Posts Tagged ‘Bolsheviks’

Cradle Robbers

December 2, 2012

russian fairy tale

Image from art mundus

CRADLE ROBBERS

(The bolsheviki have suppressed fairy tales dealing with kings, princes, princesses and references to the supernatural. — News Note.)

There, little Russ, don’t cry,
They’re crushing your dreams, I know,
For fairy-tale princes and fairy-tale kings
To bolshevik leaders are dangerous things,
And stories like that must go!
But we’ll read you a bolshevik pamphlet dry.
There, little Russ, don’t cry!

There, little Russ don’t cry,
They’ve robbed you of bliss, its true;
And the little stories you loved to hear
Of magical princesses sweet and dear
Have lately become taboo,
And the queens of the fairy-tales must die —
But there, little Russ, don’t cry!

There, little Russ, don’t cry,
Though they’ve taken those tales away,
No form of government ever stood
By filching the joy out of babyhood
And taking the fun from play;
Those tales will come back to you, bye and bye,
There, little Russ, don’t cry!

Appleton Post Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin) Dec 23, 1921

The Red – Deport Them Now!

November 27, 2012

The Red

The Red he came
From Russia, where
The Bolsheviks
Wear tangled hair.
He came because
The eats were bad
In old Moscow
And Petrograd.

When he got here
And had a feed,
He started in
To trouble breed;
He howled about
The worker’s rights
And plotted with
His gang o’ nights.

For capitalists
He plotted woe,
The government
He’d overthrow.
Old Glory he
Would tear to shreds,
And with a club
Break copper’s heads.

But sad for Red
Old Uncle Sam
The lid on him
Put with a slam,
Which put an end
Unto his yell
And locked him up
In a stone cell.

And soon this Red
And all his bunch
Will be where there
Is no more lunch.
They’ll ship him to
His native place
Where whiskers will
Freeze on his face.

Good Uncle Sam
Has now got through
Of fooling with
This vice Red crew.
He’s after them
To beat the band,
And drive them out
Of this fair land.

— Brooklyn Standard-Union

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Nov 14, 1919

True Blue

November 26, 2012

Image from Going on 80

True Blue
The farmer may have whiskers, but
He is no Bolshevik,
The Reds they cannot fool him with
A propaganda trick,
He’ll never be a Socialist,
Or join the Trotzky clan;
He will remain just what he is,
A good American.

They’ve tried to win him over to
Defy his country’s law,
But farmer man just shakes his head
And firmly sets his jaw.
By heck, they cannot make him budge,
He is not built that way,
He’s a good and solid backer,
Of the old U.S.A.

They cannot get him out on strike
To plow and hoe the sticks;
He is agin’ all Anarchists,
All Reds and Bolsheviks.
So here is to the Farmer Man
With hayseed in his hair;
As true and good American
As you’ll find anywhere.

— Brooklyn Standard-Union.

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Nov 18, 1919

On Some Far Day

November 26, 2012

Image from Seventeen Moments in Soviet History

ON SOME FAR DAY.

Some day when there’s no Bolsheviks
With whiskers on their face,
And when of frowsy anarchists
There’s not a single trace.
Ah, that will be a happy time
For all the human race.
Some day when there is no peace pact
To talk about and fight;
When cost of living does not soar
Up higher than a kite.
Ah, that will be a happy day,
Indeed it will all right.
Some day when no one is on strike
And ev’ry man’s employed.
When boss and man by foreign Reds
No longer are annoyed.
Ah, then will come such happiness
We’ll all be overjoyed.
When Europe starts to go to work
To keep herself alive —
When to support her we’re not asked
To start another drive.
Then we’ll have something for ourselves,
And save some coin and thrive.
When each one goes his proper gait,
And does not push and shove;
When wrong for right has stepped aside,
And all is peace and love;
The chances are that nearly all
Of us will be above.

— Brooklyn Standard-Union.

Olean Evening Times (Olean, New York) Dec 2, 1919

Some Thoughts on Taxes

April 17, 2012

Some Thoughts On Taxes

By George E. Sokolsky

Adam Smith, in discussing taxes on property, wrote:

“While property remains in the possession of the same person, whatever permanent taxes may have been imposed upon it, they have never been intended to diminish or take away any part of its capital value, but only some part of the revenue arising from it . . .”

The original idea of the income tax was not to deprive citizens of their savings nor to diminish their possessions but to raise revenue for the use of government. The new taxes imposed by the inequitably taxed President are actually reducing the possibility of savings and therefore of coming into possession of property. The present taxes involve not only a redistribution of earned wealth but a confiscation of earnings.

KARL MARX AIMED to abolish love of country so that the world revolution would come more quickly. Whereas in the United States the theory of life was that there would be a constant improvement, so that workers would own their own homes, buy their own insurance policies, even go into business for themselves. Karl Marx really hoped for increased poverty so that the proletariat would be more numerous.

In America, the aim was to increase the middle class; Marx sought to abolish the middle class.

Harold Laski put these ideas in this language:

“. . . If Communists are charged with seeking to abolish love of country, the Manifesto answers that workers can have no country until they are emancipated from bourgeois domination; with their acquisition of political power, the hostility between nations will disappear. So also, it will change traditional ideas in religion and philosophy. Since it puts experience on a new basis, it will change the ideas which are their expression.”

In a word, Communists seek, in every respect, to abolish our world as we have known it for at least 5,000 years.

AMONG THE MEASURES WHICH MARX advocated for the accomplishment of the revolution were these (the numbers are his; there were altogether 10):

“1. Abolition of property in land and application of all rents of land to public purposes.

“2. A heavy progressive or graduated income tax.

“3. Abolition of all right of inheritance.

“5. Centralization of credit in the hands of the state, by means of a national bank with state capital and an exclusive monopoly.

“6. Centralization of the means of communication and transport in the hands of state.”

(It will be noted that since 1848, when this list was published, many so-called Capitalist countries have accepted Marx’s program.)

The income tax is high on the list. The graduated income tax can reduce the individual to a constantly lowering standard of living. It can prevent savings by leaving nothing over after living expenses. The tax guarantees poverty.

When to the income tax is added a complex system of excises and hidden taxes, it is possible for government to arrange for an economy which permits the appearance of high wages and even high prices while all the time the standard of life is being depreciated and the middle class is being squeezed out of existence.

IN THIS COUNTRY, we are now observing precisely this process, particularly as it affects the white collar and professional classes. For them, very little hope of self-improvement is left. Their doom is to find rated jobs in government, jobs which pay little, permit of no initiative, require featherbedding to survive and end in a low standard retirement pension. If that is pie in the sky, it certainly is not of the American dream.

If we complain that too many Americans are on the government payroll, we are in error. For if we permit our white collar and cultural classes to be taxed out of opportunity for self-improvement, they must take government jobs as no others are available to them. In the past, such Americans made their own opportunities out of their ingenuity, their ability to save or to borrow from their neighbors. They were not inhibited by government through taxes.

IN A WORD, THE REVOLUTION which the New Deal under Harry Hopkins introduced and the Fair Deal under Leon Keyserling seeks to complete is being accomplished with even greater skill than Lenin exhibited in Russia. The Bolsheviks employed terror and murder and confiscation as weapons.

The American revolution is being accomplished by means of taxes, principally the income tax, by premeditated wasteful expenditure of the people’s money, and by depreciating the currency. And the revolutionists can truthfully say that it is done with our consent. We authorized the revolution by our votes.

(c 1951, King Features Syndicate, Inc.)

Tucson Daily Citizen (Tucson, Arizona) Nov 8, 1951