering on
Till it puffs into nothingness — then it is gone —
A handful of dust.
It may be a king who of old held his rule
O’er a country forgotten — it may be his fool
Who had smiles on his lips and had tears in his heart;
But the king, or the fool; who may tell them apart
In a handful of dust?
It may be some man who was mighty and proud,
Or a beggar, who trembled and crept through the crowd;
Or a woman who laughed, or a woman who wept,
Or a miser — but centuries long have they slept
In a handful of dust.

It may be a rose that once burst into flame,
Or a maiden who blushed as she whispered a name
To its ruby-red heart — and her lips were as read —
But no one remembers the words that she said,
In this handful of dust.

A handful of dust — it is death, it is birth.
It is naught; it is all since the first day of earth;
It is life, it is love, it is laughter and tears —
And it holds all the mystery lost in the years —
A handful of dust.

The Indianapolis Star — Jun 15, 1913
Call of “30” for Poet
Wilbur D. Nesbit, vice-president of the Wm. H. Rankin and Company Advertising Agency, and an author of renown, died Saturday at the Iroquois hospital in Chicago, thirty minutes after he had collapsed on the street.
During his career, Nesbit had served as humorous writer on the old Inter-Ocean, the Chicago Tribune, Baltimore American and the Chicago Evening Post. In more recent years he had allied himself with an advertising agency, but was a frequent contributor to magazines and had acquired much fame as an after-dinner speaker. As a poet, he ranked with the best. One of his finest contributions, which will always endear his name to the patriotic people, was entitled “Your Flag and My Flag.” This poem appeared in the Baltimore American in 1902, and was circulated throughout the country during the World war. A verse will not be amiss at this time:
“Your flag and my flag,
And how it flies today,
In your land and my land
And half a world away!
Rose-red and blood -red
The stripes forever gleam;
Snow-white and soul-white
The good forefathers’ dream.”
Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Aug 23, 1927
Famous Folk
Wilbur Dick Nesbit, the poet and journalist, whose first novel, “The Gentleman Ragman,” has just been published, was born in Xenia, O., in 1871. He began his career as printer and later worked as a reporter. His reputation has been won largely as a contributor of verse to magazines.
While Nesbit was finishing “The Gentleman Ragman” he was spending a few weeks in a country town in Indiana. He had sent nearly all of the revised manuscript to his publishers, but certain details of the completion of the plot had been the subject of discussion between himself and a friend connected with the publishing house.
One day a telegram for Nesbit was received at the village telegraph office. It read:
“What are you going to do about Annie Davis and Pinkney Sanger?”
Annie is the heroine of “The Gentleman Ragman;” Pinkney is the villain, if there is one in the book. The local telegraph operator personally delivered the message, and Nesbit wrote this reply:
“Will marry Annie Davis and shoot Pinkney Sanger as soon as I return to Chicago.”
The operator stared at Nesbit wonderingly when he read the message, but Nesbit did not fathom that stare until the morning when he took the train for home, when the village marshal stepped up and said meaningly:
“Mr. Nesbit, I would advise you, as an officer of the law, sir, not to do anything rash when you get to Chicago.”
Cambridge Jeffersonian (Cambridge, Ohio) Dec 20, 1906
The above poem is signed with Wilbur D. Nesbit‘s alternate nom de plumeJosh Wink. (see mention in below article.)
Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) Apr 25, 1902

Des Moines Daily Leader (Des Moines, Iowa) Oct 13, 1901
*   *   *   *
RAY HIGGINS:
Cracker Barrel
WILBUR DICK NESBIT expounded a brand of patriotism that seems to have fallen out of fashion in the current age when draft dodgers become folk heroes and the American flag is publicly despoiled.
Born in Xenia Sept. 16, 1871, the son of a Civil War veteran and court bailiff here, he grew up in Cedarville where he learned to set type on the old Cedarville Herald in which paper his first wrtings appears.
After two years he went to an Anderson, Ind. papers as a reporter, then to the Muncie (Ind.) Star in a similar capacity. There his copy attracted the attention of John T. Brush, an Indianapolis clothing merchant, who put him in charge of his store advertising.
From there he joined the ad staff of the Indianapolis Journal and next became a feature writer for the Baltimore American under the nom de plume Josh Wind [k]. After three years he was lured to the staff of the Chicago Tribune where he conducted the column “A Line O’ Type Or Two” and then joined the Evening Post.
*   *   *
AFTER HE BECAME director of the copy staff for the Makin Advertising Co. he bought an interest in it and changed the name to Rankin Advertising Agency. HE co-authored the musical comedy “The Girl of My Dreams” and turned out reams of poetry in some of which he collaborated with cartoonist Clare Briggs.
His collection, “Trail to Boyland,” reminisced about Greene County and Cedarville in the pastoral patern of James Whitcomb Riley. He also published “After Dinner Speeches and How to Make Them,” “Sermons in Song,” and “Poems of Homely Philosophy.” His “Your Flag and My Flag” was recited in most school classrooms.
Nesbit died Aug. 20, 1927. Recently his friend and admirer, ex-Cedarvillian, Fred F. Marshall, came up with his timely and appropriate poem entitled “The U.S.A.,” which follows:
There’s them that wants to get us skeered
By tellin’ us o’ things they feared.
They say we’re goin’ to th’ dogs,
Th’ gov’nment has skipped some cogs
An’ that ef we don’t trust to them
Our futur’ wont be worth a dem!
But I want to say
Th’ U.S.A.
Ain’t figgerin’ to run that way.
I’ve noticed things fer many years;
I’ve seen these men arousin’ cheers —
These high-hat men with long-tail coats
That tells us how to cast our votes,
I’ve noticed, too, their idees is
That votin’s all the people’s biz
But I want to say
Th’ U.S.A.
Ain’t only jest election day.

I’ve seen ’em lift their trimblin’ arm
An do their p’intin’ with alarm
Afore election! An’ I’ve seen
How they don’t do much work between
Elections! Seem to save their brains
For workin’ durin’ th’ campaigns
An’ I want to say
The U.S.A.
Don’t give them fellers its O.K.

There’s one or two that I wont name
That keeps a firm hand-holt on Fame
By stormin’ up an’ down the road
A-tellin’ us what long we’ve knowed
That is, they rise to heights sublime
Along about election time
Yit I want to say
The U.S.A.
Ain’t figured yit to turn their way.

It ain’t th’ men that tells our sins
That almost al’ays sometimes wins —
Its them that rolls their sleeves an’ helps
While these yere talkin’ humans yelps
That makes us know our native land
Has got a craw that’s full o’ sand
An’ makes us say
The U.S.A
Is settin’ tight an’ here to stay!

Xenia Daily Gazette (Xenia, Ohio)  Nov 2, 1972

Today in History: Woolworth Opens First Store

June 21, 2011

Image from the City of WATERTOWN New York website

June 21, 1879, F.W. Woolworth opened his first store. Although it failed almost immediately, he didn’t give up, and  eventually, Woolworth became a household name. Here is a collection of items mentioning Woolworth’s, from company business, to jokes, a movie and chewing tobacco; together they show the influence of the Woolworth “brand.”

FIVE AND TEN CENT STORES IN BIG TRUST

NEW YORK, Nov. 3. — A $65,000,000 corporation to merge the greatest string of 5 and 10 cent stores in America is announced today by F.W. Woolworth. Six hundred concerns will enter the new corporation, which will be known as F.W. Woolworth and Co.

The new corporation will take over the business of F.W. Woolworth of New York; S.H. Knox & Co. of Buffalo; F.M. Kirby & Co. of Wilkes-barre, Pa.; the E.P. Charleston & Co. of Fall River, Mass.; C.S. Woolworth of Scranton, Pa.; W.H. Moore of Watertown, N.Y., and W.H. Moors & Son of Schenectady, N.Y.
The corporation also will assume a controlling interest in the English business of F.W. Woolworth & Co. limited.

All the concerns involved in the merger own a chain of 5 and 10 cent stores, 600 in number, in all sections of the United States, Canada and England.

It is understood the new corporation will have 7 per cent preferred stock to the value of $15,000,000 and common stock to the value of %50,000,000. It is said that Goldman, Sachs and Co. and Lehman Bros. of New York and Kleinwortsen & Co. of Cleveland will acquire an interest in the new company.

Woolworth one of the founders of the scheme, was one of the originators of the 5 and 10 cent store business and has piled up  millions of dollars on his chain of establishments in which 10 cents will buy anything in the store. His fortune is so great that practically unaided he financed the building of the great building in course of construction in lower Broadway, which will tour 50 stories about the street.

The life of F.W. Woolworth head of the big merger announced today, is the romance of an idea. It is the story of how a tremendous store was built up from nickels and dimes.

Woolworth is the head himself of 286 stores besides supplementary warehouses in Lewistown, Maine, and Denver, Colorado. He has twenty stores in England.

A recent census showed that 1,500,000 persons entered his stores in a day.

The man who mastered such a business is less than 50 years of age. He started without wages as a farmer’s boy in a dry goods store in Watertown, N.Y., set up his first store in 1879 and has been in business for 30 years. He was born in Jefferson county, New York.

When he worked in a store as a boy he evolved the idea that brought him great wealth. Woolworth fixed a uniform price — five and ten cents. He opened his first store in Utica, but the proposition did not go. He tried again in Lancaster, Pa., and there laid the foundation for his fortune. Now Lancaster is an important Woolworth center with a new warehouse that is one of the sights of the town.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Nov 8, 1911

After deliberating nearly 11 hours a Des Moines, Ia., jury last night decided that bay rum sold in a Woolworth five and ten cent store there is “an intoxicating liquor fit for beverage purposes and should be condemned as such.”

Of course the decision applies only to bay rum in the Des Moines store. It will not affect the sale of similar “lotion” in the Edwardsville Woolworth store, or in stores elsewhere in the country.

As a matter of fact it seems that Edwardsville residents who are brave enough to tackle the liquid will be better off than the folks in Des Moines. Testimony in court there was to the effect that a dime would buy three ounces of the liquid.

Image from The California Perfume Company website

Here it was possible this morning to purchase for a dime a bottle of bay rum, which, according to the label, contained four ounces. The label also said that the liquid contains “60 per cent of alcohol, by volume.” There is nothing to indicate the character of the remaining 10 per cent.

The Iowa case resulted from the seizure, some months ago, by state officers of 3,000 bottles of bay rum. The state charged that the liquid was intoxicating and fit for beverage purposes, which view was upheld by the jury. There was no charges against Woolworth officials, the state merely seeking to confiscate the bottles. Counsel for the company objected.

It was announced today that an appeal would be taken.

At the same time prosecuting authorities at Des Moines announced that a drive would be instituted against sale of bay rum anywhere with their jurisdiction.

So far as is known, this is the first time a jury has passed upon the question of whether bay rum is intoxicating and fit for beverage purposes.

Edwardsville, Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Sep 13, 1929

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) May 10, 1919

HE WAS THIRSTY TOO

I spied a smart dog quench his thirst in Woolworths 10c store yesterday. Watching the people take a drink at the bubbler, he raised up and helped himself also, to the amusement of all who saw it. G.L.C.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Apr 14, 1923

Customer to girl pounding a piano in Woolworth’s: “Would you mind playing Some Time?”

Girl: “Wadda ya think I’m doin’ big boy? Sleepin’?”

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Aug 12, 1926

He — “I’ll take the first two dances.”

She (who worked in Woolworth’s) — “Twenty cents, please.”

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 20, 1926

The Daily Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) Oct 18, 1923

STABS AND JABS AND COUNTERS
By JOE WILLIAMS

Yes, we call those tricky little golf holes “Woolworths.” We make ’em in five or ten.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Aug 24, 1927

Bob: “If you stand over a dime what would you resemble?”

Rob: “I don’t know.”

Bob: “Woolworth’s. Nothing over ten cents.”

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Apr 11, 1922

ALICE WHITE LEADS CAST

Pulchritude and New Plot Ideas Mark Liberty Film.

Dialogue as she is spoke. A whiff of fresh plot ideas: Legs, Curves. Pulchritude with a pull. Good music, good singing, clever lines. That describes “The Girl From Woolworth’s,” which heads a good bill at the Liberty for three days beginning today.

But it doesn’t halfway describe the genuine enjoyment you’re going to get from this First National and Vitaphone offering, because we haven’t mentioned Alice White, the dynamic little star of the piece, and the rest of a really great cast.

Charles Delaney, that engaging young Irish ace of the World war and stunt flyer of the movies, who played opposite Miss White in “Broadway Babies,” is again her leading man. Wheeler Oakman, Ben Hall, Gladden James, Bert Moorehouse, Rita Flynn, Patricia Caron, William Orlamond and Milla Davenport appear in support.

These are not all familiar names on a film offering, because some of them are stage celebrities. Every member of the cast does excellent work And it wouldn’t be fair to pass up a mention of that delectable, pulchritudinous and clever night club chorus of 24 girls. They’re the regular First National — Vitaphone chorus, imported from Broadway, New York, and every inch, curve and kick is class. And William Beaudine‘s direction is splendid.

Still it seems that there is something more that should be said about “The Girl From Woolworth’s” as a charming, heart-touching little love story. The five-and-ten atmosphere, the big town background, the sophistication of the night club — and yet it’s human. That’s it. Human and direct and simple, so that it almost seems old-fashioned. Why, you can tell the story in one short sentence: The love of a boy and girl for each other in the wrong sort of Eden proves strong enough to make the Eden the right sort of garden after all.

By all means, take in “The Girl From Woolworth’s.”

Billings Gazette (Billings, Montana) Dec 29, 1929

*****

NOTE THE BARGAINS:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Oct 18, 1918

Influential “Boots”

June 18, 2011

A Real “Boots” Learns to Fly

Racine, Wis. — There’s more than one Boots of “Boots and Her Buddies” fame in Racine and both can fly an airplane.

One exists in the comic strip of Edgar Martin, NEA Service artist which is published daily in the Racine Times-Call. The other is Miss Charlotte Johnson, 20, blond winner of several beauty contests who found in the pen-and-ink Boots her inspiration to be an aviator — or should we say “aviatrix?”

When Boots of the comic strip began learning to fly recently, Charlotte decided that she would do the same thing. She had driven an auto since she was 11 years old, but she had never been in an airplane before

Now, according to Ed Hedeen, who runs the aviation school here, Charlotte is one of his most accomplished student-flyers.

“I decided that if Boots could learn to fly a plane I could learn to fly one, too,” explains Miss Johnson. “Really, it isn’t nearly as difficult as I thought it would be.”

Some day she may quit her job as telephone operator and take up aviation as a profession (aviation helps those who want to rise in the world, you know) but just now Miss Johnson flies for the fun of it.

But nobody calls her Miss Johnson, nor even Charlotte, any more. To everybody now she’s “Boots” — nothing else but.

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Jan 12, 1929

She’s a “Boots” in Real Life!

“Boots,” the air-minded heroine of Artist Edgar Martin’s popular Evening Huronite’s comic strip, has a counterpart in real life. She is pretty Olivia Matthews, 19, above, of Dedham, Mass. Just like Boots, this comely blonde debutante has forsaken the life of a social butterfly to go in for aviation in a serious way. Her first solo flight was made not long ago from a snow-covered field with a plane equipped with skis. Here you see her, in mechanics’ garb, going over her plane at the East Boston Airport. Notice the “Boots smile.”

Evening Huronite (Huron, South Dakota) Mar 29, 1929

RUTH IS A HEROINE TO HER KID BROTHER

Home Town Folks Wonder What Will Come Next; Husband Taught Her to Fly.

Anniston, Ala., Nov. 11 — “Ruth is a mighty smart girl and all that, but the young lady has just a little bit more nerve than is good for her.”
So says Oscar Elder, father of the young aviatrix who became the nation’s heroine through her daring attempt to fly across the Atlantic.

But Mrs. Elder, who has always been “Mom” to the young flyer, rushes to her daughter’s defense with”

“Now, Dad, you mustn’t say that, Ruth is is all right! She’s the finest daughter in the world, and she’s the greatest little woman ever, even if I am her own mother and say it.”

And so says the entire Elder family, down to her youngest brother. And when a kid brother will admit that his older sister is a good scout — well, you must admit she really is.

Her brothers, in deed, are her greatest champions.

“Ruth is the goods, all right,” says Alfred, 19. “That girl knows her onions.”

“Yes, sir!” chimes in Hughey, who is 15. “Boots is a whale of a girl. Gee, she must have had fun on that trip.”

“Boots,” be it known, is the name by which everybody in Anniston calls Ruth Elder.

Lyle Womack, Ruth’s husband, who is now in Panama with a power company, started Ruth on her career as a flyer.

His business made it necessary for him to do a good deal of flying, and frequently he took Ruth with him, so that she soon felt quite at home in an airplane.

Womack and Ruth were in Lakeland, Fla., shortly after Lindbergh’s flight. With Ed Cornell, wealthy Lakeland business man, and other friends, they were discussing the flight.

“Gee, I’d sure like to be the first woman to fly across,” said Ruth.

Cornell, who owned a pleasure plane, took her at her word and offered to find financial backing if she were serious about it. She agreed at once.

The very next morning Ruth Elder appeared at the Lakeland flying field with Captain George Haldeman, World War flyer and Cornell’s personal pilot, as her instructor.

Haldeman taught her to fly and the rest is well known.

Lyle Womack is Ruth’s second husband. Her first marriage, which ended unhappily, was the result of a high school romance. While attending school in Birmingham, Ala., she met Claude Moody.

Her parents didn’t like Moody, and the two eloped. A short time later, Ruth sued for divorce and got a decree on the grounds of cruelty and violence.

A few months after that she met Womack. Womack is something of an adventurer himself. He has traveled all over the world and is at present on a job that keeps him in Panama, where he and Ruth lived for more than a year.

Now that Ruth’s latest stunt has had a happy ending, the Elder family with all the rest of Anniston, is sitting back, breathing a sigh of relief — and wondering just what “Boots” Elder will think of doing next.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Nov 11, 1927

*****

UPDATE: This “Boots and Her Buddies” comic strip in from 1940, and mentions being “air-minded,” which is also used in the Olivia Matthews 1929 article.

 THINGS ARE PICKING UP

*****

Times Signal (Zanesville, Ohio) Jun 20, 1940

Isn’t it a wow! Ever see a smarter bob than that? Well, you can take it from us, girls, that Boots Bob is going to be the real thing this summer. Men who dictate hair styles say that Edgar Martin, the artist who draws “Boots and Her Buddies,” has fashioned the niftiest hair cut they’ve seen in many a day. For other views of it turn to the strip on page 11.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 13, 1926

Remember when the girls wore mattesses tucked under their hair? Remember the old stuff about “woman’s crowning glory?” Well, just show Grandma this strip. What a laugh she’ll get!

A hundred years ago the lady of fashion piled her hair in a pyramid and buried all the jewels of King Tut in it. When she had an eight o’clock date she and her maids started in on the coiffure about noon.

A generation or two later milady took the pearls out of her hair and put them about her neck. She pulled her tresses down tight and then gathered up the loose ends in a Parker House roll and fastened it with a thousand hairpins, more or less.

And then “the girl with the curl” came into vogue. That was long before the day of Mary Pickford too. Some girls had natural curls and some didn’t and many a long hour was spent in making unnatural curls look natural.

If you really want a laugh, dig out the old family photographs and gaze on the ostermoors of twenty years ago. Remember how the girls used artificial hair to construct those wobbly mountains atop their domes? And then came those wire rats, things that looked like large window shade springs that allowed the air to get to the scalp.

But now look at the latest. It’s the “Boots Bob.” It was created by Edgar Martin, who draws “Boots and Her Buddies,” the most artistic illustrated strip in the world. No hair pins. No nets. No rats. Just simple, solid comfort for the modern girl. Yessir, the world is growing better.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 13, 1926

Well, Folks — How Do You Like Me Now?

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 13, 1926

*****

UPDATE:  I forgot  I wanted to add this “Boots” and Empress Eugenie article here because it sort of ties in with the influential hair styles:

Several papers ran the above picture, but the Indiana Evening Gazette (maybe others, too) included this interesting Empress Eugenie article:

Who Is Empress Eugenie,
Who Sets Styles Today?

BY NEA Service

Empress Eugenie, whose name designates the “Empress Eugenie hat” — that saucy trifle that young things from Maine to California are perching over their right eyelids — has become such a figure within a fortnight that even mere men prick up their ears when her name is mentioned.

She is threatening a sartorial war. “Back to Victorian modesty and the old-fashioned virtues’ ” is the prediction which Eugenie millinery has called forth.

“Back to the styles and manners of grandma’s day, for fashions always bring a recreation in manners.”

Think so?

Here’s a thumb nail sketch of the Empress Eugenie:

She was born of humble parentage in Granada, Spain, in 1826 and at 26 married Emperor Louis Napoleon.

She never wore a gown twice.

She was alternately flirtatious and religious.

She quarreled frequently with her husband and after a particularly violent  disagreement when he refused to increase her allowance, sold part of the crown jewels.

She favored gowns containing 1100 years of material.

She loved excitement and was known as a fearless horsewoman.

She declared “Husbands are worth exactly nothing at all.”

She gave entertainments that were the talk of Europe for their extravagance.

Until extreme old age she dyed her hair and threatened to color it green if her children voiced their objections.

She almost always wore a small, stiff derby type of hat tilted over one eye with long plumes on either side.

These hats — worn at a coquettish angle — were responsible for the origin of the familiar phrase “setting your cap” for a suitor.

Empress Eugenie at the height of her fame dictated fashions for the entire civilized world. She was known as one of Europe’s most famous beauties and stories and legends about her are numerous. A contemporaneous volume states, “She loved excitement and dissipation but was discrete. She gave her heart often but always took it back. No one was bold enough to question her taste or depart from her style decrees.”

After all, was Empress Eugenie so slow?

Indiana Evening Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Aug 27, 1931

*****

“Boots” as a role model:

BOOTS IS A GOOD KID

Boots is one of the most popular girls in this part of California, judging from the comments we get from N.-H. readers. This sprightly young girl, who trips lightly through the top strip of the coming page daily, has so many friends that we believe a little about her private life would be acceptable.

Boots doesn’t smoke.

She has never been seen taking a nip out of a pocket flask or anything else.

She has lots of boy friends, but she doesn’t engage in petting parties.

Edgar Martin, who knows her better than does anyone else, swears she has never been kissed.

An unusual girl. But a fine daily companion for the girls and boys who turn first to the comic page of the N-H every day.

Modesto News-Herald (Modesto, California) Mar 24, 1927

*****

A Little Different Kind of Influence — Charity:

Indiana Evening Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Nov 8, 1935

Anniston Star (Anniston, Alabama) Nov 19, 1936

Amarillo Globe (Amarillo, Texas) Oct 15, 1940

Unemployment Relief

Daily News Standard — Nov 24, 1931

The Copperheads

June 13, 2011

Radical Democrats denounced the war and opposed action of Federal authorities.

They were called “Copperheads” because of the emblems they wore.

Many were brought to trial and imprisoned.

Clement Vallandigham was arrested and banished to the Confederacy.

High Lights of History: The “Copperheads”
By J. Carroll Mansfield

North Adams Transcript(North Adams, Massachusetts) Dec 30, 1927

Read more about the Copperheads: The Traitorous Copperheads (“Peace” Democrats)

Image from the Son of the South website, which has tons of great images and information.

Here are a couple of “Copperhead” poems:

A SOUTHERN CALL ON NORTHERN COPPERHEADS.
“RALLY, SNAKES.”

Come out, you slimy hussies,
Forget domestic musses,
And vend a few more cusses
On Abolitionists.
Wake, snakes!

Vallandigham will lead you,
While Southern traitors feed you;
And, Oh! how bad we need you,
‘Gainst Abolitionists.
Wake, snakes!

There’s only one condition,
To save us from perdition,
Just stop this Abolition —
D—-d Abolition.
Wake, snakes!

There’s nothing you can do, sirs,
To help both us and you, sirs,
Like making much ado, sirs,
‘Pout Abolition.
Wake, snakes!

The Athens Messenger (Athens, Ohio) Sep 17, 1863

[For the Messenger.
COPPERHEADS — A PARODY.
___
BY ISAAC PARTINGTON.
___
The beams of peace were smiling o’er,
Each lovely valley, hill and moor,
As through a Northern village came.
A man, with, on his brow, his name —
A “Copperhead.”

His brow was sad, with look forlorn,
His long, neglected beard, unshorn,
And with each breath he heaved a sigh —
A tear was glistening ‘neath the eye,
Of Copperhead.

A happier man he once had been,
He never dared to stoop to sin;
But love his country ever free,
And thought not that he e’er could be
A Copperhead.

But when secession clouds came o’er,
The tempter whispering at his door,
His mind and reason, so estranged,
That ere a twelvemonth he is changed,
A Copperhead.

“Oh don’t forsake,” his wife did plead,
“Your country in her hour of need.”
But putting all advice aside,
With fiendish look, “I’ll be, he cried,
“A Copperhead.”

“Beware! beware!” his conscience said,
“A day of reckoning’s o’er your head;
Your country’ll through this chastening rise,
And pour out vengeance from the skies,
On Copperheads.”

But heedless, quite, his way he took,
And all his former views forsook.
With hiss and sting he now was found,
The vilest reptile ‘bove the ground —
A Copperhead.

Too great a coward to go and fight,
To gain his “Southern brethren’s” right,
He stayed at home, with tongue and pen,
He hisses at our Union men —
Vile Copperhead.

But when the blast of war was gone,
And peace again our land smiled on,
The branded curse upon his brow,
No rest would Freedom’s soil allow,
To Copperheads.

And so this man now wanders forth,
He’s cursed, all round from South to North.
A second Cain. Such is the fate,
That in the future does await
All Copperheads.

The Athens Messenger (Athens, Ohio) May 28, 1863