Posts Tagged ‘1946’

What’s For Dinner?

November 22, 2012

Hotel Witter – Demolished in 1950 (South Wood County Historical Museum)

What was served for Thanksgiving Dinner in 1929:

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Nov 26, 1929

Cranberry Jell Easily Made by Newest Recipe

Use of Baking Powder Makes Less Sugar Necessary In Preparation of Sauce

With Thanksgiving close at hand the homemaker is thinking seriously of pumpkin pie and cranberry sauce. A new cranberry recipe made with Rumford all-phosphate baking powder is offered here.

Prepare as usual in proportion of one quart of cranberries to 2 cups water. Cook till berries are tender. If preferred clear, rub through sieve to take out seeds and skins.

Return to the fire adding to every quart of fruit 1 cup of sugar (instead of the usual two cups) and 1 level teaspoon of baking powder. Cook only till the sugar is dissolved. Chill before serving.

This cranberry sauce will be sweet and fresh-flavored with fine, clear color.

Note the great saving in sugar. Also consider the advantages in preparing fruit sauces with a minimum of sugar for invalids and children.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Nov 14, 1932


From the Sheboygan Spirit: This hotel was built in the early 1890s and torn down in 1960.

What The Grand Hotel  served for Thanksgiving in 1946:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Nov 27, 1946

Deep-Dish Cranberry Pie

3 cups cranberries
1 cup water
1 1/2 cups sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt

Boil the cranberries in the water until they “pop.” Add sugar and salt. Cool somewhat. Pour into a deep pie dish. Cover with a layer of plain pastry, fitting pastry firmly over edge of dish. (The pastry should be slashed to allow escape of steam.) Bake at 450 F. for 15 minutes.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 1, 1936

Cold Water Pastry

1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup lard
4 to 6 tablespoons cold water

Cut lard into flour and salt until the crumbs are the size of dried peas. Add the water slowly, using just enough to make the dough hold together.

Roll on a floured board.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) May 1, 1936

Happy Thanksgiving!

Midsummer Folly and a Wheelbarrow

July 30, 2012

Brownsville Herald (Brownsville, Texas) Aug 2, 1949

Midsummer Folly

This being the socalled silly season, we are moved to interest in Larry Hightower, cowboy poet, who has started to push a wheelbarrow around the world. He expects to consume the nest 12 years in this useless task. Of course everyone should have a purpose in life and if one’s purpose is to trundle a wheelbarrow 25,000 miles or more, we wish him success. To those of us who hate to push a lawnmower around a yard once a week, this man’s self-imposed stunt seems the acme of foolishness if foolishness has any acme. Yet we wonder if a lot of us aren’t just as foolish without realizing it.

Many of us are pushing wheelbarrows, figuratively speaking. We are trundling a load of unnecessary worries up hill and occasionally butting our heads against stone walls. We are loading ourselves down with self-imposed burdens and hoping someone else will lighten the load. Many of us are pursuing the wrong path, keeping the wheelbarrow wheel in a rut, so to speak, when we ought to go ahead and reconnoiter along the road and see if we shouldn’t make a turn somewhere. Oh, well, if Larry wants to push a wheelbarrow around the world for a dozen years back to where he started that’s his business. On a rough road with plenty of cream he could churn some butter while he’s a-wheeling. Maybe he isn’t much more foolish than some others. The broad highway is filled with all kinds of wheels within wheels.

Syracuse Herald Journal (Syracuse, New York) July 15, 1946

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Mar 16, 1950

Wheelbarrow Express Starts Up Pike’s Peak Despite Falling Snow

Colorado Springs, Colo., March 11 — (AP) — Larry Hightower an his “Wheelbarrow Express” began the 62 mile round trip to the summit of Pikes Peak at 8 a.m. today despite falling snow and scorning grim legends of death and disaster to winter travelers atop the peak.

Hightower is the Ellensburg, Wash., man who started pushing a wheelbarrow on July 4, 1846 and has since pushed it a total of 18,212 miles through 48 states, five Canadian provinces, Mexico and Guatemala.

“I’ve seen worse weather than this,” he commented drily abut the snow which had started falling during the night. “I’ll make it if it takes all winter.”

He carries a supply of food which includes crackers, sardines, some GI emergency rations and a thermus jug of coffee.

He has only one blanket, but wears four shirts, two pairs of trousers and four pairs of gloves.

He said he will release a red flare if he gets into danger. On reaching the summit he will set off four flares to announce his arrival.

If he gets stuck for the night in the higher altitude where there are no houses, he said, he will dig a burrow in the snow and hole up. For warmth, he said, he will depend on a flask of partly filled with sand, into which he will pour wood alcohol, making a tiny stove.

He estimated it would take him from six to eight days to make the trip.

Greeley Daily Tribune (Greeley, Colorado) Mar 11, 1950

PIKE’S PEAK SUMMIT, Colo. (UP) — Larry Hightower, the only man to push a wheelbarrow to the top of Pike’s peak, left the deserted summer house and started back to Colorado Springs Thursday.

It took him five days to reach the top of the 14,110-foot mountain. Going down, he figured it would take about two days to cover the 26 miles.

Idaho State Journal (Pocatello, Idaho) Mar 16, 1950

BOISE, (UP) — Wheelbarrow Trundler Larry Hightower headed west again Saturday after obtaining Gov. C.A. Robins’ signature on a treasured Washington state flag.

The wiry Ellensburg, Wash., World War I veteran said he would try to make Pendleton, Ore., within the next 20 days. But he won’t hurry.
After all, he said, he’s been on the road more than four years — walking every foot of the way. So a few more days, or weeks, are of little importance.

Hightower caught Gov. Robins in his office late Friday after making an unsuccessful first try at getting hte chief executive’s signature on a flag which already has the names of 13 governors on it.

Hightower and his “Irish baby buggy” arrived here Thursday night after a tough trip across the Southern Idaho desert. The wheelbarrow survived the heat well, but Hightower had several blisters atop blisters before he reached the sanctuary here.

IN HIS carefully kept log book, the deeply suntanned wheelbarrow pusher chalked up his 19,448th mile. He explained that his tour since he left Ellensburg has taken him through most states of the nation and several countries of Central America.

Hightower, who lives on a government veteran’s pension, wore out 19 pairs of shoes and 1217 pairs of socks on his trip. He wears levis and a cotton suntan shirt most of the time. A pair of gloves helps absorb some of the punishment of pushing the 120-pound ‘barrow, into which are neatly piled all of his belongings.

HE SAID the idea of setting a world record for wheelbarrow travel struck him about five years ago.

“Men have accomplished many things, but no one picked a wheelbarrow for something like this,” Hightower said. “I picked the most primitive type of travel — a one-wheeled vehicle.”

HE CALLS HIMSELF a “messenger of good will,” and has delivered 332 lectures in schools, colleges and other institutions on Americanism.

“I’ve been trying to get across the idea that the American way of life is the best in the world,” Hightower said.

When asked how he managed to live on just a pension, he replied:

“You can’t throw a whingding, but you get by  somehow.”

Hightower hasn’t made up his mind whether he’ll go back to Ellensburg and settle down or not. He thought for a while of traveling to Hawaii or perhaps the Phillippines, but the Korean was situation has soured him on making a trip across the Pacific.

“Guess I’ll just mosey along and see how things turn out,” he said.

Idaho State Journal (Pocatello, Idaho) Aug 20 1950

Long Beach Independent (Long Beach, California) Aug 27, 1947

Walla Walla Union Bulletin (Walla Walla, Washington) Sep 28, 1950

Wheelbarrow Valued Highly

MOSES LAKE (AP) — Someone else is pushing Larry Hightower’s wheelbarrow and the former Ellensburg cowboy doesn’t like it.

It’s the one he pushed up Pike’s Peak on the jaunt that took him through the western United States and into Mexico and Canada. The one-wheeler turned up missing Thursday night, he complained to police.

Police should have no trouble identifying it. It has two headlights powered by a generator, a radio aerial topped by an American flag and the base is painted red, the interior white and the outside blue.

It’s worth a lot to Hightower, too: $40,000 was the estimate he gave police.

The cowboy said he suspects two juveniles.

Tri City Herald (Pasco, Washington) Jul 23, 1954

*****

Idaho Family Girl is (at least was – searching for her great-grandfather’s log books) to put in a museum. Read more HERE.

Recent post by Idaho Family Girl with more pictures.

Footage of Larry Hightower pushing his wheelbarrow on youtube:

Larry the Wheelbarrow Pusher

Fourth of July Dud

July 25, 2012

“David, you’ve been trying to light that for almost three weeks now — Can’t you just look on it as a 15 cent loss?”

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Jul 22, 1946

More of the “White Man’s Burden”

November 7, 2011

Another collection of the “White Man’s Burden” from various papers and time periods.

Image from the book cover of A Prairie Populist on the Iowa Research Online website

CARRIES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

Populist Delegate Holds Their Baby While His Wife Lobbies.

CINCINNATI, May 8. — Mrs. Luna E. Kelli is one of the most active among the delegates and lobbyists gathering here for the anit-fusion populist national convention. In the near vicinity can usually be seen her husband carrying “the white man’s burden” — in this case their infant.

Mrs. Kelli, who is the editor of the Prairie Home at Hartwell, Neb., is here as a delegate both to the Reform Press association and the populist convention. Her husband is also a delegate to the latter body. At home he is a tiller of the soil.

Mrs. Kelli is particularly active in urging the adoption of a universal suffrage plank, and her husband gives hourly proof that he is assisting her in attaining her desire.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) May 8, 1900

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

Practically every western state is facing for this year the greatest tax bill on record. In many instances, the tax has been doubled and trebled in the past six years.

Industry will be called upon to pay this burden and there is no way to get out of it, for the bill has been contracted.

The people are largely to blame for the present state of affairs and they will get no relief until by their voice expressed at elections they have the courage to demand tax reduction and to hold public officials to campaign pledges for economy.

Further, the citizen must get out and vote for men and measures which guarantee economy. If this is not done our tax burdens will grow until it will take special deputies to hunt down individuals and confiscate their property, if they have any, to meet the tax bills. This is not an exaggerated picture.

That the power to tax is the power to destroy has been already well illustrated and taxation today is the greatest single item which prevents and will prevent a return to pre-war conditions. Inasmuch as we have an enormous war tax bill to pay in addition to our other taxes, it is all the more necessary that a reduction in local taxrolls be demanded and secured.

Ada Weekly News (Ada, Oklahoma) Jul 28, 1921

*********

MacNIDER ENLARGES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN
(By Associated Press)

NEW YORK, April 16. — Responsibility for righting the wrongs of the world rests with the people of the United States and Canada, Hanford MacNider, United States Minister to Canada, declared tonight, addressing the annual banquet of the Prudential Insurance Company of America.

“Whether we want the responsibility or not,” he said, “or whether the older countries have any desire to turn their eyes in our direction, it is from the North American Continent that the first move will be expected to right world affairs when they become complicated or confuses.”

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 17, 1931

CARRY THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

France has taken possession of seven islands off the Philippines, with the secret approval of the United States.

This country has lost interest in that part of the world, inasmuch as the Philippines are to be given their freedom, if they so desire.

The United States preferred to have French occupy the islands rather than the Japanese.

From now on the French will be called upon to carry the white man’s burden in that region.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Jul 30, 1933

NEW LANDS ON FRENCH MAPS
[Excerpt]

The despatch boats Astrolabe and Alerte that planted the French flag on Tempest, Loaita, Itu Aba, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands and Amboyne coral reef found inhabitants on only two, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Aug 4, 1933

WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

The mystery of Italy’s African policy seems to be at least partly explained in the latest statement from the government’s colonial department at Rome.

Under-secretary Allesandro Lessona says:

The Ethiopian situation is a problem of vast importance, embracing the whole European civilizing mission, not merely security for our own lands.”

Americans have not been able to see, from any facts provided by the Italian government, that lawful Italian interests were really threatened in Africa.

The Ethiopian government has seemed eager to settle on any fair basis the trivial boundary dispute that Italy makes so much fuss about. But now the situation begins to clear up. Europe has a “civilizing mission” in Africa, and must make life in that dark continent as “secure” as it is in Europe.

If the Ethiopians have a sense of humor, they must laugh as they read that.

Kokomo Tribune (Kokomo, Indiana) May 11, 1935

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

The Indians of California are on the war path again.

It’s not scalps they’re after, this time, nor are they mobilizing to repulse a new invasion of “pale faces.” They are aroused because a law they pushed through Congress at the recent session was vetoed.

The law was an amendment to an act approved in 1928, which authorized the Indians to sue the U.S. for pay for lands, goods, and other benefits promised in the “Eighteen Lost Treaties” negotiated in 1851 and 1852. It would have made possible suits totalling $35,000,000 instead of just ten or twelve millions, as in now the case.

Of course the Indians are not trying to get back the land itself. But, in view of the hazards of land-owning these days, it might be a break for white men if they did. There is the continual struggle against droughts, insects, weeds and taxes. And now there is this new threat in California to try to support the whole State treasury by a tax on land alone — the Single Tax.

Although such was what Kipling meant by the phrase, nevertheless land seems to be qualifying as the real “White Man’s Burden.” And if this latest tax blow falls on land, we might just as well give it back to the Indians to let it become the Red Man’s Burden.

Arcadia Tribune (Arcadia, California) Jul 20, 1936

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

President Truman has announced that he is considering asking congress for legislation to permit the entry of European refugees — including Jews — to the United States.

How congress will react to this is a matter for speculation, but it is to be hoped that it will be rejected.

From a humanitarian standpoint we will admit that the victims of the World War should be assisted, but it should be in a way of repatriation rather than absorption.

Not so long ago we had an acute unemployment problem in this country, and it is not impossible that it should recur. What it would be if millions of Europeans were received into this country, no one can foretell. It would certainly require more than a glorified WPA, for most of the refugees would be penniless, and would have to  be provided with housing and maintenance until they could become established.

In view of the disturbance which is now in progress in Palestine, it would seem that the admission of Jews would be taking on a problem with which Great Britain has been unable to cope. We might be inviting an explosive situation such as is now besetting the Holy Land.

Somehow Uncle Sam has fallen heir to a large proportion of the white man’s burden of the entire world. We not only financed and furnished munitions and material for our allies in the late war, but have since made them loans, and now the President proposes to adopt all the unfortunates of war-torn Europe.

If the people of the United States are not to be brought to the economic level of Chinese collies, they will have to demand that Uncle Sam quit playing the role of Santa Claus.

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Aug 17, 1946

J.A. Livingston
Three Major Crises For John Kennedy
[Excerpt]

RECOVERY OR RECESSION

Next week, Secretary of the Treasury Anderson will personally ask Chancellor Adenauer, of West Germany to assume more of the “white man’s” burden and, thus, relieve the drain on U.S. gold. The central bank of West Germany has reduced its discount rate from 5 per cent to 4 per cent in order to discourage the flow of investment funds from the U.S.

2. The new president will have to decide whether the nation is in a recession or recovery is just around the corner. More than 5,000,000 persons will be out of jobs when Kennedy assumes office. Then outdoor work on farms, construction, and the railroads will be at a seasonal low. As many as seven persons out of every hundred may be seeking work.

Mr. Kennedy, therefore, will have to decide whether to cut taxes to stimulate retail sales (see chart), or initiate hurried public works to provide jobs, or both. Such expansionary efforts will unbalance the budget and aggravate international worry about:

3. The soundness of the dollar. Even the richest nation in the world can bite off more economics than it can handle. In recent post-war years, high defense outlays, aid to under-developed nations, and federal social undertakings have overreached taxes. Collectively, as well as individually, Americans have been living on the installment plan.

Big Spring Daily Herald (Big Spring, Texas) Nov 13, 1960

*********

Previous White Man’s Burden post.

“Boots” and Her Man

June 23, 2011

While looking for more “Boots” paper dolls and/or information on Edgar Martin, I ran across various promo pieces:

Preacher, Lawyer or Doctor

Most famous comic artists will tell you that they have drawn pictures ever since their cradle days.

Not so, however, with Edgar E. Martin. He drew wrath from his college professors before he ever drew humor from an ink bottle.

Yet it was only a short time after his first experiment in drawing that Martin found himself with NEA Service and known from coast to coast as the author of the fascinating girl strip, “Boots and Her Buddies”!

Because he had none of the early experiences so common to artists, Martin’s story is an interesting one. Born in Indianapolis, Ind., he very soon was taken to Nashville, Tenn., where his father was a professor of biology in a small college. The family lived on a large country place and Edgar drew water from the well, milk from the cows and displeasure from his professor-parents for not evincing any interest in the biological fauna that thrived on the place.

But the elder Martin was determined that the younger Martin should take up some sort of profession, whether doctoring, lawyering or preaching. So Edgar was sent to a preparatory school at Nashville and absorbed a groundwork for just about any sort of career but that of artist.

After his graduation the family moved to Monmouth, Ill. Professor Martin taught biology in Monmouth College and launched Edgar into a curriculum designed to fit him for the law.

Then, one day, Professor Martin emerged from his study with a harried look on his face and a pile of drawing in his arms.

“Edgar,” he said, “I wish you’d try to help me with these charts. I’ve a great many of them to do tonight.”

Thus it was that the elder Martin inadvertently chose his son’s career. The first picture that Edgar ever drew was the likeness of a salamander, a very scaly, crawly-looking reptile. Then he sketched a frog, and a grasshopper, while his father stared, amazed. Why, the boy had all the accurate, detailed technique of a skilled biologist!

“My son,” he fairly whooped in a lapse of professorial dignity, “you’re a natural-born –”

“Cartoonist” interrupted Edgar firmly. And he was.

Young Martin didn’t even tarry to complete the semester at college, but dashed off to the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago. Once free of salamanders and frogs, his talent developed. He had been there only six months when NEA Service heard about him and sent him an invitation to come to Cleveland.

Martin turned out eight different comic strips before the great inspiration came.

Then “Boots and Her Buddies” began to march out across the newspaper pages of the nation. Masculine readers welcomed her with open eyes. Feminine readers eagerly followed her adventures and wondered “how in the world any man ever drew such perfectly wonderfully clothes.”

“Boots” today is recognized as the daintiest, most truly feminine character in any comic strip in America. And to think that Martin started out by drawing salamanders.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Feb 24, 1930

Clean humor, gay and sparkling — “That’s Boots and Her Buddies” .  .  .

The Newark Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Feb 23, 1929

Boots is so beautiful she always has a small army of lovers .  .  .

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Jul 16, 1930

The daily doings of blond and beautiful, the gay and irrepressible Boots .  .  .

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) May 17, 1931

A contest conducted by the Bay City (Mich.) Daily Times to find the most perfect counterparts of Boots and Babe, famous characters in the comic strip “Boots and Her Buddies,” resulted in Miss Goldie Anderson, left, being picked as Boots and Miss Beatrice Stevens, right, as Babe. Edgar E. Martin, “Boots and Her Buddies” artist, was the judge. “Miss Boots” and “Miss Babe” will be guests of  the newspaper at the Eastern Michigan Water Carnival in Bay City July 30 – Aug. 1.

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Jul 23, 1931

Edgar Martin, who draws “Boots and Her Buddies”

You’d never guess it, but Edgar Martin, the artist of “Boots and Her Buddies,” is a reserved young man who hates crowds and collects antiques. He draws alluring co-eds and young men in raccoon coats as if he were a part of the picture, but prefers solitary hikes to collegiate hot-cha. Martin  .  .  .  his friends call him Abe  .  .  .  lives in a small town and has three Bootlets of his own: Mary, Sally, and Nancy. He smokes corncobs and wears old sweaters for comfort .  .  .  but his smart drawings of the younger crowd make the gals sit up and take notice. His knowledge of new trends in feminine fineries is positively malicious.

The Zanesville Signal (Zanesville, Ohio) Jun 8, 1934

Boots, star of the comic strip, “Boots and Her Buddies,” becomes the bride of Rodney Ruggles today on the comic page of the Intelligencer.

The bride is an orphan and has made her home with the Stephen Tutts for the past 20 years. Her brother, Billy, is a prominent business executive in the nation’s capital. The bridegroom is the son of Ma and Pa Ruggles of Peculiar Grove, Texas.

Professor Tutt is giving the bride in marriage. She will wear a white satin gown with a sweetheart neckline, fitted peplum and full skirt.

Boots has chosen a fingertip veil held by pearlized orange blossoms. She will carry a Bible with a spray of lilies of the valley.

The matron of honor is Mrs. Stephen Tuff. Her frock is pale chiffon. She will carry a cascade bouquet of roses and wear a picture hat. Pug High will be flower girl.

A reception will be held at the home of the Tutts.

The bride attended Big Town College. She has been acclaimed glamor girl of the comic strips since her “birth” in 1924. The bridegroom is an ex-serviceman whose character and personality have won the hearts of every Boots fan.

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 2, 1945

*****

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES – HERE IT IS

*****

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 2, 1945

*****

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES — THERE THEY GO

*****

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 3, 1945

*****

BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES — TURNING THINGS AROUND

*****

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jul 12, 1946

*****

MEET THE RUGGLES FAMILY

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Jul 31, 1946

*****

Here are two more I found that ran earlier than the others.  (CLICK TO ENLARGE) They were both full length (top to bottom) half page width advertisements — and both include a photo of Edgar Martin:

Modesto News-Herald (Modesto, California) Feb 16, 1928

Modesto News-Herald (Modesto, California) Feb 26, 1927

May Day Moving

May 1, 2011

With May Day comes the annual moving proposition. It carries with it the usual annoyance of shifting your abode, for what would the first day of May come to if we didn’t continue the practice of moving? Beautiful May, all except the inconvenience of moving – a custom that won’t live down.

Portsmouth Daily Times (Portsmouth, Ohio) May 1, 1912

May Day Moving Sets New Chicago Record
(International News Service)

CHICAGO, May 24. — May Day moving here set a new record for the period of the housing shortage, according to the requests for changes to telephone and gas companies. More than 3,000 changes daily were asked of a gaslight and coke company before the yearly exodus to new homes. This is 50 per cent higher than 1921.

J.S. Waterfield, Chicago Real Estate board said the “own your own home” idea is responsible for hundreds of the movings.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) May 24, 1922

CHICAGO, May 1. — Thousands of families in Chicago went on a “rent strike” today and refused to vacate their apartments in accordance with May Day moving orders, H.S. Standish, president of the Chicago Tennants’ Protective League, asserted.

Mr. Standish predicted that 10,000 tenants would defy efforts of landlords to evict them.

Some of the disputes would be settled by arbitration, Mr. Standish said, but others would be carried into court for jury trials.

Battle Landlords
By JAMES HENLE,
N.E.A. Staff Correspondent.

NEW YORK, May 1. Two men are largely responsible for starting in this state the anti-rent profiteering crusade which, unless the laws are finally thrown out by the courts, has limited landlords to 25 per cent increases.

One of them is not even a New Yorker. His name is James F. Gannon, Jr., and he is city commissioner of Jersey City.

The other no longer hold any official post. His name is Nathan Hirsch and he was formerly chairman of the Mayor’s Committee on Rent Profiteering.

Victims Aided

It was Hirsch’s committee — and largely Hirsch himself — who first came to the aid of the victims or rent profiteers. Before this persons who objected to extortionate rent increases were called “Bolsheviki.” Hirsch had little real authority, but he used what he had with good effect.

The result was that any number of cases were compromised last year by the landlords, and tenants were enable to stay on by paying only moderate increases in rent. A strong public sentiment was built up to oppose rent hogs.

Hirsch was serving without pay and when the appropriation he asked to continue the committee’s work was refused he resigned.

Hug[e] Rent Strike

Then came Gannon. Early this year he engineered the biggest rent strike ever conducted and won it. Thousands of tenants with the city’s backing, refused to pay unreasonable rent increases and won in the courts.

This woke New York up. If Jersey City can do it, why can’t we? was the comment. The result was a wave of popular sentiment that swept everything before it and resulted in the enactment by the Legislature of a dozen laws to protect the tenant, the most important of which is the measure limiting rent increases to 25 per cent.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) May 1, 1920

NOTES AND GOSSIP

The month of May, when poets sing of roses and meadows decked with green, is, in the vicinity of New York, the flitting time for half the world — or has been. Fortunes are changing and even the May moving day, so long sacred to New Yorkers, is giving way before the iconoclastic spirit of the age. Enough, and more than enough of it, is left however. The removals of the great annual flitting time, often useless, often undertaken without clear reason than that restlessness so peculiar to American life, must cost the people of New York, Brooklyn and Jersey City, directly and indirectly, not less than $3,000,000 in actual money outlay, to say nothing of personal discomfort. Moving time entails an endless train f discomforts and disorders. It means a clear month’s comfort gone out of the year in preparing for the move and getting over it; is the direct cause of broken furniture not a little, of wrecked tempers by the thousands and of much actual suffering.

But moving day is not what it used to be. People who move in spring are beginning to discount it by removing at any time during the latter part of April, so that the first of May no longer resembles the fag end of a furniture dealer’s nightmare so much as it did. The real estate agents, too, have conspired against moving day. Not that the agents want people to stay where they are and forswear change. By no means. The more removals the more commissions for the agents. It is to increase their own profits and those of the owners that such strenuous efforts have been made, and with much success, to substitute October for May as the moving time. Many landlords now let  houses from October to October, and more are anxious to do so. The reason is that a good many people of moderate means, whose only hope of getting wives and babies into the country for the summer is to stop paying rent, and have been in the habit of giving up their houses on May 1, storing the furniture, packing off the family and seeking board until October, when the city residence could be safely resumed in another quarter. This arrangement was fine for the tenants, but it was bad for the owners and agents, consequently it had to be stopped. And it is being stopped.

Morning Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) May 1, 1887

MAN’S INHUMANITY TO MAN. —

The following unjustifiable case of landlord oppression is one of the many cases which May day moving has developed in Jersey City: — A widow named Jane Meara, with her five children, occupied a small store in Prospect street, near Morgan. The property changed hands, and as a consequence the widow was doomed; but her lease had not expired and she held a receipt for the rent of the premises, paid in advance, for the month of May. Under these circumstances the poor woman felt secure, at least for the present; but on May day, during her absence, her furniture and goods were thrown out of doors, and when she returned to her house she found the premises so locked and fastened that ingress was impossible, while every article of her household goods was drenched with rain on the sidewalk. She at once proceeded to Justice McAnally, who very humanely allowed her the use of a house for herself and her children till she can procure other quarters, as this was the only relief he could afford in the case. The woman has commenced a suit against the new proprietor, laying damages at $10,000.

New York Herald (New York, New York) May 3, 1869

NEW – YORK CITY.
First of May — Moving Day.

There was not as much moving yesterday as is common upon the last of April — pretty good evidence that landlords generally were wise enough to fall somewhat from their old rates of rent, and so far accommodate tenants that they could afford to keep their old premises another year. Whoever is abroad to day, however, will be disposed to think there never was so much moving before. It will begin early — before some of us are up, no doubt, and it will continue late. The sidewalks will be worse obstructed in every street than Wall-street is where the Brokers are in full blast. Old beds and ricketty bedstands, handsome pianos and kitchen furniture, will be chaotically huddled together. Everything will be in a muddle. Everybody in a hurry, smashing mirrors in his haste, and carefully guarding boot boxes from harm. Sofas that go out sound will go in maimed, tables that enjoyed castors will scratch along and “tip” on one less than its complement. Bed-screws will be lost in the confusion, and many a good piece of furniture badly bruised in consequence. Family pictures will be sadly marred, and the china will be a broken set before night, in many a house. All houses will be dirty — never so dirty — into which people move, and the dirt of the old will seem enviable beside the cleanliness of the new. The old people will in their hearts murmur at these moving dispensations. the younger people, though aching in every bone, and “tired to death,” will relish the change, and think the new closets more roomy and more nice, and delight themselves fancying how this piece of furniture will look here and that piece in the other corner. The still “younger ones” will still more enjoy it. Into the cellar and upon the roof, into the rat-holes and on  the yard fence, into each room and prying into every cupboard, they will make reprisals of many things “worth saving,” and mark the day white in their calendar, as little less to be longed for in the return than Fourth of July itself.

Keep your tempers, good people. Don’t growl at the carmen nor haggle over the price charged. When the scratched furniture comes in don’t believe it is utterly ruined, — a few nails, a little glue, a piece of putty, and a pint of varnish will rejuvenate many articles that will grow very old ‘twixt morning and night, and undo much of the mischief that comes of moving, and which at first sight seems irreparable.

At night, after you have kindled a fire in the grate, — don’t, because you have cleaned house, make your house a tomb for dampness, nor let the children shiver through the evening, — after the tea things have been set aside, be sure to take one peep of the moon in her eclipse. Nor stay too long to look at her, for her exhibition begins rather late, and you should be up early next day to tack down the carpets, set the furniture to rights and make a home of your new house. Moreover, if it rains or is very cloudy, take our advice and don’t look at the eclipse — it’s no great affair after all.

New York Daily Times (New York, New York) May 1, 1855

In Lighter Vein
_____

The May Queen

“You must wake and call me early,”
The prospective May Queen said.
But when called, the foxy girlie
Stayed in bed.

And her plan was far from silly
Though another served as Queen,
For the winds were raw and chilly
On the green.

To the first my hat I’m doffing,
She who dodged the breezes bleak,
For the other will be coughing
All the week.
_____
Bolting The Ticket.

“The young men have chosen her to be Queen of May.”

“And how do the other girls like that?”

“Don’t seem to like it. They’re all insurgents.”
_____
May 1 In History.

May 1, 1589 — Queen Elizabeth is Queen of May, catches cold, and has the snuffles all day.

May 1, 1755 — Moving day, Dr. Johnson evicted for non-payment of rent.
_____

“Going Maying today?”

“Nix.”

“Why not?”

“I went Maying once.”
_____
Everything Upset.

A book of verses underneath the stove,

A lump of coal upon a silver tray;

Such are the things that make a terror of

The first of May.
_____
Moving Day.

“The May migration is very ancient.”

“So?”

“Yes; Shakespeare speaks of moving accidents by flood and field.”
_____
Nothing Romantic.

“Got your wife out for a May day stroll I see. Going to hunt for arbutus?”

“Quit your kidding. We’re going to hunt for a flat.”
_____
May Moving.

“You ought to read this book. It will move you deeply.”

“Do you know any concern that will move me cheaply? That is what I’m interested in just now.”

— Washington Herald.

Evening Post (Frederick, Maryland) May 1, 1912

True Realism.

Dramatic Author — I understand that you are looking for a new play.

Manager — Yes, but I am very hard to suit. I want a play which shall combine all the elements of tragedy, comedy, farce, pantomime and spectacle.

“That’s it. That’s what I’ve got. Chock full of tragedy and human suffering, tears and smiles, joy and woe, startling surprises, unheard of mishaps, wreck and ruin, lamentations and laughter.”

“What’s the title?”

“‘A May Day Moving.'”

“What’s the plot?”

“Hasn’t any plot. Just and ordinary May day moving.”

— New York Weekly.

The Marion Star (Marion, Ohio) Nov 9, 1895

The Bradford Era (Bradford, Pennsylvania) Apr 12, 1946

I thought the May Day moving had petered out in the 1920s, but evidently it was still going strong in Pennsylvania as late as the 1940s!

Images from the Newman Library – Baruch College

This Day In History

December 2, 2009

Dec. 1st:

In 1917, the Rev. Edward Flanagan founded Boys Town in Omaha, Neb.

In 1953, the New York Stock Exchange announced for the first time in history investors could buy stocks on the installment plan.

In 1958, fire swept through the Chicago school of Our Lady of the Angels, killing 93 children and three nuns.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 1, 1967

Dec 3rd:

In 1818, Illinois entered the Union as the 21st state.

In 1833, Oberlin College, the first truly co-educational college in the United States, opened it doors.

In 1929, the Ford Motor Company raised daily wages from $6.00 to $7.00 despite collapse of the stock market.

In 1948, the nation learned that microfilm of secret U.S. documents had been found in a hollow pumpkin on the farm of Whitaker Chambers.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 3, 1962

Dec 4th:

In 1783, George Washington said goodbye to his troops at New York shortly before he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson sailed for France to attend the peace conference at Versailles.

In 1942, President Roosevelt ordered the liquidation of the Works Progress Administration, created in 1935 to provide work for the unemployed.

In 1946, the United Mine Workers union was fined $3.5 million and its leader, John L. Lewis $10,000 for refusing to call off a 17-day strike.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 4, 1963

Dec. 5th:

In 1776, the first scholastic fraternity in America, Phi Beta Kappa, was organized at the College of William and Mary.

In 1933, prohibition was abolished with the 21st amendment.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 5, 1962

Dec 6th:

In 1859, John Brown was hanged in the public square of Charlestown, Va., for his raid on Harper’s Ferry. On the way to the gallows, he said of the countryside, “This is a beautiful country!”

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Dec 6, 1976