Posts Tagged ‘1937’

Packing the Supreme Court

December 21, 2011

Supreme Court Packing Case:

What About Some Future President with Dictatorship Ideas?

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Mar 9, 1937

RUSH! – A Big Order for FDR:

Pack the Supreme Court

CONGRESS – “We didn’t ask for that!”

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas) Mar 16,  1937

Packing the Supreme Court

Patronage and the Vote

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas) Mar 22,  1937

Three Rousing Cheers for Approval!

While labor disputes and war continue.

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas)  Mar 29,  1937

Age of Miracles!

The Supreme Court Lays Golden Eggs!

El Paso Herald-Post  (El Paso, Texas) Apr 2,  1937

20 Years of Utopia – BOOMSKI!

December 1, 2011

Image from the Defender de Madrid website

TWO CELEBRATIONS AT MADRID

The Red government of Spain celebrated the 20th anniversary of Russia’s Communist revolution and with it the first anniversary of the defense of Madrid.

The Reds in Spain do not see the utter inconsistency of the two anniversaries.

When the Spanish Reds have honors to confer upon Spaniards they limit them generally to General Jose Miaja, chief of Madrid’s defenders, hailed as  national hero in that his military genius and high spirit in the direction of his troops made their dogged and so far successful defense possible.

But there is the inconsistency.

For the Reds almost always, like certain denizens of the jungle, devour their favorites.

He who is carried on the shoulders of Communists today should not be surprised to be blindfolded tomorrow and shot in the back.

During the other rampages of Communism upon this earth the leaders one week were almost invariably guillotined the next week. Under modern communism, such are the improvements of the age, a leader may last some years before he is disgraced and shot.

But, no matter. General Miaja had his great day last Sunday. and Communism never yet looked to the future.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Nov 09, 1937

“NO FAIR”

The burly Soviet Bear pushes up one of its purple and swollen eyelids to remark, above the rattle of gunfire as it shoots more of its former leaders, that Italy’s adherence to an anti-Communist pact is “not friendly toward the Soviets.”

It is wrongful for any nation to wish communism ill. It is proper, however, for the Reds to spend the millions sweated out of the Russian serfs to destroy other nations and their respective forms of government by fomenting discord and revolt.

American newspaper correspondents write from Moscow that Comintern, devoted to the spread of communism by violence, has abandoned its old offices because insufficient for its enlarged force and that those actively associated in the Russian mind with the spreading of propaganda in foreign lands are specially placed in seats of honor at the great parades staged to attract and entertain the people.

It is true, as claimed by most democratic enemies of Fascism, that the Russian Menace is largely a myth in that no people have ever undertaken it on any really extensive or serious scale except as their mental functions have been distorted by misery, disease or ignorance.

But the fact remains that this menace has been nevertheless the most powerful factor in keeping the people quiet and steady until the Fascists could yoke them.

The circle of madness has funny quirks and sketchy twists but it invariably completes itself.

The Communists set out to kill others and created conditions that, in the end, will consume themselves.

The principle involved has been recognized from of old. In the ancient vernacular it was written, “Those who live by the sword shall perish by the sword.”

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Nov 11, 1937

Image from the Masters of Photography website

THE TEMPERAMENTAL ARTIST GETS A CHILL

Diego Rivera, the Mexican artist, cannot be cited as an authority upon serene government since he has been very much of a Mexican jumping bean in respect to any stable opinion of the sort of government he really wanted.

But today Senor Rivera is no longer carrying a red flag. And he wants the world to know what he has discovered about Stalin and the Communists. Perhaps he has poured too much chili into his concoction but that is expected of most Mexicans and Rivera in particular.

Offering an interview to an American press this painter of murals declared that Moscow has selected Mexico as “a base of operations” in its restless war to bring Latin America under its sway. And to prove his assertion he declared that his own country is now alive with Russian agents, pockets stuffed as usual with the gold filched from Russian toilers, buying and bribing their way in true conformity to the principles of the Black Utopia.

And Senor Rivera, who so recently was embracing communism with wild affection, now finds that the Russian worker is worse off than the Mexican and that Communism is even more wretched than any other sort of totalitarianism. He points to the fact that Mussolini sacrificed a relatively few people and jailed no more than 30,000, that Hitler’s quota in jail has passed a million, and then he turns to the real sink of iniquity and quotes Pravda to show that Communism has to its discredit 1,863,000 political executions of which 150,000 were Red army officers and that today there are nearly six million in prisons, concentration camps and isolation areas so they cannot get their fingers upon the Red leaders who brought them this heaven and placed upon their shoulders these wings and in their hearts these pious thoughts of strangling some one. And then Rivera concludes that, by comparison, “Mussolini is a philanthropist.”

It is good to see the sinners crawl along the sawdust trail. But it cannot be expected that those who were originally so easygoing as to have faith in

Moscow will not embrace the next grisly nostrum, even one covered only by a shroud.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Nov 4, 1939

Relief for WHOM?

September 14, 2011

ONE and ONE HALF BILLION

No More This Trip – We’re Overloaded Already

RELIEF FOR WHOM?

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jun 4, 1937

New Diet – New Hope!

September 12, 2011

LABOR
Employment Scales
Renewed Business Confidence
Construction Projects
S – STR – I- IKE TUH – H
Farmers’ Strike
Coal Strike
Preparedness for the Serious Business of LIFE
THE ANNUAL TREK

Alton Democrat (Alton, Iowa) Sep 9, 1937

In School Days

September 6, 2011

In School Days
—–
BY J.G. WHITTIER.
—–

Still is the school house by the road,
A ragged beggar sunning;
Around it still the sumachs grow,
And blackberry vines are running.

Within, the master’s desk is seen,
Deep scarred by raps official;
The warping floor, the battered seats,
The Jackknife’s carved initial.

The charcoal frescoes on its walls;
Its door’s worn sill betraying
The feet, that creeping slow to school,
Went storming out to playing!

Long years ago a winter’s sun
Shone over it at setting;
Lit up its western window panes
And low eaves’ icy fretting.

It touched the tangled, golden curls,
And brown eyes full of grieving,
Of one who still her steps delayed
When all the school were leaving.

For near her stood the little boy
Her childish favor singled,
His cap pulled low upon a face
Where pride and shame were mingled.

Pushing with restless feet the snow
To right and left, he lingered,
As restlessly her tiny hands
The blue-checked apron fingered.

He saw her lift her eyes; he felt
The soft hand’s light caressing,
And heard the trembling of her voice
As if a fault confessing;

“I am sorry that I spelt the word;
I hate to go above you,
Because” — the brown eyes lower fell —
“Because, you see, I love you!”

Still memory to a gray-haired man
That sweet child-face is showing.
Dear girl! the grasses on her grave
Have forty years been growing!

He lives to learn in life’s hard school,
How few who pass above him
Lament their triumph and his loss,
Like her — because they love him.

Indiana Progress (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Oct 20, 1870

A Poet’s Birthday.

Our boys and girls will see in their column this week the portrait of a very good and famous man, John Greenleaf Whittier. He was born Dec. 19, 1807, so that this month he is 78 years old. He is called the Quaker poet, because he belongs to the Society of Friends. His father and mother were Friends, too.

He wears the plain dress and uses the pleasant old “thee” and “thou” speech of his Quaker ancestors.

When a boy Whittier worked on a farm. Then he learned the shoemaker’s trade. The man who makes the sweetest, strongest verses of any American poet made shoes in his boyhood. No doubt they were good shoes, too, for geniuses do their best at everything.

Image from the Migration Heritage Center website

But a little bird began to sing in the boy’s soul. It sang more and more loudly till at last young Whittier dropped last and awl, and began to write. From his Quaker mother and father he inherited a passionate love of liberty. It was in the days of slavery and he began to work in his way for breaking the bondman’s chains. He wrote lyrics of freedom that will live forever. During the war one of his strongest Union poems was “Barbara Frietchie,” which so many of you know by heart. In the last fifty years he has written many poems. They are full of strength and fire and music. The names of some of his books are: “Voices of Freedom,” “Home Ballads,” “Snow Bound,” “Maud Muller,” and “Ballads of New England.” There are many others.Mr. Whittier is a fine example for all boys and girls to imitate. He has proved that people can rise from the poorest station to be honored and famous. He is not a rich man, but he is something far better. His poems have given peace to the troubled and hope to the despairing. They have been recited and sung around the world. Boys and girls commit them to memory, and it does them good all their lives. This is better, far better, than to be rich. In schools all over America Whittier’s birthday is celebrated every year by bright-eyed children. In some schools the pupils have had real letters from the grand old poet, which are treasured and shown to visitors year after year.

Mr. Whittier, old as he is, still writes and gives the world from time to time beautiful poems.

He lives very quietly at Amesbury, Mass. He is a modest man and shy of meeting strangers.

The poet is a bachelor. Many of you have, no doubt, read his poem, “In School Days.” It is about a little girl that spelled a word that a boy missed, and went above him in the class. The boy and girl were particular friends, and the girl was sorry that she had gone above him. In the poem, she creeps softly up to him after school and says:

“I’m sorry that I spelt the word,
I hate to go above you,
Because — the brown eyes lower fell —
Because, you see, I love you.”

They say this little girl was a real one, and that the boy was Whittier himself. They were dear friends and child playmates. But the sweet little girl died, and the poet has remembered her and mourned for her all his life. The poem says:

“Still memory to a gray-haired man
That sweet child-face is showing;
Dear girl! The grasses on her grave
Have forty years been growing.

“He lives to learn, in life’s hard school,
How few who pass above him
Lament their triumph and his loss
Like her — because they love him!”

Davenport Daily Gazette (Davenport, Iowa) Dec 19, 1885

Image from Find-A-Grave

Whittier’s School Friend Is Honored

HAVERHILL (Mass.), Oct. 28. — (INS) — Undying tribute of John Greenleaf Whittier to Lydia A. Ayer, his childhood sweetheart, a six foot stone memorial bearing an inscription depicting the schoolhouse they both attended, stood in Walnut Cemetery today.

The memorial was erected as a result of several months’ research by Fred L. Noyes of the Haverhill Whittier Associates, who learned Miss Ayres was buried in the cemetery.

In his poem, School Days, Whittier quoted her as saying after she had spelled him down in a spelling bee:

“I’m sorry that I spelt the word;
“I hate to go above you,
“Because” — The brown eyes lower fell —
“Because, you see I love you.”

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California) Oct 28, 1937

The Dying Hobo

June 29, 2011

The Dying Hobo

(By Roland P. Gray)

Beside a Western water tank
Once cold November day,
Inside an empty box care
A dying hobo lay.

His partner stood beside him,
With low and drooping head,
And listened to the last words
The dying hobo said:

“I’m going to a better land,
Where everything is bright.
Where longnecks grow on bushes,
And you sleep out every night.

“Where you do not have to work at all,
Nor even change your socks.
And little streams of alcohol
Come trickling down the rocks.

“Tell my sweetheart back in Denver,
That her fair face I no more will view;
Tell her that I’ve jumped the fast freight
And that I am going through.”

The hobo stopped, his head fell back;
He had sung his last refrain,
His partner swiped his hat and shoes
And jumped an eastbound train.

Fresno Bee Republican (Fresno, California) May 30, 1937

Songs and Ballads of the Maine Lumberjacks: With other Songs from Maine
by Roland Palmer Gray, Bruce Rogers
Contributors: Roland Palmer Gray,Bruce Rogers
Publisher: Harvard University Press – Cambridge, MA – 1924
Page 102

*  *  *  *  *

Omitted from version in newspaper:
[after verse: “Tell my sweetheart…]

“Tell her not to weep for me,
In her eyes no tears must lurk,
For I’ve gone to a better land,
Where I won’t have to work.

“Hark, I hear a whistle;
I must catch her on the fly.
Farewell, partner, it’s not
So hard to die.”

Bio from the University of Maine 1912 yearbook

Paging Isaac Newton

March 30, 2011

San Antonio Light (TX) Apr 21, 1932

Hammond Times (IN) Oct 26, 1937

 

Brownsville Herald (TX) Jan 20, 1938

Constitution Day is September 17th

September 14, 2010

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Sep 17, 1937.

 

Etta Kett – Final Fashions for Your Paper Doll Cut-Outs

August 24, 2010

Was the editor of The Vidette Messenger surprised!

He hoped you young readers would like the Etta Kett cutout doll printed recently, but, goodness! he certainly didn’t expect to receive so many enthusiastic letters from so many of you asking that another Etta Kett doll with costumes be printed.

So, he’s happy to print another Etta Kett doll for you today with four new costumes, three of which are removable.

Just look at those pretty things to wear — that clever bathing suit, those darling pajamas, the little suit of shorts and shirt and that perfectly beautiful gown with handsome sash.

The editor hopes you like this Etta Kett cut-out as well as the other doll.

The Vidette Messenger (Valparaiso, Indiana) Jan 27, 1936

WELL, WELL, WELL! Here is Etta Kett that popular comic strip heroine, again. And she is presenting some of the new items in her spring wardrobe.

Paste the entire picture on this cardboard and then cut out the dresses and try them on Etta.

The editor of the Globe-Gazette has another Etta cut-out paper doll which he may publish if you write him and ask him to.

Mason City Globe Gazette (Mason City, Iowa) Mar 25, 1936

By 1937, the Etta Kett paper doll cut-out craze seems to be winding down. They are just running outfits, without the addition of the  updated Etta Kett dolls.

And one more:

And then, from the Mason City Globe of Apr 22, 1937,  their final Etta Kett cut-out doll:

Bull Baiting

June 29, 2010

Q. What is the etymology of the name bull dog?

A. The name is derived from the fact that these dogs were originally used in the ancient sport of bull baiting, which was popular among certain classes in England for at least 700 years, until it became illegal in 1835. The object of the dog was to seize the bull’s nose in his teeth, pin it to the ground and not let go. He was bred with an undershot jaw and a retreating nose, that he might hang on and breathe easily at the same time.

Middletown Times Herald (Middletown, New York)  Jun 17, 1937