Posts Tagged ‘1932’

What’s For Dinner?

November 22, 2012

Hotel Witter – Demolished in 1950 (South Wood County Historical Museum)

What was served for Thanksgiving Dinner in 1929:

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Nov 26, 1929

Cranberry Jell Easily Made by Newest Recipe

Use of Baking Powder Makes Less Sugar Necessary In Preparation of Sauce

With Thanksgiving close at hand the homemaker is thinking seriously of pumpkin pie and cranberry sauce. A new cranberry recipe made with Rumford all-phosphate baking powder is offered here.

Prepare as usual in proportion of one quart of cranberries to 2 cups water. Cook till berries are tender. If preferred clear, rub through sieve to take out seeds and skins.

Return to the fire adding to every quart of fruit 1 cup of sugar (instead of the usual two cups) and 1 level teaspoon of baking powder. Cook only till the sugar is dissolved. Chill before serving.

This cranberry sauce will be sweet and fresh-flavored with fine, clear color.

Note the great saving in sugar. Also consider the advantages in preparing fruit sauces with a minimum of sugar for invalids and children.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 14, 1932


From the Sheboygan Spirit: This hotel was built in the early 1890s and torn down in 1960.

What The Grand Hotel  served for Thanksgiving in 1946:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 27, 1946

Deep-Dish Cranberry Pie

3 cups cranberries
1 cup water
1 1/2 cups sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt

Boil the cranberries in the water until they “pop.” Add sugar and salt. Cool somewhat. Pour into a deep pie dish. Cover with a layer of plain pastry, fitting pastry firmly over edge of dish. (The pastry should be slashed to allow escape of steam.) Bake at 450 F. for 15 minutes.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 1, 1936

Cold Water Pastry

1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup lard
4 to 6 tablespoons cold water

Cut lard into flour and salt until the crumbs are the size of dried peas. Add the water slowly, using just enough to make the dough hold together.

Roll on a floured board.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 1, 1936

Happy Thanksgiving!

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A Wealth of Tradition

November 21, 2012

Image from House Divided

THANKSGIVING STARTED BY WOMAN

The tireless efforts of a woman — Sarah Hale, a widow with nine children — were responsible for establishing Thanksgiving day as a national holiday, the only holiday of its kind in the world! And it’s still the tireless efforts of the women which help to preserve the hearty feasting today.

The first Thanksgiving day, unlike what you may remember from your history lesson, was not a harvest festival, but marked the surrender of Burgoyne and was held in December, 1777, called by the Continental congress. President Washington called the next one, and the next, but many years were skipped before the holiday appeared again, and the dates varied so it was sometimes held in May. President Lincoln tried for the annual observation, but it was through the efforts of Mrs. Hale, as editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book, that Thanksgiving became a national holiday under Andrew Johnson, and has been celebrated on the last Thursday in November ever since.

Since then Thanksgiving has moved along under its own momentum, and this year when President Hoover proclaims the day, a wealth of tradition surrounds the festive board. Are you, as a modern thanks-giver, ready to carry out the traditions of the harvest feast?

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Nov 18, 1932

Cranberrry Contest

November 20, 2012

FIVE WOMEN TO RECEIVE PACK OF CRANBERRIES

FOOD EDITOR ANNOUNCES SIMILAR CONTEST WITH SIMILAR AWARDS FOR NEXT TWO WEEKS; ENTER YOUR RECIPE NOW!

Twenty-five pounds of cranberries, donated by the Wisconsin Cranberry Sales company, will be given to the five prize winners for excellent recipes submitted in The Tribune’s latest food contest. The names of the winners are as follows: Mrs. Leslie Holtz, city, Route 6; Mrs. T.J. Johnson, city, Route 7; Mrs. William Myers, Vesper, Route 1; Mrs. Emmett Knuteson, city, Box 35; Miss Irma Helena Heuer, Pittsville. The prizes will not be available until October 25, when they may be obtained at the Tribune office. Each will receive 5 pounds of berries.

New Contest On

On October 28 we shall again award prizes for exceptional cranberry recipes when similar awards will be made. Here and now is your chance to get a supply of cranberries which will last the ordinary family quite a while. Let us have a banner number of recipes in this contest. What is your favorite cranberry preparation? Send yours and tell your friends to send theirs also. Whatever is worth winning is worth the effort of working for. This requires little effort and the prize is a good one.

The recipes sent in by the various winners are as follows:

Massachusetts Cranberry Pie

Prepare favorite pastry as for pie, and line the pie plate
3 cups cranberries
1/2 cup brown sugar
2/3 cup corn syrup

Put berries through food chopper using coarse knife. Place in plate on top of pastry and add syrup and sugar.

Place in bowl:
5 tablespoons flour
5 tablespoons brown sugar
3 tablespoons butter

Work in mixture with fork until free from lumps and well blended. Spread over the pie filling. Cover with top crust and place in moderate oven, baking from 40 to 45 minutes. All measurements are level.

Irma Helena Heuer.
Pittsville, Wisconsin.

Bananas Baked With Cranberries

Wash one pint cranberries, pour one cupful of boiling water over them. Cook quickly until done and press through a sieve. Peel six large bananas and cut in half lengthwise and crosswise and rub with the juice of half a lemon. In the hot cranberry juice, dissolve 1 1-2 cupfuls of sugar. Pour mixture over bananas and bake in a hot oven until fruit is tender. Remove carefully to a serving dish and chill well. The berry juice forms a rich jelly over the bananas. Serve with or without whipped cream.

Mrs. Emmett Knuteson,
City, Route 7, Box 35.

Cranberry Conserve

4 cups cranberries
1 1-2 cups water
1-2 pound raisins
1-2 pound chopped walnuts
1 orange, juice and chopped rind
3 cups sugar

Cook the cranberries in water until they burst, then rub through a sieve and ad the remaining ingredients. Cook until thick, about 25 minutes.

Pour into hot sterilized jars.

Mrs. William Myers
Vesper, Route 1.

Cranberry Dessert

1 cupful raw cranberries
2 cupfuls sugar
1 cupful apples chopped
1-2 cupful nut meats chopped

Grind cranberries and apples in food chopper. Mix in the sugar and let stand for an hour. Just before serving add nuts and top with whipped cream. This tastes similar to fresh strawberries. A simple dessert.

Mrs. T.J. Johnson,
City, Route 7.

Candied Cranberries

2 cups cranberries
1-2 cup water
2 cups sugar

Pick over cranberries. Prick the skin in several places. Stir sugar and water until dissolved. Boil until thick and syrupy. Add cranberries and cook until mixture shows signs of jellying. Let fruit stand in hot syrup ten minutes. The remove berries and drain on wax paper. These may be served with ice cream or as a garnish for steamed pudding or as any candied fruit.

Mrs. Leslie Holtz,
City, Route 6.

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Oct 14, 1932

After Four Years….Think Twice, Brother

October 10, 2012

Voter – Depression Grouch

Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) Oct 5, 1932

Crow Convention

October 7, 2012

Image from Fergal of Claddagh on Flickr

CROW CONVENTION

So deafening a tumult rose
From out a grove where gathered crows.
I said to Bill: “I fancy that’s
A group of feathered Democrats.”

“Republicans perhaps,” said Bill,
“Or what is even likelier still
So long the clamoring persists
Those inky birds are Communists.”

Convention time and early fall,
A patch of woods the meeting hall.
And all that bickering, I suppose,
About the common rights of crows.

“At times,” said I, “I envy birds,
Denied the privilege of words,
But when the crows convene again
I think how much they are like men.”

Morning Herald (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) Oct 19, 1932

One More Mountain To Climb

September 7, 2012

Republican Convention – Democratic Convention

Adjournment

Campaign Pass

Whew! – Boy-Oh-Boy!

November Elections

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 8, 1932

You Can’t Forget a Garden, But Can You Forget a Poet?

July 1, 2012

Image from Alfredo Rodriguez

YOU CAN’T FORGET A GARDEN

You can’t forget a garden
When you have planted a seed —
When you have watched the weather
And know a rose’s need.
When you go away from it,
However long or far,
You leave your heart behind you
Where roots and tendrils are.

Louise Driscoll, in “Garden Grace.”

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jun 11, 1932

Louise Driscoll To Speak at Normandie

Garden lovers will have an opportunity to indulge themselves, in imagination, in the delights of their hobby, despite Winter’s barricade against outdoor participation, when Louise Driscoll speaks on Thursday, February 20, in the ballroom of the Normandie, No. 253 Alexander Street.

Miss Driscoll will have as her theme that evening “A Garden Thru the Year.” Author of “Garden Grace” and “Garden of the West,” she will bring the spirit of all gardens to her listeners, as in her poem, “Lost Garden,” from “Garden Grace.”

Guest of Mrs. Forbes

Miss Driscoll will be the guest of Mrs. George M. Forbes of Alexander Street, president of the Rochester Poetry Society, under whose auspices she will speak.

Rochester Journal (Rochester, New York) Feb 13, 1936

ON BEING A NEWSMAN IN PASADENA

I have long said one of the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena is that — no matter on what subject you write — you may rest assured that among the thousands of persons reading your stuff will be at least one of the world’s greatest authorities on that subject.

It never fails.

Some of the most valued acquaintances I have picked up over the years have developed this way. You do a “masterpiece.” Next day the phone rings, or there’s a letter on your desk. You were right, and you know it. Or you were wrong, and you’ve picked up a world of understanding.

*          *          *

On my desk this morning was a letter of a different type — illustrating the point I am making in another way.

It was in response to a column I wrote way last spring, forgot, and then published late because I still thought it was a good column. I called it, IN WHICH I GROW SENTIMENTAL. It was built around re-discovery of this poem, which, half forgotten from my boyhood days, nonetheless had carried me through many tight places.

Here’s the letter I found on my desk.

L.M. — I was very much interested and pleased to see, in your column, a quotation from a poem by Louise Driscoll.

Louise — who died some years ago — way my cousin.

She was for many years, head of the library of Catskill, New York, and was a poet of quite considerable reputation. In the days when poetry, to be publishable, did not have to be (a) an imitation of the New Yorker, or (b) something just long enough to fill that annoying gap at the end of a magazine page.

Her poems were published in many magazines in the 1920s and thereabouts, and appear in several anthologies. She published one book of collected verse, so far as I know; a small book of very charming and rather haunting poems, under the title “Garden Grace.”

I am sure it would have made her very happy to know that one of her poems was remembered.

Very sincerely,

Marjorie C. Driscoll,

Altadena.

See what I mean about the delightful aspects of being a newsman in Pasadena?

*          *          *

SENTIMENT HAS A PLACE IN OUR BEING

Star-News (Pasadena, California) Jun 9, 1959

 

Distinction for Local Women

New York, Sept. 26 (Special). —

Three Kingston women, seven residents of Woodstock, one Palenville and one Catskill woman are members of a group of outstanding women of the nation selected for inclusion in “American Women,” a who’s who of the feminine world just completed and published.

The honor was attained locally by Mary E.S. Fischer, illustrator, Melvina E. Moore-Parsons, and the late Mary Gage-Day, physicians of Kingston, Mrs. J. Courtenay Anderson, Agnes M. Daulton, Harriet Gaylord and Louise S. Hasbrouck, writers, Nancy Schoonmaker, lecturer, Lily Strickland, composer, and Mrs. Bruno L. Zimm of Woodstock, Jennie Brownscombe, artist, of Palenville, and Louise Driscoll, librarian, of Catskill.

New York state has contributed 1,096 of the 6,214 women chosen for the distinction of places on the list. Eighty-two per cent attended college and the majority are active in clubs and organizations. The possibility of success for a career and marriage combination receives strong endorsement from the fact that 41 per cent of the roster are married.

Approximately a third of the list, in true feminine fashion, declined to state their age. Writers formed the largest class, numbering 800, and professors the second with 355. Four each are engaged in aviation and astronomy, five in engineering and thirteen in the ministry. Gardening is the most popular hobby. Only sixty-four like to play bridge and one goes in for hunting mushrooms.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Sep 27, 1935

Louise won an award for this one:

Title: Poems of the Great War
Editor: John William Cunliffe
Publisher: The Macmillan Company, 1917
“The Metal Checks”
Pages 78-83

Her Father:

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Jan 3, 1941

Services Tonight For Mr. Driscoll, Dean of Masons
—–
Native of Rockland County, 103, Died Yesterday in Catskill
—–

CATSKILL — Masonic services will be held tonight for John Leonard Driscoll, a native of Piermont, Rockland County, and oldest Mason in the state, who died yesterday at his home. Mr. Driscoll, who had been in remarkable good health until two weeks ago, was 103 years old last October eleventh.

Mr. Driscoll was a descendant of Johannes ver Vailen, one of the holders of the Harlem Patent who had an inn and a ferry at Spuyten Duyvil in the early days of the state. His father was Isaac Driscoll and his mother Eliza Burgess Shaw. His great-grandfather came to the United States from Ireland about the middle of the Eighteenth Century.

Surviving Mr. Driscoll, who had lived under twenty-five of the nation’s thirty-two presidents, are the Misses Lizbeth, Caroline and Louise Driscoll, all at home.

As a boy Mr. Driscoll witnessed the digging of holes and the planting of rails for the Hudson River Railroad. Until the age of sixty he had never smoked. He first tried a cigar, without becoming sick, and then changed to a pipe which was his favorite and constant companion during the last few years of his life.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Sep 30, 1937

At the age of 100, referring to his job in the 1830’s when pine logs were used for fuel and he was chief engineer for the Catskill Mountain Railroad, he said, “A good fireman in those days would handle the wood only once. He pitched each chunk at such an angle that when it landed on the floor of the engine it would bounce through the fire door into the box.”

He explained his philosophy of life, take it as it comes, by saying:

“When you’ve lived as long as I have, and seen many things, you realize there are few things in the world worth worrying about. It’s a good world, too, as long as people keep their sense of humor.”

Middletown Times Herald (Middletown, New York) Jan 3, 1941

* Another obituary states his wife died in 1903. (See end of post for image.)

* I couldn’t find obituaries for Louise or her sisters. It is possible there were some in the Greene County Examiner-Recorder, but I don’t have access to the years they would have appeared. A shame, really; Louise was a very talented lady and I would like to know more about her.

Quilt square sewn by Louise Driscoll’s grandmother:

From Dutch Door Genealogy:

18. E.B. Driscoll, age 47
She was Eliza Burgess Shaw, mother of Carrie, above, and in 1862 was the widow of Isaac Blauvelt Driscoll (#6010) in 1836. Isaac died in 1851. Their children who lived were John Leonard Driscoll, born 1837, lived to be 103; Charles Francis, born 1841; and Caroline, born 1844. Eliza was a seamstress, per the 1860 census.

Read more about the quilt at the link.

This is the closest I could come to finding a biography, other than the short bit I linked at the top of the post:

Louise Driscoll, who had a story, “The Tug of War,” in Smith’s Magazine for May, and a novelette, “The Point of View,” in the June number of the same magazine, lives in Catskill, N.Y. She has written verse since she was a very little girl, and while still a schoolgirl used occasionally to send poems to the New York newspapers and different magazines, many of them being accepted. It is only within the last few months that she has tried to do much prose, and she says that she has found the editors of the American magazines so ready to receive and educate a new writer that she has no faith in the tales so often heard concerning the necessity of influence to gain attention. Her verses have appeared in Lippincott’s, the Critic — now Putnam’s Monthly — the Independent, the Metropolitan, and a number of other periodicals, and some of them have been widely copied. One poem, “The Highway,” which appeared in Lippincott’s about three years ago, brought her a good many letters from readers, including some editors of other magazines. Miss Driscoll in now at work on a longer and more serious book than “The Point of View,” which is her first long story. She is very ambitious and believes fully in hard work, but she says she writes because she must, and is sure she would write if she had never heard of type. Incidentally, she has a large regard for the English language, and a sincere desire to use it correctly.

The Writer, Volume 19
By William Henry Hills, Robert Luce, 1907

Another garden themed poem by Louise Driscoll:

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Nov 17, 1924

One of Louise Driscoll’s books can be accessed for free at Google Books:

Title: The Garden of the West
Author: Louise Driscoll
Publisher: The Macmillan company, 1922

From Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine – 1907

THE POOR HOUSE

by Louise Driscoll

There’s a white road lined with poplars
And the blue hills rise behind,
The fields lie green on either side
And the overseer’s kind.

This is a play/skit:

Title: The Drama Magazine – Volume 7
Author: Drama League of America
Editors: Charles Hubbard Sergel, William Norman Guthrie, Theodore Ballou Hinckley
Publisher: Drama League of America, 1917
Pages 448-460

This description from The Quarterly Journal of Speech Education – 1918:

One act tragedy for two men and two women. Realistic play of American rural life and the tragedy of weakness and lack of determination.

She also wrote and/or translated music lyrics. I ran across a Christmas carol she did as well:

Polska
Metsän puita tuuli tuudittaa,
ja joka lehti liikkuu,
oksat keinuu, kiikkuu,
karjan kellot kilvan kalkuttaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuor eli’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä
Näin iloiten vain ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Karjan kellot kilvan kaikottaa
ja linnut livertävät
la la la la la la.

Sunnuntaina taasen kiikuttaa
pojat iloissansa
kukin neitojansa.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.
Niinpä neidon mieli nuorell’ ijällä
lentää kuin lehti ilman tiellä.
Näin iloiten vaan ma laulelen
la la la la la la la la la la la la.
Korkealle keinu heilahtaa
ja tytöt laulelevat
la la la la la la.

*****

Polka

In the woods the trees, the trees are gay.
See how the branches lightly swing and sway, swing and sway.
Sheep bells tinkle and sweet birds sing,
So sing the maidens, tra la, la,la, la,la.
Shaken like a leaf when winds are blowing,
Is a girl’s heart when the rose is showing.
Tra la, la tra la,la, when high flies the swing,
Tra la, la,la,la.la,la,la,la,la,la,la,la.
Her heart goes there like the swing in air,
And falls while she is singing_Tra la, la,la,la,la.

English version by
Louise Driscoll.

Title: Folk Songs of Many Peoples, Volume 1
Editor: Florence Hudson Botsford
Publisher: Womans Press, 1921
Page 26

*     *     *     *     *

Greene County Examiner-Recorder (Catskill, New York) Jan 9, 1941

Pockets

June 30, 2012

POCKETS

(By Susan Adger Williams in Good Housekeeping)

A child should have a pocket —
Supposing on the road
He runs across a beetle,
Or a lizard, or a toad?
However will he carry them?
Whatever will he do
If he hasn’t got a pocket
To put them into?

A child should have a pocket
On which he fairly dotes!
Not one or two, but many
In his little waistcoats —
And one will be for money
He finds on the roads,
And one for cakes and cookies —
And one for hoptoads!

Fitchburg Sentinel (FItchburg, Massachusetts) Aug 20, 1932

Why Women Go West

June 30, 2012

The Clothes are Loose and Comfy —

The Saddles are Nice and Roomy —

And the Hats are Big and Shady!

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 2, 1932

Atlas on Strike

May 15, 2012