Posts Tagged ‘1945’

Tin Soldiers, Toy Soldiers, Wartime Toys

December 8, 2012

Tin Soldier Cut-Outs - Edwardsville Intelligencer IL 06 Dec 1941

He was only a little tine soldier then,
To be used as a battering ram;
Today he’s the pride of a nation wide —
He’s the nephew of Uncle Sam.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Dec 6, 1941

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

THE Toyville army, marching
Into billets ‘neath a chair,
Discovered two tin soldier spies
Beneath the carpet there.

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

The captain sternly marched them out,
Their case and fate to settle.
They stood at ease with steady knees,
For they were men of mettle!

Toyville Army 3 - Oakland Tribune CA 12 May 1918

I’m glad Ted chanced to pass just then
And took a hand. He thrust
The two spies in his pocket,
To the captain’s great disgust!

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 12, 1918

Toyville Army 1 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

THE Toyville army bravely marched
Across high table land,
Upon the table edge, some one
Forgot the right command!

Toyville Army 2 - Oakland Tribune CA 19 May 1918

No welcome “Halt!” to bid them stay,
So like the gallant host of yore,
Theirs not to question, but obey,
They fell in companies to the floor.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) May 19, 1918

Wartime Christmas - Reno Evening Gazette NV - 16 Nov 1942

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Nov 16, 1942

LITTLE TIN SOLDIER.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright should your captain say,
“Fall out, dismissed, well done — let’s play!”

Or would the Something that comes with drill
O’ershadow you, follow you, hinder you still —
And you hear like the beat of a distant tattoo,
“Count off, front and rear, one two .  .  .  one two?”

Time was, I am sure, though you look so grim
There’s a gleam in your eye, though ’tis often dim,
When your memory quickens and troubles you
As you quick-step, march — one two, one two.

Little Tin Soldier, how stiff you stand
With your sword buckled on and your gun in your hand.
Would you hear aright if I said what is true,
“I love you, my darling — I do, I do?”

— Ann Drew.

Syracuse Herald (Syracuse, New York) Jul 4, 1926

Be a Tin Soldier - Billings Gazette MT 08 Jul 1945

Billigns Gazette (Billings, Montana) Jul 8, 1945

Whittlesey’s Cranberry Marsh

November 21, 2012

The Tribune Rural Editor Visits Whittlesay’s Marsh

BY E.E. SCHROEDER

When one sits down to enjoy his dish of cranberry sauce or slice of cranberry pie at Thanksgiving time he is not reminded of the highly developed agriculture which is needed to produce the popular berry which has become famous along with roast turkey and mincemeat pie.

The writer recently enjoyed dinner at the S.N. Whittlesay cranberry marsh at Cranmoor and later was taken for a trip over the marshes and given an explanation of the methods used to produce high quality berries.

The Whittlesay marsh is among the oldest in Wisconsin and ranks as one of the three largest in the state in acreage and also production, per acre. According to the “History of Wood County” the marsh was started in 1871 when wild berries were first harvested. Later as scientific methods were discovered Mr. Whittlesay was quick to grasp their importance and applied them to his own marshes.

The writer knows little about the culture of cranberries and this story is not intended as a treatise on the subject. It is intended as a story of what he saw and learned in several hours jaunt over the marshes. Much of this may not be news at all to many readers and again some of it may be incorrectly stated. If the latter is true it is unintentional.

To begin with we learned that cranberry marshes must be scalped. That means that the rough surface soil must be removed in order that a level firm seed bed can be secured on which to plant the tame berry. We learned further that certain kinds of fertilizer are needed and provided which makes the berry develop to its fullest. Commercial fertilizers are applied in the middle of June.

It was further learned that the common variety of berry on the average marsh is known as the Bell and Cherry. The Late Howe berry is replacing the former variety as it is firmer and more pleasing in appearance to the purchaser. The Late Howe is an eastern variety and are shipped from the east not as seed but as the young plant which must be transplanted into the fresh, slightly moistened, and well prepared seed bed.

Require Attention

Cranberries require a great deal of attention through the blossoming, ripening and harvesting season. In fact they must be carefully watched the year around. Growing in lowlands means that frosts are more common visitors than to other crops on high ground. Flooding the marshes in the only means of combating this arch enemy of the cranberry grower. This process of flooding at once calls into play a highly developed system of engineering. Huge dependable reservoirs on higher ground than the marshes must be available to provide sufficient water on short notice. Heavy embankments are thrown up around these reservoirs to hold the water in check in flood season and prevent washouts. Gates are installed at the lower levels to control the water supply into the marshes as needed.

The marshes themselves must have ditches into which the water can drain when the danger period is over. These latter ditches must also be well constructed, with gates to hold the water on the marshes until no longer needed.

The Whittlesay marsh has more than a thousand acres within its limits, but a large part of it is used for water control. Harry, a son of S.N. Whittlesay, is in charge and is laying plans to increase the acreage until the marsh ranks as the largest in the west. Formerly connected with the Nekoosa-Edwards paper company, he has turned his energy toward the cranberry “game” and finds it fascinating, judging from his enthusiasm.

The elder Mr. Whittlesay has been in the business for many years and his election to the board of directors of the Wisconsin Cranberry Sales company is a compliment to the membership as well as to him. He has followed the growth of the industry and knows the advantages and shortcomings.

He can tell many interesting incidents of the time before men with rakes took the place of hand pickers. Many men and women were needed in those earlier days. A dance hall was a common part of the equipment on every farm. Every evening the pickers would enjoy themselves to the strains of old fashioned music. Mr. Whittlesay recalls the time when a wooden tramway with trucks carted the berries from the marshes in the Cranmoor district.

During the winter season the cranberry marsh does not present the busy scene common to harvesting time. But there is important work to be done. Many loads of sand are hauled over the surface to add to the porous condition of the soil. A special quality sand can only be used to advantage.

A visit to the packing house on the Whittlesay marsh was also of interest. The latest in grading devices simplified the sorting of pie berries from the others. Fanning mills blow the twigs and leaves and other rubbish from the harvested berries.

Though a story of this kind could be made to include many other interesting features lack of space prevents. A visit to any of the good marshes, of which the Whittlesay marsh is one, impresses the visitor of the extent of the work, the care, the experience and trials involved in successfully catering to the palate of the American consumer for this particular variety of kitchen delicacy.

Mr. Whittlesay ranks high among cranberry growers. His well kept marshes and buildings are ample proof of his success. His son is succeeding him as manager and should meet the continued success which the Whittlesay marshes have enjoyed. The visit to their home and the trip over the marshes will be an event not soon forgotten.

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Feb 15, 1928

Image from CranLib photostream on flickr

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From the History of Wood County by George O. Jones (1923):

HISTORY OF WOOD COUNTY

…In 1855 Abner Whittlesey’and his family came west to Illinois, settling in Galesburg, where Mrs. Whittlesey died. Mr. Whittlesey soon after went to Lockport, Ill., and from there to Berlin, Wis., where he engaged in the cranberry business; this was in the late sixties. In 1870 he came to Wood County, and, together with his son, Sherman Newell Whittlesey, bought six 40-acre tracts of marsh land and established the Whittlesey Marsh, they and Theodore Bearss and Ralph S. Smith being the first cranberry growers in the township. In 1880 ….

…Sherman Newell Whittlesey, subject of this sketch, coming to Illinois with his parents in 1855, was reared in Galesburg and attended the grade schools there and the high school at Lockport, from which latter he was graduated in 1867. He then spent a year in Chicago, and while there took a course in the Chicago Business College, after which he came to Berlin, Wis., and in 1870, with his father bought the 240 acres of marsh land mentioned above and established the Whittlesey Marsh in Wood County, coming here to live in 1871; his first residence in Wood County was in Centralia.

He at once began the raising of cranberries, wild berries being the only ones grown here at that time and his first crop yielding 150 barrels of this variety. As the industry developed he applied scientific methods to the cultivation of his marsh, cutting ditches, scalping the land, and cultivating the berries by the most modern methods available, on which lines he has conducted all his subsequent operations.

From 1878 to 1884 he was engaged in the mercantile business with Frank Garrison at Centralia, under the firm name of Garrison & Whittlesey. In 1884 Mr. Whittlesey and family hired parties to run their marsh while they went to South Dakota. In that state they first took a tree claim of 160 acres, then a preemption claim of 160 acres, and, after proving up on this property, they took a homestead of 160 acres, building up one of the finest farms in Faulk County, S. D. They bought adjoining land until they owned 1,200 acres. At the same time they operated a farm of 320 acres in southeastern Nebraska, which they owned, alternating their residence between the two farms, and thus conducting, with the assistance of hired help, three separate enterprises at the same time, the third being their marsh in Wood County.

In 1892 they returned and took up their residence on the latter property, and here they have since made their home. They have been very successful in the industry and have become very prominent and popular residents of the community. They have increased their holdings to 1,100 acres, 67 acres of which are in cranberry vines. In 1921 they raised and sold 600 barrels of berries, getting as high as $17 per barrel for part of them. The place is well improved and is provided with adequate buildings for care of the crops. Mr. Whittlesey employs several men during the busy season. He has become an expert cultivator and has enjoyed a successful career in every way. He was formerly treasurer of the city of Centralia and of Port Edwards Township, and later of Cranmoor Township.

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*     *     *     Cranberry Recipes     *     *     *

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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Nov 1, 1945

“… you are inviting revolution.”

September 13, 2012

Image from the Federal Reserve

Detroit Priest Criticizes Federal Reserve System
[excerpt]

He called upon congress to “recover” its constitutional powers to regulate the value and coinage of money, and added that:

“Unless you do that, you are inviting revolution.”

The Charleston Daily Mail (Charleston, West Virginia) Jan 16, 1935


Lake Park News (Lake Park, Iowa) Sep 20, 1934

Image from the Federal Reserve

ABOLITION OF FEDERAL RESERVE IS ADVOCATED

Editor of The Bee — Sir: If the isolationists wish to give direction to the government policies of the United States they should induce congress to dismantle and abolish the Federal Reserve Bank in toto and restore the United  States Treasury to the prestige it enjoyed prior to 1907.

At that time Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany ordered his bankers to get their money out of the United States and home to Germany. With that order, hell started on a rampage and where it will end is a moot question. We are not inclined to predict.

However, when a conflagration is raging, people who can are justified in taking preliminary steps at self preservation and one of these precautionary measures is to bring unresponsible agencies under disciplinary control.

The Federal Reserve Bank with its sanctions and its sanctions in reverse can do a lot of mischief. The efforts of the national administration to restore normalcy to commerce and industry are futile so long as an unauthorized agency can flout moral standards and carry on as it pleases, we use the term “unauthorized” advisedly, for when the war ended and the writ of habeas corpus was restored to the nation, Woodrow Wilson’s war time emergency acts ceased to have authority to continue their functions.

When the Democratic Party in 1932 gave the people an opportunity to vote on the socalled amendment, they voted it out. It had become nothing but a racket for the late Andrew Mellon’s personal benefit.

W.J.S.
Modesto, January 16, 1940.

Modesto Bee and Herald-News (Modesto, California) Jan 17, 1940

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Mar 7, 1935

Coxey Considers Another March To Washington

CHICAGO, Sept. 19. — (INS) — “Coxey’s Army” may march again.

That was the admonition today of “Gen.” Jacob S. Coxey who led the march of unemployed from Massillon, O., to Washington, in 1894.

The 91-year-old “General” told a meeting of 16, the Mothers of America, Inc., that he is prepared to encamp in Washington until someone introduces his bill to abolish the Federal Reserve system.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Sep 19, 1945

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Jul 14, 1956

Delaware County Daily Times (Chester, Pennsylvania) May 10, 1974

Sign of a Nation, Great and Strong

June 14, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

Our American Flag

Our flag has valor for stripes of red,
A gruesome symbol of the blood shed
To preserve precious freedom of speech,
Right in public assembly to preach.

Pureness of purposes the white shows,
Gives the choice of religion which grows
As we worship in the church we choose,
Nothing that is right do we refuse.

The blue is for courage, loyalty
Of women left behind, royalty
Brave, to whom the war will never end,
Vets’ broken bodies, spirits, they mend.

Stars for states that love, honor, our flag,
A grand symbol, not only a rag,
In service blue ones in windows hung,
Were gold, when taps for heroes was sung.

The American Flag, red, white, blue,
As it waves up high for me or you,
Represents the best of life’s treasure,
Privileges so great none can measure!

(Melitta Foeste King)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 13, 1959

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

Observing Flag Day

Ample opportunity will be afforded Sunday for the public to participate in observance of Flag Day.

The people will be paying homage Sunday for the last time — officially — to the 48-star flag. It is the standard the people have known longest — since Arizona was admitted to the Union in 1912. The 48-star flag will be superseded on July 4 by a new flag recognizing Alaska as the 49th state. The life of the new standard will be brief. On July 4, 1960, it will be replaced by a flag with a 50th star for Hawaii.

Display of the new flag would be improper before Independence Day, but after that day the 48-star emblems will not be discarded. The White House announced early this year that “with limited exceptions, agencies of the federal government will continue to display the 48-star flag so long as it is still in good condition.”

Observance of Flag Day dates back to June 14, 1885, when Dr. Bernard Cigrand, then a 19-year-old teacher at the Stony Hill school near Wauheka and Fredonia in Ozaukee County, had his students write themes on the subject of the American Flag. The next year he proposed that the day be observed nationally. However, it was not until 1916 that President Woodrow Wilson issued an official Flag Day proclamation.

In observing Flag Day, it would be well to note that a number of countries have adopted the Red, White and Blue in tribute to the encouragement given them by the United States in their efforts to gain independence. This is particularly true in regard to the Republics of Liberia, Cuba, Panama, and the Philippines. Each of these independent nations directly owes its existence to the fact hat such a course was fostered by your country. As a result, their flags derive from the Stars and Stripes of the United States.

The refusal of Spain to withdraw troops from Cuba led to occupation of the island by American forces. After the defeat of the Spanish in 1898, American military rule continued only long enough for the Cubans to adopt a constitution and elect their first congress. This congress met for the first time in 1902.

Granting full freedom for the Philippines was more recent. It took two wars to wrest the Filipinos from Spanish and later Japanese rulers. They obtained full freedom in 1946, shortly after World War II, and at a time when the Russian Communists were destroying freedom in such countries as Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and large parts of the Balkan area.

The red, white and blue flags of these countries provide the answer to the claims of Russian Communists that our country is imperialistic. Further answer is found in this country’s favorable attitude toward efforts of other areas to gain independence.

Thus, in paying tribute to the U.S. Flag tomorrow, we will be recognizing not only the freedoms enjoyed in our country but in other republics as well.
As in previous years, Flag Day ceremonies will be held at the Cigrand memorial in Waubeka early Sunday afternoon and at the restored Stony Hill schoolhouse at 4:30 p.m. Locally, a special Flag Day program has been arranged by the Sheboygan Lodge of the Elks, beginning at 1 p.m. with a motorcade from intersection of 8th Street and Ontario Avenue to the Elks Club at 1943 Erie Ave.

We are also reminded that display of the flag throughout the community will be an important contribution to the observance of Flag Day.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) 13 Jun 1959

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1922

Let’s Read About — Old Glory

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
It’s fascinating history,
A thrill packed story,
For every American.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
The story of her birth —
Man’s boundless faith
In Men of fate —
Born to glorify the earth.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And meet those noble souls
Who night and day
Fought all the way . . .
Immortalizing their roles.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And learn on what blest morn
George told Betsy what to do
With stars and stripes, and know
How our GRAND FLAG was born.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And the Freedoms she unfurls —
Freeing King and Slave
From a coward’s grave . . .
In both worlds.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
A blood and thunder history
For Liberty and Democracy,
The glory of every American.

ELIO ORFEO CENCI
April 6, 1948
High Falls, N.Y.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Apr 16, 1948

About Bernard J. Cigrand:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

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Read more: The National Flag Day Foundation

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Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

We are fortunate, indeed!

Cinco de Mayo, 1945

May 5, 2012

The free world had cause for celebration on May 5, 1945.

Tucson Daily Citizen (Tucson, Arizona) May 5, 1945

Nazis Whipped – Burma Japs Gone!

Yanks Down 154 Nippon Aircraft

Germans in North Quit

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) May 5, 1945

Nazis Give Up Southern Germany

Patton Tries for a Knockout

The Fresno Bee (Fresno, California) May 5, 1945

1,000,000 Nazi Soldiers Laid Down Their Arms

Continued Fighting Against West Allies Senseless

Air Power Prime Factor in Defeat

Indiana Evening Gazette (Indiana, Pennsylvania) May 5, 1945

Major German Resistance at End

Desperate Foes Fights Grimly

Denmark Celebrates End of Five-Year Nazi Rule

The Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) May 5, 1945

Take My Income – Gimme the Tax

April 17, 2012

The Oweds of March

By Arthur “Bugs” Baer

Today’s the old reliable Income Tax Day when you have to shell out like a self-bailing bean pod.

A man can be sober, reliable and honest 364 days in the year and still not know what to do with the extra day in February.

This is the day the corners on the Square Johns get a little rounded.

It’s tough when March the Fifteenth falls on a Wednesday and both of them fall on the taxpayer.

Honest Abe Lincoln never made out an income tax. And you notice he hurried through with his birthday a month ago.

Here’s the way I mail my income tax blank during the dark of the moon.

I flank the Town Hall in a turning movement, bypass the fire-house, wear blinkers going by the statue of Daniel Webster, sneak up on an isolated mail-box, drop a mysterious letter into the chute and then fan the letter-box for five minutes with my hat.

If no smoke comes out I know that truth and the right have again conquered throughout the land and unto all the inhabitants thereof. If sparks emerge I rush home and turn the clock back to 1912 for an alibi.

The only thing that bothers me this year is the money. They have added a Forgiveness Tax that is meaner than a porcupine with his underwear on backward.

That Forgiveness Tax forgiveth not my transgressions, my bad bookkeeping, my poor memory nor my elastic chicanery. Nossir, that Forgiveness Tax sinketh me with all on board.

That Forgiveness Tax is a deadly torpedo in the form of a bon-bon.

When it comes to me sinning and the government forgiving I would like to have it twice as versa. Let me do the forgiving next time.

However, I guess I’ll get by all right. I have a date with a loan corporation at noon for a transfusion.

(c 1944, King Features)

Tucson Daily Citizen (Tucson, Arizona) Mar 17, 1944

*****

From the Tax History Project: [excerpt]

World War II brought two major changes to the federal tax system. First, it dramatically expanded the individual income tax, boosting the number of taxpayers sevenfold in just six years. Second, it introduced wage withholding to help new taxpayers meet their obligations.

….

Before 1943, taxpayers were expected to save enough money over the course of the year to pay their tax liability when it came due early in the next calendar year. Had pay-as-you-go withholding been simply superimposed on that system, then taxpayers would have been making payments on their current liability while simultaneously paying the tax bill for the previous year. For many taxpayers, that was impossible, especially given the steep annual increase in tax rates during the war.

The Lowell Sun (Lowell, Massachusetts) Mar 12, 1945

The Generals, Buckner and Buckner

November 10, 2011

Eighty-eight, poor and living in a log cabin in Hart county, Kentucky — the cabin he was born in — General Simon Bolivar Buckner, Confederate commander, former governor of Kentucky and running mate of Palmer on the Gold Democrat ticket in 1896, swears he is the happiest man alive.

“The cabin is 103 years old,” he says, “I raise my own tobacco, have a fine mint bed and my old dog General wags his tail every time I come in sight. I have a fine spring just outside the cabin door — this water, a little mint and a little of Kentucky’s best spirits in conjunction would make anyone happy. I wouldn’t give up my log cabin home for a palace — Rockefeller or Vanderbilt couldn’t buy my cabin.”

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 10, 1910


GEN. BUCKNER JOINS MAJORITY

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Death Ends Distinguished Career As Soldier and Political Leader

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LEXINGTON, Ky., Jan. 8. — General Simon Bolivar Buckner, former governor of Kentucky, and candidate for vice president on the gold democratic national ticket in 1896, died at his home tonight.

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General Simon Bolivar Buckner had a long and distinguished career as a soldier, having served in the Mexican and civil wars, in both of which he was promoted for bravery and soldierly qualities. He was born on a farm in Hart county, Kentucky, April 1, 1823, and graduated from the United States military academy in 1822. [1844]

During the Mexican war, he was brevetted for bravery at the battles of Contreras, Churubusco and Molino Del Rey. He remained with the army until 1855, when he resigned. When the civil war broke out he joined the confederate army with the rank of brigadier general. He was successively made major general and lieutenant general.

He was governor of Kentucky from 1887 to 1891, and served as a member of the Kentucky constitutional convention in 1891. After being a candidate for vice president on the gold democratic ticket in 1896, he retired to his farm in Hart county, but continued to take a lively interest in public affairs.

General Buckner had been in ill health, due to his advanced age, for about a year. He died at 9 o’clock tonight at his home, “Glen Lily,” near Munfordville.

The body will be buried in the state cemetery at Frankfort Saturday.

General Buckner was the last surviving lieutenant general of the confederacy.

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Jan 9, 1914

GENERAL SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER

Times have changed, and so has the attitude of the Buckner family toward unconditional surrender. Lieut. Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner today is doing a great job in leading our new Tenth army in Okinawa in its drive to force unconditional surrender upon Japan.

General Buckner is the son of Lieut. Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner of the Confederate States of America, who was the first to be forced to yield to the “unconditional surrender” demands of U.S. Grant.

In February, 1862, General Buckner sent a note to Grant suggesting an armistice for the purpose of discussing the terms upon which he would surrender Fort Donellson, Tennessee, then under siege. Buckner and Grant had been classmates at West Point and Buckner once loaned Grant money to get home on vacation but despite this, Grant replied, “No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted.”

The Lowell Sun (Lowell, Massachusetts) Apr 9, 1945

10TH AVENGES DEATH OF LEADER

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Gen. Buckner Killed in Okinawa Battle

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Death Comes Almost at Moment of Final Victory By His Tenth Army

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jun 19, 1945

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More about General Buckner, Jr. at Remember the Deadeyes – In Honor of General Buckner

“Boots” and Her Man

June 23, 2011

While looking for more “Boots” paper dolls and/or information on Edgar Martin, I ran across various promo pieces:

Preacher, Lawyer or Doctor

Most famous comic artists will tell you that they have drawn pictures ever since their cradle days.

Not so, however, with Edgar E. Martin. He drew wrath from his college professors before he ever drew humor from an ink bottle.

Yet it was only a short time after his first experiment in drawing that Martin found himself with NEA Service and known from coast to coast as the author of the fascinating girl strip, “Boots and Her Buddies”!

Because he had none of the early experiences so common to artists, Martin’s story is an interesting one. Born in Indianapolis, Ind., he very soon was taken to Nashville, Tenn., where his father was a professor of biology in a small college. The family lived on a large country place and Edgar drew water from the well, milk from the cows and displeasure from his professor-parents for not evincing any interest in the biological fauna that thrived on the place.

But the elder Martin was determined that the younger Martin should take up some sort of profession, whether doctoring, lawyering or preaching. So Edgar was sent to a preparatory school at Nashville and absorbed a groundwork for just about any sort of career but that of artist.

After his graduation the family moved to Monmouth, Ill. Professor Martin taught biology in Monmouth College and launched Edgar into a curriculum designed to fit him for the law.

Then, one day, Professor Martin emerged from his study with a harried look on his face and a pile of drawing in his arms.

“Edgar,” he said, “I wish you’d try to help me with these charts. I’ve a great many of them to do tonight.”

Thus it was that the elder Martin inadvertently chose his son’s career. The first picture that Edgar ever drew was the likeness of a salamander, a very scaly, crawly-looking reptile. Then he sketched a frog, and a grasshopper, while his father stared, amazed. Why, the boy had all the accurate, detailed technique of a skilled biologist!

“My son,” he fairly whooped in a lapse of professorial dignity, “you’re a natural-born –”

“Cartoonist” interrupted Edgar firmly. And he was.

Young Martin didn’t even tarry to complete the semester at college, but dashed off to the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago. Once free of salamanders and frogs, his talent developed. He had been there only six months when NEA Service heard about him and sent him an invitation to come to Cleveland.

Martin turned out eight different comic strips before the great inspiration came.

Then “Boots and Her Buddies” began to march out across the newspaper pages of the nation. Masculine readers welcomed her with open eyes. Feminine readers eagerly followed her adventures and wondered “how in the world any man ever drew such perfectly wonderfully clothes.”

“Boots” today is recognized as the daintiest, most truly feminine character in any comic strip in America. And to think that Martin started out by drawing salamanders.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Feb 24, 1930

Clean humor, gay and sparkling — “That’s Boots and Her Buddies” .  .  .

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Feb 23, 1929

Boots is so beautiful she always has a small army of lovers .  .  .

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Jul 16, 1930

The daily doings of blond and beautiful, the gay and irrepressible Boots .  .  .

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) May 17, 1931

A contest conducted by the Bay City (Mich.) Daily Times to find the most perfect counterparts of Boots and Babe, famous characters in the comic strip “Boots and Her Buddies,” resulted in Miss Goldie Anderson, left, being picked as Boots and Miss Beatrice Stevens, right, as Babe. Edgar E. Martin, “Boots and Her Buddies” artist, was the judge. “Miss Boots” and “Miss Babe” will be guests of  the newspaper at the Eastern Michigan Water Carnival in Bay City July 30 – Aug. 1.

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Jul 23, 1931

Edgar Martin, who draws “Boots and Her Buddies”

You’d never guess it, but Edgar Martin, the artist of “Boots and Her Buddies,” is a reserved young man who hates crowds and collects antiques. He draws alluring co-eds and young men in raccoon coats as if he were a part of the picture, but prefers solitary hikes to collegiate hot-cha. Martin  .  .  .  his friends call him Abe  .  .  .  lives in a small town and has three Bootlets of his own: Mary, Sally, and Nancy. He smokes corncobs and wears old sweaters for comfort .  .  .  but his smart drawings of the younger crowd make the gals sit up and take notice. His knowledge of new trends in feminine fineries is positively malicious.

The Zanesville Signal (Zanesville, Ohio) Jun 8, 1934

Boots, star of the comic strip, “Boots and Her Buddies,” becomes the bride of Rodney Ruggles today on the comic page of the Intelligencer.

The bride is an orphan and has made her home with the Stephen Tutts for the past 20 years. Her brother, Billy, is a prominent business executive in the nation’s capital. The bridegroom is the son of Ma and Pa Ruggles of Peculiar Grove, Texas.

Professor Tutt is giving the bride in marriage. She will wear a white satin gown with a sweetheart neckline, fitted peplum and full skirt.

Boots has chosen a fingertip veil held by pearlized orange blossoms. She will carry a Bible with a spray of lilies of the valley.

The matron of honor is Mrs. Stephen Tuff. Her frock is pale chiffon. She will carry a cascade bouquet of roses and wear a picture hat. Pug High will be flower girl.

A reception will be held at the home of the Tutts.

The bride attended Big Town College. She has been acclaimed glamor girl of the comic strips since her “birth” in 1924. The bridegroom is an ex-serviceman whose character and personality have won the hearts of every Boots fan.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 2, 1945

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BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES – HERE IT IS

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Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 2, 1945

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BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES — THERE THEY GO

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Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 3, 1945

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BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES — TURNING THINGS AROUND

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Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jul 12, 1946

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MEET THE RUGGLES FAMILY

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jul 31, 1946

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Here are two more I found that ran earlier than the others.  (CLICK TO ENLARGE) They were both full length (top to bottom) half page width advertisements — and both include a photo of Edgar Martin:

Modesto News-Herald (Modesto, California) Feb 16, 1928

Modesto News-Herald (Modesto, California) Feb 26, 1927