Posts Tagged ‘1933’

Feeding the Animals

February 9, 2012

Last August, on the nineteenth day, the Democratic Union, the Democratic Clubs, the Democratic Veterans and the Democratic Lawyers of the State of New York met in their annual joint convention in the city of Elmira.

The outcome of that session was a historic resolution, adopted UNANIMOUSLY, which is known as the Elmira Declaration.

It pledged the entire Democratic Party of the State to a complete reform of our obsolete, cumbersome, ridiculous, extravagant and inefficient “system” of local and county government. The resolution said:

The State of New York, outside of New York City, is divided into FIFTY-SEVEN COUNTIES, which are cut up into 932 towns, 59 cities and 535 villages, and in which there have been organized fire, water, lighting, sidewalk and improvement districts to the number of 2,467 districts and 9,504 school districts — a total number of 13,497 municipal units outside of New York City.

“Each levies taxes, the same property often being levied upon by FIVE OR MORE AUTHORITIES.

“The towns and counties alone have 15,000 OFFICIALS, mostly elective. There are OVER 11,000 tax collectors. They have been appropriately called the ‘regular army of occupation.'”

The tax burden of this devouring collection of governmental absurdities is rapidly becoming UNBEARABLE.

Demands for TAX REFORM are becoming more and more insistent.

But the plain fact is, NO tax reform can be extensive or really effective until the enormous expense of useless government is abolished.

The Legislature meets in January. The Democratic party should proceed FORTHWITH to carry out its Elmira Declaration — and the Republican Party should give its patriotic assistance to the reform.

This issue transcends party lines. The tax-oppressed people must have RELIEF from the ruinous burden — and the time for that relief is NOW.

Rochester Evening Journal (Rochester, New York) Dec 15, 1933

More of the “White Man’s Burden”

November 7, 2011

Another collection of the “White Man’s Burden” from various papers and time periods.

Image from the book cover of A Prairie Populist on the Iowa Research Online website

CARRIES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

Populist Delegate Holds Their Baby While His Wife Lobbies.

CINCINNATI, May 8. — Mrs. Luna E. Kelli is one of the most active among the delegates and lobbyists gathering here for the anit-fusion populist national convention. In the near vicinity can usually be seen her husband carrying “the white man’s burden” — in this case their infant.

Mrs. Kelli, who is the editor of the Prairie Home at Hartwell, Neb., is here as a delegate both to the Reform Press association and the populist convention. Her husband is also a delegate to the latter body. At home he is a tiller of the soil.

Mrs. Kelli is particularly active in urging the adoption of a universal suffrage plank, and her husband gives hourly proof that he is assisting her in attaining her desire.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) May 8, 1900

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

Practically every western state is facing for this year the greatest tax bill on record. In many instances, the tax has been doubled and trebled in the past six years.

Industry will be called upon to pay this burden and there is no way to get out of it, for the bill has been contracted.

The people are largely to blame for the present state of affairs and they will get no relief until by their voice expressed at elections they have the courage to demand tax reduction and to hold public officials to campaign pledges for economy.

Further, the citizen must get out and vote for men and measures which guarantee economy. If this is not done our tax burdens will grow until it will take special deputies to hunt down individuals and confiscate their property, if they have any, to meet the tax bills. This is not an exaggerated picture.

That the power to tax is the power to destroy has been already well illustrated and taxation today is the greatest single item which prevents and will prevent a return to pre-war conditions. Inasmuch as we have an enormous war tax bill to pay in addition to our other taxes, it is all the more necessary that a reduction in local taxrolls be demanded and secured.

Ada Weekly News (Ada, Oklahoma) Jul 28, 1921

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MacNIDER ENLARGES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN
(By Associated Press)

NEW YORK, April 16. — Responsibility for righting the wrongs of the world rests with the people of the United States and Canada, Hanford MacNider, United States Minister to Canada, declared tonight, addressing the annual banquet of the Prudential Insurance Company of America.

“Whether we want the responsibility or not,” he said, “or whether the older countries have any desire to turn their eyes in our direction, it is from the North American Continent that the first move will be expected to right world affairs when they become complicated or confuses.”

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 17, 1931

CARRY THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

France has taken possession of seven islands off the Philippines, with the secret approval of the United States.

This country has lost interest in that part of the world, inasmuch as the Philippines are to be given their freedom, if they so desire.

The United States preferred to have French occupy the islands rather than the Japanese.

From now on the French will be called upon to carry the white man’s burden in that region.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Jul 30, 1933

NEW LANDS ON FRENCH MAPS
[Excerpt]

The despatch boats Astrolabe and Alerte that planted the French flag on Tempest, Loaita, Itu Aba, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands and Amboyne coral reef found inhabitants on only two, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Aug 4, 1933

WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

The mystery of Italy’s African policy seems to be at least partly explained in the latest statement from the government’s colonial department at Rome.

Under-secretary Allesandro Lessona says:

The Ethiopian situation is a problem of vast importance, embracing the whole European civilizing mission, not merely security for our own lands.”

Americans have not been able to see, from any facts provided by the Italian government, that lawful Italian interests were really threatened in Africa.

The Ethiopian government has seemed eager to settle on any fair basis the trivial boundary dispute that Italy makes so much fuss about. But now the situation begins to clear up. Europe has a “civilizing mission” in Africa, and must make life in that dark continent as “secure” as it is in Europe.

If the Ethiopians have a sense of humor, they must laugh as they read that.

Kokomo Tribune (Kokomo, Indiana) May 11, 1935

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

The Indians of California are on the war path again.

It’s not scalps they’re after, this time, nor are they mobilizing to repulse a new invasion of “pale faces.” They are aroused because a law they pushed through Congress at the recent session was vetoed.

The law was an amendment to an act approved in 1928, which authorized the Indians to sue the U.S. for pay for lands, goods, and other benefits promised in the “Eighteen Lost Treaties” negotiated in 1851 and 1852. It would have made possible suits totalling $35,000,000 instead of just ten or twelve millions, as in now the case.

Of course the Indians are not trying to get back the land itself. But, in view of the hazards of land-owning these days, it might be a break for white men if they did. There is the continual struggle against droughts, insects, weeds and taxes. And now there is this new threat in California to try to support the whole State treasury by a tax on land alone — the Single Tax.

Although such was what Kipling meant by the phrase, nevertheless land seems to be qualifying as the real “White Man’s Burden.” And if this latest tax blow falls on land, we might just as well give it back to the Indians to let it become the Red Man’s Burden.

Arcadia Tribune (Arcadia, California) Jul 20, 1936

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

President Truman has announced that he is considering asking congress for legislation to permit the entry of European refugees — including Jews — to the United States.

How congress will react to this is a matter for speculation, but it is to be hoped that it will be rejected.

From a humanitarian standpoint we will admit that the victims of the World War should be assisted, but it should be in a way of repatriation rather than absorption.

Not so long ago we had an acute unemployment problem in this country, and it is not impossible that it should recur. What it would be if millions of Europeans were received into this country, no one can foretell. It would certainly require more than a glorified WPA, for most of the refugees would be penniless, and would have to  be provided with housing and maintenance until they could become established.

In view of the disturbance which is now in progress in Palestine, it would seem that the admission of Jews would be taking on a problem with which Great Britain has been unable to cope. We might be inviting an explosive situation such as is now besetting the Holy Land.

Somehow Uncle Sam has fallen heir to a large proportion of the white man’s burden of the entire world. We not only financed and furnished munitions and material for our allies in the late war, but have since made them loans, and now the President proposes to adopt all the unfortunates of war-torn Europe.

If the people of the United States are not to be brought to the economic level of Chinese collies, they will have to demand that Uncle Sam quit playing the role of Santa Claus.

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Aug 17, 1946

J.A. Livingston
Three Major Crises For John Kennedy
[Excerpt]

RECOVERY OR RECESSION

Next week, Secretary of the Treasury Anderson will personally ask Chancellor Adenauer, of West Germany to assume more of the “white man’s” burden and, thus, relieve the drain on U.S. gold. The central bank of West Germany has reduced its discount rate from 5 per cent to 4 per cent in order to discourage the flow of investment funds from the U.S.

2. The new president will have to decide whether the nation is in a recession or recovery is just around the corner. More than 5,000,000 persons will be out of jobs when Kennedy assumes office. Then outdoor work on farms, construction, and the railroads will be at a seasonal low. As many as seven persons out of every hundred may be seeking work.

Mr. Kennedy, therefore, will have to decide whether to cut taxes to stimulate retail sales (see chart), or initiate hurried public works to provide jobs, or both. Such expansionary efforts will unbalance the budget and aggravate international worry about:

3. The soundness of the dollar. Even the richest nation in the world can bite off more economics than it can handle. In recent post-war years, high defense outlays, aid to under-developed nations, and federal social undertakings have overreached taxes. Collectively, as well as individually, Americans have been living on the installment plan.

Big Spring Daily Herald (Big Spring, Texas) Nov 13, 1960

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Previous White Man’s Burden post.

Vet of Local Battle Dies

October 28, 2011

Image of the Charles M. Pratt mansion,  ‘Seamoor’ from the Old Long Island blog.

VET OF LOCAL BATTLE DIES

90-Year-Old Soldier Observed 71st Wedding Anniversary August 3.

Glen Cove, L.I., Oct. 31. — George Washington Dickinson, veteran of Kilpatrick’s 2nd New York light cavalry in the Civil war, died of pneumonia Monday at his home on the Pratt estate here. He was ninety years old. His wife, Sarah Carpenter Dickinson, died last August 17, two weeks after the couple had celebrated their seventy-first anniversary. Mr. Dickinson had served for thirty-five years as caretaker of the Charles M. Pratt estate, making his home in a cottage in the twenty-six acre park surrounding the family’s mausoleum.

Mr. Dickinson, who became ill last Wednesday was born in Oyster Bay, L.I., on March 10, 1843, the son of Susan Dove and Albert Dickinson. When Mr. Dickinson was nineteen years old he married Sarah Carpenter, daughter of a Long Island family, and two weeks later, on August 18, 1862, left his bride to go to war.

Mr. Dickinson saw service at Gettysburg and Bull Run and with the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah. He was wounded twice, held in Libby prison and returned home on parole the day Lincoln was assassinated. The aged man often attributed his robust health to his out-of-doors job on the estate, where he arose at 6:30 a.m. each day and passed the remainder of the daylight hours in tasks about the estate.

In addition to holding the record of being seventy-one years married, Mr. Dickinson boasted another record — the friendship of the oldest and best man on Long Island. He is Andrew Carpenter, brother of the bride, now in his early nineties.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Oct 31, 1933

Railroads Bringing Us to the Present Time

October 7, 2011

1850-1870: HURRAH for the RAILROADS

Build Up the West!

1890-1910: DOWN with the RAILROADS

Outrageous Rates! — Protect the People!

1930—: SAVE the RAILROADS

Protect the Public’s Investments! — S.O.S. Help the Railroads!

The Brownsville Herald (Brownsville, Texas) Apr 27, 1933

The Mohammedans Have Nothing on Us

September 11, 2011

Faithful Democrats at Prayer for Jobs

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jul 7, 1933

If Things Keep On…

September 7, 2011

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Mar 4, 1933

Government of the People – From the People

July 27, 2011

Government of the People, by the People, for the People…

and FROM the people — Federal Taxes

FROM the people — State Taxes

FROM the people — Local Taxes!

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) May 6, 1933

Flapper Fanny’s Tickled with New Wardrobe

June 29, 2011

CLICK TO ENLARGE IMAGES

Now You Can Dress ‘Flapper Fanny’ in Her New Outfit

Right in keeping with the spirit of spring, “Flapper Fanny,” popular newspaper feature star, has a brand-new wardrobe. And what an outlay of wearing apparel it is. An evening gown, an afternoon dress, a spring suit, a warm weather coat, some lounging pajamas and a printed chiffon dress.

No wonder the young lady is tickled. And you should be tickled, too, for “Flapper Fanny” wants you to color her costumes. Hence we are going to give them to you in the form of “Flapper Fanny” paper dolls .  .  .  a trim little figure of “Flapper Fanny” and six costumes.

All you need do, is borrow mother’s scissors, and get out your colored crayons .  .  .  then cut out and color “Flapper Fanny” and all of her garments. First, paste the above figure on cardboard, and cut out carefully. Fold the standard on the dotted line and paste the smaller section to the back of the doll.

Next, color “Flapper Fanny’s” cheeks pink, and pick out the colors you like best for the garment she is wearing, and for her evening gown. Now, try the gown on the young lady. Then watch for another spring costume, tomorrow.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 9, 1936

‘Flapper Fanny’ Picks Out Striking Afternoon Gown

IN the spring a young girl’s fancy .  .  .  if she togs out in an afternoon dress such as this one, which “Flapper Fanny” picked as part of her spring outfit. It surely lends itself to color Nave blue skirt, red patent leather belt, red kerchief and yellow blouse for instance. But, use your own judgment. Just get out your crayons and color the dress as you see fit. Then try it on your “Flapper Fanny” paper doll. Tomorrow we will give you “Flapper Fanny’s” spring suit.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 10, 1936

This New Spring Suit Just Suits ‘Flapper Fanny’

NOTHING suits a girl in the spring better than a nice, new spring suit. “Flapper Fanny” is proud of this one .  .  .  and can you blame her? Very neatly tailored, we’d say, and very fitting as part of “Flapper Fanny’s” spring outfit. Imagine how nice it would look colored blue, with a yellow blouse. Or, maybe you can think of a better color scheme. Color the garment any way you wish .  .  .  then try it on your “Flapper Fanny” paper doll. And watch for “Flapper Fanny’s” spring coat. It will appear tomorrow.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 11, 1936

‘Flapper Fanny’s’ New Coat Is Last word in Style

CLASS will tell. This spring coat, for example. It’s classy, and it tells you that “Flapper Fanny” used rare judgment in picking it as part of her spring outfit. We can imagine the garment in several colors .  .  .  gray, for instance, with a splash of color on the flowers at the neck. Perhaps you prefer green, or blue. Crayon the coat to suit yourself. Then slip it on your “Flapper Fanny” paper doll. Oh-o-o! We just peeked into “Flapper Fanny’s” closet and found a beautiful afternoon dress. It will appear tomorrow.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 13, 1936

This Printed Chiffon Dress Becomes ‘Flapper Fanny’

ON a Sunday afternoon .  .  .  or any afternoon, for that matter .  .  .  who is the girl who doesn’t like to step out in a smart, bright new spring dress? Well  .  .  .  it isn’t “Flapper Fanny!” She loves even the thought of it. That’s why this dress was included in her spring outfit. It is printed chiffon, and what an opportunity for color. Dots of green, violet, blue and yellow are certain to be attractive. It should be real fun coloring this dress with your crayons. The final costume in “Flapper Fanny’s” spring outfit  .  .  .  lounging pajamas  .  .  .  will appear tomorrow.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 14, 1936

Lounging Pajama Complete ‘Flapper Fanny’s’ Outfit

“FLAPPER FANNY” is very proud of the lounging pajamas she picked to complete her spring outfit. And rightly so, we think. They look the last word in comfort .  .  .  and that’s a comforting thought. Imagine them in aquamarine crepe. Or, perhaps your imagination runs to some other color. Crayon them as you please. And then, with the five other garments, you have “Flapper Fanny’s” complete spring outfit. Try each one on the young lady and see in which one you think she looks best.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Apr 15, 1936

*  *  *  *  *

A New Feature

Flapper Fanny Says

Begins in The News today. It is a two column cartoon which will contain a trite saying each day.

The News (Frederick, Maryland) Jan 26, 1925

*  *  *  *  *

Note the two column Flapper Fanny (Jan 1925) quickly downsized to a one column (Mar 1925.) Flapper Fanny.

A few (O.K., several) samples of the Flapper Fanny comic from various years:

Girls used to marry to get a husband. Now they marry to get a divorce.

The News (Frederick, Maryland)  – Jan 27, 1925


A kiss has a funny way of getting back to its originator.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Mar 2, 1925

When a wife mends a hole in her husband’s pocket, he’s usually appreciative enough to wonder how she knew it was there.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 2, 1925

The first-year-of-married-life-biscuits are the hardest.

Reno Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Jul 2, 1928

It isn’t always a brilliant child who is considered too smart.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jun 7, 1929

Girls who wear stripes attract attention all along the line.

Modesto Bee and Herald (Modesto, California) Jul 28, 1933

In the old days girls would have gotten a good dressing down for the way they dress up now.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jun 19, 1936

“No, you can’t read my diary! It wouldn’t interest you, anyway — it’s mostly about boys you don’t know.”

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jul 6, 1939

“Wonder why we haven’t seen any robins yet?”

“Guess they know the early bird catches a cold.”

Cumberland Evening Times – Mar 14, 1940

Cut-Outs for Tired Taxpayers

June 22, 2011

Uncle Sam and some of his business outfits: Farmer, Railroad Man and Banker — Why does this ring a bell?

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jun 14, 1933

Before the Garden — The Seeds

June 18, 2011

Image from The City Sage

WORTHWHILE REPRINTS

SOMETIMES POETRY — SOMETIMES PROSE — ALWAYS WORTHWHILE

Before the gardens — the seeds. This lovely song of the seeds bears reprinting.
B.C.N.

Song of the Seeds.

‘Tis so dark, so dark here under the ground.
We reach and we struggle, we know not where;
We long for something we have not found,
We seek and we find not, but we cannot despair.

It is warm and sweet here under the earth,
And so peaceful too — why cannot we stay?
What is this change that is named a birth?
And whit is this wonderful thing called Day?

But a power is on us we may not wait;
Within us we feel it struggle and thrill,
While upward we reach to find our fate,
And this ceaseless, mysterious want to fulfill.

They say that at last we shall reach the air —
Will breathing be freedom, and Light be Life?
What mystic changes shall we meet with there
When the blossoms shall crown this mute, strange strife?

So, ending answerless, the song is done —
The song so oft upon the earth begun,
Whose closing and triumphant harmonies
Shall ne’er be sounded but beyond the skies.

Written by Florence Smith who lived 1845-71.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jun 13, 1933