Posts Tagged ‘1958’

Double Barreled Stuff

March 26, 2012

Drilling For Oil — 1928 Campaign — Oil Charges — Public Interest

Lancaster Daily Eagle (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) Apr 7, 1928

Middle East War Threats — OIL — Mutant Arab Nationalism

The Lancaster Eagle-Gazette (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) Jul 3, 1958

Mussolini’s Ghost and the Corporative State

December 1, 2011

Mussolini’s Ghost

One of the “anti-recession” measures talked of by liberal politicians during the recent session of Congress was creation of a gigantic federal bureau to oversee American industry.

Among other things the bureau would be empowered to move industrial plants into pockets of unemployment and thus provide work for the jobless. Rep. John W. Byrnes calls the idea 99.9 per cent socialism. he sees it as an opening wedge for further government control of private enterprise.

In the light of historical experience the idea of government control over a nation’s industrial resources is an interesting one, especially since it is apparently being offered now as a brave progressive step toward economic utopia.

The fact is that such a proposal is neither brave, new or very progressive. State control of the means of production is usually associated with communism — a theory advocated by the extreme left side of the political spectrum. The idea is Marxist in its conception, but it was a man named Benito Mussolini, hardly a liberal saint, who developed it into a working reality, all the while professing a vague belief in private enterprise.

A great show was made of utilizing all productive forces of the nation by combining politics with economics in Mussolini’s Italian “corporative state.”

He tried to produce a social paradise by organizing producers into nine syndicates — four for employers and four for employes, in agriculture, industry, credit and commerce, plus one for professional men and artists. These syndicates were responsible for wages, working conditions and industrial relations. They also exercised a measure of control over production.

The fascist constitution gave the syndicates power to “fix fair prices” on the basis of “reasonable profits.” They could adjust wages “to meet the normal requirements of life and assure a fair price to the consumer.” In short, the state had total power to regulate prices, profits and wages.

Economic life was further organized and controlled by the formation of 22 corporations or guilds, each to be concerned with all phases of production in one field — such as cereals, mining, internal communications, the tourist industry and so on. Mussolini, representing the state, was head of each corporation and of the national council of corporations. He appointed ministers of corporations who were nominal directors of the system.

Eventually the chamber of corporations, plus a collection of other party hacks, took the place of Italy’s parliament. As head of the ruling party and the corporations, Mussolini could legislate by degree and depend on the chamber for confirmation.

An enlightening sidelight to the “corporative state” was that once the government decided to regiment industry, it developed similar plans for labor. Unions too became appendages of the government. Stating that “public order must not be disturbed for any reason, at any cost.” Mussolini decreed a national labor charter. He saw it as a means of eliminating industrial conflict and bringing about a balanced economy.

With one or two exceptions, the terms of the fascist labor charter sound like the realization of a trade unionist’s dreams. It established uniform collective labor contracts and labor courts to resolve disputes. The 8-hour day became law of the land. Each labor syndicate was given jurisdiction over workers in one field of production.

But, in return for state protection, the government asked some concessions from labor. Into the charter went terms stating that each syndicate would be controlled by the government, and wages and conditions were to be regulated “as best suited to the needs of employes and type of job.” Since the economic paradise was at hand, there wouldn’t be any need to strike, so the right to strike became illegal.

What did the utopia bring? A contemporary writer reported that between 1923 and 1932 wages in Italy were reduced 40 to 50 per cent and the cost of living was reduced 5 per cent.

Image from the CusterMen website

The “corporative state” was hardly a success and Mussolini, its founder, ended up a bullet-riddled corpse, shot by his own people.

The lesson taught by the “corporative state” experiment should be borne in mind again today when politicians of another stripe seek to protect capitalism from itself.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Sep 12, 1958

I’ve Been Working on the Railroad

October 8, 2011

Archaic Regulations and Crushing Taxes

Albuquerque Tribune (Albuquerque, New Mexico) Jun 14, 1958

You Deviationist!

September 10, 2011

The Road to Socialism – We’re All Jolly Fellows

The Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 6, 1958

Understanding UN Is Simple as Your ABC’s

By HAL BOYLE

NEW YORK (AP) — Are you aware? Are you hep to what is going on in the United Nations? Can you astonish your friends with your easy command of diplomatic terms?

Do the people who used to laugh when you sat down at the piano now hold back their hoots until you try to pronounce plenipotentiary?

Well, there is a way to end all that. No longer need you babble with the rabble about simple subjects like baseball, the structure of the atom, or the eternal whether about the weather.

You, too, can talk about the United Nations, the most thrilling story of our times. You too, can be the life of the party as you hold your listeners spellbound with fluent word pictures of the problems and pitfalls that beset a one-world government.

Understanding the United Nations is as simple as A-B-C. Or, rather, it is as simple as learning your ABC’s all over again — and backwards.

To help pierce the fog of phases and phrases that erupt from the UN sessions you merely need a dictionary of the new diplomatic language generated there.

Somewhere lost in every group of words used by the statesmen is a meaning — something someone is trying to say. The words only need to be translated to be understood. So herewith is presented a glossary of the more common phrases employed at the United Nations which should make its debates crystal clear to everybody.

TRUCE — Something which is stranger than friction.

SOVEREIGNTY — A thing every nation except itself ought to give up.

VETO — A device with five handles for getting rid of hot potatoes without loss of dignity.

NEGOTIATIONS — A type of conference known in baseball as “A Rhubarb.”

BLOC — A group of dissident nations whose leader is known to the other side as a “bloc-head.”

PEACE — This is what all the fighting is about.

The foregoing are general terms. There follows a strictly Russian glossary:

WAR MONGER — A nation that won’t tell you how to make an atom bomb.

MONGER — One who mongs. An insane man you can’t sell on the idea he is entirely wrong and you are entirely right.

PETTY BOURGEOIS — One who has three meals a day — and enjoys them.

BOURGEOIS — One who could afford to eat four meals a day if he wanted to.

FASCIST OBSTRUCTIONIST — A guy who wants to vote in private.

TROTSKYITE OBSTRUCTIONIST — Any Russian who left Russia except on a government expense account.

RIGHTIST OBSTRUCTIONIST — A right-handed Trotskyite.

LEFTIST OBSTRUCTIONIST — A search fails to reveal this term exists in the Russian language of today.

COUNTER-REVOLUTIONARY — A man who counts revolutions.

FASCIST — A non-Communist.

MONARCHO-FASCIST — A non-Communist with a royal flush.

DEVIATIONIST — A man who couldn’t swallow Communism all at one gulp.

NATIONAL DEVIATIONIST — A Yugoslav hotfoot.

RIGHTIST NATIONALIST DEVIATIONIST — The Politburo still hasn’t figured out anyone mean enough to call this.

IMPERIALIST — Anyone who objects to Russian expansion.

CAPITALIST IMPERIALIST — The same, in spades.

CAPITALIST EXPLOITER — A popcorn stand owner who butters his product — but only puts oil in the machine.

Amarillo Globe (Amarillo, Texas) Nov 19, 1948

Buck County Courier – Oct 4, 1966

Are Your Clocks Fast? Set ‘Em Back!

November 7, 2010

What Time Is It At Your House Today?

By GEORGE TAYLOR

If the phrase “time change” doesn’t remind you of a certain biannual ritual that you attended to last night, then it is time to put down the paper and call the time number on the telephone.

You may have already lost an hour of sleep or, if you are a post-church newspaper reader, you may have arrived at church an hour early.

Just for the record, this morning at 2 a.m. most of the nation went back on Standard Time.

If you didn’t set your clocks back last night or this morning then all you need to do is subtract one hour from the time. For example, if your clock says it is 8 a.m., then set it for 7 a.m.

Of course this can be done by turning it back an hour or ahead 11 hours. Now, in the event you happen to miss the number the first time around, you can correct the error by continuing and setting it back one hour plus any multiple of twelve or by setting it ahead 11 hours plus any multiple of twelve.

For those who are confused at this point, it may help to know that there are residents in 46 other states who are equally confused.

Since the Uniform Time Act of 1966 only Kentucky, Hawaii, Alaska and parts of Indiana in the Eastern Time Zone are being exempted.

By next year all states in the country will be making the spring change to Daylight Saving Time and the fall change back to Standard Time.

New Journal (Mansfiled, Ohio) Oct 28, 1967


From the San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Nov 21, 1883

ARE YOUR CLOCKS FAST?

Did you “oversleep” an hour this morning?

Could be, if you forgot to set your clocks back sixty minutes before retiring Saturday night. For this is the day California regains that hour lost last April when Daylight Saving Time sent into effect.

When the clock hands touched 2 this morning it really was 1 o’clock, Pacific Standard Time. The lost hour was regained — until next spring.

Independent Press Telegram (Long Beach, California) Oct 25, 1964


They must have had quite a few heavy drinkers and slackers  living in New Hampshire during the 1950s.

Set ‘Em Back

The lazy man, the tired man, or the fellow sleeping off a hangover will be in luck tonight because he can legitimately take an extra hour’s slumber.

Yep, Daylight saving time goes out the window officially at 2 a.m. Sunday morning, so don’t forget to set your clocks BACK one hour before retiring tonight.

The time change applies both in New Hampshire and across the border in Maine as well as all the other New England and northeastern states and parts of eastern Canada.

Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) Oct 25, 1958

Retroactive Time, heh!

NEW TIME CHANGE

Don’t set your clocks back now, but wheels within wheels are turning on a bill to re-establish pre-war time for the months of November, December, January, and February. It is hard to see how it will be made retroactive for November if it should pass.

Preliminary committee hearings listened to farm representatives who are ardent proponents. The dairy man who used to start his daily schedule at four, now has to start at three to catch up with market.

Amarillo Daily News (Amarillo, Texas) Nov 26, 1943

From the Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin)  Nov 1, 1909

I am so thankful time isn’t quite as confusing as it was for the poor folks in Coshocton, Ohio, circa 1919. I think the newspaper should have had a chart to go with their explanation. My head was swimming just trying to transcribe it!

CENTRAL DAYLIGHT TIME, ONE HOUR SLOWER, IS STANDARD IN COSHOCTON-CO AFTER SATURD’Y

At midnight tonight Coshocton city and county goes back to central standard time on a daylight saving basis. All reference to time in these columns will be understood to mean central daylight time, which is a half hour faster than sun time, an hour faster than the pre-war central standard time, and one hour slower than the prevailing eastern daylight saving time.

Congress has apparently decided to keep the daylight saving law in force until October. When that act is repealed in October central and eastern standard time will both move back one hour. What time Coshocton-co will use then remains to be decided upon.

Central standard time on a daylight saving basis, in use in Coshocton-co after midnight tonight is one hour slower than railroad and Western Union time. Therefore, if a train is scheduled to leave Coshocton at 4:58 p.m. that train goes at 3:58 p.m. by Coshocton time.

Coshocton time is the legal time for the state of Ohio, and all state activities, including opening and closing of election polls will continue to be by central daylight saving time. This is due to the fact that a majority of Ohio territory, including the capital, is located in the central time belt.

Special attention is called to the fact that all church announcements for Sunday morning are in terms of the new time, one hour earlier by the sun, but the same hour by the clocks, which have been turned back one hour.

Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) Jun 7, 1919

This Day In History

December 2, 2009

Dec. 1st:

In 1917, the Rev. Edward Flanagan founded Boys Town in Omaha, Neb.

In 1953, the New York Stock Exchange announced for the first time in history investors could buy stocks on the installment plan.

In 1958, fire swept through the Chicago school of Our Lady of the Angels, killing 93 children and three nuns.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 1, 1967

Dec 3rd:

In 1818, Illinois entered the Union as the 21st state.

In 1833, Oberlin College, the first truly co-educational college in the United States, opened it doors.

In 1929, the Ford Motor Company raised daily wages from $6.00 to $7.00 despite collapse of the stock market.

In 1948, the nation learned that microfilm of secret U.S. documents had been found in a hollow pumpkin on the farm of Whitaker Chambers.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 3, 1962

Dec 4th:

In 1783, George Washington said goodbye to his troops at New York shortly before he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army.

In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson sailed for France to attend the peace conference at Versailles.

In 1942, President Roosevelt ordered the liquidation of the Works Progress Administration, created in 1935 to provide work for the unemployed.

In 1946, the United Mine Workers union was fined $3.5 million and its leader, John L. Lewis $10,000 for refusing to call off a 17-day strike.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 4, 1963

Dec. 5th:

In 1776, the first scholastic fraternity in America, Phi Beta Kappa, was organized at the College of William and Mary.

In 1933, prohibition was abolished with the 21st amendment.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Dec 5, 1962

Dec 6th:

In 1859, John Brown was hanged in the public square of Charlestown, Va., for his raid on Harper’s Ferry. On the way to the gallows, he said of the countryside, “This is a beautiful country!”

Tyrone Daily Herald (Tyrone, Pennsylvania) Dec 6, 1976