Posts Tagged ‘1960’

The Argument of Tyrants

June 28, 2012

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Apr 19, 1956

A Daily Thought

“Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves! — William Pitt

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Jun 30, 1928

“How Liberty is Lost”

Insofar as the present dictatorships in Europe are concerned, Mr. Lippmann demonstrates satisfactorily that they have been caused by the knuckling in of people who surrendered to tyrants because of their fear, fear concerning their individual futures, fear about their jobs, fear of their truculent neighbors, always fear, fear, fear.

That sort of a condition cannot arise in a country that keeps its mind upon a fair distribution of wealth. Such a distribution does not mean, and can never mean, the ladling of money out of the public coffers to the undeserving. It does mean a wide distribution of jobs and of opportunities and a careful husbanding of the savings or accumulations of those who are smart enough to keep an eye out for the future.
…..

The American citizen of today who is blinded by constant sobbing references to his condition, to the “goodness” of the present administration, needs cast his attention upon the methods employed which have resulted in continued and widespread fear, the fear that grows on the tree of insecurity.

And there is no greater insecurity than to depend for one’s life upon the nod of an ambitious man looking for more power.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jul 20, 1938

Sen. Goldwater may be a super, right-wing Republican, but that has not kept him from some fundamental points in what follows:

To understand the importance of the federal Constitution, we must recognize that it is primarily a system of restraints against the natural tendency of government to expand in the direction of absolutism.

We all know the main components of the system. The first is the limitation of the federal government’s authority to specific, delegated powers. The second, a corollary of the first, is the reservation to the states and the people of all power not delegated to the federal government. The third is a careful division of the federal government’s power among three separate branches. The fourth is a prohibition against impetuous, alteration of the system — namely, Article V’s tortuous but wise, amendment procedures.

Was it then a democracy the framers created? Hardly. The system of restraints on the face of it, was directed not only against individual tyrants, but also against a tyranny of the masses. The framers were well aware of the danger posed by self-seeking demagogues — that they might persuade a majority of the people to confer on government vast powers in return for deceptive promises of economic gain.

And so they forbade such a transfer of power — first by declaring, in effect, that certain activities are outside the natural and legitimate scope of the public authority, and secondly by dispersing public authority among several levels and branches of government in the hope that each seat of authority, jealous of its own prerogatives, would have a natural incentive to resist aggression by the others.

But the framers were not visionaries. They knew that rules of government, however brilliantly calculated to cope with the imperfect nature of man, however carefully designed to avoid the pitfalls of power, would be no match for men who were determined to disregard them.

In the last analysis of their system of government would prosper only if the governed were sufficiently determined that it should.

“What have you given us?” a woman asked Ben Franklin toward the close of the Constitutional Convention.

“A republic,” he said, “if you can keep it!”

We have not kept it. The system of restraints has fallen into disrepair. The federal government has moved into every field in which it believes its services are needed.

The state governments are either excluded from their rightful functions by federal pre-emption, or they are allowed to act at the sufferance of the federal government. Inside the federal government both the executive and judicial branches have roamed far outside their constitutional boundary lines.

…..

The Constitution is not an antique document. It is as pertinent today as it was when it was written. Our great error has been in departing from the Constitution as a document to restrain the concentration of power.

How do you stand, sir?

Daily Chronicle (Centralia, Washington) May 9, 1960

Delaware County Daily Times (Pennsylvania) Feb 22, 1966

Sign of a Nation, Great and Strong

June 14, 2012

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

Our American Flag

Our flag has valor for stripes of red,
A gruesome symbol of the blood shed
To preserve precious freedom of speech,
Right in public assembly to preach.

Pureness of purposes the white shows,
Gives the choice of religion which grows
As we worship in the church we choose,
Nothing that is right do we refuse.

The blue is for courage, loyalty
Of women left behind, royalty
Brave, to whom the war will never end,
Vets’ broken bodies, spirits, they mend.

Stars for states that love, honor, our flag,
A grand symbol, not only a rag,
In service blue ones in windows hung,
Were gold, when taps for heroes was sung.

The American Flag, red, white, blue,
As it waves up high for me or you,
Represents the best of life’s treasure,
Privileges so great none can measure!

(Melitta Foeste King)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 13, 1959

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

Observing Flag Day

Ample opportunity will be afforded Sunday for the public to participate in observance of Flag Day.

The people will be paying homage Sunday for the last time — officially — to the 48-star flag. It is the standard the people have known longest — since Arizona was admitted to the Union in 1912. The 48-star flag will be superseded on July 4 by a new flag recognizing Alaska as the 49th state. The life of the new standard will be brief. On July 4, 1960, it will be replaced by a flag with a 50th star for Hawaii.

Display of the new flag would be improper before Independence Day, but after that day the 48-star emblems will not be discarded. The White House announced early this year that “with limited exceptions, agencies of the federal government will continue to display the 48-star flag so long as it is still in good condition.”

Observance of Flag Day dates back to June 14, 1885, when Dr. Bernard Cigrand, then a 19-year-old teacher at the Stony Hill school near Wauheka and Fredonia in Ozaukee County, had his students write themes on the subject of the American Flag. The next year he proposed that the day be observed nationally. However, it was not until 1916 that President Woodrow Wilson issued an official Flag Day proclamation.

In observing Flag Day, it would be well to note that a number of countries have adopted the Red, White and Blue in tribute to the encouragement given them by the United States in their efforts to gain independence. This is particularly true in regard to the Republics of Liberia, Cuba, Panama, and the Philippines. Each of these independent nations directly owes its existence to the fact hat such a course was fostered by your country. As a result, their flags derive from the Stars and Stripes of the United States.

The refusal of Spain to withdraw troops from Cuba led to occupation of the island by American forces. After the defeat of the Spanish in 1898, American military rule continued only long enough for the Cubans to adopt a constitution and elect their first congress. This congress met for the first time in 1902.

Granting full freedom for the Philippines was more recent. It took two wars to wrest the Filipinos from Spanish and later Japanese rulers. They obtained full freedom in 1946, shortly after World War II, and at a time when the Russian Communists were destroying freedom in such countries as Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and large parts of the Balkan area.

The red, white and blue flags of these countries provide the answer to the claims of Russian Communists that our country is imperialistic. Further answer is found in this country’s favorable attitude toward efforts of other areas to gain independence.

Thus, in paying tribute to the U.S. Flag tomorrow, we will be recognizing not only the freedoms enjoyed in our country but in other republics as well.
As in previous years, Flag Day ceremonies will be held at the Cigrand memorial in Waubeka early Sunday afternoon and at the restored Stony Hill schoolhouse at 4:30 p.m. Locally, a special Flag Day program has been arranged by the Sheboygan Lodge of the Elks, beginning at 1 p.m. with a motorcade from intersection of 8th Street and Ontario Avenue to the Elks Club at 1943 Erie Ave.

We are also reminded that display of the flag throughout the community will be an important contribution to the observance of Flag Day.

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) 13 Jun 1959

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1922

Let’s Read About — Old Glory

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
It’s fascinating history,
A thrill packed story,
For every American.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
The story of her birth —
Man’s boundless faith
In Men of fate —
Born to glorify the earth.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And meet those noble souls
Who night and day
Fought all the way . . .
Immortalizing their roles.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And learn on what blest morn
George told Betsy what to do
With stars and stripes, and know
How our GRAND FLAG was born.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
And the Freedoms she unfurls —
Freeing King and Slave
From a coward’s grave . . .
In both worlds.

Let’s read about OLD GLORY,
As often as we can —
A blood and thunder history
For Liberty and Democracy,
The glory of every American.

ELIO ORFEO CENCI
April 6, 1948
High Falls, N.Y.

Kingston Daily Freeman (Kingston, New York) Apr 16, 1948

About Bernard J. Cigrand:

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1945

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Read more: The National Flag Day Foundation

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Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Jun 14, 1947

We are fortunate, indeed!

A Product of Southern Cultivation

March 29, 2012

The Atlanta Constitution – Apr 9, 1910

American Tobacco Company (Wiki link)

American Tobacco – Downtown Durham – History

The Washington Post – Apr 6, 1910

Knowledge.
From the Philadelphia Press.

Johnny — Smokin’ cigarettes is dead sure to hurt yer.

Jimmy — G’on! where did yer git dat idee?

Johnny — From Pop.

Jimmy — Aw! he wuz jist stringin’ yer.

Johnny — No, he wuzn’t stringing me; he wuz strappin’ me. Dat’s how I know it hurts.

The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.) Aug 1, 1908

The Washington Post – Apr 30, 1910

Strange Smoking Disorder Reported

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A disorder which appeared in four patients after they stopped smoking cigarettes vanished dramatically when they took up the habit again, says a medical journal.

These strange cases were reported by Dr. Ralph Bookman, of Beverly Hills, in an article in California Medicine, official journal of the California Medical Association.

The disorder was canker sores in the mouth and on the tongue. They developed a few days after smoking was stopped.

Abilene Reporter News (Abilene, Texas) Oct 17, 1960

Galveston Daily News – Oct 7, 1910

“Maybe I was wicked to do it, but I feel a lot easier in my mind how that I know how a cigarette tastes.”

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Jun 24, 1925

Galveston Daily News – Oct 21, 1910

“I pledged too much for missions, but I had took a puff at a cigarette Pa’s nephew left yesterday just to see what it was like an’ my conscience was hurtin’.”

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Jun 26, 1926Galveston Daily News – Nov 15, 1910

Galveston Daily News – Nov 15, 1910

“My boy John used to argue in favor of women smokin’ cigarettes, but I ain’t heard a cheep out of him since I lit one last winter to try him out.”

Suburanite Economist (Chicago, Illinois) Aug 14, 1928

Galveston Daily News – Mar 14, 1911

“A MAN with whiskers ain’t got no business smokin’ cigarettes. Pa tried smokin’ a few the winter before he shaved clean, an’ I was forever smellin’ somethin’ burnin’.”

Suburbanite Economist (Chicago, Illinois) Sep 11, 1928

Reno Evening Gazette – Mar 15, 1911

Two things that keep Jane’s teen age daughter from eatin’ enough are smokin’ cigarettes and the knowledge that she has a cute little figure.

Traverse City Record Eagle (Traverse City, Michigan) Sep 18, 1962

The Atlanta Constitution – Mar 29, 1911

Jim Harkins has taken to readin’ theatrical magazines. He’ll be smokin’ cigarettes next.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Aug 22, 1913

Most o’ th’ daubed-up girls I see sittin’ around with ther knees crossed smokin’ cigarettes must be gettin’ by on ther personality, if they git by at all. I remember when it used t’ take ten or twelve years o’ good, hard consistent boozin’ t’ kill a feller.

Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) Oct 18, 1926

Nevada State Journal – Apr 11, 1911

ZINGG SOLD CIGARETTES.
Grass Valley, Cal., April 1, 1906.

Editor OAKLAND TRIBUNE: Sir — I used ter resyde in Oakland, but after readin’ the sermons and newspaper akkounts of the wiked doins uv yure peple I feel thankful thet I am now residin’ in a moar moral kommunity.

It ‘pears tu me thet Berkly and Alameder are even wuss hotbeds of krime then Oakland.

From the time thet Deacon Logan set an example, which hes been follered by such a numerous band of amorous kohorts, Sally Jane an’ me heve been almost afraid to venture neer yure plase.

Our peeple are strong on chewin’ terbaccer an’ smokin’ pipes, but it is an unritten law here that if a feller is caught sellin’ or smokin’ cigarettes, ‘specially if he blos the smoke threw his nose, that the Vigilance Kommittee shall take the kriminal in hand.

My darter Sally has writ the followin’ feelin’ pome wich is inclosed. Yours till deth,

HAYSEED SMITH.

The town of Alameda, on San Francisco bay,
Lay sleeping in the sunshine of a balmy winter’s day;
The merry wavelets rippled along the tide canal,
And the live oaks nodded to the breeze upon the Encinal.

But woe to Alameda, disaster, shame and crime
Were to stain its fair escutcheon, e’en to the end of time,
And fill each dweller’s bosom with the keenest of regrets,
For Macfarlane had discovered that Bill Zingg sold cigarettes.

The mayor and city officials all
Were summoned at once to the City Hall,
The police were ordered to be within call,
Armed, cap-a-pie, with powder and ball;
A resolution was passed expressing regrets
That wicked Bill Zingg had sold cigarettes.

At once the press and pulpit the news disseminates
To every town and city throughout our galaxy of States;
From Bangor east to the Philippines west come expression of regrets
That Bill Zingg of Alameda ‘d sold a pack of cigarettes.

For centuries bold Captain Kidd, freebooter of the main,
Has sustained a reputation which quite equaled that of Cain,
But now he’s way down on the list, his reputation sets
Away among the “has beens” since Zingg sold cigarettes.

Oh, Billy Zingg! Oh, Billy Zingg! Regret e’re yet too late,
The greatest sinner may return, pass through the golden gate.

St. Peter may smile as you pass in, and express to you regrets,
That you’re the only Alamedan there, though you did sell cigarettes.

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Apr 3, 1906

IHOP Provides Hope (and FREE Pancakes) on National Pancake Day

February 28, 2012

Valley News (Van Nuys, California) Nov 25, 1960

Today is National Pancake Day and IHOP is celebrating:

Flip for Free Pancakes!
February 28, 2012

Since beginning its National Pancake Day celebration in 2006, IHOP has raised nearly $8 million to support charities in the communities in which it operates. On February 28, 2012, guests from around the country are invited to celebrate National Pancake Day at IHOP and enjoy a free short stack of Buttermilk pancakes.* In return for the free pancakes, guests are asked to consider leaving a donation for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals © ** and other designated local charities.

Here are some IHOP flashbacks:

“Home of the never empty coffee pot

Valley News (Van Nuys, California) Oct 20, 1960

SYRUP FOR CINDY — Pert Cindy Robbins, popular television actress who stars on “Tom Ewell” show, has ball at International House of Pancakes. Fast growing chain has nine restaurants open, four of which are located in Valley — Toluca Lake, Panorama City, Woodland Hills and Northridge.

Van Nuys News (Van Nuys, California) Dec 9, 1960

HERE’S NESS! — Blithely unaware of two “rogues” in other picture, star of “The Untouchables” Robert Stack enjoys dining with wife and children at International House of Pancakes.

Van Nuys News (Van Nuys, California) Feb 3, 1961

Attack on a stack of “wheats” lights eye of young Johnny Crawford of TV show The Rifleman.

*****

PANCAKE BOOM.

Man’s oldest known form of bread food is fast becoming the newest dining-out craze as restaurants specializing in pancakes spread throughout the nation. One of the leading pancake chain operations, the International House of Pancakes, has jumped in three years from a single operation to a string of 25 units with an annual gross of $10 million. Under a licensing agreement with the Waldorf Systems, International  is opening new restaurants every few weeks in New England, Ohio, the West Coast, upstate New York. The restaurants draw most customers for Sunday morning breakfasts.

Independent Star News (Pasadena, California) May 21, 1961

Who is the Forgotten Man?

February 16, 2012

(Forgotten Man – emphasis mine)

The Burdens of “The Forgotten Man.”

NEW YORK, Feb, 2. — Professor William G. Sumner, of Yale college, delivered a lecture last night before the Brooklyn Revenue Reform club, at the Long Island Historical Society building. His subject was “The Forgotten Man.” Professor Sumner said that the forgotten man was the simple, honest man, who earned his living by good hard work, paid his debts, kept his contracts and educated his children. He was passed by and forgotten because he did his duty patiently and without complaint. On him rested all the burdens engendered by paupers, vagrants, spendthrifts, criminals and jobbers. All legislation which tended to relieve the weak, the vicious and the negligent to the consequences of their faults threw those consequences upon the forgotten man.

Daily Advocate (Newark, Ohio) Feb 3, 1883

*****

*****

Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) Oct 29, 1932

HE WHO PROVIDES IT ALL

William G. Sumner Gave Credit to the “Forgotten Man” for His Patient Industry.

Wealth comes only from production, and all that the wrangling grabbers, loafers and robbers get to deal with comes from somebody’s toil and sacrifice. Who, then, is he who provides it all? Go and find him, and you will have once more before you the Forgotten Man. You will find him hard at work because he has a great many to support. Nature has done a great deal for him in giving him a fertile soil and an excellent climate, and he wonders why it is that, after all, his scale of comfort is so moderate. He has to get out of the soil enough to pay all his taxes, and that means the cost of all the jobs and the fund for all the plunder. The Forgotten Man is delving away in patient industry, supporting his family, paying his taxes, casting his vote, supporting the church and school, reading his newspaper and cheering for the politicians of his admiration, but he is the only one for whom there is no provision in the great scramble and the big divide. Such is the Forgotten Man. He works, he votes, generally he prays — but he always pays — yes, above all, he pays.

Denton Journal (Denton, Maryland) Dec 23, 1922

Don’t Think – Just Vote the Straight Ticket!

Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio) Nov 6, 1932

“The Forgotten Man” is that individual who does an honest day’s work, pays his bills, brings up three or four children, indulges in a pipe or an occasional cigar, keeps up a small savings account, never asks for charity from anyone, never gets into trouble with the police, never makes a speech or writes a letter to the city editor — in short he’s the individual who keeps going on his own momentum, good times, bad times.
When the hat is passed around for the down-and-outers, or those lads who have lost $4.90 by some cruel, heartless flapper, the “Forgotten Man” chips in his mite.

The tax collector visits the “Forgotten Man” regularly, and collects toll for the upkeep of the police courts, jails, workhouses, and poor houses — none of which the “Forgotten Man” ever uses. He is self-supporting, self starting, self-sufficient, and being so he is counted in on nothing except the census. But in that document he cuts a big figure because he probably forms the vast majority.

— Harold the Imaginer.

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Feb 25, 1929

LONG-SUFFERING LANDLORDS

In commiserating the “forgotten man,” an observant citizen suggests why overlook the forgotten landlord? He, too, in this painful period, may well be an object of sympathy. Often, too, of admiration.

There is still too much remaining of the tradition which represents a landlord as a ruthless old skinflint, who probably got his property dishonestly and who rejoices in any pretext to gouge rent out of a poor tenant, or to turn a sick family out into the cold. There have been, and are, such landlords, but certainly in these days they are exceptional.

The owner of a house or a farm today is lucky if he is getting enough out of the property to pay the taxes and mortgage charges, without any income on his investment. In almost any town there may be found hundreds of rented homes where, because the tenants are out of work, the owner is carrying them along for half their usual rental or for nothing at all, because he has not the heart to turn them out. Many a family has skimped and saved and put its savings into a house or two for renting, to help safeguard its own future, is as badly off as the tenants who never saved in good times. All in all, honest inquiry will probably show that landlords as a class have been behaving pretty handsomely.

Daily Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland) Oct 11, 1932

But Ain’t We Got Beer?

THINKING OUT LOUD

Why is our prolific and prolix correspondent Jone Howlind, so incensed at the decidedly dubious prospects of the new deal? I presume she voted for the egregious F.D.R., and certainly has been an advocate of repeal. Her letter in Friday’s Post is inconsistent with former letters.

Surely, prices are rising over the moon and the average person is being ground between the upper and nether millstones. What does that matter? We’ve got beer, and “hard likker” is in sight.

The many will continue to be sacrificed for the few and the hungry and ragged are increasing. Never mind — we’ve got beer!
Beer puts some men to work. The wet papers sedulously refrain from reporting the men who lose their jobs in the candy and soft drink and allied industries.

The well known “Boobus Americanus” with his propensity for following and believing the demagogue, turned out of office a wise, far seeing statesman and elected a man whose own neighbors refused to vote for him.

Now the “forgotten man” is still forgotten; thy new deal is the same old deal; the specter of anarchy rides the minds; the Blue Eagle is only a plucked pigeon, but “sing you sinners, sing” — we got beer!

MRS. EVELYN FORTT
4130 Pera

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Sep 13, 1933

Roosevelt and Wall St.

THINKING OUT LOUD:

The Herald-Post editorial on the Farley-Pecora move was splendid, although I must confess I thought parts of it a trifle naive in view of the fact that while Farley gets Pecora removed from conducting his investigations of the crooked operations of Wall Street bankers, two more Wall Street men take up office in Washington.

I refer to James Bruce, now financial advisor to the Board of the Home Loan Bank, erstwhile vice president of the Chase National bank under Mr. Wiggin, and George Lindsay, fiscal agent of the Home Loan Bank Board, lately vice president of the Blancamerica – Blair Corp.

I can, by stretching my imagination, credit a newspaper with being naive about such a situation, but I can’t stretch it far enough to include Mr. Roosevelt. Consequently, what seems “new” about the “New Deal” is that the Wall Street operators are now operating in Washington where in the old deal they operated in Wall Street.

I advise anyone who doubts this to go over the old newspaper files of the early summer showing the corporations through which the House of Morgan stretched its influence and the lists of Morgan beneficiaries and with these lists check Roosevelt’s appointments. count ’em yourselves. The information isn’t hidden. The strength of politicians lies in the short memories of the public.

I think the Herald-Post’s optimism in regard to Roosevelt’s ability to keep hold of the Progressives was more a case of the wish being father to the thought than anything else. The public may be ignorant as to the character and background of the men with whom Roosevelt has surrounded himself by choice, but it can hardly be thought that the leaders of the Progressives are not perfectly aware of the personnel of the entire set-up. Their stand, therefore, will not be a case of ignorance, but a test of their weakness or strength of character.

Will the “forgotten man” be not only forgotten, but deserted by all as well?

JONE HOWLIND.

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Oct 10, 1933

“The Forgotten Man”

THINKING OUT LOUD

We have been watching the administration of the “New Deal,” and have seen how the “Forgotten Man” — the banker, manufacturer, jobber and retail merchant have been remembered. We wondered, naturally, if another class of citizens who seem to be having a hard time “carving” a name for themselves on the torso of humanity, would likewise be “remembered.”

I make special reference to the “25,000 doctors out of a job” which the press mentioned as a surplus of the profession a few months ago. We felt worried about the future of these poor souls, when realizing that they are slaves to “medical ethics” and can not advertise the skill with which they can do human carving or puncture you with a hypodermic needle.

But thanks to the faithful press for informing us that prospects for their relief is in sight, as soon as congress convenes. Rex Tugwell, assistant secretary of agriculture under the guise of protecting the innocent from poisonous, harmful and mislabeled patent medicines, and habit-forming drugs, proposes (in a bill he has prepared for consideration of congress) to place our precious lives wholly in the hands of the medical doctor.

It seems that the doctor has for several years felt himself slipping from his exalted position of holding a monopoly on the lives of mankind. In the first place his business is regularly called “practice,” and it seems he has followed it so diligently in the trimming of human “giblets” and bank rolls that the people are leaving him in a manner most alarming. This fact is set forth in an article in the Literary Digest of Sept. 22, 1923 [maybe 1933?], wherein a certain member of the A.M.A. set about to find out why they were their patients who had not died under treatment.

Several thousand citizens were accosted on the street, street cars, offices, etc., and asked two questions: “What would you do if you got sick, and why?”

He found that over 90 per cent would not call a doctor. In his paper read before the A.M.A. convention, he recommended that the doctor be not quite so ethical and treat his profession as a business and “get the money;” that a campaign be instituted through the press, for education of the gullible humans, and to admonish them to “see their doctor first.”

There are many people who sincerely believe that mutilation of the body by surgical operation is sinful.

Whenever you give an organization of people a monopoly over lives or rights of others, you have destroyed respect for the law that created such monopoly, and created contempt for those who enjoy such special privileges.

The number of people who die under medical and surgical treatment are several thousand fold greater than those who succumb from home remedies.

I am for a law that will take away the monopolistic powers already granted the doctor and give the individual a course of commonsense instruction in food, cleanliness, habits of living.

Over three billion dollars is the annual doctor bill, besides the loss of time from work. This becomes an economic problem besides the question of relief from suffering.

So, who is forgotten?

LOUIS BOND CHERRY.

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Nov 3, 1933

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Nov 8, 1932

The Forgotten Man

THINKING OUT LOUD:

We will let the gold and silver rust
And pledge our faith to the brain trust
If they will unfold a plan
To help the long forgotten man.

In honest sweat he toils for years
With fondest hopes and sadest fears
Now on the brink of dark despair
In nature’s bounty he cannot share.

Hungry, ragged, bare-foot and cold
He possesses not silver nor gold
Still believing “the Lord will provide”
But knowing mankind must divide.

Let us hope they will find a way
To bring to us a brighter day
Spreading happiness, spreading health,
Learn us that gold is not wealth!

M.M. OWENS,
Lordsburg, N.M.

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Dec 20, 1933

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Mar 17, 1933

Image from Cosmeo

REMEMBER FORGOTTEN MAN

New Dealers Give Him Bill to Pay, Coughlin Says.

PROVIDENCE, R.I., (AP). The Rev. Charles E. Coughlin declared that under the new deal “the forgotten man has been remembered” in time to pay the government’s bills. He spoke at an outdoor rally which he said was attended by 25,000 persons.

“With the new deal the forgotten man has been remembered,” he declared, “because every gallon of gas you buy, every pound of butter, every loaf of bread, all your groceries and drugs, have posted on them a mortgage to the United States in favor of international bankers.” He made his statement after saying “one day out of every three you work is taken out of your payroll for hidden taxes.”

NEW BEDFORD, (AP). The Rev. Charles E. Coughlin, discussing the administration of President Roosevelt, declared: “As I was instrumental in removing Herbert Hoover from the white house, so help me God, I will be instrumental in taking a communist from the chair once occupied by Washington.”

Evening State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Aug 3, 1936

I hear Spain’s nice this time of year.

ILL CHOSEN.

Ackley (Ia.) World-Journal: For a man who has talked about the “forgotten man” as much as Roosevelt, it comes with very poor grace to go on a cruise that costs the American people half a million dollars; it comes with even poorer grace to include his three sons, the “crown prince,” the “heir apparent” and another in waiting.

Evening State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Aug 11, 1936

NEW TAX COMING.

Jan. 1 will usher in the era of short pay checks. One percent will be deducted by order of the new deal. The forgotten man will be remembered by a new tax. The little fellow will pony up. One percent will be the deduction. It will affect the payrolls of thousands of industries and the well being of millions. Not content with the present tax rate, where it is figured that the average citizen gives one day’s pay out of every week for government, another one-hundredth of what the people earn is to be deducted from individual earnings for government use. It will be paid to the government and retained for the use of new deal administrators, and perhaps for the establishment of new bureaus to help to administer the funds that will be collected. The benevolent touch of a paternal government will be felt in a new effort with the beginning of 1937.

If at any time in the future the law should be repealed or declared unconstitutional that will not end the expense that has been incurred. Like the NRA and the FERA it will live on and on, the organization set up for its administration will continue and the government will pay the bill.

This is one of the new taxes made necessary by new deal management of public affairs. The tax may not be so obnoxious as the bureaucracy which it will help to enlarge and the complexity it will add to government.

Evening State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) Oct 19, 1936

El Paso Herald-Post (El Paso, Texas) Jul 5, 1933

A BIT INCONSISTENT

Time marches on! And today we find the federal government doing the things for which it condemned private citizens only three or four years ago. Such as, for example, foreclosing mortgages on the homes of persons unable to meet their interest and principle payments. It’s a strange world.

It is only good business, we suppose, for the Home Owners Loan corporation (a federal agency) to get its money when due. But, as we witness the numerous foreclosures by the HOLC, we recall the bitter denunciations, a few years ago, of private individuals who did the same thing. State governments then passed moratorium laws, making it impossible for mortgage holders to foreclose. And the moratoriums undoubtedly gave temporary relief to many farm and home owners. We found no fault with them then; we find no fault now. But, it would seem that the federal government now would practice what it preached to private lenders back in 1934-1935. If it is wrong for a private to put a man out of his home, it also is wrong for the government.

In Lyon county, right now, a man and wife who have passed middle age are losing their home, upon which they gave a mortgage to HOLC several years ago. The mortgage is due — and  HOLC wants its money, or else. Or else the couple moves into the street. The HOLC, as we get the story, refuses to compromise. Although the couple is able to raise half of the amount now due, HOLC officials have declared they want “all or nothing”.

It is a bitter awakening for those trusting souls who have been led to believe that the Man in Washington will chastise the bade, bad money-lenders and see the the “forgotten man” does not lose his home. The Lyon county couple to whom we have referred, as well as the rest of us, are beginning to realize that the grim realities of life are still with us; that they must be faced in the same old way. We are returning to the point where we again face such cold, hard facts as money borrowed, whether from private citizen or government, must be paid back. Also, that assurances of security by politicians seeking office often are merely a means of getting votes. Sad, but true.

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) Oct 21, 1937

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) May 14, 1942

National Debt Worries Farmers
[excerpt – Simon E. Lantz]

“Mr. Roosevelt promised to place the cost of government upon the shoulders of those most able to pay. In 1930, the wealth of the nation was paying 69 per cent of governmental costs and the laborers, farmers and common people were paying 31 per cent. But last year we found that the wealth of the nation was paying only 39 per cent while the ordinary people were paying 61 per cent. That is how Mr. Roosevelt took care of the forgotten man and soaked the rich.

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Oct 24, 1940


WHITE COLLAR WORKER IS ‘THE FORGOTTEN MAN’

ON A BIG munitions plant being built with government money at Wilmington, Ill., carpenters are paid $25 a day; men trundling wheelbarrows or working with pick or shovel are paid $16 and $17 a day.

In Chicago, 50 miles away, the clerical forces working in the offices of business and industry are being paid from $17 to $35 a week.
The carpenters and laborers in Wilmington may, and do, dress in coveralls; they change shirts possibly once a week; they wear coarse, unshined shoes; they enjoy the lower rentals of the rural districts.

The clerical worker in Chicago, if he is to hold his job, must have a clean shirt every day; he must wear a white collar; there must be a crease in his trousers; his shoes must be kept cleaned and shined; he must pay the much higher rentals of the city. His income will average about one-sixth of that of the carpenter at Wilmington.

To meet the ever-increasing demand of taxes and labor, and to continue to operate, business and industry have been forced to economize in every possible way. The white collar man has paid the bill. He is the “forgotten man” of today.

Boyden Reporter (Boyden, Iowa) Dec 25, 1941

Cumberland Evening Times (Cumberland, Maryland) Nov 14, 1960

More of the “White Man’s Burden”

November 7, 2011

Another collection of the “White Man’s Burden” from various papers and time periods.

Image from the book cover of A Prairie Populist on the Iowa Research Online website

CARRIES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

Populist Delegate Holds Their Baby While His Wife Lobbies.

CINCINNATI, May 8. — Mrs. Luna E. Kelli is one of the most active among the delegates and lobbyists gathering here for the anit-fusion populist national convention. In the near vicinity can usually be seen her husband carrying “the white man’s burden” — in this case their infant.

Mrs. Kelli, who is the editor of the Prairie Home at Hartwell, Neb., is here as a delegate both to the Reform Press association and the populist convention. Her husband is also a delegate to the latter body. At home he is a tiller of the soil.

Mrs. Kelli is particularly active in urging the adoption of a universal suffrage plank, and her husband gives hourly proof that he is assisting her in attaining her desire.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) May 8, 1900

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

Practically every western state is facing for this year the greatest tax bill on record. In many instances, the tax has been doubled and trebled in the past six years.

Industry will be called upon to pay this burden and there is no way to get out of it, for the bill has been contracted.

The people are largely to blame for the present state of affairs and they will get no relief until by their voice expressed at elections they have the courage to demand tax reduction and to hold public officials to campaign pledges for economy.

Further, the citizen must get out and vote for men and measures which guarantee economy. If this is not done our tax burdens will grow until it will take special deputies to hunt down individuals and confiscate their property, if they have any, to meet the tax bills. This is not an exaggerated picture.

That the power to tax is the power to destroy has been already well illustrated and taxation today is the greatest single item which prevents and will prevent a return to pre-war conditions. Inasmuch as we have an enormous war tax bill to pay in addition to our other taxes, it is all the more necessary that a reduction in local taxrolls be demanded and secured.

Ada Weekly News (Ada, Oklahoma) Jul 28, 1921

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MacNIDER ENLARGES WHITE MAN’S BURDEN
(By Associated Press)

NEW YORK, April 16. — Responsibility for righting the wrongs of the world rests with the people of the United States and Canada, Hanford MacNider, United States Minister to Canada, declared tonight, addressing the annual banquet of the Prudential Insurance Company of America.

“Whether we want the responsibility or not,” he said, “or whether the older countries have any desire to turn their eyes in our direction, it is from the North American Continent that the first move will be expected to right world affairs when they become complicated or confuses.”

San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas) Apr 17, 1931

CARRY THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

France has taken possession of seven islands off the Philippines, with the secret approval of the United States.

This country has lost interest in that part of the world, inasmuch as the Philippines are to be given their freedom, if they so desire.

The United States preferred to have French occupy the islands rather than the Japanese.

From now on the French will be called upon to carry the white man’s burden in that region.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Jul 30, 1933

NEW LANDS ON FRENCH MAPS
[Excerpt]

The despatch boats Astrolabe and Alerte that planted the French flag on Tempest, Loaita, Itu Aba, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands and Amboyne coral reef found inhabitants on only two, Thi-Tu and Twin Islands.

Ogden Standard Examiner (Ogden, Utah) Aug 4, 1933

WHITE MAN’S BURDEN.

The mystery of Italy’s African policy seems to be at least partly explained in the latest statement from the government’s colonial department at Rome.

Under-secretary Allesandro Lessona says:

The Ethiopian situation is a problem of vast importance, embracing the whole European civilizing mission, not merely security for our own lands.”

Americans have not been able to see, from any facts provided by the Italian government, that lawful Italian interests were really threatened in Africa.

The Ethiopian government has seemed eager to settle on any fair basis the trivial boundary dispute that Italy makes so much fuss about. But now the situation begins to clear up. Europe has a “civilizing mission” in Africa, and must make life in that dark continent as “secure” as it is in Europe.

If the Ethiopians have a sense of humor, they must laugh as they read that.

Kokomo Tribune (Kokomo, Indiana) May 11, 1935

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

The Indians of California are on the war path again.

It’s not scalps they’re after, this time, nor are they mobilizing to repulse a new invasion of “pale faces.” They are aroused because a law they pushed through Congress at the recent session was vetoed.

The law was an amendment to an act approved in 1928, which authorized the Indians to sue the U.S. for pay for lands, goods, and other benefits promised in the “Eighteen Lost Treaties” negotiated in 1851 and 1852. It would have made possible suits totalling $35,000,000 instead of just ten or twelve millions, as in now the case.

Of course the Indians are not trying to get back the land itself. But, in view of the hazards of land-owning these days, it might be a break for white men if they did. There is the continual struggle against droughts, insects, weeds and taxes. And now there is this new threat in California to try to support the whole State treasury by a tax on land alone — the Single Tax.

Although such was what Kipling meant by the phrase, nevertheless land seems to be qualifying as the real “White Man’s Burden.” And if this latest tax blow falls on land, we might just as well give it back to the Indians to let it become the Red Man’s Burden.

Arcadia Tribune (Arcadia, California) Jul 20, 1936

THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN

President Truman has announced that he is considering asking congress for legislation to permit the entry of European refugees — including Jews — to the United States.

How congress will react to this is a matter for speculation, but it is to be hoped that it will be rejected.

From a humanitarian standpoint we will admit that the victims of the World War should be assisted, but it should be in a way of repatriation rather than absorption.

Not so long ago we had an acute unemployment problem in this country, and it is not impossible that it should recur. What it would be if millions of Europeans were received into this country, no one can foretell. It would certainly require more than a glorified WPA, for most of the refugees would be penniless, and would have to  be provided with housing and maintenance until they could become established.

In view of the disturbance which is now in progress in Palestine, it would seem that the admission of Jews would be taking on a problem with which Great Britain has been unable to cope. We might be inviting an explosive situation such as is now besetting the Holy Land.

Somehow Uncle Sam has fallen heir to a large proportion of the white man’s burden of the entire world. We not only financed and furnished munitions and material for our allies in the late war, but have since made them loans, and now the President proposes to adopt all the unfortunates of war-torn Europe.

If the people of the United States are not to be brought to the economic level of Chinese collies, they will have to demand that Uncle Sam quit playing the role of Santa Claus.

Daily Inter Lake (Kalispell, Montana) Aug 17, 1946

J.A. Livingston
Three Major Crises For John Kennedy
[Excerpt]

RECOVERY OR RECESSION

Next week, Secretary of the Treasury Anderson will personally ask Chancellor Adenauer, of West Germany to assume more of the “white man’s” burden and, thus, relieve the drain on U.S. gold. The central bank of West Germany has reduced its discount rate from 5 per cent to 4 per cent in order to discourage the flow of investment funds from the U.S.

2. The new president will have to decide whether the nation is in a recession or recovery is just around the corner. More than 5,000,000 persons will be out of jobs when Kennedy assumes office. Then outdoor work on farms, construction, and the railroads will be at a seasonal low. As many as seven persons out of every hundred may be seeking work.

Mr. Kennedy, therefore, will have to decide whether to cut taxes to stimulate retail sales (see chart), or initiate hurried public works to provide jobs, or both. Such expansionary efforts will unbalance the budget and aggravate international worry about:

3. The soundness of the dollar. Even the richest nation in the world can bite off more economics than it can handle. In recent post-war years, high defense outlays, aid to under-developed nations, and federal social undertakings have overreached taxes. Collectively, as well as individually, Americans have been living on the installment plan.

Big Spring Daily Herald (Big Spring, Texas) Nov 13, 1960

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Previous White Man’s Burden post.

The Curtain Falls – Creator of “Boots” is Dead

June 25, 2011

Creator of ‘Boots’ Is Dead;
Started Comic Strip in 1924

By ERNEST LYNN
(NEA Service, Inc.)

A great career in the world of comic strips came to a close with the death Aug. 30 in Clearwater, Fla., of Edgar E. Martin.

More than 36 years ago a handsome, slender, blond young man brought to the nation’s newspapers the girl who was to become known as the “Sweetheart of the Comics.” She was called “Boots,” star character of the daily comic strip “Boots and Her Buddies” and the Sunday page “Boots.” The man was Edgar Martin, nicknamed “Abe” by his friends.

At the time of his death, Boots was running in nearly 700 daily and Sunday newspapers, and was followed every day by millions of readers. She exerted a profound influence on women’s fashions.

Martin was born in Indianapolis, Ind., July 6, 1898. Early in his boyhood his family moved to Nashville, Tenn., and then to Monmouth, Ill., where his father was a professor at Monmouth College.

*  *  *

As a freshman Martin used to draw grasshoppers, lizards and frogs in his father’s biology classes. He quit in his junior year to enter the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago. He joined Newspaper Enterprise Association in 1921.

At first he drew several comics with varying success. When NEA told him it wanted a girl strip he swung into action and, on February 18, 1924, he came up with the strip that was to bring him fame.

Originally Martin featured four girls in the strip, but soon two of them were dropped. Cora, a school teacher, remained true to type, while Boots was developed into a glamour girl.

Dressing Boots in the latest fashions became a hobby, with him. He attended style shows, read all the fashion magazines, and developed a style sense that the designers of feminine finery often copied. When he gave Boots a new haircut in 1926 and called it the “Boots Bob,” it was a nationwide “click” and was endorsed by leading hairdressers in New York and other cities.

*  *  *

When Cora, with whom Boots had been living, was married to Prof. Stephen Tutt in 1927, Boots moved in with them. In early days Martin’s comic had its greatest following among high school and college students. They loved his glamour girl, delighted in her numerous romances.

Martin introduced a new character in 1927, popular Pug, who grew up to be one of the best-liked teen-agers in the comics. Boots, the much sought-after belle, remained in single blessedness until readers began demanding wedding bells. In 1945 Martin married her to a Texan named Rodney Ruggles and the strip became a family strip. A son was born in 1946, on the Fourth of July. Once more Boots’ great army of followers showed their interest by besieging Martin with suggestions for a name for the baby. David won by a big vote. Pug became an established member of Boots’ family when her father’s yacht was lost at sea with all on board.

*  *  *

Nearly every successful comic artist has one or more assistants. Martin was unusual in that he insisted on drawing and writing his strip himself. He finally turned the Sunday paper over to an assistant, but the daily was another matter. He felt so close to the numerous characters, all highly individualized, that he had to do the job himself. Much of Martin’s own character was expressed in the strip, especially in the person of Boots’ brother Billy, who disappeared from the strip some years ago.

Many people said Edgar Martin really was portraying himself in the character of Billy. Martin never admitted this, but he and Billy did have the same fine courtesy and courtly manners. Both were always every inch the gentleman.

Martin lived in Cleveland, headquarters for NEA, for many years. He and his family moved to Clearwater about 20 years ago. He is survived by his widow, Margery, three married daughters and five grandchildren.

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Sep 6, 1960

‘Boots’ Ends Comic Strip Career in Tribune Today

One of the nation’s great comic strips is leaving the daily entertainment scene today.

Edgar E. Martin, creator of “Boots and Her Buddies,” died Aug. 30. His daily strip comes to an end with the conclusion of the current sequence on today’s comic page.

There is symbolism in the falling leaf in the final picture, and in the caption, “The Curtain Falls.” For the curtain has fallen on a daily drama which has entertained the American public for more than 36 years.

Replacing “Boots” in The Tribune will be “The Story of Martha Wayne,” beginning on Monday.

This is a return engagement for this true-to-life narrative, which made a brief appearance in this newspaper several years ago.

Although some Sunday comic pages will continue to carry “Boots” as drawn by Lester Carroll, Martin’s assistant, the Newspaper Enterprise Assn. which syndicates the strip has decided against having the daily version carried on by another artist.

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Oct 15, 1960

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Wisconsin Rapids Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin) Oct 15, 1960