Posts Tagged ‘Auld Lang Syne’

Should Auld Acquaintance be Forgot … 1956

December 31, 2011

Famed Sports Celebrities Passed Away During 1956

By OSCAR FRALEY
(United Press Sports Writer)
NEW YORK, Dec. 31 — (UP)

There will be quite a few tears in the cup of happiness tonight.

For when they ring in the new year, too many sporting favorites won’t be on hand. They just didn’t make it all the way with the infant 1956 they helped welcome only a year ago.

But they’ll be in many a mind when the voices rise in the old refrain “should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Babe Didrikson

Like the Babe. They all knew her and the world mourned when its greatest woman athlete, Mrs. Mildred Didrikson Zaharias, died in September at the age of 42. President Eisenhower summed it up when he said:

“I think that every one of us feels sad that finally she had to lose this last one of all her battles.”

Connie Mack

Gone, too, is the tall, spare man who was a baseball legend. Connie Mack, the seemingly indestructible, struck out at 93. But, then, life hadn’t been the same for him since the heart-breaking morning 15 months earlier when his beloved A’s were sold down the river to Kansas City.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Who can forget the “Boston Tar Baby”? He fought the best of them and won the championship of Mexico when he was almost blind. But at 75, Sam Langford finally took the count in a Massachusetts nursing home.

And Bill Cane, the man whose vision “made” the Hambletonian and helped make harness racing a big business. Big Bill, at 81, finally laid down the reins at Miami, Florida, far from the Good Time track at Goshen, N.Y., which he loved so dearly.

Red Strador

It came early for Norman (Red) Strador. The bluff red-head who coached football for St. Mary’s, the San Francisco 49’ers and the erstwhile New York Yankees, was cut down by a heart attack at 53.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot?”

Racing fans will remember three who took the checkered flag.

You see again, white-toothed Bob Sweikert sitting happily in victory lane at Indianapolis in 1955 and asking his wife jokingly:

“You were worried about me?” He got it against the wall at Salem, Ind. Age 30.

Then there were bushy-browed Jack McGrath, dead in a Phoenix, Ariz., crash at 35.

And little Walt Faulkner, who flipped five times and out at Vallejo, Calif., a passion for speed burning him out at 37.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot” when you think of the others who bowed out? Like horseman Clifford Mooers, a fabulous personality; Burly Donna Fox, the bobsledder whose passion was golf, and genial, gentle Rud Rennie, a long-time pal from the New York Herald-Tribune.

It can’t be — for the sake of auld lang syne.

The Bridgeport Post (Bridgeport, Connecticut) Dec 31, 1956

Robert Burns: Auld Lang Syne

December 29, 2009

For the Ohio Repository

TO THE MEMORY OF ROBERT BURNS.

A PARODY ON “AULD LANG SYNE.”

Dear BURNS, till earth itself decline,
And nature fades away,
The mystic powers of auld lang syne,
Thy genius shall portray;
Thy genius shall portray, my dear,
Thy genius shall portray,

The mystic, &c.

Oh, yes! each feeling, magic line,
Shall swell the grateful soul,
And while we sing of auld lang syne,
We’ll grasp the friendly bowl;

We’ll grasp, &c.

We’ll drink, the friend, not cool by time,
We’ll drink the friend of soul,
We’ll drink to thee, to auld lang syne,
We’ll drain the social bowl;

We’ll drain &c.

Oh, could I reach thy friendly hand,
And could’st thou but reach mine;
We’d take a cordial, social glass,
For auld lang syne;

For auld lang syne, &c.

But fare thee well, if thou art blest,
Thy friends need not repine;
But sometimes give a kindly thought,
To auld lang syne;

To auld lang syne, &c.

Ohio Repository (Canton, Ohio) Apr 1, 1825

Has another public idol fallen? Was Burns a plagiarist are the important questions that are agitating the literary world. Burns has ever been regarded as one of the most original poets but according to Henley & Henderson’s newly published volume, out of 509 of his songs, 158 were appropriated or derived from other and older ballads. Spare forbids me to give many examples, but take the popular “Old Lang Syne.” Burns’ version reads:

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And ne’er be brought to mind;
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And the days of auld lang syne.
Chorus —
For auld lang syne, my dear,
Auld lang syne,
We’ll tak’ a cup of kindness yet
For the days of auld lang syne.”

An old English ballad extant many years anterior to Burns’ birth reads as follows:

Should old acquaintance be forgot
And never thought upon
The Flames of Love extinguished
And freely passed and gone;
Is thy kind Heart now grown so cold
In that Boving Breast of thine,
That thou can’st never once reflect
On old lang syne.
Chorus —
On old lang syne,
On old lang syne,
On old lang syne,
That thou can’st never once reflect
On old lang syne.

In the Scotch vernacular “auld” means “old,” and “lang” means “long.” There are many other so glaring resemblance in verse and sentiment that while we must admit that Burns’ version is an improvement on the old song we cannot resist the impression that his supposed original songs are simply parodies of old ballads he heard or read in his native land.

San Antonio Light (San Antonio, Texas) Feb 6, 1898

Interesting discussion of the song in:

Title:    Annual Burns chronicle and club directory, Issues 13-16
Authors:    Robert Burns, Burns Federation
Publisher:    D. Brown, 1904
Original from:    Harvard University

“Auld Lang Syne” starts on page 89. (Google Book link)

Alexander Graham Bell: Music To Your Ears

December 29, 2009

Alexander G. Bell (Image from http://www.dailyhistory.net)

Music by Telegraph.

[From the Boston Traveller.]

The readers of the Traveller have been made acquainted with the wonderful inventions of Professor Bell, by which musical and vocal sounds can be and have been sent over the electric wires, but few if any are aware of the wonderful results which are sure to follow these improvements in telegraphy.

A few nights ago Professor Bell was in communication with a telegraphic operator in New York, and commenced experimenting with one of his inventions pertaining to the transmission of musical sounds. He made use of his phonetic organ and played the tune of “America,” and asked the operator in New York what he heard.

“I hear the tune of America,” replied New York; “give us another.”

Professor Bell then played Auld Lang Syne.

“What do you hear now?”

“I hear the tune of Auld Lang Syne, with the full chords, distinctly,” replied New York.

Thus, the astounding discovery has been made that a man can play upon musical instruments in New York, New Orleans, or London, or Paris, and be heard distinctly in Boston! If this can be done, why can not distinguished performers execute the most artistic and beautiful music in Paris, and an audience assemble in Music Hall, Boston, to listen?

Professor Bell’s other improvement, namely, the transmission of the human voice, has become so far perfected that persons have conversed over one thousand miles of wire with perfect ease, although as yet the vocal sounds are not loud enough to be heard by more than one or two persons. But if the human voice can now be sent over the wire, and so distinctly that when two or three known parties are telegraphing, the voices of each can be recognized, we may soon have distinguished men delivering speeches in Washington, New York or London, and audiences assembled in Music Hall, or Faneull Hall, to listen!

Galveston Daily News (Galveston, Texas) Jul 29, 1876

***

View Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers on the Library of Congress website.