Posts Tagged ‘1942’

Tin Soldiers, Toy Soldiers, Wartime Toys

December 8, 2012

Tin Soldier Cut-Outs - Edwardsville Intelligencer IL 06 Dec 1941

He was only a little tine soldier then,
To be used as a battering ram;
Today he’s the pride of a nation wide —
He’s the nephew of Uncle Sam.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 6, 1941

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

THE Toyville army, marching
Into billets ‘neath a chair,
Discovered two tin soldier spies
Beneath the carpet there.

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

The captain sternly marched them out,
Their case and fate to settle.
They stood at ease with steady knees,
For they were men of mettle!

Toyville Army 3 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

I’m glad Ted chanced to pass just then
And took a hand. He thrust
The two spies in his pocket,
To the captain’s great disgust!

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 12, 1918

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

THE Toyville army bravely marched
Across high table land,
Upon the table edge, some one
Forgot the right command!

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

No welcome “Halt!” to bid them stay,
So like the gallant host of yore,
Theirs not to question, but obey,
They fell in companies to the floor.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 19, 1918

Wartime Christmas - Reno Evening Gazette NV - 16 Nov 1942

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 16, 1942

LITTLE TIN SOLDIER.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright should your captain say,
“Fall out, dismissed, well done — let’s play!”

Or would the Something that comes with drill
O’ershadow you, follow you, hinder you still —
And you hear like the beat of a distant tattoo,
“Count off, front and rear, one two .  .  .  one two?”

Time was, I am sure, though you look so grim
There’s a gleam in your eye, though ’tis often dim,
When your memory quickens and troubles you
As you quick-step, march — one two, one two.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright if I said what is true,
“I love you, my darling — I do, I do?”

— Ann Drew.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jul 4, 1926

Be a Tin Soldier - Billings Gazette MT 08 Jul 1945

Billigns Gazette (Billings, Montana) Jul 8, 1945

A Little Less Patter and A Lot More Fury

July 3, 2012

Not parades, not fireworks, not speeches or flagwaving will feature this fateful anniversary of the birth of our nation this year.

Instead grim-faced workmen toiling through the holiday in Fitchburg’s 100 per cent war industries, children and housewives still searching out precious scrap to add to the nation’s resources, civil defense unites going seriously about their protective duties and Fitchburg businessmen unselfishly contributing to the great community effort mark this 166th birthday of our independence.

This is a Fighting Fourth; bullets and bombs replace firecrackers and rockets. It’s time to face the issue squarely and to stop side-stepping and avoiding the sacrifices that must be made in the daily life of every man, woman, and child.

It’s time to show a little fury; to get mad at the things that are threatening the freedom we have gained through 166 years of sweat and struggle. We’re a free nation; we’re a fighting nation — read the battle-cries of the men who have fought to protect this country as they are dramatically presented by picture and story elsewhere in this issue of The Sentinel.

What is your battle-cry for this Fighting Fourth?

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

FIGHTING WORDS FOR THE 4th

IF THERE were no man like Douglas MacArthur to say, “I came through, and I shall return;” if there had been no man like John Paul Jones to shout, “I have not yet begun to fight”; if there were no men like the doughboy at the left, who know such words in their hearts, even if they have not heard them spoken — if none of these men had ever lived, there would be no Independence Day now for America. On this page are pictured some of the Americans whose fighting words have echoed ’round the world. They are shown in the dramatic settings under which the words were spoken.

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves . . . . The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this Army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of a brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or to die.

“Our own, our Country’s honour, calls upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion; and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us, then, rely on the goodness of our cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being, in whose hands victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble actions. The eyes of all our countrymen are now upon us; we shall have their blessings and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the tyranny meditated against them. Let us, therefore, animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a freeman contending for liberty . . . is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.

“Liberty, property, life and honour are all at stake.”

— GEORGE WASHINGTON,  before Battle of Long Island, 1776.

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“Give me liberty, or give me death.” — Patrick Henry, 1775.

“Damn the torpedoes, and full speed ahead” — Admiral David Farragut, 1864.

“Don’t give up the ship.” — Capt. James Lawrence, 1813.

“Come on you __ __ __ do you want to live forever?” — Marine Sgt. Daniel Daly, 1918.

“I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” — Nathan Hale, 1776.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

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Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

Hugh Mulcahy, left, is greeted by Hank Greenberg on arrival at Air Force Officers’ school, at Miami Beach. Mulcahy, former pitching star of Philadelphia Nationals, and the big boy who hit home runs for the Detroit Americans are in the same league now.

Fitchburg Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jul 3, 1942

Wisconsin – A Vote for Our Nation

June 5, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 6, 1934

THE MAN OF TOMORROW

There’ll be a strong man tomorrow
Fight out there,
Stormed at by sorrow,
Attacked by despair,
Betrayed by the traitors,
Maligned by the haters,
Abused by the greedy,
But loved by the needy
And cheered by the fair.

By Edgar A. Guest

Decatur Review (Decatur, Illinois) Nov 6, 1928

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 6, 1934

DEMOCRACY — VISION OF THE AGES

Man’s soul called out from brutish strength;
Not need of help alone held firm the clan,
But mighty need of brotherhood
Turned fighting creature into thinking man.

And age by age a vision grew,
Held fast, though much submerged by strong decree —
A vision of a brotherhood
So great that little men might all be free.

Man’s life was counted willing gift
When valiant souls but hoped their sons might reap
That brotherhood and love from out
Their sacrifice and hard-held vision deep.

That vision did materialize;
The world has seen its torch give heartening glow.
Free men must strive to hold it high
As symbol of the brotherhood we knew.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Apr 21, 1942

Salina Journal (Salina, Kansas) Apr 11, 1962

Battle of Midway – Japs Caught By Surprise

June 4, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 9, 1942

Japs Caught By Surprise, Report American Fliers

Young Airmen Grin As They Describe Raid

—–

Flying Fortresses Bomb Big Jap Transport And Two Heavy Cruisers In Battle Of Midway

—–

(By FRANK TREMAINE)
United Press Staff Correspondent

At an army air base, Hawaii. —
(UP) — Sprawled around their “Yankee Doodle” flying fortress under the palm trees of this air base, army aviators talked today about the battle of Midway.

They grinned like school boys on commencement day.

Capt. Paul Payne, 25, Des Moines, Iowa, who studied banking at the University of Illinois, answered for all of them when in reply to a question he said:

“We we scared? Gosh! To tell the truth I don’t know. But come to think of it, I guess we were all scared as hell, now that you mention it.”

Most of them had had the first taste of fire in the battle of Midway. They went in boys and came out veterans. They had fought off the attack of Japanese planes, and had hit a big Japanese transport and two heavy cruisers, scored a near miss which probably damaged a carrier and shot down a zero fighter.

“We came out of the mess unscratched simply because we caught the Japs by surprise the first time and were just gosh awful lucky other times,” Payne said, propping himself against the massive wheel of the Yankee Doodle.

Spotted Them First

“We spotted them long before they spotted us. It was a pretty sight to look down on those columns of ships. I don’t want to guess how many there were, but there were plenty.

“Our three flying fortresses picked the biggest one in the bunch, a battleship or a big cruiser, and we saw bombs of all three planes strike on or alongside it. Then they gave us the book.

“Then we had a piece of luck that seemed bad at the moment but turned out to be a break. One of the doors of the bomb bay stuck and we couldn’t release all our eggs. Finally we worked it open and looked for a target.”

“An d we didn’t have to look far,” said Lieut. Gone Wills, Petersburg, Tenn. “There below us was a big transport.

“I heard Payne say, ‘Let’s go get the big one,’ and got her we did. We unloaded our last bombs squarely amidships. Flames enveloped the whole superstructure and smoke, that black, oily kind, gushed from every part of her.”

“And that was our first day’s work completed,” Payne said. “We high-tailed it home and arrived right on the nose at nightfall. We didn’t have a mark on us.”

The next day the three planes in Payne’s element attacked a carrier.

“All the time it was going around like a dog chasing its tail, and it and its escorts were peeling shells at us from all directions,” Payne said.

“They had our altitude but they couldn’t get the range. The shells exploded beside us and behind us. Some came so close that the concussion slapped

Bargdill to the floor when he stuck his head out of the window of the gunner’s compartment.
(Bargdill is Coroporal Don C. Bargdill, 27, Hutchinson, Kans.)

“Just then Karotsky hollered over the phone:

“‘Three zeros from the carrier are coming after us.'”
(Zarotsky is Corporal Alexander Zarotsky, 20, Cincinnati, Ohio.)

“Bargdill, you pick it up from here. That Jap was your baby.”

Bargdill scratched at the back of his neck.

“The tracers were scooting overhead as I looked out the window,” he said. “One zero came up as fast as lightning. In a few seconds he was heading right for my side of the ship, throwing plenty of lead. And I was throwing plenty right back on him.

Plummets Into Sea

“I didn’t bother to use the sights. I just followed the tracers. They practically cut him in two. I saw the first burst hit his cowling and watched the tracers move down his fuselage. He seemed to hang in the air just a fraction of a second. Then he slid off into an uncontrolled dive. He plummeted straight down to the sea.

“He was so close when he got my last burst that I could make out his facial features. It’s the gospel truth. That Jap looked just like the cartoons. He had goggles on and he had buck teeth.

“He also had guts. He came right on into the face of that fire until it got him.

“Did he hit me? Shucks, no. He ought to have practiced more. He didn’t even come close.”

On the way back Zarotsky hurt his little finger in closing the bomb door, but it didn’t rate as a casualty.

They refueled and went back.

“Every once in a while we would see a burning ship as we flew toward the Japanese fleet. It was ample evidence that the torpedo planes and the dive bombers were having a field day of their own,” Capt. Payne said.

This time they attacked a cruiser, flying high above 25 Japanese fighters which did not rise to challenge them.

“The cruiser was zig-zagging around but we crossed its stern and the bombs fell right across it,” Payne said. “As we swung around I could see we had hit it badly. It was burning amidships and aft.”

With Payne and the others mentioned were Sergt. Barney Ford, Sergt. R.L. Pleky, Rear Gunner Leonard Hendry, Brentwood, Md.; and Corporal J.J. O’Brien, Jermyn, Pa.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 11, 1942

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Jun 12, 1942

Doughnuts for Doughboys

June 1, 2012

DOUGHNUTS FOR DOUGHBOYS

Of course you’re planning a party for the boy home on a furlough and you will want to serve the food he likes best. Put doughnuts at the top of the list for at canteens they are first choice.

Here are doughnuts that will top any your doughboy ever tasted. Light as a feather, moist, tender, deliciously spicy pumpkin doughnuts. Sugar a few for the folks with a sweet tooth and serve wedges of cheese for added goodness. Make them often for the family, too.

Try this new way of frying doughnuts. See how light and tender they are — how delicate tasting. There’s no unpleasant smell or smoke, and foods fried the

Spry way are so digestible even the children can eat them. Will they love that pumpkin flavor, too!

Evening Standard (Uniontown, Pennsylvania) Oct 23, 1942

The doughnut has been removed from the list of indigestibles by the Chicago school of domestic science. Those who have been forced to take to their beds after eating them in the past, will now be able to partake in safety.

The Daily Herald (Chicago, Illinois) Jul 1, 1910

New York Times – Chicago Tribune Leased Wire.

CHICAGO. May 7. — Any housewife who things she may have unexpected guests — say, about 600 of them and mostly male — will do well to cut out and paste in her cook book “Ma” Burdick’s tested recipe for doughnuts.

“Pa” and “Ma” Burdick, the doughnut king and queen of the Salvation Army, reached Chicago yesterday, after nearly two years of service overseas — two years of work for the American doughboys.

“What’s the most important thing in making doughnuts?” “Ma” was asked.

“Speed, she replied. Then she gave her recipe.

“It’s for six hundred,” she said, “but I guess you can divide it.”

Here it is:

Salvation Doughnuts.
Twelve quarts of flour.
Six quarts sugar.
Twenty-four tablespoonsful baking powder.
Three teaspoonsful salt.
Three quarts milk.
Fry in deep fat.

“The secret’s in the mixing,” said “Ma.”

“Ma” Burdick’s “shrapnel cake” was another favorite with the boys.

Here is the recipe:

Shrapnel Cake.
(Three pieces.)
Two large cups sugar.
One cup molasses.
Two cups milk.
One cup strong black coffee.
Three heaping teaspoonsful cinnamon.
One heaping teaspoonful cloves.
One teaspoonful salt.
One teaspoonful baking powder.
Two large cups raisins (the shrapnel).
Flour to make a stiff batter.

The famous flapjacks were made in the following manner:

Fifty Flapjacks

One quart flour.
Two heaping teaspoons baking powder.
One teaspoon salt.
Milk to make a soft batter. Beat until light.

San Antonio Evening News (San Antonio, Texas) May 7, 1919

Hot, tasty doughnuts and a cup of steaming, fresh coffee really hit the spot these damp, cold days in England .   .   . and especially for two Iowa doughboys who know the Red Cross Iowa clubmobile was made possible through contributions by residents of their own state.

Once a week the club-kitchen on wheels drops in at an aerial reconnaissance station with “doughnuts for doughboys.” When it does, Cpl. Clyde Olsen, left, and Pfc. Carl C. Larsen, right, of Forest City, Ia., are among the first to welcome it and its two comely attendants, Miss Leo Lindsley of Fallons, Neb., and Mrs. Georgette Hayes of Middletown, N.J.

Corporal Olsen, a radio operator with a Station Complement squadron, assisted his father on his farm near Missouri Valley, Ia., before he entered the army May 29, 1942. He is the husband of Lucille Craig Olsen, 1 11 Stutsman street, Council Bluffs, and a son of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Olson, RFD No. 2, Missouri Valley.

Council Bluffs Nonpareil (Council Bluffs, Iowa) Nov 17, 1943

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Sep 21, 1927

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The Chronicle Telegram (Elyria, Ohio) Oct 11, 1926

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By the way, it’s National Doughnut Day.

Women Everywhere Taking to Slacks

May 3, 2012

(With women, everywhere taking more and more to slacks, overalls, halter-alls and similar garb formerly associated only with males and publicity-minded feminine movie stars, a man offers some advice to the opposite sex about wearing pants. He happens to be so expert on women’s styles, whose famous comic strip character, “Tillie the Toiler,” was one of the original factors in popularizing slacks among working girls. This is the first of a series of articles written especially for The Light.)

By RUSS WESTOVER

Famous Cartoonist – Creator of
“Tillie the Toiler”

I find that among women the question no long is, “Shall I wear trousers?” but “What kind of trousers shall I wear and when?” Slacks for women have passed the fad stage; they are every day garb for hundreds of thousands of them and are actually mandatory in numerous industries from coast to coast. In the machine shops of the naval station at Alameda, Calif., at the Pan American Airways base at New York, the rule is: all women employes wear pants.

However, the utility of slacks, halter-alls and such as feminine garb in war work doesn’t mean that skirts are going to be, or should be, abandoned altogether. It isn’t necessary, and it is undesirable, both from the standpoint of expediency and feminine attractiveness. Slacks designed for all hours of the day are available now, but as a uniform to replace skirts in public, they are affected and in bad taste. Furthermore, to abandon all skirts and dresses in favor of mannish attire would be wasteful of materials urgently needed for the war effort.

It’s my opinion that the less women wear slacks or other forms of pants when their work doesn’t require it the better for their appearances. Slacks are really becoming to but few adult women. However, if a girl’s job must be done in slacks, she need not dress at home in skirts and change at the plant, unless her travels to and from work wearing slacks would make her unpleasantly conspicuous. On the other hand, work which requires halter-alls accompanies a mechanical career, and men at such jobs shirt to overalls at the plant.

—–

Tomorrow: Helpful hints on slacks for office wear.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) May 18, 1942

By RUSS WESTOVER

“Tillie the Toiler”

No woman thinks in terms of glamour, of course, in buying trousers or pants for factory wear. Glamour doesn’t mix with safety and safety must set the style for women workers. However, for the sake of uniformity in appearance, many concerns are requiring women office help, as well as feminine machine operators, to wear pants. The office worker can safely give more thought to good appearance.

Most women to whom slacks now occur as revolutionary garb for everyday wear, will probably have to go through the novice coyness about them, or they think they will. One group will get too mannish and look like fools; the other will go too far in the opposite direction.

The best advice is to get full cut garments, with correct waistline measure. Good fabric, good fit, good lines, the right color, determine the figure you cut in slacks. They should be more a tailoring job than a dressmaker’s creation. Don’t choose slacks that have too deep a crotch and wide, flapping legs.

As a man in public unless he is a slum vacationer at a resort seldom wears a shirt and pants without a jacket, the woman doomed to slacks will find her looks bolstered if she wears a coat when not on the job in the office or shop with her slacks. Her tailored suit jacket or tweed sports coat will be proper with them.

The strictly tailored blouse, the knit pullover, the bellhop jacket, are appropriate with slacks as the working garb at typewriter, desk or counter.

Stockings beneath slacks are uncomfortable; wearing socks to protect the feet from the shoe-lining is the sensible thing, besides saying wear and tear on more expensive hose.

Proper underwear is, of course, essential to the fit and comfort of slacks. Women need no advice from a man about the proper panties, girdles, etc., which every shop, from dime stores up, now stock. The combination one-piece streamlined shorts and slip-like middles, seems to be a good idea.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) May 19, 1942

By RUSS WESTOVER

Famous Cartoonist-Creator of
“Tillie the Toiler.”

Any job, from making a bed to constructing an airplane, is easier done in slacks or overalls than skirts. Stooping not only wipes the floor with your skirt, but creates a real accident hazard. You stumble and trip over the spread skirt, if it’s full. If it’s tight you can’t stoop in it without appearing obscene. So it’s natural that more and more women should be taking to slacks for home tasks.

However, slacks should be considered primarily as working clothes and not as round-the-clock garb. A woman with any sense would never deliberately wear slacks to a home wedding or a funeral; or, unless at a nobody-cares resort, to a dining or lunching date in public. Even dinner pajamas are restricted by usage to your own home, or the home of a neighbor or close friend whose home you visit by automobile.

You may have seen photos of Paulette Goddard, the film star, wearing short slacks as evening garb at a resort some time ago. Well, as Paulette told me a few days ago,  she’s had a change of mind about slacks. She’s decided that they’re not becoming to a feminine figure. She’s adhering to the conventional evening gown now.

Paulette told me, by the way, that there was a howl of protest from the soldiers when a contingent of Hollywood feminine entertainers showed up at an army camp in slacks or uniforms. The soldiers made it plain they wanted the femmes who visit them to look feminine. So now the stars wear their prettiest frills and furbelows when they go to the camps to contribute their bit to morale.

For dress-up slacks, if you do choose to wear them, frilly blouses, sheer shirts, costume jewelry, etc., are part of the costume, the more feminine the better the effect. Low heels are always the correct item with slacks, unless the evening variety; replacing the teagown or dinner gown, are the slacks in question.

Tomorrow: Helpful hints on accessories for the slacks costume.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) May 21, 1942

By RUSS WESTOVER

Famous Cartoonist – Creator of
“Tillie the Toiler”

The girls appear to be winning their battle for the right to wear slacks to school. In Pittsburgh, for example, the superintendent of schools approved, provided, however, the girls do not take to any outlandish fashions that will create a distraction and a disturbance. In New York, when Beverly Bernstein was forbidden to wear slacks to Abraham Lincoln High School, she and fellow students staged a strike for the emancipation of women from skirts. They got up a petition which school authorities couldn’t talk down:

“The undersigned want official permission for girls to wear slacks to school for the following reasons:

(a) the United States government advocates slacks for school, because they are better than skirts in the event of an air raid; (b) they conserve silk stockings; (c) they curb sexy clothes such as short skirts.

Note: Boys also wish the girls to wear slacks and are signing this petition.”

It isn’t exactly true the government is advocating slacks for school. In fact, it’s fearful that unnecessary adoption of the style will aggravate the shortage of wool. However, in scores of other cities, girls have donned pants for school hours, and they’re on their honor not to let the fashion get beyond conservative bounds.

The least captious girls hate their beaux to present a rumpled, unpressed appearance. Let them take this tip unto themselves and keep slacks in press. Washable slacks should be kept at least as fresh as a girl keeps her blouse, her handkerchief. If the tailor stitches down the crease of wool pants, pressing them neatly is then an easy home job, and the crease doesn’t get out of line between pressing.

There has been a great spurt of publicity to get hats onto heads above slacks. And the long-visored cap, the cocoanut straw hat and the felt fedora type have been advocated for the slacks ensemble. The scarf or handkerchief turban is very popular. Another suggestion is the worsted snood.

Tomorrow: Practical hints on getting the best fit in slacks.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) May 22, 1942

By RUSS WESTOVER

Famous Cartoonist, Creator of “Tillie the Toiler.”

Even if you do not have an ideal figure like Film Stars Hedy LaMarr and Peggy Diggins, there are a number of things you can do to look your best in slacks.

First of all, choose slacks of a masculine cut — the straight-hanging style helps a lumpy figure a lot. You can add a jacket capable of concealing average figure faults. Slacks tailored of dark, substantial material flatter heavy figures.

Be sure, in fitting your slacks, to study the back view in a long mirror. Avoid slacks with too deep a crotch, and wide, flopping legs.

Prefer high-waisted lines; instep-length, tapering at the ankle; no pleats or bunchiness about the waist.

I find some good advice to women on this subject in Good Housekeeping magazine:

“Consider slacks as part of an ensemble — not just a pair of trousers. Complement them with the right accessories — low-heeled shoes, tailored shirts or blouses, right-length coats, informal hairdos, appropriate headgear. Follow masculine preference in fabrics and colors. Determine which becomes you most — fly-front or side-closing. Be sure slacks have well-pressed creases.”

Don’t be afraid to wear slacks. Any objectionable points will not be seen once the novelty wears off. Tillie the Toiler is no slacker when it comes to slacks. You shouldn’t be either, if by wearing them you can do your war-time job better.

—–

(This is the last of a series in which a man who is an expert on women’s styles gives some advice to the opposite sex on wearing slacks.)

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) May 23, 1942

Below are two examples showing Tillie in slacks, the first one also has her mom wearing them:

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 11, 1942

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) May 8, 1942

Brother, Can You Spare a Tube?

March 7, 2012

Image from Gallery of Graphic Design

A SONG FOR TODAY

(To the tune of “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?”)

Once I had some toothpaste, long ago,
Gosh, I sure was a boob!
Now I’m out of toothpaste, moanin’ low —
Brother, can you spare a tube?

Used to have my whiskers shaved each day,
Now I look like a Rube;
Shaving cream costs more than I can pay —
Brother, can you spare a tube?

I’m all-out for Vict’ry, beard and all,
Let’s slice those Japs into cubes!
Meanwhile, can’t you hear me sadly call —
Brother, can you spare some tubes?

— Frank M. Schmitt.

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) May 14, 1942

Who is the Forgotten Man?

February 16, 2012

(Forgotten Man – emphasis mine)

The Burdens of “The Forgotten Man.”

NEW YORK, Feb, 2. — Professor William G. Sumner, of Yale college, delivered a lecture last night before the Brooklyn Revenue Reform club, at the Long Island Historical Society building. His subject was “The Forgotten Man.” Professor Sumner said that the forgotten man was the simple, honest man, who earned his living by good hard work, paid his debts, kept his contracts and educated his children. He was passed by and forgotten because he did his duty patiently and without complaint. On him rested all the burdens engendered by paupers, vagrants, spendthrifts, criminals and jobbers. All legislation which tended to relieve the weak, the vicious and the negligent to the consequences of their faults threw those consequences upon the forgotten man.

Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Feb 3, 1883

*****

*****

Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) Oct 29, 1932

HE WHO PROVIDES IT ALL

William G. Sumner Gave Credit to the “Forgotten Man” for His Patient Industry.

Wealth comes only from production, and all that the wrangling grabbers, loafers and robbers get to deal with comes from somebody’s toil and sacrifice. Who, then, is he who provides it all? Go and find him, and you will have once more before you the Forgotten Man. You will find him hard at work because he has a great many to support. Nature has done a great deal for him in giving him a fertile soil and an excellent climate, and he wonders why it is that, after all, his scale of comfort is so moderate. He has to get out of the soil enough to pay all his taxes, and that means the cost of all the jobs and the fund for all the plunder. The Forgotten Man is delving away in patient industry, supporting his family, paying his taxes, casting his vote, supporting the church and school, reading his newspaper and cheering for the politicians of his admiration, but he is the only one for whom there is no provision in the great scramble and the big divide. Such is the Forgotten Man. He works, he votes, generally he prays — but he always pays — yes, above all, he pays.

Denton Journal (Denton, Maryland) Dec 23, 1922

Don’t Think – Just Vote the Straight Ticket!

Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) Nov 6, 1932

“The Forgotten Man” is that individual who does an honest day’s work, pays his bills, brings up three or four children, indulges in a pipe or an occasional cigar, keeps up a small savings account, never asks for charity from anyone, never gets into trouble with the police, never makes a speech or writes a letter to the city editor — in short he’s the individual who keeps going on his own momentum, good times, bad times.
When the hat is passed around for the down-and-outers, or those lads who have lost $4.90 by some cruel, heartless flapper, the “Forgotten Man” chips in his mite.

The tax collector visits the “Forgotten Man” regularly, and collects toll for the upkeep of the police courts, jails, workhouses, and poor houses — none of which the “Forgotten Man” ever uses. He is self-supporting, self starting, self-sufficient, and being so he is counted in on nothing except the census. But in that document he cuts a big figure because he probably forms the vast majority.

— Harold the Imaginer.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Feb 25, 1929

LONG-SUFFERING LANDLORDS

In commiserating the “forgotten man,” an observant citizen suggests why overlook the forgotten landlord? He, too, in this painful period, may well be an object of sympathy. Often, too, of admiration.

There is still too much remaining of the tradition which represents a landlord as a ruthless old skinflint, who probably got his property dishonestly and who rejoices in any pretext to gouge rent out of a poor tenant, or to turn a sick family out into the cold. There have been, and are, such landlords, but certainly in these days they are exceptional.

The owner of a house or a farm today is lucky if he is getting enough out of the property to pay the taxes and mortgage charges, without any income on his investment. In almost any town there may be found hundreds of rented homes where, because the tenants are out of work, the owner is carrying them along for half their usual rental or for nothing at all, because he has not the heart to turn them out. Many a family has skimped and saved and put its savings into a house or two for renting, to help safeguard its own future, is as badly off as the tenants who never saved in good times. All in all, honest inquiry will probably show that landlords as a class have been behaving pretty handsomely.

Daily Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland) Oct 11, 1932

But Ain’t We Got Beer?

THINKING OUT LOUD

Why is our prolific and prolix correspondent Jone Howlind, so incensed at the decidedly dubious prospects of the new deal? I presume she voted for the egregious F.D.R., and certainly has been an advocate of repeal. Her letter in Friday’s Post is inconsistent with former letters.

Surely, prices are rising over the moon and the average person is being ground between the upper and nether millstones. What does that matter? We’ve got beer, and “hard likker” is in sight.

The many will continue to be sacrificed for the few and the hungry and ragged are increasing. Never mind — we’ve got beer!
Beer puts some men to work. The wet papers sedulously refrain from reporting the men who lose their jobs in the candy and soft drink and allied industries.

The well known “Boobus Americanus” with his propensity for following and believing the demagogue, turned out of office a wise, far seeing statesman and elected a man whose own neighbors refused to vote for him.

Now the “forgotten man” is still forgotten; thy new deal is the same old deal; the specter of anarchy rides the minds; the Blue Eagle is only a plucked pigeon, but “sing you sinners, sing” — we got beer!

MRS. EVELYN FORTT
4130 Pera

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Sep 13, 1933

Roosevelt and Wall St.

THINKING OUT LOUD:

The Herald-Post editorial on the Farley-Pecora move was splendid, although I must confess I thought parts of it a trifle naive in view of the fact that while Farley gets Pecora removed from conducting his investigations of the crooked operations of Wall Street bankers, two more Wall Street men take up office in Washington.

I refer to James Bruce, now financial advisor to the Board of the Home Loan Bank, erstwhile vice president of the Chase National bank under Mr. Wiggin, and George Lindsay, fiscal agent of the Home Loan Bank Board, lately vice president of the Blancamerica – Blair Corp.

I can, by stretching my imagination, credit a newspaper with being naive about such a situation, but I can’t stretch it far enough to include Mr. Roosevelt. Consequently, what seems “new” about the “New Deal” is that the Wall Street operators are now operating in Washington where in the old deal they operated in Wall Street.

I advise anyone who doubts this to go over the old newspaper files of the early summer showing the corporations through which the House of Morgan stretched its influence and the lists of Morgan beneficiaries and with these lists check Roosevelt’s appointments. count ’em yourselves. The information isn’t hidden. The strength of politicians lies in the short memories of the public.

I think the Herald-Post’s optimism in regard to Roosevelt’s ability to keep hold of the Progressives was more a case of the wish being father to the thought than anything else. The public may be ignorant as to the character and background of the men with whom Roosevelt has surrounded himself by choice, but it can hardly be thought that the leaders of the Progressives are not perfectly aware of the personnel of the entire set-up. Their stand, therefore, will not be a case of ignorance, but a test of their weakness or strength of character.

Will the “forgotten man” be not only forgotten, but deserted by all as well?

JONE HOWLIND.

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Oct 10, 1933

“The Forgotten Man”

THINKING OUT LOUD

We have been watching the administration of the “New Deal,” and have seen how the “Forgotten Man” — the banker, manufacturer, jobber and retail merchant have been remembered. We wondered, naturally, if another class of citizens who seem to be having a hard time “carving” a name for themselves on the torso of humanity, would likewise be “remembered.”

I make special reference to the “25,000 doctors out of a job” which the press mentioned as a surplus of the profession a few months ago. We felt worried about the future of these poor souls, when realizing that they are slaves to “medical ethics” and can not advertise the skill with which they can do human carving or puncture you with a hypodermic needle.

But thanks to the faithful press for informing us that prospects for their relief is in sight, as soon as congress convenes. Rex Tugwell, assistant secretary of agriculture under the guise of protecting the innocent from poisonous, harmful and mislabeled patent medicines, and habit-forming drugs, proposes (in a bill he has prepared for consideration of congress) to place our precious lives wholly in the hands of the medical doctor.

It seems that the doctor has for several years felt himself slipping from his exalted position of holding a monopoly on the lives of mankind. In the first place his business is regularly called “practice,” and it seems he has followed it so diligently in the trimming of human “giblets” and bank rolls that the people are leaving him in a manner most alarming. This fact is set forth in an article in the Literary Digest of Sept. 22, 1923 [maybe 1933?], wherein a certain member of the A.M.A. set about to find out why they were their patients who had not died under treatment.

Several thousand citizens were accosted on the street, street cars, offices, etc., and asked two questions: “What would you do if you got sick, and why?”

He found that over 90 per cent would not call a doctor. In his paper read before the A.M.A. convention, he recommended that the doctor be not quite so ethical and treat his profession as a business and “get the money;” that a campaign be instituted through the press, for education of the gullible humans, and to admonish them to “see their doctor first.”

There are many people who sincerely believe that mutilation of the body by surgical operation is sinful.

Whenever you give an organization of people a monopoly over lives or rights of others, you have destroyed respect for the law that created such monopoly, and created contempt for those who enjoy such special privileges.

The number of people who die under medical and surgical treatment are several thousand fold greater than those who succumb from home remedies.

I am for a law that will take away the monopolistic powers already granted the doctor and give the individual a course of commonsense instruction in food, cleanliness, habits of living.

Over three billion dollars is the annual doctor bill, besides the loss of time from work. This becomes an economic problem besides the question of relief from suffering.

So, who is forgotten?

LOUIS BOND CHERRY.

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Nov 3, 1933

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Nov 8, 1932

The Forgotten Man

THINKING OUT LOUD:

We will let the gold and silver rust
And pledge our faith to the brain trust
If they will unfold a plan
To help the long forgotten man.

In honest sweat he toils for years
With fondest hopes and sadest fears
Now on the brink of dark despair
In nature’s bounty he cannot share.

Hungry, ragged, bare-foot and cold
He possesses not silver nor gold
Still believing “the Lord will provide”
But knowing mankind must divide.

Let us hope they will find a way
To bring to us a brighter day
Spreading happiness, spreading health,
Learn us that gold is not wealth!

M.M. OWENS,
Lordsburg, N.M.

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Dec 20, 1933

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Mar 17, 1933

Image from Cosmeo

REMEMBER FORGOTTEN MAN

New Dealers Give Him Bill to Pay, Coughlin Says.

PROVIDENCE, R.I., (AP). The Rev. Charles E. Coughlin declared that under the new deal “the forgotten man has been remembered” in time to pay the government’s bills. He spoke at an outdoor rally which he said was attended by 25,000 persons.

“With the new deal the forgotten man has been remembered,” he declared, “because every gallon of gas you buy, every pound of butter, every loaf of bread, all your groceries and drugs, have posted on them a mortgage to the United States in favor of international bankers.” He made his statement after saying “one day out of every three you work is taken out of your payroll for hidden taxes.”

NEW BEDFORD, (AP). The Rev. Charles E. Coughlin, discussing the administration of President Roosevelt, declared: “As I was instrumental in removing Herbert Hoover from the white house, so help me God, I will be instrumental in taking a communist from the chair once occupied by Washington.”

Evening State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Aug 3, 1936

I hear Spain’s nice this time of year.

ILL CHOSEN.

Ackley (Ia.) World-Journal: For a man who has talked about the “forgotten man” as much as Roosevelt, it comes with very poor grace to go on a cruise that costs the American people half a million dollars; it comes with even poorer grace to include his three sons, the “crown prince,” the “heir apparent” and another in waiting.

Evening State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Aug 11, 1936

NEW TAX COMING.

Jan. 1 will usher in the era of short pay checks. One percent will be deducted by order of the new deal. The forgotten man will be remembered by a new tax. The little fellow will pony up. One percent will be the deduction. It will affect the payrolls of thousands of industries and the well being of millions. Not content with the present tax rate, where it is figured that the average citizen gives one day’s pay out of every week for government, another one-hundredth of what the people earn is to be deducted from individual earnings for government use. It will be paid to the government and retained for the use of new deal administrators, and perhaps for the establishment of new bureaus to help to administer the funds that will be collected. The benevolent touch of a paternal government will be felt in a new effort with the beginning of 1937.

If at any time in the future the law should be repealed or declared unconstitutional that will not end the expense that has been incurred. Like the NRA and the FERA it will live on and on, the organization set up for its administration will continue and the government will pay the bill.

This is one of the new taxes made necessary by new deal management of public affairs. The tax may not be so obnoxious as the bureaucracy which it will help to enlarge and the complexity it will add to government.

Evening State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Oct 19, 1936

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Jul 5, 1933

A BIT INCONSISTENT

Time marches on! And today we find the federal government doing the things for which it condemned private citizens only three or four years ago. Such as, for example, foreclosing mortgages on the homes of persons unable to meet their interest and principle payments. It’s a strange world.

It is only good business, we suppose, for the Home Owners Loan corporation (a federal agency) to get its money when due. But, as we witness the numerous foreclosures by the HOLC, we recall the bitter denunciations, a few years ago, of private individuals who did the same thing. State governments then passed moratorium laws, making it impossible for mortgage holders to foreclose. And the moratoriums undoubtedly gave temporary relief to many farm and home owners. We found no fault with them then; we find no fault now. But, it would seem that the federal government now would practice what it preached to private lenders back in 1934-1935. If it is wrong for a private to put a man out of his home, it also is wrong for the government.

In Lyon county, right now, a man and wife who have passed middle age are losing their home, upon which they gave a mortgage to HOLC several years ago. The mortgage is due — and  HOLC wants its money, or else. Or else the couple moves into the street. The HOLC, as we get the story, refuses to compromise. Although the couple is able to raise half of the amount now due, HOLC officials have declared they want “all or nothing”.

It is a bitter awakening for those trusting souls who have been led to believe that the Man in Washington will chastise the bade, bad money-lenders and see the the “forgotten man” does not lose his home. The Lyon county couple to whom we have referred, as well as the rest of us, are beginning to realize that the grim realities of life are still with us; that they must be faced in the same old way. We are returning to the point where we again face such cold, hard facts as money borrowed, whether from private citizen or government, must be paid back. Also, that assurances of security by politicians seeking office often are merely a means of getting votes. Sad, but true.

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) Oct 21, 1937

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) May 14, 1942

National Debt Worries Farmers
[excerpt – Simon E. Lantz]

“Mr. Roosevelt promised to place the cost of government upon the shoulders of those most able to pay. In 1930, the wealth of the nation was paying 69 per cent of governmental costs and the laborers, farmers and common people were paying 31 per cent. But last year we found that the wealth of the nation was paying only 39 per cent while the ordinary people were paying 61 per cent. That is how Mr. Roosevelt took care of the forgotten man and soaked the rich.

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Oct 24, 1940


WHITE COLLAR WORKER IS ‘THE FORGOTTEN MAN’

ON A BIG munitions plant being built with government money at Wilmington, Ill., carpenters are paid $25 a day; men trundling wheelbarrows or working with pick or shovel are paid $16 and $17 a day.

In Chicago, 50 miles away, the clerical forces working in the offices of business and industry are being paid from $17 to $35 a week.
The carpenters and laborers in Wilmington may, and do, dress in coveralls; they change shirts possibly once a week; they wear coarse, unshined shoes; they enjoy the lower rentals of the rural districts.

The clerical worker in Chicago, if he is to hold his job, must have a clean shirt every day; he must wear a white collar; there must be a crease in his trousers; his shoes must be kept cleaned and shined; he must pay the much higher rentals of the city. His income will average about one-sixth of that of the carpenter at Wilmington.

To meet the ever-increasing demand of taxes and labor, and to continue to operate, business and industry have been forced to economize in every possible way. The white collar man has paid the bill. He is the “forgotten man” of today.

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) Dec 25, 1941

Cumberland Evening Times (Cumberland, Maryland) Nov 14, 1960

Armistice Day

November 11, 2011

On November 11th, 1918 when the Armistice was declared ending the first World War, America was once again the Victor. She proved to the world that the right way of life triumphs against evil. She proved that her sons were ready and able to stand up against those who believed in world domination and oppression.

Let us, then, on this Armistice Day pray that their deeds may always be remembered. Let us pray and give thanks for their God given courage that helped to make our great America the guardian of the world.

Bessemer Herald (Bessemer, Michigan) Nov 11, 1948

Image from LIFE magazine – Caption:

Shirtless American sailor relax on and around several torpedos on the deck of an unidentified ship during the Pacific Conflict, 1943. On one torpedo is written ‘Armistice Day – Hell!’

*****

ARMISTICE DAY

To save from the ash can a burning Old World
And keep flying sparks from the roof of the New,
Our brave Uncle Sam with his colors unfurled
Just smothered it out with live red, white and blue.

Warm RED flowed the blood of his sturdy young sons,
Whose WHITE bled-out faces were lost in the grime,
While tested BLUE steel in projectiles and guns
Completed the job in new world-record time!

In rev’rence we bow on this ARMISTICE DAY,
Before the same altar their sacrifice blessed,
With a priceless return of Hope’s peaceful array
In which the whole earth joins their own hallowed rest.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 11, 1927

Bayard News (Bayard, Iowa) Nov 12, 1942

He Remembers Pearl Harbor

June 4, 2011

He Remembers Pearl Harbor

Billings Gazette (Billings, Montana) Jun 14, 1942

The Midway Battle in Brief

Salient Points in the Great Battle of  Midway

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Jun 11, 1942

SIX MONTHS OF WAR

Pearl Harbor Attacked – Singapore Collapses

Industry Speeds – Rations & Salvage – War Bonds Sell

U-Boats Hit Hard

A.E.F. Around the World – Sky Fighters Busy

THE YANKS STRIKE BACK

Greeley Daily Tribune (Greeley, Colorado) Jun 6, 1942