Posts Tagged ‘Bicycles’

Foes of the Wheel Have Trotted Out Another Scarecrow

October 28, 2010

BICYCLE VOICE NOW.

Enemies of Wheeling Say It Affects the Vocal Chords.

All the talk of the bicycle face having practically died out, the foes of the wheel have now trotted out another scarecrow claiming that as a result of wheeling women are becoming loud talkers, with an unpleasant quality of voice. They assert that wheeling, especially with the mouth open, has a detrimental effect on the vocal chords, and when to this is added the strain to which the voice is subjected in an effort to keep up a conversation while cycling the danger seems something more than a shadow. Some persons who have made voice culture a life study are inclined to fall in with these views, asserting that exercise on the wheel is responsible for an apparent alteration in the voices of women. One vocal teacher says:

“While bicycle riding people frequently fill their lungs with dust, and this is, of course, injurious. Then the exercise leaves the system exhausted and unable to resist the bad effects of excessive perspiration. A severe cold is detrimental to the speaking voice, and when these colds are frequent, as they are with bicyclists, they will ultimately result in permanent injury. If women would ride but a few miles at a time and would keep their mouths closed there would be no danger, but I find that many of my pupils cannot refrain from overdoing the sport. Professional women realize the harm that bicycling does to their voices, but they say that they cannot bear to give up wheeling. Calling to one another as wheelwomen frequently do cannot help but strain the voice is persisted in.”

Another vocal instructor hold totally opposite views. Said she: “I am strongly in favor of cycling for women. It is a most healthful exercise, and so cannot fail to be beneficial to he singing and speaking voice. I do not believe the old-fashioned theory of things affecting the vocal chords directly. Of course it is possible to strain the voice but I should think this most unlikely when wheeling. The very tendency of the wheel is to keep the rider quiet. If riders should call from one to the other when outdoors their speaking voices might be affected, but the most strident speakers are often the sweetest singers. The soft, well-modulated voice of the English girl does not give us as many brilliant examples of the song bird as the less pleasant and somewhat nasal tones of the American. Nine out of every ten successful singers abroad to-day are Americans. This is because the other girls are never allowed to expand their lungs with the same delightful freedom. A good digestion is the first requisite toward good singing. I should say poor cooks have more to do with spoiling the voice than all the wheels in Christendom. A theory has been advanced that the rapid breathing necessary when riding the wheel is injurious. This is wrong, as the vocal chords are completely protected when not in use.” — Philadelphia Press.

Reno Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) Aug 5, 1897

“One, Two, Three, Go!”

September 28, 2010

THE RELAY RACE.

“One, Two, Three, Go!” — Now They are Off — Watch ‘Em.

The great relay bicycle race against time, from Washington, D.C., to Pittsburg, Pa., is in progress today, and wheelmen in all this section of the country are excited over the outcome of the event.

The distance to be covered is about 400 miles and the race is run to determine the efficiency of a bicycle service in time of war, should it ever happen that communication by rail, telegraph on horseback were rendered impossible. The race is under the auspices of the Pittsburg Leader, and Mr. T.S. Fullwood, of that paper, have been over the route arranging the details.

Messrs. Le Roy Hayes and Burton C. Shildkneck, of Hagerstown, who are to ride the relay from Frederick to Middletown, arrived here last night and today are at the City Hotel. The riders of the first relay left Washington at 2 o’clock this afternoon and will reach Frederick at 6.15 o’clock this evening by way of Ridgeville and New Market.

A detachment of the 2nd Separate Company Washington Military Cyclers arrived here this morning and will send a relay to New Market this afternoon to relieve the relay at that point and ride in to Frederick. Messrs. Hayes and Shildneck will leave immediately upon the arrival of the New Market relay and expect to reach Middletown in 45 minutes. A relay will then ride to Boonsboro in 50 minutes, one from Boonsboro to Hagerstown in 40 minutes and at Hagerstown a relay of Cumberland men will ride to Cumberland, from there the ride to Pittsburg being made by Pittsburg century riders.

President Benjamin Harrison

The riders in the relay carry a message written by President Harrison and it is expected that the ride will be completed by noon tomorrow. Frederick Futterer will carry the letter from Middletown to Boonsboro, accompanied by two others; from Boonsboro to Hagerstown Chas. Johnson will deliver the letter.

The Daily News (Frederick, Maryland) Sep 2, 1892

Bicycles and Bloomers

August 6, 2009

Bicycle Bloomers1894cp

MUST SHE WEAR THEM?

We do not speak in disparaging tones when we say that a woman who wears bloomers has loose habits.

— Syracuse Post.

*****
The queen of Spain now knows what pain
And woe and ruth are like.
No legs has she; and so, you see,
She cannot ride a bike.

— New York Recorder.

*****
“Woman is still far from her ideals.”

“Oh, I don’t know. We don’t wear them as loose as we did.”

— Detroit Tribune.

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There’s a bicycle girl in Weehawken
That has set all the neighbors to tawken;
This feminine biped
Wears bloomers bright striped,
And red is the shade of her stawken.

*****
“I hear,” said the cheerful idiot, “that they are talking of revising the costume of the Goddess of Liberty.”

“And what will it be pray?” asked the typewriter boarder, who has a wheel.

“Red, white and bloomers,” said the cheerful idiot. –Indianapolis Journal.

*****
Bobbie — Say, fellers, let us holler “Rats!” as that woman passes.

Freddie — What’s the use? Don’t you see she has bloomers on? — Judge.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jun 16, 1895

MORE ABOUT BLOOMERS.

There were more bloomers out on bicycles in this city yesterday than ever before and fewer accidents. The new woman is rapidly ceasing to be a public danger.

— New York Evening Sun.

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It is only a reversal of condition. The society girl wears bloomers on her bodice and the bicycle girl wears sleeves on her pantaloons.

— Nashville American.

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“I don’t for the life of me see how you can uphold bloomers,” said the conservative man.

“I supposed not,” said the fluffy girl. “The suspenders fad has been out of date more than two years.”

— Indianapolis Journal.

*****
Bicycle bloomers should be proud of the sensation they have created. They appear as topics of earnest discussion on the lecture platform, in the club, and even in the pulpit. And the agitation is still growing. Not the silver question itself has more hopelessly divided families, separated friends and made sworn enemies than the now end-of-the-century theme — the bicycle bloomers.

— Baltimore American.

*****
“Do you keep bloomers to rent?” she asked, as she sailed into the fashionable dressmaker’s on Fulton street, yesterday.

“No,” said the polite saleswoman, “but we keep materials for repairing rents in bloomers. Have you –”

But she was gone.

— Brooklyn Eagle.

*****

“Mother, may I go out to bike?”

“Yes, my darling daughter.
But when you reach the Schuylkill pike
Don’t tumble in the water;
For if you do you’ll get a fall,
With a melancholy thud.
And then yourself, your bike, and all,
Will be a was of mud.”

— Philadelphia Inquirer.

*****
The bloomers or the knickerbockers of the lady bicyclist of the period present a neat and tasteful appearance. To say that the wearers look like men is unadulterated nonsense. The men who say so themselves disprove the assertion by the very fact that they denounce them and stand on the street corners, as too many of them do, leering and sneering at them as they pass. If they looked like men, these cheap and nasty fellows would not waste a minute looking at them.

— New York Recorder.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jun 19, 1895

BIKE AND BLOOMERS.

Pity the blind. hey have never seen the bloomer-clad woman on a bicycle.

–Sonerville Journal.

*****

To a Bicycle Girl:

Whenne on two rims of stele this maid doth go,
Within my hedde I fele
A whele
Alsoe.

— Washington Star.

*****

When money for a modish gown
The modern maid desires,
She has a scheme that’s sure to down
The most unkind or sires.
Should he refuse, she does not pout,
Nor into weeping go,
But knocks him quite completely out
With: “I’ll wear bloomers. So!”

— Detroit News.

The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) Jun 30, 1895

Probable Reason 1897

The Daily Review (Decatur, Illinois) May 30, 1897

*****

Previous posts about bloomers:

Amelia Bloomer, Dress Reform and Bloomers

No Fillings for the Whangdoodle in Bloomers