Posts Tagged ‘1974’

“… you are inviting revolution.”

September 13, 2012

Image from the Federal Reserve

Detroit Priest Criticizes Federal Reserve System
[excerpt]

He called upon congress to “recover” its constitutional powers to regulate the value and coinage of money, and added that:

“Unless you do that, you are inviting revolution.”

The Charleston Daily Mail (Charleston, West Virginia) Jan 16, 1935


Lake Park News (Lake Park, Iowa) Sep 20, 1934

Image from the Federal Reserve

ABOLITION OF FEDERAL RESERVE IS ADVOCATED

Editor of The Bee — Sir: If the isolationists wish to give direction to the government policies of the United States they should induce congress to dismantle and abolish the Federal Reserve Bank in toto and restore the United  States Treasury to the prestige it enjoyed prior to 1907.

At that time Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany ordered his bankers to get their money out of the United States and home to Germany. With that order, hell started on a rampage and where it will end is a moot question. We are not inclined to predict.

However, when a conflagration is raging, people who can are justified in taking preliminary steps at self preservation and one of these precautionary measures is to bring unresponsible agencies under disciplinary control.

The Federal Reserve Bank with its sanctions and its sanctions in reverse can do a lot of mischief. The efforts of the national administration to restore normalcy to commerce and industry are futile so long as an unauthorized agency can flout moral standards and carry on as it pleases, we use the term “unauthorized” advisedly, for when the war ended and the writ of habeas corpus was restored to the nation, Woodrow Wilson’s war time emergency acts ceased to have authority to continue their functions.

When the Democratic Party in 1932 gave the people an opportunity to vote on the socalled amendment, they voted it out. It had become nothing but a racket for the late Andrew Mellon’s personal benefit.

W.J.S.
Modesto, January 16, 1940.

Modesto Bee and Herald-News (Modesto, California) Jan 17, 1940

Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan) Mar 7, 1935

Coxey Considers Another March To Washington

CHICAGO, Sept. 19. — (INS) — “Coxey’s Army” may march again.

That was the admonition today of “Gen.” Jacob S. Coxey who led the march of unemployed from Massillon, O., to Washington, in 1894.

The 91-year-old “General” told a meeting of 16, the Mothers of America, Inc., that he is prepared to encamp in Washington until someone introduces his bill to abolish the Federal Reserve system.

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Sep 19, 1945

Lima News (Lima, Ohio) Jul 14, 1956

Delaware County Daily Times (Chester, Pennsylvania) May 10, 1974

Women’s Equality Day

August 26, 2012

Yuma Daily Sun (Yuma, Arizona) Aug 26, 1977

Women’s equality day proclaimed

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Nixon has proclaimed Aug 26 as Women’s Equality Day and urged speedy ratification of the Equal Rights amendment to the Constitution.

The proclamation, requested by Congress, said the nation has made giant strides in recent years toward ensuring equal economic opportunity for women.

“Much still remains to be done,” Nixon said.

Walla Walla Union Bulletin (Walla Walla, Washington) Aug 19, 1973

The Times Herald (Vallejo, California) Aug 23, 1974

Simpson’s Leader-Times (Kittanning, Pennsylvania) Aug 21, 1975

Yuma Daily Sun (Yuma, Arizona) Aug 26, 1976

Valley News (Van Nuys, California) Aug 25 ,1977

Eat Your Peas

February 22, 2012

Eat Your Peas

Abilene Morning News (Abilene, Texas) Jun 11, 1935

HELPFUL HINTS

Eat your peas with honey,
I have done it all my life;
They do taste kind of funny,
But it keeps them on the knife.

Daily News (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania) Aug 19, 1948

Eat Your Peas

Daily Review (Hayward, California) Aug 30, 1955

Eat Your Peas

Oneota Star (Oneota, New York) Sep 20, 1963

Eat Your Peas

Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Jul 18, 1967

*****

Eat Your Peas

Danville Register (Danville, Virginia) Feb 20, 1969

*****

Eat Your Peas

Anderson Herald (Anderson, Indiana) Dec 20, 1969

*****

 

The Hayakawa column
Law, economics and sin
By S.I. Hayakawa

Aldous Huxley once wrote: “The consistency of human behavior … is due to the fact that men have formulated their desires, and subsequently rationalized them, in terms of words … If it were not for the descriptive and justificatory words with which we bind our days together, we should live like the animals in a series of discreet and separate spurts of impulse.”

Thus, indeed, do we bind our days together. Whether you describe yourself as “machinist,” “policeman,” or “teacher,” you don’t always feel like being a machinist or policeman or teacher. There are days when you would far rather be doing something else. But we continue with our jobs, held there by the words which define our role in life.

Law is the mighty collective effort made by human beings to organize that degree of orderly and uniform behavior that makes society possible.

Law and science are very different from each other. What science predicts (“ice will melt at temperatures above 32 degrees Fahrenheit”) comes true independent of our wishes. What law predicts (“Persons convicted of murder will be hanged.”) comes true only if we are determined to do what we said we would do. At the basis of law is our determination to observe conjunction.

Language of the law is of necessity, therefore, in part a kind of sermonizing. In addition to prescribing certain forms of behavior, it must create in us the will and the desire to follow the prescription. This fact makes the judge, to a large degree, a preacher. The trial is a kind of morality play.

The art of preaching has its own pitfalls. Sermons are almost always faded at a higher level of generalization and with a greater dogmatism than the immediate situation calls for. The reasons for this are largely rhetorical: to get attention and to impress the sermon firmly in the hearer’s mind.

To reduce this matter to a simple example, let us suppose that the purpose of a given directive is to get Junior to eat his peas. If the simple demand, “Junior, eat your peas,” does not work, one proceeds immediately to a sermon on the subject: “Vegetables are good for you,” and “All growing boys should eat plenty of vegetables.”

In other words, the demand that Junior eat his peas is asserted to be not merely a passing whim, but the particularization of a general nutritive principle.

If Junior still leaves his peas untouched, one appeals to history: “You grandfather was a vegetarian and he lived to the age of 99,” and, “Sailors in the old sailing ships used to die of scurvy because they didn’t get enough fresh vegetables.” From here on it is but a short jump to say that God intended that peas be eaten and father be obeyed.

But the great principles we enunciate on one day prove to be extremely inconvenient on another day, as inevitably they must, since they state it so much more than was necessary to begin with.

So, as Father himself leaves untouched his carrots — and raisin salad a few days later, he can say, if challenged: “what I was arguing for all along is not vegetables as such, but a balanced diet — as it is possible to achieve balance without this particular salad. A man can’t keep going on rabbit food. Do you know that millions in Asia are suffering from protein deficiency because they get nothing but vegetables to eat?”

Thus do fathers keep all bases covered and maintain fiction with infallible wisdom. And if the layman regards the law with a mixture of exaggerated respect and exaggerated distrust, is it not because lawyers and judges perform on a large scale as the rest of us do daily?

I write these words as President Ford’s economic summit conference draws to a close. One gets the impression, hearing the summaries of the proceedings, that economics, like law, is not so much a science as it is a branch of homiletic, or the art of preaching.

One speech after another tells us how to save ourselves from inflation, which has come upon us as punishment for our economic sins.

Salvation lies, we are told, in rigid controls over prices and wages — or no controls at all; in relaxing the federal regulation of business; in giving the consumer greater protection; in lower taxes for the poor; in high taxes for everybody; in a balanced budget; in a more abundant flow of money; in eliminating (or increasing) depletion allowances and subsidies.

There are as many economic doctrines as there are Protestant sects, which goes to show that  while economics as a science is not doing well, economics as a religion is doing just fine.

Idaho Free Press (Nampa, Idaho) Oct 5, 1974

Having kids means having to say all the things you swore you’d never say
[excerpt]

I also know why parents don’t make great conversationalists. They only know a few familiar words and phrases: Don’t slam the door. Turn off the lights. Don’t interrupt. Quit running around the house. Close the refrigerator door. Pick up your room. Did you flush the toilet? Eat your peas. Think of the starving people in …

The Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) Apr 20, 1987

Eat Your Peas

The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) May 31, 1989

Offer Choices.
[excerpt]

Children need lots of experience in making their own decisions, and living with the consequences. “Would you like to eat your peas now?” does not encourage a “yes.” A much better technique is, “Would you rather have peas first or carrots first?” Early on, before babies can talk, find ways to offer good choices. As children grow, increase the number and complexity of their options. when toddlers (or grown-ups) feel they have some control over what happens to them, they are much more likely to be kind and friendly.

The Gettysburg Times (Gettsyburg, Pennsylvania) Sep 5, 1996

Image from ARRA News Service

Let’s Move!

Now,  Eat Your Peas!

In The Attic with Wilbur D. Nesbit

June 27, 2011

Image by Janet Kruskanp.

I had originally planned to post this with the other “dolls in the attic” poem (see previous post) but after doing some  research on Wilbur D, Nesbit, I decided to separate the poems so I could include more about him and his work.

IN THE ATTIC.

Up in the attic where mother goes
is a trunk in a shadowed nook —
A trunk — and its lid she will oft unclose
As it were a precious book.
She kneels at its side on the attic boards
And tenderly, soft and slow,
She counts all the treasures she fondly hoards —
The things of the long ago.

A yellow dress, once the sheerest white
That shimmered in joyous pride —
She looks at it now with the girl’s delight,
That was hers when she stood a bride.
There is a ribbon of faded blue —
She keeps with the satin gown;
Buckles and lace — and a little shoe;
Sadly she lays that down.

One lock of hair that is golden still
With the gold of the morning sun;
Yes, and a dollie with frock and frill —
She lifts them all one by one.
She lifts them all to her gentle lips
Up there in the afternoon;
Sometimes the rain from the eave trough drips
Tears with her quavered croon.

Up in the attic where mother goes
is a trunk in a shadowed place —
A trunk — with the scent of a withered rose
On the satin and shoe and lace.
None of us touches its battered lid,
But safe in its niche it stays
Scared to all that her heart had his —
Gold of the other days.

— W.D. Nebsit in Chicago Tribune.

New Castle News ( New Castle, Pennsylvania) Oct 28, 1904

Wilbur D. Nebsit was also the author of An Alphabet of History, the FRANKLIN image above taken from the book, which can be viewed/read on the Open Library website. I linked the Google book version of this book in my The Unknown Blue and Gray post, which also includes his poem by the same name.

*  *  *  *  *

A very brief Masonic Bio can be found HERE. Some of his Freemason poetry can be found HERE.

Below are  some articles that give a little more insight:

Image from The Indianapolis Star – Apr 4, 1914

RACE DRAWS LARGE GROUP OF WRITERS

Scribes From Afar Arrive to Describe Speed Battle for Papers and Journals.

The 500-mile Motor Speedway race has drawn men from two continents, whose names are known to the world of letters. These men will relate the human interest tale of the struggle of men and steel machines against time and danger in the columns of publications throughout the world. Gellett Burgess is one of the many who will pen the history of the race.

Wilbur D. Nesbit, author of poems, comic operas and books, is another. He will write the story of the race for Harper’s Weekly….

The Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Indiana) May 30, 1912

CHICAGO HOOSIERS ELECT.

Wilbur D. Nesbit Made President of Indiana Society.

Wilbur D. Nesbit, the well-known bard, was elected president during his absence in New York….

The Indianapolis Star – Jan 17, 1912

*  *  *  *  *

I clipped this particle biographical sketch from a book on Ancestry.com:

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. Indiana and Indianans : a history of aboriginal and territorial Indiana and the century of statehood [database on-line]. Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: Dunn, Jacob Piatt,. Indiana and Indianans : a history of aboriginal and territorial Indiana and the century of statehood. Chicago: American Historical Society, 1919.
Image from the Culver-Union Township Public Library websiteCulver Through the Years
*  *  *  *  *
The following poem by Wilbur D. Nesbit appeared in The Indianapolis Star as part of:
the remarkable sermon delivered by Wilbur D. Nesbit, the famous Hoosier writer, in the Mt. Vernon Methodist Episcopal pulpit at Baltimore last Sunday…
A handful of dust, that is blown by the wind
That is sporting with whatever thing it may find.
It goes swirling and whirling and scattering on
Till it puffs into nothingness — then it is gone —
A handful of dust.
It may be a king who of old held his rule
O’er a country forgotten — it may be his fool
Who had smiles on his lips and had tears in his heart;
But the king, or the fool; who may tell them apart
In a handful of dust?
It may be some man who was mighty and proud,
Or a beggar, who trembled and crept through the crowd;
Or a woman who laughed, or a woman who wept,
Or a miser — but centuries long have they slept
In a handful of dust.

It may be a rose that once burst into flame,
Or a maiden who blushed as she whispered a name
To its ruby-red heart — and her lips were as read —
But no one remembers the words that she said,
In this handful of dust.

A handful of dust — it is death, it is birth.
It is naught; it is all since the first day of earth;
It is life, it is love, it is laughter and tears —
And it holds all the mystery lost in the years —
A handful of dust.

The Indianapolis Star — Jun 15, 1913
Call of “30” for Poet
Wilbur D. Nesbit, vice-president of the Wm. H. Rankin and Company Advertising Agency, and an author of renown, died Saturday at the Iroquois hospital in Chicago, thirty minutes after he had collapsed on the street.
During his career, Nesbit had served as humorous writer on the old Inter-Ocean, the Chicago Tribune, Baltimore American and the Chicago Evening Post. In more recent years he had allied himself with an advertising agency, but was a frequent contributor to magazines and had acquired much fame as an after-dinner speaker. As a poet, he ranked with the best. One of his finest contributions, which will always endear his name to the patriotic people, was entitled “Your Flag and My Flag.” This poem appeared in the Baltimore American in 1902, and was circulated throughout the country during the World war. A verse will not be amiss at this time:
“Your flag and my flag,
And how it flies today,
In your land and my land
And half a world away!
Rose-red and blood -red
The stripes forever gleam;
Snow-white and soul-white
The good forefathers’ dream.”
Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, Wisconsin) Aug 23, 1927
Famous Folk
Wilbur Dick Nesbit, the poet and journalist, whose first novel, “The Gentleman Ragman,” has just been published, was born in Xenia, O., in 1871. He began his career as printer and later worked as a reporter. His reputation has been won largely as a contributor of verse to magazines.
While Nesbit was finishing “The Gentleman Ragman” he was spending a few weeks in a country town in Indiana. He had sent nearly all of the revised manuscript to his publishers, but certain details of the completion of the plot had been the subject of discussion between himself and a friend connected with the publishing house.
One day a telegram for Nesbit was received at the village telegraph office. It read:
“What are you going to do about Annie Davis and Pinkney Sanger?”
Annie is the heroine of “The Gentleman Ragman;” Pinkney is the villain, if there is one in the book. The local telegraph operator personally delivered the message, and Nesbit wrote this reply:
“Will marry Annie Davis and shoot Pinkney Sanger as soon as I return to Chicago.”
The operator stared at Nesbit wonderingly when he read the message, but Nesbit did not fathom that stare until the morning when he took the train for home, when the village marshal stepped up and said meaningly:
“Mr. Nesbit, I would advise you, as an officer of the law, sir, not to do anything rash when you get to Chicago.”
Cambridge Jeffersonian (Cambridge, Ohio) Dec 20, 1906
The above poem is signed with Wilbur D. Nesbit‘s alternate nom de plumeJosh Wink. (see mention in below article.)
Bedford Gazette (Bedford, Pennsylvania) Apr 25, 1902

Des Moines Daily Leader (Des Moines, Iowa) Oct 13, 1901
*   *   *   *
RAY HIGGINS:
Cracker Barrel
WILBUR DICK NESBIT expounded a brand of patriotism that seems to have fallen out of fashion in the current age when draft dodgers become folk heroes and the American flag is publicly despoiled.
Born in Xenia Sept. 16, 1871, the son of a Civil War veteran and court bailiff here, he grew up in Cedarville where he learned to set type on the old Cedarville Herald in which paper his first wrtings appears.
After two years he went to an Anderson, Ind. papers as a reporter, then to the Muncie (Ind.) Star in a similar capacity. There his copy attracted the attention of John T. Brush, an Indianapolis clothing merchant, who put him in charge of his store advertising.
From there he joined the ad staff of the Indianapolis Journal and next became a feature writer for the Baltimore American under the nom de plume Josh Wind [k]. After three years he was lured to the staff of the Chicago Tribune where he conducted the column “A Line O’ Type Or Two” and then joined the Evening Post.
*   *   *
AFTER HE BECAME director of the copy staff for the Makin Advertising Co. he bought an interest in it and changed the name to Rankin Advertising Agency. HE co-authored the musical comedy “The Girl of My Dreams” and turned out reams of poetry in some of which he collaborated with cartoonist Clare Briggs.
His collection, “Trail to Boyland,” reminisced about Greene County and Cedarville in the pastoral patern of James Whitcomb Riley. He also published “After Dinner Speeches and How to Make Them,” “Sermons in Song,” and “Poems of Homely Philosophy.” His “Your Flag and My Flag” was recited in most school classrooms.
Nesbit died Aug. 20, 1927. Recently his friend and admirer, ex-Cedarvillian, Fred F. Marshall, came up with his timely and appropriate poem entitled “The U.S.A.,” which follows:
There’s them that wants to get us skeered
By tellin’ us o’ things they feared.
They say we’re goin’ to th’ dogs,
Th’ gov’nment has skipped some cogs
An’ that ef we don’t trust to them
Our futur’ wont be worth a dem!
But I want to say
Th’ U.S.A.
Ain’t figgerin’ to run that way.
I’ve noticed things fer many years;
I’ve seen these men arousin’ cheers —
These high-hat men with long-tail coats
That tells us how to cast our votes,
I’ve noticed, too, their idees is
That votin’s all the people’s biz
But I want to say
Th’ U.S.A.
Ain’t only jest election day.

I’ve seen ’em lift their trimblin’ arm
An do their p’intin’ with alarm
Afore election! An’ I’ve seen
How they don’t do much work between
Elections! Seem to save their brains
For workin’ durin’ th’ campaigns
An’ I want to say
The U.S.A.
Don’t give them fellers its O.K.

There’s one or two that I wont name
That keeps a firm hand-holt on Fame
By stormin’ up an’ down the road
A-tellin’ us what long we’ve knowed
That is, they rise to heights sublime
Along about election time
Yit I want to say
The U.S.A.
Ain’t figured yit to turn their way.

It ain’t th’ men that tells our sins
That almost al’ays sometimes wins —
Its them that rolls their sleeves an’ helps
While these yere talkin’ humans yelps
That makes us know our native land
Has got a craw that’s full o’ sand
An’ makes us say
The U.S.A
Is settin’ tight an’ here to stay!

Xenia Daily Gazette (Xenia, Ohio)  Nov 2, 1972

Dust Off the Old Waffle Iron

June 29, 2010

Today is National Waffle Iron Day!

GRIDDLE-CAKES, WAFFLES, ETC.

If you have not used your griddle or waffle-iron for some time; wash it off hard with hot soap and water; wipe and rub well with dry salt. Heat it and grease with a bit of fat salt pork on a fork.

It is a mistake, besides being slovenly and wasteful, to put on more grease than is absolutely necessary to prevent the cake from sticking.

A piece of pork an inch square should last for several days. Put on a great spoonful of butter for each cake, and before filling the griddle, test it with a single cake, to be sure that all is right with it as well as the batter.

The same rules apply to waffles. Always lay hot cakes and waffles upon a hot plate as soon as baked.

Indiana Progress (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Feb 17, 1874

RAISED FLOUR WAFFLES.

Stir into a quart of flour sufficient lukewarm milk to make a thick batter. The milk should be stirred in gradually, so as to have it free from lumps. Put in a table-spoonful of salt, and half a tea-cup of yeast.

When risen, fill your waffle irons with the batter, bake them on a bed of coals.

When they have been on the fire between two and three minutes, turn the waffle irons — when brown on both sides, they are sufficiently baked.

The waffle irons should be well greased with lard, and very hot, before one is put in.

The waffles should be buttered as soon as cooked. Serve them up with powdered white sugar and cinnamon.

Title: The Ladies’ National Magazine, Volumes 7-8
Publisher: C. J. Peterson, 1845
(Google book LINK Pg 178)

WAFFLES.

We are indebted to the Germans for this cake, which, if this receipt is exactly followed, will be found excellent. Warm a quart of milk, and cut up in it a quarter of a pound of the best fresh butter, and stir it about to soften in the warm milk. Beat eight eggs till very thick and smooth, and stir them gradually into the milk and butter, in turn with half a pound of sifted flour. Then add two table-spoonfuls of strong fresh brewer’s or baker’s yeast. Cover the pan with a clean thick cloth, and set it in a warm place to rise.

When the batter has risen nearly to the top, and is covered with bubbles, it is time to bake; first stirring in a wine-glass of rose-water. Having heated your waffle iron in a good fire, grease it inside with the fresh butter used for the waffle mixture, or with fresh lard; fill it, and shut the iron closely. Turn it on the fire, that both sides of the cake may be equally well done. Each side will require about three minutes baking. Take them out of the iron by slipping a knife underneath. Then grease and prepare the iron for another waffle. Butter them, and send them to the tea-table “hot and hot;” and, to eat with this, a bowl or glass dish of sugar flavored with powdered cinnamon.

In buying waffle irons choose them very deep, so as to make a good impression when baked — if shallow, the waffle will look thin and poor. Those that bake one waffle at a time are the handsomest and most manageable.

Title: Miss Leslie’s New Cookery Book
Author: Eliza Leslie
Publisher: T. B. Peterson, 1857
(Google book LINK, pgs. 441-442)


RICE WAFFLES.

Two cupfuls flour, one-half teaspoonful salt, one teaspoonful baking powder, one egg beaten separately, one tablespoonful butter, one cupful milk, one cupful cold boiled rice, one-half cup of the water in which the rice was boiled. Sift the dry ingredients into a bowl; make a hole in the center, into which put the rice and the rice water. Add the well beaten yolk of the egg, the milk and melted butter. Stir until thoroughly mixed. Lastly, fold in the white of the egg beaten to a still froth.

Fry in a well greased waffle iron.

Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Mar 23, 1899

To make rice waffles take a teacup and a half of rice that has been well boiled, and warm in a pint of rich milk, stirring it till smooth and mixed. Then removed it from the fire, and stir in a pint of cold milk and a teaspoonful of salt. Beat four eggs very light, and stir them into the mixture, in turn, with sufficient rice flour to make a thick batter.

Bake in a waffle-iron.

Send them to the table hot, butter them, and eat them with powdered sugar and cinnamon, prepared in a small bowl for the purpose.

Indiana Progress (Indiana, Pennsylvania) Mar 27, 1873

How to Make Good Waffles.

Boil and mash about a pint of sweet potatoes. Sift one good teaspoonful of soda with three cups of flour. Beat two eggs light. Add one teaspoonful salt and sour milk enough to make a thin batter. Have the waffle-iron as hot as possible without burning the waffles.

Woodland Daily Democrat (Woodland, California) Mar 24, 1890

GERMAN WAFFLES.

1 quart flour, 1/2 teaspoonful salt, 3 tablespoonfuls sugar, 2 large teaspoonfuls Royal Baking Powder, 2 tablespoonfuls lard, rind of 1 lemon, grated, 1 teaspoonful Royal Extract Cinnamon, 4 eggs and 1 pint thin cream. Sift together flour, sugar, salt and powder; rub in lard cold; add beaten eggs, lemon rind, extract and milk. Mix into smooth, rather thick batter.

Bake in hot waffle iron, serve with sugar flavored with Royal Extract of Lemon.

***

SOFT WAFFLES.

1 quart flour, 1/2 teaspoonful salt, 1 teaspoonful sugar, 2 teaspoonfuls Royal Baking Powder, 1 large tablespoonful butter, 2 eggs, 1 1/2 pints milk.

Sift together flour, salt, sugar and powder; rub in butter cold; add beaten eggs and milk; mix into smooth consistent batter that will run easily and limpid from mouth of pitcher.

Have waffle-iron hot and carefully greased each time; fill 2-3, close it up, when brown turn over.

Sift sugar on them, serve hot.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) May 25, 1895

South African Wafels.

South African “wafels” vastly differ from our waffles merely in being made with wine as a “moistener” rather than with milk for the principal liquid ingredient.

In South Africa when they are going to make “wafels” they take a pound of flour, three-quarters of a pound of butter, half a pound of sugar, eight eggs, half a pint of wine and a teaspoonful of sifted cinnamon. The butter and eggs are creamed; then they mix in alternately one egg and one spoonful of flour, add the wine and spice and bake in a waffle iron.

Eau Claire Leader (Eau Claire, Wisconsin) May 10, 1903

CREAM WAFFLES.

Put into a bowl two cupfuls of sifted flour, three and a half level teaspoonfuls of baking powder and half a teaspoonful of salt. Beat the yolks of two eggs and add to them one and one quarter cupfuls of milk and then the flour mixture. Beat until smooth one teaspoonful of melted butter and the whites of two eggs whipped stiff.

Cook on a hot, greased waffle iron and serve with maple sirup.

The waffles should be thin and crisp.

The Daily Review ( Decatur, Illinois) May 14, 1904

Tomato Waffles

Pare six medium-sized ripe tomatoes, chop very fine and add one teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, one tablespoon butter melted after measuring; sift one-half teaspoon soda in a little flour to make the mixture like a thin griddle cake batter; have your waffle iron very hot, grease both under and upper lids, place a small tablespoon of the batter into each section, close the lid upon it and bake at least one minute on each side; when serving, cut the sections apart and arrange on a napkin.

This makes a novel and delicious entree.

Title: Good Living and How to Prepare it
Authors    King’s Daughters of Iowa, King’s Daughters of Iowa. Circle No. One (Oskaloosa)
Publisher: Hedge-Wilson Co., 1905
(Google book LINK pg. 113)

Waffles, Southern Style.

Mix and sift one and three-fourths cupfuls of flour, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one-half teaspoonful of salt, add gradually one cupful of milk, the yolks of two eggs well beaten, one tablespoonful of melted butter and the white of two eggs beaten stiff.

Cook on a greased hot waffle iron and serve at once with maple syrup.

A waffle iron should fit closely on the range, be well heated on the one side, turned, heated on the other side, and thoroughly greased before the iron is filled. In filling put a tablespoonful of the batter in each compartment near the centre of the iron, cover, and the mixture will spread to just fill the iron. If sufficiently heated, it needs to be turned almost as soon as filled and covered.

Trenton Times (Trenton, New Jersey) Sep 14, 1906

Recipes For Waffles.

(By Mrs. J.M. Fine)

One-half cup of cornstarch, two cups of flour, three teaspoons of baking powder, one teaspoon of salt, three eggs, well beaten, one and one-half cups of sweet milk, three tablespoons of melted butter, one tablespoon of Karo corn syrup.

Mix to a thin batter.

Have waffle iron very hot before pouring in the batter.

Witchita Daily Times (Wichita Falls, Texas) Sep 3, 1914

Buckwheat Waffles.

2 cups buckwheat flour.
1/2 teaspoon salt.
4 teaspoons baking powder.
2 tablespoons molasses.
2 cups milk.
1 tablespoon melted fat.
2 eggs, beaten separately.

Mix and sift dry ingredients. Add molasses, milk, melted fat and eggs.

Heat waffle iron and grease well, put a tablespoon of mixture in each compartment, cover and cook, turn occasionally until crisp and brown.

Serve with syrup.

These may be cooked on a griddle if a waffle iron is not available.

Fitchburg Daily Sentinel (Fitchburg, Massachusetts) Jun 17, 1918

The chocolate nut waffles are made by sifting together 2 cups of pastry flour, 1/3 cup of sugar, 1/3 cup of ground chocolate or 3 tablespoons of cocoa, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon salt. Beat 2 egg yolks and add 1 1/4 cups of milk. Stir liquids into dry ingredients and add 1/2 cup melted butter. Fold in stiffly-beaten egg whites and 1/2 cup finely-chopped nuts and bake in hot waffle iron. This makes 7 or 8 large waffles.

Centralia Chronicle Advertiser (Centralia, Washington) Apr 24, 1936


The Rowin’ Rowes: Whiskey, Shotguns and Stones

April 28, 2010

Originally, this was going to be a “Hump Day Humor” post because this article was so absurd it made me laugh. But… as I starting looking for more information about this father, daughter, and other family members, it seemed they didn’t need a laugh, they needed Alcoholics Anonymous and Anger Management Classes.

DAUGHTER AND FATHER FINED, DRUNK CHARGE

William Rowe and Elsie Rowe, Of Dry Run, Have Suit In City Court Today

Father and daughter supplied the sensation in city court this morning when William Rowe and his 20 year-old daughter, Elsie of Dry Run were arraigned before Justice Richard Duffeffy on the charge of being drunk and disorderly.

The two were found guilty and fined $10 and costs each. The father went to jail while the girl’s fine was paid by a younger brother due to the fact that the girl is the unwedded mother of two small children.

The pair were arrested by Deputy Sheriff Charles E. Cushwa Sunday afternoon after Mrs. Mary Host and Harold Mills had telephoned headquarters that Elsie and her father threatened them with a shotgun. Mrs. Host said she had called at the Rowe home for her husband.

Daily Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland) Aug 1, 1927

News From Neighboring Counties
WASHINGTON COUNTY

BLAME PAIR FOR FATAL STONING
Hagerstown — George William Rowe, 50, farmer residing in the Dry Run district near Clearspring, was stoned to death early Tuesday night, allegedly by his niece, Elsie Rowe, 25, and nephew, George Rowe, 15, following an argument.

The young pair was arrested Tuesday night about 9 o’clock at their home by Deputy Sheriff Emmert Daley, and after questioning, are reported to have admitted the fatal attack.

Gettysburg Times – Jun 1, 1933

Two Released After Probe Of Death Of George Rowe

Jury Unable to Determine Cause of Death of Dry Run Man — Inquest Held at Clearspring

That George Rowe, 45, came to his death from unknown causes during a fight with his niece, Elsie Rowe, 25, in the Dry Run section the evening of May 20, was the verdict of a coroner’s jury investigating the death at Clearspring yesterday afternoon. George T. Prather was foreman of the jury of inquest presided over by Magistrate Charles Kreigh, acting coroner.

Elsie Rowe and her brother, George Rowe, 15, arrested the night of the fatal mishap by Deputy Emmert Daley, were ordered released. Further action, if any, will be taken by the November grand jury when facts in the case will be presented to them.

Dr. Ralph Stauffer and Dr. D.A. Watkins, physicians who performed an autopsy over Rowe’s body, testified that Rowe suffered no fractures or other injuries in the fight which could have caused death. The only fracture found by the physicians was a broken shoulder.

John Irvin testified that he saw the youth and young woman chase Rowe from their home, stoning him as they gave pursuit. He also said he saw them in a clinch before the elder Rowe fell to the road. Another witness said he saw the woman drag Rowe to the side of the road.

Rowe, who had been living on the Clyde Ankeney farm, visited the younger Rowes in the early afternoon of May 30. They consumed liquor during the afternoon, the woman said, and about 7 o’clock they engaged in an argument which subsequently led to the alleged fight.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jun 2, 1933

Man Held In Shooting Of His Nephew

Thirty-two year old George William Rowe of Clear Spring Route One was charged with assault yesterday after his nephew, Charles Wilbur Rowe, 27, was shot early Saturday morning.

State Trooper Richard Myers said George is accused of firing a shotgun at Charles at the height of a family argument.

Charles’ left arm was badly injured by the blast and a number of pellets lodged in the forearm.

The shooting took place at Charles’ grandfather’s house at Fairview in the Clear Spring section.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jan 29, 1951

CITY, AREA OBITUARIES

George William Rowe

CLEAR SPRING, Md. —

George William (Short) Rowe, 56, of Rt. 2, Clear Spring, died suddenly Friday morning at his home.

He was a life resident of Clear Spring district, a son of the late Anna Mae Smith and William Rowe.

He was a retired employe of the Mummert Canning Factory of Big Pool, Md. He was a veteran of World War II.

He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Elsie Sites of Stewartstown, Pa.

Arrangements will be announced later by the Thompson Funeral Home in Clear Spring.

Daily Mail (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jul 20, 1974

ITEMS OF INTEREST IN COUNTY TOWNS

DRY RUN LETTER.

Mr. Denton Faith and Mr. William Rowe put out a large potato patch on Mr. Samuel Rowe’s farm.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jul 13, 1917

DRY RUN LETTER

Dry Run, Feb. 20

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rowe were callers with Mr. William Rowe and family Sunday.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Feb 26, 1930

William K. Rowe

William Kreigh Rowe, Clear Spring Route One, died at the Washington County Hospital yesterday afternoon after an illness of one day, aged 71 years.

He was born in Dry Run, the son of late Samuel T. and Catherine Dickerhoff Rowe.

He spent his entire life at farming. In his later years he had a small orchard.

He is survived by daughters, Mrs. Elsie Sites, Four Corners, Md.; Mrs. Lucy Atherton, Mercersburg Route 5; sons, George W., Clear Spring Route One; John F., Hagerstown; sisters, Mrs. Jane Wempe and Mrs. Mary Hoover, Hagerstown, and Mrs. Lucy Holderman, Harrisburg; also five grandchildren.

The body was removed to the Suter Funeral Home. Funeral announcements later.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Feb 14, 1951

1910 Census

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1920 Census

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1930 Census

Rain-Slick Fairview Brings Death To Five

[Excerpt]…a woman was killed in Clear Spring Saturday night when she ran into the path of a car….

The sixth victim was Mrs. Lucinda Vonorsdale, 51, of Main St., Clear Spring, who was killed when she ran into the path of a car Saturday night….

Mrs. Vonorsdale was born at Dry Run, Md., a daughter of the late William Rowe. She had been a lifetime resident of the Clear Spring area and a member of the Clear Spring Church of God.

She leaves sisters, Mrs. Elsie Sites, of Hagerstown, Mrs. Edna Reigel of Clear Spring; brothers, Frank Rowe of Hagerstown and George Rowe of Big Pool.

The Body was taken to the Thompson Funeral Home in Clear Spring. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Sep 13, 1965

John F. Rowe Sr.

John F. Rowe Sr., 64, of 440 Salem Ave., died Wednesday afternoon at the Washington County Hospital. He was born in Clear Spring, the son of William and Anna May Smith Rowe. He had been employed as a painter for the Jamison Cold Storage Door Co. for 35 years.

His is survived by his wife, Sarah May Long Rowe; daughters, Mrs. Mary F. Jorden of Waynesboro, Mrs. Anna M. Garlock of Leitersburg, Mrs. Nancy L. Eichelberger of Shepherdstown and Miss Linda L. Rowe of Waynesboro; sons, John F. Jr. and Jeffrey L. both at home; sister, Mrs. Elsie Sites of Stewardstown, Pa; brother, George W. Rowe of Big Spring; 8 grandchildren.

Services will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Rouzer-Gerald N. Minnich Funeral Home. The Rev. Michael L. Jones and the Rev. Daniel J. Barnhart will officiate; burial will be in the Cedar Lawn Memorial Garden.

The family will receive friends at the funeral home this evening from 7 to 9.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Jun 7, 1974

Image from Find-A-Grave

Samuel T. Rowe

Samuel T. Rowe died at his home at Dry Run at 5:30 o’clock yesterday morning of heart disease at the age of 80 years.

He is survived by his wife, two sons, George and William, both of near Clearspring; daughters, Mrs. Harry Hoover, Wilsons; Mrs. A.G. Haldeman, Harrisburg and Mrs. E.H. Wempe, this city; 18 grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren.

Funeral on Saturday leaving the home at 1:30 o’clock with services in the Lutheran Church at Fairview at 2 o’clock by Rev. W.C. Huddle; interment in cemetery adjoining.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Aug 12, 1932

Mrs. Gettie Rowe

Mrs. Gettie Ruth Rowe died Friday evening at 6:45 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. B.H. Wempe, 615 Salem avenue, aged 85 years.

She was a member of the Mt. Tabor Lutheran Church at Fairview.

Surviving are: Daughters, Mrs. B.H. Wempe, Mrs. H.D. Hoover, Western Pike; Mrs. A.H. Haldeman, Harrisburg, Pa.; son, William Rowe, Clearspring; brothers, James Dickerhoff, Kansas and Simon Dickerhoff, this city. Twenty-five grandchildren and ten great grandchildren also survive.

The body may be viewed at the Kraiss mortuary.

The funeral service will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from the Mt. Tabor Church. Service by Rev. Luther L. Hare. Interment in cemetery adjoining.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Oct 15, 1937

Woman Hurts Wrist In Fall Off Ladder

Sarah Jane Wempe, 600 block Salem Avenue, fell off a ladder yesterday while washing windows and fractured her right wrist. She was treated at Washington County Hospital and discharged.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) Dec 15, 1950

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Mrs. Sarah Jane Wempe

Mrs. Sarah Jane Wempe, 80, of 388 Key Circle, died at Washington County Hospital Tuesday after a four-day illness.

Born at Dry Run, she was the daughter of Samuel and Gettie R. (Dickerhoff) Rowe. She had spent her entire life in this area.

Mrs. Wempt was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church. Surviving are a daughter, Miss Margaret A., at home; son, Joseph F., Hagerstown; five grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Requiem mass will be Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at St. Mary’s.

Morning Herald (Hagerstown, Maryland) May 5, 1965