Posts Tagged ‘1965’

Sometimes I Wonder…

October 10, 2012

Foreign Aid for our Foreign “Friends”?

The Valley Independent (Monessen, Pennsylvania) Dec 23, 1965

Christopher Columbus Day

October 8, 2012

Edwardsville Intelligencer (Edwardsville, Illinois) Oct 15, 1965

Christopher Columbus discovered America 426 years ago. The kaiser discovered it just about 425 years later, and to show his contempt for Spain he sinks an occasional ship of King Alfonso’s fleet.

New Castle News (New Castle, Pennsylvania) Oct 28, 1918

Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California) Oct 12, 1921

The Rowin’ Rowes: Whiskey, Shotguns and Stones

April 28, 2010

Originally, this was going to be a “Hump Day Humor” post because this article was so absurd it made me laugh. But… as I starting looking for more information about this father, daughter, and other family members, it seemed they didn’t need a laugh, they needed Alcoholics Anonymous and Anger Management Classes.

DAUGHTER AND FATHER FINED, DRUNK CHARGE

William Rowe and Elsie Rowe, Of Dry Run, Have Suit In City Court Today

Father and daughter supplied the sensation in city court this morning when William Rowe and his 20 year-old daughter, Elsie of Dry Run were arraigned before Justice Richard Duffeffy on the charge of being drunk and disorderly.

The two were found guilty and fined $10 and costs each. The father went to jail while the girl’s fine was paid by a younger brother due to the fact that the girl is the unwedded mother of two small children.

The pair were arrested by Deputy Sheriff Charles E. Cushwa Sunday afternoon after Mrs. Mary Host and Harold Mills had telephoned headquarters that Elsie and her father threatened them with a shotgun. Mrs. Host said she had called at the Rowe home for her husband.

Daily Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland) Aug 1, 1927

News From Neighboring Counties
WASHINGTON COUNTY

BLAME PAIR FOR FATAL STONING
Hagerstown — George William Rowe, 50, farmer residing in the Dry Run district near Clearspring, was stoned to death early Tuesday night, allegedly by his niece, Elsie Rowe, 25, and nephew, George Rowe, 15, following an argument.

The young pair was arrested Tuesday night about 9 o’clock at their home by Deputy Sheriff Emmert Daley, and after questioning, are reported to have admitted the fatal attack.

Gettysburg Times – Jun 1, 1933

Two Released After Probe Of Death Of George Rowe

Jury Unable to Determine Cause of Death of Dry Run Man — Inquest Held at Clearspring

That George Rowe, 45, came to his death from unknown causes during a fight with his niece, Elsie Rowe, 25, in the Dry Run section the evening of May 20, was the verdict of a coroner’s jury investigating the death at Clearspring yesterday afternoon. George T. Prather was foreman of the jury of inquest presided over by Magistrate Charles Kreigh, acting coroner.

Elsie Rowe and her brother, George Rowe, 15, arrested the night of the fatal mishap by Deputy Emmert Daley, were ordered released. Further action, if any, will be taken by the November grand jury when facts in the case will be presented to them.

Dr. Ralph Stauffer and Dr. D.A. Watkins, physicians who performed an autopsy over Rowe’s body, testified that Rowe suffered no fractures or other injuries in the fight which could have caused death. The only fracture found by the physicians was a broken shoulder.

John Irvin testified that he saw the youth and young woman chase Rowe from their home, stoning him as they gave pursuit. He also said he saw them in a clinch before the elder Rowe fell to the road. Another witness said he saw the woman drag Rowe to the side of the road.

Rowe, who had been living on the Clyde Ankeney farm, visited the younger Rowes in the early afternoon of May 30. They consumed liquor during the afternoon, the woman said, and about 7 o’clock they engaged in an argument which subsequently led to the alleged fight.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jun 2, 1933

Man Held In Shooting Of His Nephew

Thirty-two year old George William Rowe of Clear Spring Route One was charged with assault yesterday after his nephew, Charles Wilbur Rowe, 27, was shot early Saturday morning.

State Trooper Richard Myers said George is accused of firing a shotgun at Charles at the height of a family argument.

Charles’ left arm was badly injured by the blast and a number of pellets lodged in the forearm.

The shooting took place at Charles’ grandfather’s house at Fairview in the Clear Spring section.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jan 29, 1951

CITY, AREA OBITUARIES

George William Rowe

CLEAR SPRING, Md. —

George William (Short) Rowe, 56, of Rt. 2, Clear Spring, died suddenly Friday morning at his home.

He was a life resident of Clear Spring district, a son of the late Anna Mae Smith and William Rowe.

He was a retired employe of the Mummert Canning Factory of Big Pool, Md. He was a veteran of World War II.

He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Elsie Sites of Stewartstown, Pa.

Arrangements will be announced later by the Thompson Funeral Home in Clear Spring.

Daily Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jul 20, 1974

ITEMS OF INTEREST IN COUNTY TOWNS

DRY RUN LETTER.

Mr. Denton Faith and Mr. William Rowe put out a large potato patch on Mr. Samuel Rowe’s farm.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jul 13, 1917

DRY RUN LETTER

Dry Run, Feb. 20

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rowe were callers with Mr. William Rowe and family Sunday.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Feb 26, 1930

William K. Rowe

William Kreigh Rowe, Clear Spring Route One, died at the Washington County Hospital yesterday afternoon after an illness of one day, aged 71 years.

He was born in Dry Run, the son of late Samuel T. and Catherine Dickerhoff Rowe.

He spent his entire life at farming. In his later years he had a small orchard.

He is survived by daughters, Mrs. Elsie Sites, Four Corners, Md.; Mrs. Lucy Atherton, Mercersburg Route 5; sons, George W., Clear Spring Route One; John F., Hagerstown; sisters, Mrs. Jane Wempe and Mrs. Mary Hoover, Hagerstown, and Mrs. Lucy Holderman, Harrisburg; also five grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Suter Funeral Home. Funeral announcements later.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Feb 14, 1951

1910 Census

*****

1920 Census

*****

1930 Census

Rain-Slick Fairview Brings Death To Five

[Excerpt]…a woman was killed in Clear Spring Saturday night when she ran into the path of a car….

The sixth victim was Mrs. Lucinda Vonorsdale, 51, of Main St., Clear Spring, who was killed when she ran into the path of a car Saturday night….

Mrs. Vonorsdale was born at Dry Run, Md., a daughter of the late William Rowe. She had been a lifetime resident of the Clear Spring area and a member of the Clear Spring Church of God.

She leaves sisters, Mrs. Elsie Sites, of Hagerstown, Mrs. Edna Reigel of Clear Spring; brothers, Frank Rowe of Hagerstown and George Rowe of Big Pool.

The Body was taken to the Thompson Funeral Home in Clear Spring. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Sep 13, 1965

John F. Rowe Sr.

John F. Rowe Sr., 64, of 440 Salem Ave., died Wednesday afternoon at the Washington County Hospital. He was born in Clear Spring, the son of William and Anna May Smith Rowe. He had been employed as a painter for the Jamison Cold Storage Door Co. for 35 years.

His is survived by his wife, Sarah May Long Rowe; daughters, Mrs. Mary F. Jorden of Waynesboro, Mrs. Anna M. Garlock of Leitersburg, Mrs. Nancy L. Eichelberger of Shepherdstown and Miss Linda L. Rowe of Waynesboro; sons, John F. Jr. and Jeffrey L. both at home; sister, Mrs. Elsie Sites of Stewardstown, Pa; brother, George W. Rowe of Big Spring; 8 grandchildren.

Services will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Rouzer-Gerald N. Minnich Funeral Home. The Rev. Michael L. Jones and the Rev. Daniel J. Barnhart will officiate; burial will be in the Cedar Lawn Memorial Garden.

The family will receive friends at the funeral home this evening from 7 to 9.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jun 7, 1974

Image from Find-A-Grave

Samuel T. Rowe

Samuel T. Rowe died at his home at Dry Run at 5:30 o’clock yesterday morning of heart disease at the age of 80 years.

He is survived by his wife, two sons, George and William, both of near Clearspring; daughters, Mrs. Harry Hoover, Wilsons; Mrs. A.G. Haldeman, Harrisburg and Mrs. E.H. Wempe, this city; 18 grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren.

Funeral on Saturday leaving the home at 1:30 o’clock with services in the Lutheran Church at Fairview at 2 o’clock by Rev. W.C. Huddle; interment in cemetery adjoining.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Aug 12, 1932

Mrs. Gettie Rowe

Mrs. Gettie Ruth Rowe died Friday evening at 6:45 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. B.H. Wempe, 615 Salem avenue, aged 85 years.

She was a member of the Mt. Tabor Lutheran Church at Fairview.

Surviving are: Daughters, Mrs. B.H. Wempe, Mrs. H.D. Hoover, Western Pike; Mrs. A.H. Haldeman, Harrisburg, Pa.; son, William Rowe, Clearspring; brothers, James Dickerhoff, Kansas and Simon Dickerhoff, this city. Twenty-five grandchildren and ten great grandchildren also survive.

The body may be viewed at the Kraiss mortuary.

The funeral service will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from the Mt. Tabor Church. Service by Rev. Luther L. Hare. Interment in cemetery adjoining.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Oct 15, 1937

Woman Hurts Wrist In Fall Off Ladder

Sarah Jane Wempe, 600 block Salem Avenue, fell off a ladder yesterday while washing windows and fractured her right wrist. She was treated at Washington County Hospital and discharged.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Dec 15, 1950

*****

Mrs. Sarah Jane Wempe

Mrs. Sarah Jane Wempe, 80, of 388 Key Circle, died at Washington County Hospital Tuesday after a four-day illness.

Born at Dry Run, she was the daughter of Samuel and Gettie R. (Dickerhoff) Rowe. She had spent her entire life in this area.

Mrs. Wempt was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church. Surviving are a daughter, Miss Margaret A., at home; son, Joseph F., Hagerstown; five grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Requiem mass will be Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at St. Mary’s.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) May 5, 1965

Presidents’ Day Feature: Ronald Reagan

February 15, 2010

From the Sitka Sentinel (Sitka, Alaska) Nov 5, 1980

For President’s Day, a Ronald Reagan montage: It’s just some  random things  leading up to his Landslide Presidential Victory.  The “objectivity” of these articles makes them entertaining to read; it’s really a wonder he ever got elected to anything. Evidently,  the people could read between the lines.

Gov. Ronald Reagan (Image from http://courses.csusm.edu)

$6.74 Billion Calif. Budget Proposed By Gov. Reagan

By BILL STALL
Associated Press Writer

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP)

Gov. Ronald Reagan proposed Tuesday a spartan $6.74 billion state budget which avoids a tax increase mainly by slashing the rate of welfare spending by $700 million annually.

Reagan told the California Legislature that “something must be done and done immediately” about soaring welfare and health care costs.

Proposed welfare spending in Reagan’s budget totals $2.2 billion. The state’s share would be 676.5 million — down $65.2 million from the current year.

The Republican governor’s proposed 1971-72 budget, 2 percent larger than the current one, cuts spending in many areas, hold the University of California to the current $337 million of state support and denies state workers the annual cost-of-living salary increases they have enjoyed for the past decade.

HEAVIER TEACHER LOAD

Reagan told the state’s college and university faculty members they would have to spend more time teaching to handle a heavier classroom load.

Reagan predicted in an address to the Republican state convention Sunday the budget would bring “resistance and cries of anguish.”

Referring to welfare, he said “When many snouts are threatened with forcible withdrawal from the public trough, it makes waves.”

Reagan shunned both the deficit financing of President Nixon’s new federal budget and new taxes such as those proposed by New York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller to balance his state’s $8.45 billion budget.

FACES BIG PROBLEM

California had a bigger state budget than New York when Reagan first took office four years ago.

The Republican governor faces major problems in getting the budget, and its companion reform legislation, through a legislature controlled by Democrats: 43 to 37 in the Assembly and 20 to 19 in the Senate.

Reagan will propose administrative and legislative changes that will cut welfare spending by a projected $606 million of state, county and federal funds in the budget year beginning July 1. This will be done by tightening up on eligibility and doing away with a number of allowances considered by the Reagan administration to be frills. Details will be revealed in a welfare message to go to the legislature soon.

To save another $100 million, Reagan will ask the legislature to cut back the free health care given by the state to 2.5 million welfare recipients and medically needy in California’s Medi-Cal program.

Reagan proposes to limit Medi-Cal spending to what an average citizen who pays for his own health needs lays out during a year. This is estimated at about $300 by state officials. California has been paying an average $517 for each Medi-Cal patient, Reagan said.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Feb 3, 1971

Image from the Graham Owen Gallery

Reagan Prepares For “Hawk” Tour

By BILL BOYARSKY

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) —

Gov. Ronald Reagan is getting ready for his first nationwide political tour as a full-fledged hawk on Vietnam and closer then ever to campaigning actively for the Republican presidential nomination.

Less than three weeks before his speechmaking trip through Illinois, South Carolina and Wisconsin, Reagan made his toughest statement so far on the war, asking for a sharp escalation.

“I don’t think the full technological power of the United States is being used,” Reagan told a news conference Tuesday.

He said he didn’t think nuclear weapons are needed to win but insisted “the enemy should be frightened that we might” use them.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 13, 1967

Brown: Reagan ‘Last Hope’ of Extremists

Gubernatorial Nominee Likened to Death Valley

SACRAMENTO (UPI) — Gov. Edmund G. Brown Sunday attacked his Republican opponent, actor-politician Ronald Reagan, as “the best and perhaps last hope” of right wing extremists for an attractive candidate who shares their philosophy.

In a speech prepared for a meeting of the Democratic State Central Committee, Brown said Reagan’s backers include ultra-conservatives from throughout the nation, not just California.

“They will spend whatever they must, and they will resort to whatever tactics they must,” the Democratic governor said.

“And they will do this because they know that Ronald Reagan is their best and perhaps last hope of inflicting on this nation a revolution of the right.”

Gov. Edmund G. Brown Sr. (Image from http://courses.csusm.edu)

Ignored Fight

Brown’s text concentrated on Reagan and ignored a bitter fight for selection of a new Democratic state chairman.

Committee members, almost 1,000 of them, were to choose between Mrs. Carmen Warschaw and Assemblyman Charles Warren, both of Los Angeles.

Brown is backing Mrs. Warschaw, currently the party’s southern California chairman. Lt. Gov. Glenn M. Anderson and most of the liberal wing are supporting Warren.

Supporters of Mrs. Warschaw have warned delegates that a Warren victory would be interpreted as a slap in the face of the governor. [SLAP! They chose Warren]

Brown said Reagan was trying to gloss over his earlier right-wing pronouncements. But the governor said Democrats would not let him do so.


Death Valley (Image from http://www.tripadvisor.com)

‘Quaint Place”

“The people are going to find that Mr. Reagan’s philosophy is not unlike the landscape of Death Valley — threatening, barren and forbidding. And they will not let him remodel California in that image. Death Valley might be a quaint place to visit — but who wants to live there?”

(In Santa Monica, Reagan told a news conference Saturday the Democrats were trying to tie an extremist label on him ‘because they don’t dare run on their record.”)

The governor’s prepared remarks made no mention of his proposal, unveiled Saturday, for creation of a bipartisan committee to study the controversial Rumford Open Housing Law and recommend amendments or a substitute.

Platform

The Democratic state convention, in a platform adopted a few hours after the governor made the proposal, ignored it completely.

The platform said Democrats were “ready at all times to amend or improve” civil rights laws including the Rumford Act which prohibits racial discrimination in the sale or rental of housing.

But it said the party opposes repeal of any of the laws against discrimination.

In another speech prepared for the central committee, Democratic National Committeeman Eugene L. Wyman said Reagan was basing his campaign on information fed to him by “the behavioral scientists, the pollsters and the public relations experts.”

“They tell him the Rumford Act is unpopular, and Mr. Reagan calls for its repeal,” Wyman said. “They probe for the hidden fears and prejudices of the people, and Mr. Reagan goes on television to exploit those deep-seated emotions as coldly and cynically as the extremists of the left and right who would rule by mass manipulation of the mobs.”

Nevada State Journal (Reno, Nevada) Aug 15,  1966

California GOP Leaders Fear Future

Don’t Like Reagan For Governor but Have No Candidate

WASHINGTON —

Republican fat cats met secretly in Los Angeles Dec. 17 to hear an audacious proposal from money men backing moderate George Christopher, former Mayor of San Francisco, for governor.

Christopher’s bankrollers agreed that unrestrained blood-spilling in primary elections has helped debilitate the Republican party in California. Instead of another expensive primary, they continued, the money men should agree on one candidate for Governor: George Christopher.

The audacity of this proposal stems from the fact that in statewide polls, Christopher runs far behind Hollywood actor Ronald Reagan, darling of California’s Goldwater movement. Naturally then, Reagan’s financial backer were not about to capitulate. The Dec. 17 meeting adjourned with nothing accomplished.

End Of an Era

This story illustrates the desperate straits of California moderate Republicans trying to salvage the Hiram JohnsonEarl Warren tradition in their party. The increasingly likely nomination of Reagan might well destroy whatever remains of that tradition. Yet, leading moderates looked to that Dec. 17 meeting as a last hope of beating Reagan by cutting away financial support.

Reliance on so doubtful a maneuver is part of the Cherry Orchard syndrome. After Barry Goldwater’s nomination in 1964, journalist Murray Kempton compared anti-Goldwater moderates to the impoverished Russian aristocrats in Chekhov’s play, “The Cherry Orchard” — foolishly waiting for somebody to save them as they edged inexorably toward the abyss. The Cherry Orchard analogy is equally applicable to California today.

Looked to Kuchel

Although Reagan’s candidacy was building all through 1965, the moderates waited for somebody to save them — specifically, for Sen. Thomas Kuchel to come home and run for governor. Kuchel, Earl Warren’s last political protege, kept the hope alive by refusing to say yes or no. when he finally said no in September, the moderates were left with Christopher.

A progressive who was an excellent mayor of San Francisco, Christopher failed to catch on in populous southern California during two previous losing statewide races. Many moderates believed aggressive, young state Rep. Robert Monagan, Republican leader of the state assembly, would run better against Reagan.

So progressive and excellent, he couldn’t get elected anywhere other than San Francisco!

Monagan has been the subject of a low-paced build-up since September (coming to Washington last month to see officials of the Council of Republican Organizations, a national coalition of moderate groups.) But so long as the better-known Christopher is running, Monagan is stymied.

Here again the Cherry Orchard mentality was at work. Some moderates hoped Kuchel would convince Christopher to step aside for Monagan. Based on a cordial private conversation between Richard M. Nixon and Monagan in September, other moderates hoped Nixon would do the same. These were but dreams.

Nowadays, there are even Zombies in The Cherry Orchard!  If we only had a Zombie Reagan, we could save the Cherry Orchard.

Seek Nixon’s Help

With Monagan’s candidacy still-born and Christopher determined to run hard, California’s Cherry Orchard moderates now are seeking outside help for Christopher from two influential members of the party’s old Nixon wing: Sen. George Murphy and former Nixon aide Robert Finch. Neither has much us for Reagan. Either could do him damage.

It is, however, naive to believe either will Murphy, who upset Pierre Salinger in 1964 as an apostle of party unity, sticks to that theme.The highly astute Finch is not likely to endanger his unimpeded road to the nomination for lieutenant governor and an excellent chance against the weak Democratic incumbent by attacking Reagan.

This leaves many moderates reduced to the wish that Christopher’s money men somehow will talk Reagan’s money men into quitting. They are praying Reagan will drop, or at least fail to gain in the next statewide opinion polls. Christopher’s fat cats then could argue that the polls prove Reagan has only hard-core right wing support and would be a goner against Democratic Gov. Pat Brown.

This is relying on providence. Reagan instead relies on his political management firm, Spencer, Roberts and Associates, which plans for Reagan to announce his candidacy on the same day California pollsters will have interviewers in the field. The reason publicity generated by Reagan’s announcement will help him in the polls.

Forgetting Reagan’s neanderthal ideology,** nobody can say his campaign hasn’t outplanned, out-thought, and outfought the Chekhovesque moderates. It’s 1964 all over again.

(Copyright 1965)

Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jan 5, 1966

** NEANDERTHAL?  No journalistic bias there!

Post Crescent (Appleton, WI) Jun 3, 1965

Kinda funny, the paper’s name is the Post Crescent. Supposedly, this paper leans right, according to MondoTimes. Based on the preceding article from the Post Crescent, that doesn’t really appear to be the case.

From the Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, OH) Nov 16, 1947

Who doesn’t love Shirley Temple?

1941

Ronald Reagan and Jane Wyman peddle cigarettes, and look so good doing it!

From the Nevada State Journal (Reno, NV) Aug 11, 1939

A hint of things to come? “To Keep You Safe, They Risk Their Lives!”

Ronald Reagan, the Life Saver!

From the Lima News (Lima, OH) Jul 3, 1937

Charles A. Bonfils, Husband of Winifred Black aka “Annie Laurie”

February 11, 2009

In my previous post, “Diary of a WWI Canteen Worker,” the author of the diary excerpts mentioned Charles A. Bonfils.

This first article is just something sort of random,  but following are a few articles about his first wife, Winifred Black, who also wrote under the pen name of Annie Laurie.

Excerpt from “I Remember,” by Les Claypool, in which he writes about some premonitions he had during his life, including one regarding Charles Bonfils.

Declines Trip

In 1914 I was editor of the Kansas City Weekly Post. I was planning to take some time out soon to go to Europe with Charles A. Bonfils, editor of the Daily Post. I had made reservations and all other arrangements in so far as that was possible.

One morning, on the way to work, I had a strange feeling of depression. I had the feeling that I should not go to Europe. I told Mr. Bonfils that I was canceling out and he insisted on being told why.

“I can’t tell you why,” I replied. “I have a feeling that it would be dangerous for me to go to Europe at this time.”

Mr. Bonfils went on as he had planned. In a short time World War I broke out in Europe and it made travel in Europe a serious problem. Although he normally had adequate funds and his brother, the late F.G. Bonfils, was a millionaire, Charles was stranded in Europe and had to wait quite a while for funds and his travel plans on the continent were stymied.

Valley News (Van Nuys, California) Mar 12, 1965

This is what I found about his wives, Winifred being a rather interesting person to read about:

Winifred (Sweet) Black Bonfils

Winifred (Sweet) Black Bonfils

Winifred Black Dies in Frisco
(Assoiciated Press)

San Francisco, May 25. — Mrs. Winifred Sweet Bonfils, 73, veteran newspaper woman, who wrote under the names of Annie Laurie and Winifred Black, died at her home here Monday.

Though ill for several months Mrs. Bonfils had continued her daily newspaper columns and her friends said she died as she would have wished, “Still in the harness.”

After spending her earlier years in Chicago, New York, Washington, Massachusetts and Denver she came to San Francisco 34 years ago. She had been connected with the Hearst papers for 37 years.

Mrs. Bonfils was born in Chilton, Wis., the daughter of General Benjamin Jeffrey. She attended school in Chicago and Northhampton, Mass., and married Orlow Black in June 1892.

After his death she married Charles A. Bonfils of the Denver newspaper family.

Greeley Daily Tribune (Greeley, Colorado) May 26, 1936

winifred-black-73-journalist-dead2

Click on the above news clipping  from the  May 26, 1936, New York Times for full size to read more details about her life.

Read a 1935 TIME article about Winifred online HERE.

The TIME article mentions that Winifred and Charles had been separated for years. Evidently, he waited till she died to remarry rather than divorce?

Bonfils funeral services pending

DENVER (UPI) — Funeral arrangements were pending today for Mabel W. Bonfils, widow of a one-time assistant publisher of the Denver Post.

Mrs. Bonfils died Sunday at her home following a long illness. She was 85.

She worked in the advertising department of The Post prior to her marriage to Charles A. Bonfils in 1936.

Greeley Daily Tribune (Greeley, Colorado) Jam 20, 1976